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PROGRAM HANDBOOK Ed.S. in School Psychology

2012-2013

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Table of Contents Program in School Psychology .......................................................................... 3 Statement of Philosophy .............................................................................. 3 School of Education Conceptual Framework ....................................................... 4 Mission ...................................................................................................... 4 Elements ................................................................................................... 4 Program Objectives ........................................................................................ 5 The Importance of Ethics and Standards............................................................ 6 Program Requirements ................................................................................... 6 Comprehensive Examinations .......................................................................... 6 Course Plan ................................................................................................... 7 Active Status ................................................................................................. 7 Advising System ............................................................................................ 7 Technology Competencies ............................................................................... 9 Working and Professional Portfolios................................................................... 9 Evaluation of Students .................................................................................... 9 Field Experiences ........................................................................................... 9 Background Check and Fingerprinting ............................................................ 9 Practicum .................................................................................................. 9 Internship ................................................................................................ 10 Endorsements ............................................................................................. 11 Preliminary Michigan School Psychology Certification...................................... 11 Courses Required for Preliminary Certification ............................................... 12 Preliminary Certification ............................................................................. 13 Full Michigan School Psychologist Certificate ................................................. 13 Professional Identity and Affiliation ................................................................. 14 Campus Communications .............................................................................. 14 Financial Aid/Work Opportunities .................................................................... 15 Student Retention Policy ............................................................................... 16 Grievance Procedure..................................................................................... 17 Determination of Grades ............................................................................... 18 Discrimination and Harassment Including Sexual Harassment ............................. 20 Who’s Who in the School of Education and Department of Educational & Counseling Psychology ........................................................................................ 21 Whom to See for What .................................................................................. 22 Clearance for Internship Experience/Certification .............................................. 23 Self-Assessment of Computer Competencies .................................................... 25 Required Technology Competencies for School Psychology ................................. 27 SED Candidate Disposition Evaluation ............................................................. 29 Notice of Concern ......................................................................................... 31 Probationary Contract ................................................................................... 32 Superintendent of Public Instruction School Psychologist Certificate..................... 33 EdS Degree Course Requirements .................................................................. 37 Program Requirements for Graduation ............................................................ 38 Ed.S. School Psychology: Recommended Course Sequence ............................... 39Â

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Program in School Psychology The Department of Graduate Psychology and Counseling offers a program in School Psychology. This program leads to preliminary certification, or the granting of an Ed.S. degree. Satisfactory completion of the program allows the student to receive a Preliminary Michigan School Psychologist certification. School Psychology is an applied psychological discipline based on principles from general psychology, human development, learning, measurement and personality theory. Specialized training is designed to provide expertise in meeting the challenges of educational, emotional, and behavioral problems of preschool and school-age children. School psychologists function as child advocates, assessment diagnosticians, consultants, administrators, educators and in private practice. Graduates of the Ed.S. program will most often seek employment within schools as a school psychologist, in related areas of pupil personnel services or educational research and program evaluation; in child guidance, learning disabilities and psychoeducational clinics; and children's unit of various hospital or community mental health settings.

Statement of Philosophy The School Psychology program at Andrews University is designed to prepare professional school psychologists who are committed to excellence and service in the areas of consultation, diagnosis, intervention and prevention for school systems and students. Andrews’ graduates will work with teachers, students, parents, administrators, and other professionals to improve learning environments and enhance individual student potential. The program strives to augment the traditional assessment approach by contemporary research-based models of school psychology services and utilizes “Best Practices of School Psychology” as the guiding standards for training and practice. Training is provided in the context of a Christian worldview and philosophy that promotes a balanced development of an individual’s the mental, physical, social, and spiritual facets.

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School of Education Conceptual Framework Mission The School of Education mission is to provide programs based on redemptive Christian worldview to prepare professionals for global service: To Educate Is To Redeem.

Elements Curriculum and instruction are expanded in six overarching Elements, which are embedded in academic programs fulfilling the mission in the lives of graduating students. Element I:

A. B. C. Element II:

A. B. Element III:

A. B. C. D. E.

Worldview. This element addresses appreciation of the perspectives of others and development of personal philosophy from which action and service arise. Graduates will be able to... Explain worldviews and trace their historical development Critique worldviews from a Christian perspective Integrate principles of a Christian worldview into their chosen fields of study Human Growth and Change. This element addresses principles of growth, development, and learning and the use of these principles to effect positive change. Graduates will be able to... Describe human development Apply current theories of learning Groups, Leadership, and Change. The element addresses principles of group behavior and the use of these principles to effect positive change for individuals and organizations. Graduates will be able to... Facilitate change in groups and organizations Relate effectively with various cultural, racial, and special interest groups Identify political and legal issues Manage human, financial, and material resources Demonstrate servant leadership

Element IV:

Communication and Technology. This element addresses oral, written, intrapersonal, and interpersonal communication as the essence of human behavior and technology as it enables, supports, and enhances human interaction and learning. Graduates will be able to... A. Communicate effectively in written, verbal, and non-verbal forms B. Use electronic tools effectively for professional communication, teaching, and research

Element V: A. B. C. Element VI: A. B. C.

