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XUETING ZHOU Mia

landscape architecture selected works


Auburn English

Beijing mandarin


Xueting Zhou 周雪婷

xzz0066@auburn.edu +1 3344443134 (USA) +86 15801651184 (China) 433 Harper Ave, Auburn AL

Education MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE Auburn University/ Auburn, AL, USA 2016-2018 BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING IN URBAN PLANNING Beijing University of Civil Engineering and Architecture/ Beijing, China 2012-2017

Experience American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) Volunteer at National ASLA conference in New Orleans 10/2016 Terrain Metrics Workshop Drone flight methods for landscape observation and representation Build a 3D point cloud model from drone aerial imagery Analyze 3D digital landscape models with Rhino and Grasshopper 9/2016 Member of BUCEA student’s Council 2012-2013 New Oriental Education & Technology Group Inc / teaching assistant Chemical and physical teaching assistant 8/2013-2/2014 China Academy Of Urban Planning & Design/ Internship 2.2015-5.2015

Award BUCEA scholarship Excellent student award 2015-2016 Chinese Greative Design silver award 10/2015 Exchange student Scholarship From city of Beijing The tuition fee in the first year in USA 9/2016

Skill

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Contents SELECTED WORKS. 06-79 City wilds summer 2017 06-29 Active Connection fall 2016 30-47 Cultivating the Wild 2017 48-77

CONTEXTS 78-84

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SELECTED WORKS City wilds summer 2017 06-29 Active Connection fall 2016 30-47 Cultivating the Wild 2017 48-79

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CITY WILDS

Birmingham, Alabama, U.S. summer 2017 Instructor: Kelly Homan

As neighborhood populations in Birmingham are decreasing, the results is more abandoned land and buildings. There are 7,585 abandoned city parcels in Birmingham, including 1175 parcels with buildings that comprise a total area of 3002 acres, and 6410 parcels of empty land that comprise a total of 2177 acres. Because there is significantly more vacant properties than can be realistically occupied, the question becomes how to best utilize the empty spaces. City wilds are a combination of novel ecosystems and design ecosystems. The city wilds occur when the city will prepare the land first, and then let the natural growth take over to benefit the city in ecology, economic, and social aspects. In another word, humans provide a condition and nature fills it in.

ALABAMA

BIRMINGHAM

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Site Photos

Birmingham,AL

Why we need city wilds? 1.The city’s population is decreasing, if the city builds new things into the vacant lots, the land will become abandoned again later. 2.Keep the good things that nature provides, including clean air and water, carbon storage flooding control. This site will become a better environment and biodiversity place many years later.

What are the benifits? 1.The city to wilderness can have a lower maintenance cost compared other land use. Saving money through reducing energy use, including cooling and heating. 2.This kind of land can pay for itself overtime. Allowing the nature look after itsself

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People are part of nature. There can be a potential for people to go bird watching, flower touring and camping. A better environment can make for better living conditions for all. Some years later, this site could provide a habitat for city-dwelling wildlife and foster biodiversity, all at a very low maintenance cost.

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Site Management The city wilds is the city will prepare the land first, and then let the natural growth take over to benefit the city in ecology, economic and social aspects. Humans provide a condition and nature fill it in. We can see in city wilds that manual work is decreasing and natural process increasing at the same time.

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building area lawn area paving area

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Site Stratagies

Material Reuse

1.Digging the channel connects to the creek to let the water fill into the site to provide different water condition 2.Keep the original plant surrounding the paving area to let the plants crack the paving 3.Deconstruction : One building propose to remove the wall and roof, just leave the frame. Another one remove the roof.

Reuse materials from deconstructing the building and cracking the pavement. The bricks from the building and crack the asphalt could be used in trails in this site. These trails can provide a pathway for people to go through the site, and move the site to net zero emissions.


first year

after 15 year

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People provide this condition and let the nature to fill it in. Digging the channel to provide a better condition for plants grow can make this site home to more species. Deconstructing the building can provide a shelter for animals and improve biodiversity. Then the site can keep the good things that nature provides, include clean air and water carbon storage, flood control to make a better environment. Allowing nature to pay for itself over time. If more and more empty spaces are allowed to return to a natural state, it could save money through reducing energy use for cooling and heating. People are part of nature. There can be a potential for people to go bird watching, flower touring and camping. A better environment can make for better living conditions for all. Some years later, this site could provide a habitat for city-dwelling wildlife and foster biodiversity, all at a very low maintenance cost.

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plant shallow-rooted and fast-growing trees

start the process of primary succession with fastgrowing, shallow-rooted pine trees.

shallow-rooted trees

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the trees have brok trees and paving. p


ken apart the road remove the plant new trees

Crack the Paving

At present, some plant growth destroys part of the pavement. Digging a channel in the paving area may make those plants grow faster and better. As time passes, the plants will grow along the channel, and gradually destroy the paving. Planting fast growing and shallow-rooted trees in the paving area outside of the channel. The dug out asphalt can be reused to pave the trails at this site. Fifteen years later, as the trees continue growing, the asphalt pavement should be completely destroyed by then, and will need to be removed. Otherwise, fragmented asphalt will destroy the tree roots. The City should come to move the trees, and switch them out for latesuccession species to accelerate the succession. Deconstruction or crack the paving can be reuse in the trail paving in the site.

