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2009 MEN’S NCAA CHAMPIONS 2009 NCAA Results 1. Auburn 526 2. Texas 487 3. Stanford 460.5 4. California 350 5. Florida 324 6. Arizona 309 7. Michigan 248 8. Tennessee 144 9. Virginia 133 10. Georgia 131 2009 Auburn Titles • Jakob Andkjaer 200 FR, 400 FR • Adam Klein 400 MR • Gideon Louw 200 FR, 200 MR • Tyler McGill 400 FR, 400 MR • Kohlton Norys 100 Back, 200 FR, 400 FR • Michael Silva 200 MR • Matt Targett 200 FR, 400 FR, 200 MR, 400 MR • Jared White 200 MR • Pascal Wollach 400 MR

Now that the Tigers had silenced any critics of continued Auburn dominance in the conference, it was time to move on to the big dance. Auburn had won five straight national titles from 2003-07 but saw their streak snapped in 2008 with a disappointing fifth-place showing. Quickly setting the tone for fans and competitors alike, the Tigers hit a new US Open record time in the 200 freestyle relay. Auburn trailed Stanford by two-tenths going into the anchor. Targett left the block and it was all but over. The two-time Olympic medalist stormed passed David Dunford (18.52), clocking an 18.19 and earning Auburn a new NCAA and US Open record time of 1:14.08. Stanford placed second, hitting the wall in 1:14.22. “People thought we peaked at SECs,” said Hawke after day one of NCAAs. “We knew as a team we hadn’t. We knew, coming into this, it was going to be a dogfight the whole way. We feel like we have a team that can contend. We have to prove ourselves to be champions. There are still two days to do that. I feel pretty good about where we’re at right now.” On the 1-meter springboard, junior Kelly Marx set the all-time Auburn six-dive record en route to a sixth-place finish, earning the Tigers 13 valuable points. The Overland Park, native topped the 3-year-old record, scoring 386.80. Marx surpassed the 382.80 mark set by Steve Segerlin at the 2008 NCAA Championships. Auburn concluded day one with 141 points, trailing only Texas with 171. Behind Auburn were Stanford (130), Florida (107) and Cal (103).

Norys claimed the first men’s 100 backstroke title in school history, setting the pace for a strong Auburn showing on day two of the 2009 NCAA Championships. Auburn relay set another US Open Record on Friday while junior Kelly Marx and sophomore Adam Klein set new school records to edge the Tigers closer to the Texas Longhorn’s top-spot. “I knew it was a close race and when I turned at the 50,” said Norys. “I saw someone ahead of me. I just tried to get my hand there first. It was great having two other teammates with me in the race, because we practice and train together. It was nice to win my first individual Gold Medal. It was a proud moment to be up on the awards stand in the top spot. “

The team celebrating the win with Richard Quick.

McGill led the Tigers with a second-place finish in the 100 fly, setting a new Auburn record of 44.63 in the process. Madson took third with a new career-best time of 44.99. The Tigers took a total of 38 points from the 100 fly, cutting the Texas lead to 225-219. Stanford trailed close behind with 204. Auburn earned 48 points in the 100 back, retaking second place from Stanford to trail Texas, 305-297. Stanford was in third with 265. Only 3-meter springboard finals and the 800 FR remained on the day’s itinerary. Marx set another Auburn record off the 3-meter springboard, earning a 454.85 as the Auburn divers looked to chip away at the Texas lead. Marx shattered the previous record of 427.80 set by Steve Segerlin on Feb. 3, 2007. “I am speechless,” said Marx. “I was excited when I finished second in the preliminaries, but to do it here tonight and set a school record is incredible. It has been hard this year, but I feel like I am peaking at the right time. I have taken it dive by dive and the consistency has paid off.” The Tigers entered Saturday’s final session six points behind the Longhorns, however a strong preliminary swim gave Auburn the upper hand entering the finals. Trailing Texas by as many as 62 points on day two, Auburn took the lead for good following sophomore Klein’s school-record setting performance in the 200 breast, where he finished fourth. Auburn grabbed a one point advantage after the event and never looked back. Saturday’s finals began with the AU backstrokers, who continued their dominant display, putting the Tigers seven points back of the Longhorns with a 44-point effort. Wollach led the way for Auburn, hitting the wall in 1:39.65 for a fourth-place finish worth 15 points. The Tigers earned 36 points in the 200 fly and extended their lead to 473-436, behind senior Madson (1:41.70) who finished third. McGill (1:42.44) followed in fifth while sophomore Robert Looney (1:42.76) hit a new personal-best time to place 11th. Auburn capped the championship, winning the 400 free relay behind the A foursome of Andkjaer, Targett, Norys and McGill, who turned in a time of fo fo 2:46.67. 2 “To “ win a national championship is an incredible feeling that I can’t begin to describe,” said Madson. “To start at Auburn as a champion and finish my career as a champion is incredible. That is exactly why I came to Auburn.” c Auburn finished the meet with 526 points, 39 ahead of second place Texas. A Quick, who is the first coach to win a national title at three schools, is Q battling an inoperable brain tumor that was diagnosed in December 2008. b Quick was not in College Station for the championships, as the Tigers were Q directed by assistant Brett Hawke who has led the program since Quick’s d diagnosis. d “This is just a great way to finish the meet,” Hawke said. “It’s a great tribute “ t Richard Quick and what he means to this program” to Over the course of his 31 year coaching career, Quick won seven national O at Stanford and five at Texas to accompany his first at Auburn. ttitles ti i - by Gary Thorne, Auburn Media Relations

The Th he Tigers Tig ge ers cel celebrate leb ebrate e ttheir he eir eighth NCAA title title.

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2010-11 Auburn Swimming & Diving Guide  

2010-11 Auburn Swimming & Diving Guide

2010-11 Auburn Swimming & Diving Guide  

2010-11 Auburn Swimming & Diving Guide

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