Research and Evaluation. This element addresses valuing and conducting disciplined inquiry for decision-making. Graduates will be able to... Read and evaluate research Conduct research Report research findings Personal and Professional Growth. This element addresses commitment to holistic personal and professional growth. Graduates will be able to... Demonstrate continuing professional development Demonstrate ethical behavior in all professional activities Demonstrate balanced physical, mental, spiritual, and social development

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Program Objectives The graduate training program in School Psychology is designed to prepare professional school psychologists who are committed to excellence and service to others. These competencies are specifically linked to the SED Conceptual Framework as noted in parentheses. Graduates from the School Psychology program are expected to demonstrate the following general competencies: A. Aware of, appreciates, and works with individuals and groups with a variety of strengths and needs from a variety of racial, cultural, ethnic, experiential, and linguistic backgrounds. (I.A-C) (III.C) B. Able to develop appropriate learning goals for all students, provide information about ways in which students can achieve these goals, and monitor student progress towards these goals. (II.B) C. Able to develop appropriate behavioral goals and management plans based on data for all students and monitor student progress towards these goals. (II.B) D. Knowledgeable of social, personality, cognitive, moral, and physical development of the human along with the ability to differentiate between normal and psychopathological behavior. (II.A) E. Knowledgeable of local and state school systems and the ability to work with individuals and groups to facilitate structure and policies that create and maintain schools as a safe, caring place for members of the school community. (III.A) F. Knowledgeable of federal and state special education laws and other legal aspects of providing services to students. (III.D) G. Able to conduct ecological classroom observations that result in effective planning and prescribing of teaching and curriculum strategies for students/teachers. (V.B) H. Able to implement crisis interventions and prevention programs on a school-wide basis, and/or available on a consultative basis with relevant resources. (III.A) I. Able to listen well, participate in discussions, communicate and consult effectively with individuals, groups, and systems. (IV.A) J. Able to provide clear, written communications (including report writing and other job-related responsibilities) with parents and school personnel that integrate multiple sources of information. (IV.A) (V.C) K. Knowledgeable of computer technology necessary to implement computer applications for managing databases for decision-making, understanding the computer’s instructional value, and access resources needed in the delivery of school psychological services. IV.B L. Able to define current problem areas, strengths, and needs (at the individual, group, and systems level) through assessment and measure the effects of the decisions that result from the problem solving process. (V.B) M. Knowledgeable of the current literature in the field of education and psychology, and is able to translate research into practice, and understand research design and statistics in sufficient depth to conduct investigations relevant to their work. (V.A) N. Responsible for professional conduct and practice in ways which meet all appropriate ethical, professional, and legal standards intended to protect the rights of all parties. (III.D) (VI.A-B) P. Knowledgeable of family influences that affect students’ wellness, learning, and achievement, and be able to form partnerships between parents, educators, and the community. (III.A)

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The Importance of Ethics and Standards Throughout the graduate program, all students are expected to become familiar with and behave in accordance with the ethics and standards of state and national associations for school psychologists. These documents are provided during the orientation meeting, formally reviewed in the introductory courses, and their contents evaluated at different points in the program. Appropriate professional behavior is an important part of satisfactorily completing school psychology programs. In order to receive the program coordinator’s endorsement and recommendation for credentialing and/or employment it is not sufficient to have merely completed the academic requirements. All students are to have additionally demonstrated their knowledge of and conformity with ethics and practice guidelines throughout all aspects of the program.

Program Requirements The Education Specialist (Ed.S.) in School Psychology program is designed to meet the criteria established by the Department of Education in the State of Michigan and earn an Ed.S. degree in School Psychology. The program is also approved by the National Association of School Psychologist (NASP) and meets specific standards specified by this organization. Students in the specialist program must complete a minimum of 69 credit hours that include the required courses. It is also the student’s responsibility to meet the academic requirements of Andrews University’s School of Education. These policies are outline in the Ed.S. Handbook available online at www.andrews.edu/sed/resources/student/handbook.html In addition to completing the course requirements listed in this handbook, candidates for the Specialist degree in School Psychology must accomplish the following:  Maintain a grade point average of not less than 3.20 on a 4.00 system.  Satisfactorily pass the Ed.S. comprehensive examination.  Satisfactorily complete 1200 clock hours of internship in an approved setting.  Pass the Praxis II -- School Psychology Specialty Exam (0400).  Present a Professional Portfolio.  Attend mandatory department sponsored professional workshops (one each year and provide documentation as part of professional portfolio).  Propose research for presentation at one of the following: NASP, MASP, or another psychological/educational association sponsored conference. Attendance is required at a conference regardless of proposal acceptance.  Sign a clearance statement in regards to moral conduct toward children (Form A).

Comprehensive Examinations Students in the School Psychology programs must successfully pass the Ed.S. Comprehensive Examination. The Comprehensive Exam must be written on campus and prior to internship. Advancement to Candidacy and Application for Comprehensive Examination forms must be filed the semester prior to taking Comprehensive Examinations. These forms are available from the Graduate Programs Coordinator in Bell Hall #164. An Ed.S. Comprehensive Examination Guidelines manual contains further explanation of exam procedures and evaluation along with study guides. This manual is available from the School Psychology Program Coordinator and departmental secretaries.

