Page 1

HOW we put

IDEAS

to work STEP 1: Idea

STEP 2: Investment

STEP 3: Design

STEP 4: Testing

STEP 5: Build

STEP 6: At Work


THE VALUE OF AN

STEP 1: Idea

IDEA

LIES IN THE USING OF IT. —Thomas Edison


“WOULDN’T IT BE GREAT IF . . . ”

At Auburn University, researchers ask that ques-

Auburn’s multifaceted response to the Gulf oil

tion every day. They then collaborate with funders

spill; and techniques that produce fit soldiers and

and investors, design, build and test their con-

reduce their training injuries.

cepts, and eventually put their ideas to work.

Each of these efforts — and many more across

Auburn researchers look at the unknown, create

campus and in our new Huntsville Research Cen-

new knowledge and turn that knowledge into a

ter — begins with an idea that we pursue until

tangible improvement of the human condition.

we’ve created something concrete and functional.

Today, you can find Auburn research at work around the globe.

A snapshot of 2010, this annual update will give you a sense of what we’ve done and where we are

In the pages that follow, we’ll show you a few ex-

going. We hope you enjoy it, and we invite you to

amples of what we’re doing today: cyber security

learn more at www.auburn.edu/research and con-

designs that battle terrorists, spies and thieves;

nect with us on Facebook and Twitter.

SINCERELY,

JOHN M. MASON, JR. PhD, PE Associate Provost and Vice President for Research

For more, visit www.auburn.edu/research/johnmason


AN

INVESTMENT IN

KNOWLEDGE

PAYS THE BEST ALWAYS

INTEREST.” — Benjamin Franklin


AUBURN RESEARCH 2010 ANNUAL UPDATE

AUBURN UNIVERSITY’S HUNTSVILLE RESEARCH CENTER matches Auburn’s research capacities with the fast-growing research community in north Alabama. “Our intent is to leverage the vast intellectual capital of Auburn and Huntsville,” says executive director RODNEY ROBERTSON. The center fosters economic development by increasing research funding to Alabama and expanding the state’s role in the national research agenda. A high-tech economic engine for the state, Huntsville executes more than $30 billion in federal contracts yearly. Increasingly, these contracts require

the collaboration of a broad array of disciplines. Auburn’s research center is making it easier for business and government to connect with Auburn and easier for Auburn to find investment and funding. “The breadth and depth of Auburn’s research caFor more, visit www.auburn.edu/research/huntsville pability is remarkable, but what is truly impressive is the practical nature of that research,” Robertson says. “You point Auburn researchers at a problem, you get a solution — whether it’s in cyber security, advanced composite engineering or canine detection.” For more, visit www.auburn.edu/research/huntsville

STEP 2: Investment


“ DESIGN

AUBURN RESEARCH 2010 ANNUAL UPDATE

IS NOT JUST WHAT IT LOOKS LIKE OR FEELS LIKE.

DESIGN IS

HOW IT WORKS. ” — Steve Jobs

Every day, DREW HAMILTON and his students enter a cyber combat zone filled with terrorists, foreign spies and corporate thieves. And every day, new threats emerge. It’s impossibly complex. But the impossible is what researchers in Auburn’s Information Assurance Laboratory do every day. “Young minds don’t know what they’re trying to do is supposed to be impossible,” says Hamilton. “Then we find out that it’s not impossible, and they say, ‘We can actually do this.’” The “this” in Hamilton’s case ranges from software vulnerability and protection to the art and science of steganography — a way of encoding and decoding hidden messages in unrelated images and music. Researchers in his labs design the tools to outwit terrorists, spies and thieves at their own game. And forget hypothetical case studies — these experts are at work on real problems. “You come to a university for new and innovative ideas. You want something that actually works, that has a proof of concept,” says Hamilton. “The cost of doing research at Auburn is remarkably low for the return on investment.” For more, visit www.auburn.edu/research/security

STEP 3: Design


STEP 4: Testing


AUBURN RESEARCH 2010 ANNUAL UPDATE

TEST

FAST, FAIL FAST, ADJUST

What is the impact of the Gulf Coast oil spill? How do we handle that impact? How do we recover from it? These broad questions and the myriad of possible answers range from the ecological to the economic. Auburn researchers are at work on them all. “Auburn’s marine and coastal researchers are committed to developing the most comprehensive understanding and science for dealing with the spill,” says KEN HALAYNCH, coordinator of the Auburn University Gulf Research Initiative. This comprehensive, interdisciplinary approach has led to grants from BP and the National Science Foundation.