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Accelerate succession As time passes, the channel will fill up with organic matter and by siltation, water depth decrease. The channel will disappear.

Nature Succession

Accelerate Succession

filled by position, organic mater and by siltation water depth decrease

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fast growing trees

flooding time

flooding time

flooding time

flooding time

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big concrete or asphalt fragment

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Site/accelerate succession This strategy focuses on the lawn area and extends the channel in order to connect it to the creek. Water will fill into the site from flooding or on a rainy day. With the rise and fall of the water level, the site can generate different soil conditions, including aquatic, wet prairie, mesic, and dry. Under different water conditions, different species will grow and increase the site’s biodiversity.

largest dischage rainy

large dischage rainy

medium dischage rainy

small dischage no rain

Precipitation (inches)

2015 2014

discharge(ft/s)

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Deconstruction Into Ecological This strategy is for the two buildings area. Removing the roof and walls will save the frame of the small one. For another one that is made of brick, removing the roof is sufficient. The frame or walls can provide shelter for local animals. The abandoned materials can then be reused in paving the site trails.

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Planting climbing plants that attract bees and butterflies around the building can provide healthy growing conditions. Planting certain species can provide food for birds around the building and lead to new species using the building as a habitat.


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ACTIVE CONNECTION Lagrange, Georgia, U.S. fall 2017 Instructor: Kenneth Speetjens

The City of LaGrange is located in West Central Georgia, USA. The Hillside Neighborhood is a low income area of 275 acres. Enhancing resilience in physically vulnerable areas and amongst socially vulnerable populations is most effective with participation from the local community. Engaging population groups who are often left out of the design process and can thereby be untrusting of authorities can be a challenge. This design incorporates an approach that transforms numerous community problems into citizen driven methodologies for data collection and design decision making. The engagement process specifically works to enhance the condition of the neighborhood and methods for collecting data on these problems through education, awareness, and feedback that support Active Connection in the Hiilside neighborhood.

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The park in the north is near the art district

Hillside Apartment

Troup County Park playground, picnic space, and passive greenspace.

Existing Condition The Hillside Neighborhood totals approximately 275 acres. The neighborhood is a low income area.The site is located in the middle of Hillside Neighborhood about 2.27 acres.

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Art in the neighborhood Cochran Gallery in the downtown area is a 6 minute drive to the site. Since 2007 the Cochran Gallery has exhibited modern and contemporary work of both regional and national artists. Lagrange Art Museum is located in the downtown area, about a 6.5 minute drive. The LaGrange Art Museum is committed to being a vital partner in the educational and cultural life of the community it serves. It provides art classes for both adults and children The Lamar Dodd Art Center is located northeast of the site, about a 15 minute walk. The Art Center houses the Art Depart-

ment and the visual arts museum of LaGrange College. Lagrange college is about a 10 minute walk to the site. LaGrange is a four-year liberal arts and sciences institution offering more than 60 academic and pre-professional programs. What is more, the master plan designs a commercial node beside the site. This site builds from the existing arts based energy that Pure Life Studios brings to the area. Growth of this node into an arts district with galleries, studios, restaurants and retail would provide a unique Hillside character.

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Work Process and Community Feedback What do residents want to change? What do residents want to create? What do residents want to connect it all?

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Existing green space & community services

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Proposed Hillside Neighborhood Plan Create a Hillside Neighborhood that provides safe, unique, and supported spaces for the neighborhood and adjacent communities to live, interact, learn and work together to make a better LaGrange.

main axis

green node

second axis

other node

Gneral Analysis

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residental

mixed use

commercial

governmental

green space

Landuse Analysis

main road

sidewalk

Road System

railroad

new buildings

original buildings

New buildings


Proposed example of Neighborhood road design

How to connect the neighborhood? Local parks, playing fields, green infrastructure and undeveloped lands act as an art to activate economy and increase social interaction within the community.

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1

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Hillside Neighborhood Development Plan 2

1. Art wall 2. Amphitheatre 3. Resting are 4. Jogging trail 5. Plantbed reasting area 6. Pavillion 7. Open entrance 8. Ground water fountain

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B

B 5

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Hillside aprtment residents trail

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A

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Ground water fountain can store ground water and rain water for later recreation use

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parking

apartment

sidewalk

public green space

sidewalk

apartment

parking

sectionA-A

section of middle greenspace The apartment could be reconfigured for parking to provide behind the buildings so the greenway could become a shared space for the neighbrohood. Then using vegetation to separate the public space and the way that Hillside Apartment’s residents walk back home.

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Locaton of site activities

road

lawn

sidewalk

planting

lawn

section of open entrance sectionB-B

An open entrance combined with sidewalk and greenspace for picnic and rest.

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For “Art Park�, includes an art wall, exhibition area, small theater and rest area. It could have mobile exhibitions for art festivals. The art wall can be used for artist or children. It can change monthly.