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Course Plan Normally, during the first year the student and advisor work out a proposed course plan to complete degree requirements. Students must file an Advancement to Candidacy (ATC) form which can be obtained from the Graduate Programs Office before registering for the last 16 credits of course work, preferably sooner. Before filing an ATC form, the student must remove all deficiencies, achieve regular admission status, and have a cumulative GPA of 3.2 or higher. Any changes in the course plan of the ATC must be approved in advance by the advisor.

Active Status In order to maintain active status in the Ed.S. program, the student must be enrolled in classes for two out of three semesters during a full academic year. University policy requires that the Ed.S. degree be completed within a six-year time period. If a student fails to maintain active status, he/she must make a request to the Graduate Program Office by letter or petition. If active status is granted, the student must meet the requirements of the current bulletin.

Advising System When a student is admitted into the School Psychology program, she/he is assigned an advisor. Unless a student requests a change of advisor, the assigned advisor will become their permanent advisor. Although it is desirable to stay with one's advisor, it is the student's right to change advisors at any time during the course of study. A Petition for Change of Advisor must be completed by the student and signed by the program director. Advisors have the following responsibilities:  To develop a plan of study with each advisee  To advise students each semester about courses to be taken next semester  To communicate feedback to students based on faculty evaluations Students have the following responsibilities:  To make contact with her/his advisor at least once a semester regarding courses to be taken  To familiarize and fulfill the requirements outlined in the Andrews University Bulletin, School of Education Handbook, and program handbook

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COURSES REQUIRED Psychological Foundations

(11 credits)

Semester hrs

GDPC514

Psychology of Learning

3

GDPC615

Advance Human Development

3

GDPC640

Multicultural Issues for Counselors & Psychologists

2

GDPC676

Theories of Personality

3

Professional Core

(46 credits)

GDPC525*

Psychology & Education of Exceptional Children (Lab: 25 hrs fieldwork)

3

GDPC540

Behavioral and Emotional Problems of Children

3

GDPC555

Issues in Early Childhood Assessment (Lab: 25 hrs fieldwork)

1

GDPC618

Legal and Ethical Issues in Schools

GDPC625

Biopsychology

3

GDPC626

Cognitive Psychology

3

GDPC635

Theories and Techniques of Counseling

3

GDPC644

Psychological Testing

3

GDPC651*

Behavioral and Educational Applications (Lab: 50 hrs fieldwork)

3

GDPC652*

Cognitive Applications (Lab: 50 hrs fieldwork)

3

GDPC654

Practicum in School Psychology

3

GDPC672

Psychoeducational Consultation

3

GDPC686

Therapies for Children

3

GDPC753

Adv Psych Decision Making and Interventions

3

GDPC810

Internship in School Psychology

6

Research Methods/Statistics

2-3

(6 credits)

EDRM505

Research Methods & Stats in Educ & Psy I

3

EDRM611

Research Methods & Stats in Educ & Psy II

3

Interdisciplinary Area SPED645 Educational Foundations EDFN500

(3 hours) Advanced Diagnosis and Educational Therapy in Reading

3

(3 hours) Philosophical Foundations of Education & Psychology

TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED *Courses with an asterisk also require registration for a 0-credit lab to show practical field experiences; the lab requires that the student meet with the practicum coordinator once a month to ensure the student is getting relevant field experience.

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3

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Technology Competencies In order to meet the demands of technology in the educational workplace, the school psychology student is required to develop and monitor technology competencies during their program. When a student enters the school psychology program, basic computer skills are assessed through a checklist (Form B). If students do not have the prerequisite computer skills needed for program course work, they will be advised to take a computer course/workshop. The Technology Competencies Matrix for School Psychology has been developed based on program objectives and NASP training domains (Form C). Experiences to develop these skills are purposefully embedded throughout the school psychology curriculum. The Matrix will be provided to the students at the beginning of their program and will be a required component of the Working and Professional Portfolio. Students are expected to frequently re-visit the matrix throughout their program in order to monitor and document their growth in this skill area.

Working and Professional Portfolios Students will be provided a Portfolio Handbook that describes requirements, timelines, and evaluative criteria. Artifacts for the portfolio are to be entered into LiveText. It is required that, prior to starting a fall internship, the student meets with the program coordinator in order to receive feedback about the working portfolio and present learning goals and a plan to achieve them, for each NASP standard. Before completion of the internship a Professional Portfolio must be presented to the school psychology program faculty. This portfolio will demonstrate how the student has met program objectives, and may serve as an opportunity to showcase the student’s work for prospective employers. Many of the portfolio elements are incorporated in the student’s course work, and it is the student’s responsibility to save papers/documents for the portfolio. The Professional Portfolio needs to show either a “Proficient” or “Exemplary” rating for all provided evaluation rubrics in order to receive a satisfactory grade for the second part of the internship.

Evaluation of Students In addition to on-going individual course evaluations, the Graduate Psychology and Counseling faculty annually review the personal and professional development of students in the School Psychology program. Satisfactory progress on a variety of competencies is evaluated, along with areas of concern (Form D). Students receive a copy of their evaluation and feedback from their faculty advisor concerning their progress in the program. More frequent evaluation of students is recommended if faculty note concerns regarding student performance. A Student Retention Policy has been developed by the GPC department and will be followed in the event of significant student concerns (See Page 16).