FAST.

— Tom Peters

“People want to know what’s really going on and what our future looks like,” says Orange Beach, Ala., mayor Tony Kennon. “Auburn responded quickly, assessed and understood the situation and took action to provide us with the information and data we needed to move forward.” “Auburn University was here, along the coast, before the oil spill,” affirms Auburn researcher BILL WALTON, “and we’re here now, checking, testing and monitoring. Now we’re looking at recovery — how we help the environment and how we help people get back to work.”


“ GOOD THINGS WHATEVER

WE

BUILD END UP

BUILDING

US.

— Jim Rohn


AUBURN RESEARCH 2010 ANNUAL UPDATE

THE AUBURN RESEARCH PARK opened its second building in November, a new MRI Research Center. In addition to the 3T and 7T MRI machines, the Center is home to neurosurgery, rehabilitation and orthopedic groups as well as an elaborate kinesiology lab and a host of Auburn researchers. The Auburn Research and Technology Foundation (ARTF) will launch the Auburn Business Incubator in May 2011 and, in the summer of this year, will begin construction of the park’s third building. This latest addition will house the Center for Advanced Science, Innovation and Commerce. In concert with the ARTF and the Auburn Research Park, THE OFFICE OF TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER builds upon the success of Auburn research and moves ideas and prototypes into working or commercial use. The office develops licensing opportunities, fosters investor relations and facilitates patents, copyrights and trademarking. In 2010, Tech Transfer logged a record number of invention disclosures and joined the prestigious National Academy of Inventors. For more, visit www.ott.auburn.edu

STEP 5: Building


AUBURN RESEARCH 2010 ANNUAL UPDATE


ISN’T IT NICE WHEN THINGS JUST

WORK?

— Garrison Keillor

Auburn University has a reputation for producing world-class athletes. Now, the same science that keeps those athletes in top form keeps soldiers fit for duty. Each year, some 35,000 soldiers cycle through training at the U.S. Army’s facilities at Fort Benning. And with them every step of the way is a group of Auburn board-certified athletic trainers. They diagnose injuries, evaluate soldiers for potential injuries, teach rehabilitative and training techniques, and, most importantly, work to prevent injuries from occurring.

“We’ve already seen a significant decrease in the severity of injuries since the program started,” says Army Col. Terrence McKenrick, commander of the 192d Infantry Brigade. “We are catching injuries earlier and getting them looked at sooner.” “This program saves time and money,” says JO ELLEN SEFTON, director of Auburn’s Warrior Research Center. “Direct results of our research and expertise are a reduction in injuries and a quicker return to training. This program works and we can replicate it nationwide.” For more, visit www.auburn.edu/research/soldiers

STEP 6: At Work


ALL SPONSORED AWARDS ($M)