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Jogging trail goes through the north to south make a spatial connection between south and north of the neighborhood.

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CULTIVATING THE WILD Demopolis, Alabama, U.S. fall 2017 Instructor: David Hill

Demopolis is the largest city in Marengo County, Alabama, United States. The population was 7,483 in 2010. The city lies at the confluence of the Black Warrior and Tombigbee rivers. On the east bank of the Tombigbee River there is the Demopolis Chalk Formation. The city already has some recreational places and activities including basketball, baseball and golf. Considering this situation, there needs to be a place that people can experience wildlife. Many of today’s city forest patches in the city are spatially separated from their surrounding communities because the density of vegetation makes it difficult for people to get in. Cultivating The Wild incorporates the activities associated with surrounding school to lwwwead the engagement of community to cultivate wildlife to finding and fostering a stronger relationship between people and wildlife to build a place that people can enjoy the amazing wildlife. Making the wildlife public.

ALABAMA

Demopolis

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Field Work Method First Trip Second Trip Drone

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Vegetation Transformation

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Section of soil type

Gullied Land-Demopolis Complex

Demopolis-Urban Land Complex

Demopolis Silty Clay Loam

Sumter Silty Clay Loam

Photos of Demopolis chalk On the east bank of the Tombigbee River there is the Demopolis Chalk Formation. The chalk is made of soft limestone that is a geological formation formed by deposited pelagic sediments. Because of the chalk, the site dominates the Eastern Red Cedar, except for the soil type of Gullied Land-Demopolis Complex.

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Site Space Typology

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Site Management Cultivating The Wild can provide a school extension learning space for local students, a wildlife experience for visitors, a research area for scientist. Building a wildlife infrastructure provides a place for experimenting and monitoring for research use as well as an experiential place for residents. Let the groups such as Alabama Scenic

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River Trail include this site to support the money use of wildlife preservation. Using Crowdsourcing as a specific sourcing model in which individuals or organizations use contributions from Internet users to obtain needed services or ideas. Building a network to let more people know the knowledge of wildlife.


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Site Species Selected the species that already in this site. Design for this kind of species to let people can see them in particular area.

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Animal Watching Time schedule

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Site Plan and Ativities Cultivating The Wild provokes the public imagination and prompts discourse about how we relate to other species. Encourage people interact with wildlife.

500ft

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Site uses Cultivating The Wild does not use full area to let people activities. Some of spaces need provide animals a place that people cannot bothered it.

500ft

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trail design

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Animal Hub Plan

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Animal Hub Animal Hub is a test place and an outdoor classroom for scientist or schoolchildren. The concept of animal hub is provide food, water and shelter to attract animals here. Remove trees in the circle of the old trees, planting multiple shrubs to provide seasonally food for animals. The shrubs can attract insect and birds. Some insects are food for other species, and then the other animals can be attracted here. Nesting boxes are provide to attract birds in breeding seasons, as well as an opportunity for volunteer works.

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Bird Blind Pavillion The bird blind pavilion provide a change for people stop here to watch bird and rest. Some of bird species like nesting in the buildings. Therefore it is also an opportunity for birds to build its home.

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Snag habitat Snag Supports a rich community of decomposers like bacteria and fungi, insects, and other invertebrates. These organisms and their consumers, along with the structural complexity of cavities, hollows, and broken tops make snags important habitat for birds, bats, and small mammals, which in turn feed larger mammalian predators.

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Trailer Park Plan

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section of skytrail

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skytrail rest area plan

resting area 75


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CONTEXTS PLANT EPHEMERALITY 82

PHYSICAL AND DIGITAL MODEL EXPLORATION

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MODEL MAKING 84 CHOREOGRAPHING SUCCESSION 85

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PLANT EPHEMERALITY Auburn, Alabama, U.S. Fall 2016

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The project is a surgical landscape installation intended to reveal the dynamic, complex, rich potential that plants possess within the landscape. This installation depends on plants to register the persistent changes that occur as days turn into weeks, into months, into years, etc. Design a landscape proposal for the aevus project that uses plants to heighten the awareness of the tremendous change of the seasons


PHYSICAL AND DIGITAL MODEL EXPLORATION

The project is a riverside urban park in Columbus, GA with a detailed focus on community integration and topographic resolution. A series of materials explorations, along and diital modeling, program interpretation, and the mediation of local conditions will serve as design catalysts. The site is inprired by the physical and digital model exploration.

Columbus, Georgia, U.S. Fall 2016, Xueting Zhou, xzz0066@auburn.edu

Rhino models

CNC models

Plaster models

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MODEL MAKING Lagrange, Georgia, U.S. Spring 2016

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CHOREOGRAPHING SUCCESSION

“However conscious the choice for a certain vegetation or plant species may have been, the initial design can only be the start of a process that gains momentum in time.� -----Creative Management by Hein Koningen

Langrange, Georgia, U.S. Spring 2017

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Auburn, Alabama, U.S.

PLANT NOTES


Others Beijing, China

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