Field Experiences Background Check and Fingerprinting For the safety of the student and the children with whom the student works, prior to doing any fieldwork students are required to have a Life Span Finger Print Check and background check. This can be done at Berrien RESA. Fieldwork is required in the following courses: GDPC618, 651, 652, 654, and 810.

Practicum All students must register for three semester credits of practicum experience. Each practicum semester hour is an expected investment of 55 clock hours. The practicum is taken before the internship experience, and the student must apply prior to the semester they wish to enroll for practicum credit. The practicum focuses on observing the various roles and functions of school psychologists in the surrounding counties, observing school district structure, and performing direct service to children which might involve (a) assessing strategies, (b) applying behavior analysis principles in home and/or classroom, (c) assisting in the development of educational programs for intervention in the classroom, and (d) assisting with counseling services for students who are facing crises. At the close of the practicum experience, an evaluation is completed in conjunction with the 9


practicum supervisor and practicum coordinator. Students registering for practicum hours should obtain and closely follow the requirements in the Practicum Manual. A cumulative GPA of 3.2 at the finish of the fall term prior to the practicum semester, is required for registration for the practicum. Additionally, the following courses should be completed prior to registering for GDPC 654: Practicum in School Psychology: GDPC525 Psych & Education of Exceptional Children GDPC540 Behavioral & Emotional Problems of Children GDPC618 Legal and Ethical Issues in Schools GDPC635 Theories and Techniques of Counseling GDPC651 Behavioral and Educational Assessment GDPC652 Cognitive Assessment Readiness for practicum will be determined, and voted on, by the faculty at the end of the fall semester.

Internship After students have successfully completed their school psychology practicum, they must complete a 1200-clockhour school psychology internship in either a clinic or school facility. Of the 1200 clock hours required, a minimum of 600 clock hours must be in direct service work in a public school setting. Typically, the internship requires a fulltime schedule for one school year. Students may arrange to complete their internship on a part-time basis; however the internship must be completed within a two-year period. During the internship, full-time intern students receive two hours per week of individual supervision on-site as well as periodical group supervision on campus. Planning for an internship should begin early. Typically, students should contact the university internship coordinator during the practicum to schedule an appointment to discuss internship placement. Most internship sites are located outside of the village of Berrien Springs, and students are responsible for transporting themselves to and from their internship site. Prior to beginning the internship, the student must complete an internship application, and be approved to begin internship by department faculty. Throughout the internship, the university coordinator is available for consultation and will initiate on-site visits, and telephone/email contact with the supervisor to obtain progress evaluations. A final evaluation session is arranged by the internship coordinator and the on-site supervisor near the end of the internship for the purpose of discussing the on-site supervisor's written evaluation of the intern's performance. Complete details of requirements for the internship are outlined in the Internship Manual which is available from the internship coordinator and department secretaries. Students are responsible to carefully read the manual and fulfill the requirements. The following courses must be completed before the Internship is begun: GDPC525 Psychology and Education of Exceptional Children GDPC540 Behavioral and Emotional Problems of Children GDPC555 Issues in Early Childhood Assessment SPED 645 Advanced Diagnosis & Educational Therapy in Reading GDPC618 Legal and Ethical Issues in Schools GDPC672 Psychoeducational Consultation GDPC635 Theories and Techniques of Counseling GDPC651 Behavioral and Educational Assessment GDPC652 Cognitive Assessment GDPC654 Practicum in School Psychology GDPC753 Psychological Decision Making and Interventions

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Endorsements When a student in the School Psychology program applies for Michigan certification as a school psychologist the Andrew University School Psychology Program coordinator in conjunction with the Certification Officer, will verify that the student has met the requirements for certification as a School Psychologist. The Andrews University Certification Committee will then recommend certification to the Michigan Department of Education. There are two types/levels of certification in the state of Michigan: Preliminary School Psychologist Certificate and the School Psychologist Certificate. A copy of the rules from the Michigan Department of Education is included in Appendix A at the end of this handbook and should be carefully reviewed by the student. Preliminary Michigan School Psychology Certification The Preliminary Certification in School Psychology is designed for direct placement in an educational setting. Students applying for Michigan Preliminary Certification must complete the required courses listed below and have earned an MA degree or equivalent. Classes within the designated Professional Studies must receive a grade of B- or higher. The Michigan Department of Education allows a school psychologist to work for three years with a Michigan Preliminary Certificate. In addition to completing the following list of course requirements, candidates for Preliminary Certification in School Psychology must accomplish the following: (1). An applicant for preliminary school psychologist certificate shall meet both of the following requirements: (a) Have completed a minimum of 45 graduate semester hours in an approved program toward the school psychologist certificate. An internship shall not be considered a part of the 45 semester hours. (b) Have completed not less than a 600-clock-hour, supervised internship with school-age pupils in an approved school psychologist program, 300 clock hours of which shall be in a school setting under the supervision of a person who holds a Michigan School Psychologist certificate. (2). Officials of a Michigan institution that has an approved program shall recommend to the department, on a form provided by the department, the issuance of a preliminary school psychologist certificate. The recommendation to issue the preliminary school psychologist certificate shall be made when an applicant has completed the requirements approved by the board as defined in these rules. An application to an institution with an approved program for a preliminary school psychologist certificate shall be considered a certification requirement. An applicant shall meet the requirements for a preliminary school psychologist certificate when his or her application has been received and approved by the institution and the department. The department shall review the recommendation made by the officials of an institution before the certificate is issued to determine that certification requirements are met. (3). A preliminary school psychologist certificate shall be valid for 3 years. A preliminary school psychologist certificate expires on June 30 of the expiration year indicated on the certificate. (4). A person employed under the preliminary school psychologist certificate shall have local supervision provided by a fully certificated Michigan school psychologist with a minimum of 2 hours per week of supervision. (5). An applicant and an employer shall be familiar with the specific requirements of the preliminary school psychologist certificate. (6). A preliminary school psychologist certificate may be renewed for an additional 3 years upon completion of not less than 6 semester hours of credit in an approved program. Credit shall be in courses appropriate to a school psychologist as determined by the institution. A preliminary school psychologist certificate may be renewed once. (7). Correspondence credit is not acceptable for meeting the requirements of an initial preliminary school psychologist certificate, or its renewal. Online and distance learning coursework is acceptable for renewal if attending a state, regional, or nationally accredited institution. Coursework shall be applicable to the school psychologist position. 11