PERCENTAGE OF TOTAL SPONSORED AWARDS BY UNIT - FY2010

153 114 111

109

106

2004

2005

2006

2007

124 108

2008

2009

2010

15%

2%

Agriculture

Cooperative Extension

4%

25%

Education

Engineering

2%

10%

Forestry

Human Sciences

2%

8%

Liberal Arts

Science and Mathematics

10%

20%

Veterinary Medicine

Centers, Institutes, and Other Administrative Units

57.09%

Federal

$70,711,697 FY2010 Non-Federal

$53,151,920

42.91%

FEDERAL SPONSORS Department of Education

$17,338,160

National Science Foundation

$11,692,099

Department of Defense

$10,149,724

Department of Agriculture

$9,696,504

Department of Energy

$9,157,921

Department of Health and Human Services

$5,491,921

Less than 1%

Department of Justice

$2,600,000

Architecture

Other Federal Agencies

$1,341,684

Department of Commerce

$1,162,880

NASA

$1,134,899

Department of Transportation

$945,905

Business Library Nursing Pharmacy

NON-FEDERAL SPONSORS State of Alabama

$23,009,811

Other

$18,417,340

Industry

$11,724,769


OFFICE OF TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER METRICS Invention Disclosures

Standard U.S. Patent Applications Filed 110

93

26

105 87

84

16

15

17

5

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2006

Provisional U.S. Patent Applications Filed 121

2008

2009

2010

Other U.S. Patent Applications Filed 10

120

80

2007

65

91

7

6

2 1

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2006

U.S. Patents Granted

2007

2009

2010

Total Granted U.S. Patents Still Active 25 19

125

149

137

126

106

14 12

10

2006

2008

2007

2008

2009

2010

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

FY2006

FY2007

FY2008

FY2009

FY2010

Licenses/Options Executed

20

13

16

15

25

Active Licenses/Options

64

42

54

66

63

0

3

1

0

1

11

12

14

14

14

$699,810

$553,614

$675,132

$693,452

$770,135

Start-up Companies Formed Total Active Startup Companies Option and License Income


An annual report is a moment in time, but every day Auburn Research produces interesting ideas, great stories and remarkable innovation. Take a look. No QR reader? Visit www.auburn.edu/research


RESEARCH ADVISORY BOARD Our ambassadors and advocates. Industry leaders connecting AUBURN RESEARCH with the private sector, military, and government. Jimmie Adams

Mike Kilgore

Terry Andrus

Michael Kirkpatrick

John Beard

Paul Lioy

Thomas Bice

Michael McCartney

Dennis Bragg

Brooks Moore

Fred Clark

Richard Myers

Chenavis Evans

Bill Neville

John Fairbank

Lloyd Nix

Michael Fountain

Jack Odle

Bill Goodrich

James Odom

Roger Graben

Charles Pick

Dorman Grace

Paul Pinyan

Stan Graves

Jimmy Sanford

Tee Green

John Secrist

Rebecca Hatcher

Steven Spencer

Tom Hayley

Loraine St. Onge

James Hoskins

Yu-Tueng Tsai

Linda Jackson

Judith Wackenhut

William Jordan

Ann Whitaker

Michael Kelly


AUBURN UNIVERSITY RESEARCH CONTACTS

John M. Mason, Jr., PhD, PE Associate Provost and Vice President for Research

202 Samford Hall Auburn, Alabama 36849 334-844-4784 jmason@auburn.edu

Carl A. Pinkert, PhD

Larry Fillmer

Associate Vice President for Research

Executive Director, Program Development

202 Samford Hall Auburn, Alabama 36849 334-844-4784

570 Devall Drive, Suite 302 Auburn, Alabama 36849 334-844-6140

cap@auburn.edu

larry.fillmer@auburn.edu

Martha M. Taylor

Rodney L. Robertson, PhD

Assistant VPR for Administration

Executive Director, Huntsville Research Center

310 Samford Hall Auburn, Alabama 36849 334-844-4438

530 Discovery Drive Huntsville, AL 35806 256-327-3158

taylomm@auburn.edu

rrobert@auburn.edu

John D. Weete, PhD Acting Assistant VPR for Technology Transfer and Commercialization Executive Director, Auburn Research & Technology Foundation

570 Devall Drive, Suite 101 Auburn, Alabama 36849 334-844-7480 weetejd@auburn.edu


R E S E A R C H www.auburn.edu/research Auburn University is an equal opportunity educational institution/employer. May 2011 Produced by the Media Production Group for Auburn Research

Auburn Research Annual Update 2010  

Auburn Research Annual Update 2010