Courses Required for Preliminary Certification Psychological Foundations (8 credits)

Semester hrs

GDPC514

Psychology of Learning

3

GDPC615

Advance Human Development

3

GDPC640

Multicultural Issues for Counselors & Psychologists

2

Professional Core (37 credits) GDPC525

Psychology and Education of Exceptional Children

3

GDPC555

Issues in Early Childhood Assessment

1

GDPC618

Legal and Ethical Issues in Schools

3

GDPC625

Behavioral and Emotional Problems of Children

3

GDPC644

Psychological Testing

3

GDPC651

Behavioral and Educational Assessment

3

GDPC652

Cognitive Assessment

3

GDPC654

Practicum in Educational/School Psychology

3

GDPC672

Psychoeducational Consultation

3

GDPC676

Theories of Personalities

3

GDPC686

Therapies for Children: Theory and Practice

3

GDPC753

Adv Psych Decision Making and Interventions

3

GDPC810

Internship in School Psychology

3

Research Methods/Statistics (3 credits) EDRM505

Research Methods and Stats in Education and Psychology I

3

Interdisciplinary Area (3 credits) SPED645

Advanced Diagnostic and Educational Therapy in Reading

3

Educational Foundations (3 credits) EDFN500

Philosophical Foundations of Education & Psychology

TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED

3 54

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Preliminary Certification The following documents must be submitted to the School Psychology Program Coordinator in order to initiate a recommendation for preliminary certification to the State Education Office. Applications and further information can be obtained from the Program Coordinator or the certification officer, located in the School of Education, Department of Teaching, Learning and Curriculum.     

Completed Michigan Preliminary Certification application. The form can be obtained from Andrews certification officer or Program Coordinator. The signature of the supervising school psychologist is a required part of the application. Official transcripts from all colleges /universities attended other than Andrews University. Satisfactory evaluation of the applicant’s personal and professional competencies from the student’s internship experience. A letter from internship placement (supervising school psychologist or ISD supervisor) recommending student for certification. A copy of the MI state certification of the supervising psychologist at the internship site.

Full Michigan School Psychologist Certificate An applicant for the School Psychologist Certificate shall meet all of the following requirements: (a) Hold a valid Michigan Preliminary School Psychology Certificate. (b) Completed the EdS degree requirements including comprehensive examinations. (c) Satisfactorily completed a 1200-clock-hour internship with school-aged pupils under the supervision of a person who holds a valid Michigan School Psychologist Certificate. (d) Have completed one year of successful experience employed as a school psychologist in a Michigan public school and have local supervision provided by a fully certificated Michigan school psychologist with a minimum of 2 hours per week of supervision.. The following documents must be submitted by the student in order to initiate a recommendation for full certification to the State Education Office. Applications and further information can be obtained from the certification officer, located in the School of Education, Department of Teaching, Learning and Curriculum.  Completed Michigan Certification application. Form can be obtained from Andrews University Certification Officer or Program Coordinator. The application includes a section requesting documentation of work under supervision as a school psychologist in the public school setting for a year after holding a Michigan Preliminary certificate.  A letter from the Michigan-certified supervising psychologist recommending the applicant for state certification.  A copy of the Michigan state certification of the supervising psychologist at the employment site. PLEASE SEE APPENDIX A FOR COMPLETE DETAILS. PLEASE NOTE: It is the student’s responsibility to understand certification requirements for the states where you anticipate working and to plan your program to meet those requirements. If you choose to complete an internship outside of Michigan, it is your responsibility to determine if certification requirements will be met in that state. It is advised that you keep documents which you may need later to obtain your license/certificate. Students may contact the Michigan Department of Education for further information: Michigan Department of Education, Ottawa Tower South P.O. Box 30008 Lansing, Michigan 48909 (517) 373-6892

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Professional Identity and Affiliation Students in the School Psychology programs are required to join one of the following organizations by the end of their first year in the program: National Association of School Psychologists, American Psychological Association, or their local state association of school psychologists. Included in the theme of professional affiliation and continuing growth, students are encouraged to required to attend professional workshops, seminars, and conferences. Documentation of three such experiences is required in the Professional Portfolio (one of these must be NASP, MASP, or another psychological/educational association sponsored conference). Attendance at a conference must be a minimum of one full day. Documentation at multiple sessions is required, if applicable. The National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) is a national organization representing more than 21,000 members in the United States and 22 foreign countries. NASP is the largest organized body representing school psychology in the world. Student membership is open to any graduate student enrolled more than half-time in a psychology or human service area. Benefits include a subscription to School Psychology Review, Communique (newsletter), and an electronic listserv. The American Psychological Association (APA) is a society of scientists, teachers, and professionals organized by charter to advance psychology as a science and as a means of promoting the public welfare. Student membership is open to any graduate student enrolled more than half-time in a Psychology or human services area. As a student member of APA, Division 16 (School psychology), your benefits will include an annual subscription to School Psychology Quarterly. In addition, you will be eligible for professional liability insurance programs and professional development through workshops, conferences, and conventions. MASP is the Michigan Association of School Psychologists. Membership is open to persons who are currently functioning as school psychologists in Michigan, trained and approved as school psychologists, but now functioning as consultants, supervisors, or administration in school psychological services or related areas, or person primarily engaged in the training of school psychologists at a college or university. Student membership is open to students in a Michigan college or university who are enrolled at least half time in a graduate program leading to approval as a school psychologist. Graduates of the School Psychology program are encouraged to seek national certification (Nationally Certified School Psychologist; NCSP) through the National Association of School Psychologists. NASP is an independent, voluntary, not-for-profit organization whose primary purposes are to establish and monitor a national certification system, to identify to professionals and the public those school psychologists who have voluntarily sought and obtained generic school psychologist certification, and to maintain a register of these school psychologists. This process grants recognition to school psychologists who have graduated from an approved training program and have scored at a specified level on the Praxis School Psychology Examination (a “passing score” of 165 or better was required in the 2008 NCSP requirements).

Campus Communications The campus communication system includes the student newspaper, Student Movement, and the campus announcement sheet published weekly, the Agenda. The Department of Graduate Psychology and Counseling has two bulletin boards near the entrance to the department offices. General announcements for all students in the School of Education are usually posted on the bulletin boards near the Dean's office. In addition, important announcements pertaining to the student body at Andrews University are emailed to students at their Andrews email addresses. It is the student’s responsibility to check these sources of information frequently.

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Financial Aid/Work Opportunities Each year Andrews University School of Education awards over $150,000 in graduate grants, named scholarships and graduate assistantships based on financial need and/or academic performance. To be eligible for any of these you must be a full-time (8+ credits or equivalent) graduate student on regular or provisional status in the School of Education. 1.

Graduate Grants are awarded in the spring of each year (for disbursal during the upcoming fall, spring and summer semesters) to 20-30 graduate students in the School of Education on the basis of financial need. Normally, grants are given in the amounts of $1,000 - $3,000 per school year. To be eligible for these grants you must submit an application to the office of the Dean in the School of Education no later than the first Friday in February.

2.

Graduate assistantships totaling approximately $130,000 for the year are given out each semester to approximately 30 graduate students. These are given to students who do teaching, research, or administrative work for the School of Education. Selection of graduate students are made by the departments. Initial applications are made to the office of the Dean in the School of Education. Graduate assistantships are also available in other departments on campus, such as the Academic Skills Center, the Scholarly Research Office, the Research and Statistical Consultation Center, the residence halls, the Reading Center, or the Center for Church Ministries. Many other work opportunities are available on campus and can be applied for at the Student Labor office in the Administration Building. Current work opportunities are posted on a bulletin board outside their office. 3.

Named University Scholarships totaling approximately $20,000 are awarded each spring to approximately 20 undergraduate and graduate students. During Spring Semester, the Financial Aid Office notifies our office of the named scholarships that the School of Education can award. Awards are usually $1000. Applications for these scholarships must be submitted by the first Friday in February.

Application forms and further information about graduate grants and named scholarships are available at the office of the Dean in the School of Education.

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Student Retention Policy All students pursuing degrees in the Department of Graduate Psychology and Counseling (GPC) at Andrews University will be reviewed yearly as to their goodness of fit in the program in which they are enrolled. Please refer to the respective program handbook for further details on how these evaluations will be conducted. Apart from these times, if for any reason a professor should have significant concerns regarding a student’s academic progress, interpersonal skills, counseling skills, testing skills, goodness of fit for the relevant profession/program, and/or a student’s ethical behavior, the following steps will be followed: 1.

Concerns are presented to the full faculty (which typically occurs at the next GPC faculty meeting). The full faculty are involved so that multiple perspectives can be offered to avoid situations in which one faculty member has a concern with a student but other faculty do not. Additionally, discussion with the full faculty has historically led to a actions more beneficial to the student given the more objective and more creative ideas that come from a group process. The goal of the discussion is that faculty recommend actions to remediate the problem (rather than actions that are solely punitive in nature). Faculty: a. b. c.

recommend actions to be taken by faculty and student identify immediate and/or future consequences identify the timeline related to when the concern needs to be resolved and/or reevaluated.

Potential actions may range from minor (e.g., require the student to increase organization and timeliness in attending classes) to major (e.g., program termination). The nature of actions are commensurate with the nature of the concern. During the GPC meeting, the Notice of Concern form is completed based on the faculty’s voted actions, consequences and timeline. 2.

The student is presented with the Notice of Concern form (a copy of the Notice of Concern will be placed in the student’s official file). The Notice identifies: a. b. c. d.

what the concern is what the voted actions are the timeline related to when the concern needs to be resolved and/or reevaluated any immediate and/or future consequences.

The student will receive the Notice of Concern by both email and by certified mail with return receipt. The receipt will be kept in the students’ file as verification that the student has received the Notice. Within 7 days of receipt of the Notice of Concern the student must either (A) arrange to meet with the faculty named in the “Voted actions the student must take” section of the Notice of Concern form or (B) notify those faculty of the student’s decision to appeal the Notice of Concern. Failure of the student to arrange a meeting within 7 days or failure to communicate his/her decision to appeal will be interpreted to mean that the student does not intend to meet the requirements of the program and will thus be treated as the student choosing to withdraw from the program. The withdrawal will be acknowledged by an official letter (also sent certified mail with return receipt) noting the students choice to withdraw and notifying the student that they are dropped from the official list of program participants. After such a withdrawal, students would have to complete a new application to a program if they wished to return to a program. When the student meets with the faculty named in the “Voted actions the student must take” section of the Notice of Concern, the faculty discuss the concern with the student and work toward remediating the situation. Attached to the Notice of Concern (or to a termination letter) is information about the 16


Appeal Process. Anytime a student is placed on probation or terminated, they have the option to request a student hearing at the next GPC full Faculty meeting. Subsequent to the hearing, if the student disagrees with any aspect of the Notice he/she may pursue the appeal process. During the appeal process the student will continue to engage in all academic activities unless the concern is such that continuation in those activities jeopardizes compliance with ethical or legal mandates (e.g., if there is a concern about the nature of a student’s interaction with clients during practicum, the student would not be allowed to continue meeting with clients during the appeal process). 3.

Case review. If indicated, the concern will be reevaluated according to the timeline presented in the Notice of Concern. This review process follows the same procedures outlined in steps 1 and 2 above. Further actions may be voted, or, the case may be considered closed. If the case is closed, the program coordinator will provide a student with a letter indicating this and a copy of the letter will be placed in the student’s official file. If additional actions are voted, step 2 above will be followed.

Grievance Procedure If a student believes that he or she has been treated unfairly or finds him/herself in conflict with departmental policy or practice, they have a right to state their grievance and initiate a student appeal process. This process is explained in detail in the School of Education Handbook for Educational Specialist Students.

17


Determination of Grades Authority of Faculty Member The authority to determine grades rests with the faculty member(s) teaching the course or substitute instructor(s) assigned by the relevant department chair in consultation with the dean where the regular instructor is unavailable. Authority of the Department Chair and Dean The department chair and dean of the school have general oversight responsibility through counsel with each faculty member to ensure that a carefully crafted grading policy is used and that students are fully informed of the policy and its application. Only when a grade complaint is lodged or a grading grievance petition is filed by a student will the department chair and dean become involved with decisions on grading. Changes of Correction of Errors in Grades To protect the integrity of the grading system, alterations to the official grade record occur only where instructor error is discovered. Grades are not changed because additional work has been completed since the grade was assigned. Errors are reported on the official grade change form provided by the Registrar's Office and must be signed by the instructor and the dean. On this form, which becomes the basis for a corresponding correction in the record, a written statement of explanation must be provided. Other Grade Changes Grade changes require authorization in writing by the faculty member who is the instructor of record. Only in the case of the faculty member's departure from the university or the death of a faculty member may grade changes be effected without the specific signature of the faculty member on the official grade form or appropriate official change of grade form. In such an event, the dean of the relevant school signs for the instructor. Timing of Grade Changes Any change of grade must normally be made within the semester following the term for which the grade was assigned for any class taken on campus. In no case should grades be revised after two (2) semesters. Graduate grade changes may not be made after one semester without the permission of the dean/program coordinator following the term in which the course was offered except as allowed by a specific policy. In the case of classes offered on an extension campus, the grade change must occur within two semesters following the term in which the course was taken. Resulting changes in the grade point average subsequent to the issuing of the diploma shall not result in withdrawal of the diploma. Resolution of Grade Disputes Students who dispute the grade received for a course are to be encouraged, by any faculty member or administrator who is approached, to seek a resolution through the following procedural steps. Succeeding steps should be taken only as failure is experienced in the previous step: Informal Resolution in Person A student reporting dissatisfaction over a grade received in a course should be counseled to first seek a resolution in person with the instructor. Should such a meeting not succeed, the student may seek a resolution through the instructor’s immediate supervisor, the department chair or, in the absence of the chair, the dean of the school. The supervisor may arrange a joint discussion between the student and the instructor. When such attempts at resolution of the grade problem fail, the student may file a written grade complaint with the relevant instructor’s immediate supervisor. Grade Complaint A student may request an investigation of a grade through a written grade complaint to the supervisor of the instructor which explains the reasons for the student’s belief that the grade was assigned as a result of: carelessness, arbitrariness, or capriciousness. If the chair is also the instructor in question, the chair should direct the grade complaint to the next highest officer for processing. The written grade complaint must be filed within the semester (not counting the summer terms) after the grade was given and/or a grade report card had been issued. Complaints filed after a full semester has elapsed since a grade was given 18


and/or a report card issued, or a written grade complaint that does not detail the evidence called for above, shall not be investigated. A department chair or the instructor’s immediate supervisor can recommend or make a grade adjustment only if his/her findings reveal clear evidence of carelessness, arbitrariness, or capriciousness on the part of the instructor. The department chair or the instructor’s immediate supervisor is to render a written report on his/her findings within a week (if school is in session; if not, within the first week after school reconvenes). If the student does not receive a report or remains dissatisfied, he/she may file a written grade grievance with the dean of the relevant school. Grade Grievance A student may file a written grade grievance with a dean of a relevant school to resolve a grade problem. The grade grievance must be filed within three weeks of receiving a response to the original filing of the written grade complaint. The written grade grievance shall provide evidence for the claim that the grade was assigned as a result of arbitrariness, capriciousness, or carelessness. Should the dean be the instructor in question, the dean shall direct the grade grievance to the provost. A written grade grievance that does not detail the evidence called for above, or that is filed more than three weeks after the response to the original filing of the complaint, will not be investigated. Providing the student has met the conditions for filing a grade grievance, the relevant dean or his/her immediate supervisor as noted shall appoint a Grade Review Committee of three (3) faculty members with authority to investigate the matter further and to recommend a resolution. The dean’s or his/her supervisor’s shall issue a written verdict in response to a specific Grade Review Committee within one week after having received the written recommendations of the Committee that shall be final and binding on both student and faculty member. The verdict may necessitate a grade change. Consequences of Failing Grades Academic Program Failure Grades considered to represent an unsatisfactory level of achievement by a student in a given class are defined as failing grades. A student may be dismissed from a particular program during a given semester because of failing grades. Where a student fails to meet the published professional and lifestyle requirements for some programs he/she may be refused a degree even when all the other academic requirements have been satisfactorily completed . Failure in Non-Academic Areas Where the requirements for a particular professional degree as published in the Bulletin include personality, lifestyle, clinical aptitude and other special traits, a student may be deemed fail in that program if he/she does not measure up to those requirements. Such a student may be denied a degree and may be dismissed from the program if the dismissal decision is well-documented by the faculty advisor and reviewed by the departmental faculty in session noting the process and criteria used. The decision to dismiss must be filed with the minutes of the meeting Rights of Students to Due Process Students who are dismissed on the basis of failing performance have a right to appeal and to due process through consultation with the vice president of academic administration.

19


Discrimination and Harassment Including Sexual Harassment It is the policy of Andrews University to provide an educational and employment environment free from all forms of intimidation, hostility, offensive behavior and discrimination, including sexual harassment. Such discrimination or harassment may take the form of unwarranted verbal or physical conduct, verbal or written derogatory or discriminatory statements, which may result in decisions affecting status, promotions, raises, favorable work assignments, recommendations, class assignments or grades. Such behavior, or tolerance of such behavior, on the part of an administrator, supervisor, faculty or staff member violates the policy of the university and may result in disciplinary action including termination. The conduct herein described is contrary to University policy and may be illegal under both state and federal law. The United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has defined sexual harassment as unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when (1) submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual’s employment; (2) submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as the basis for employment decisions affecting such individual; or (3) such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive working environment. The State of Michigan has defined sexual harassment as unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct or communication of a sexual nature when (1) submission to such conduct or communication is made a term or condition either explicitly or implicitly to obtain employment, public accommodations or public services, education, or housing; (2) submission to or rejection of such conduct or communication by an individual is used as a factor in decisions affecting such an individual’s employment, public accommodations or public services, education, or housing, or creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive employment, public accommodations, public services, educational, or housing environment. An employee (including a student employee) who believes that he or she has been subject to discrimination or harassment should report the conduct to his or her immediate supervisor, and in the event the supervisor is the aggrieving party, to the next higher responsible party. If necessary, the Andrews University employee grievance procedure should be utilized. A student who believes that he or she has been discriminated against or harassed by a teacher should report the conduct to the chair of the department to which the teacher is assigned, and if the chair is the aggrieving party, to the dean of the college/school in which he or she is enrolled.

20


Who’s Who in the School of Education and Department of Graduate Psychology and Counseling School of Education

800. 471. 6210

Graduate Psychology and Counseling Main Office

269. 471. 3473

Dean, School of Education

Jim Jeffery

Executive Assistant

Vicki Wiley

3481

Graduate Services Coordinator

Anna Piskozub

3109

Department Chair

Rudi Bailey

3346

Assistant to the Chair

Karen Benjamin

3473

Administrative Assistant

Heidi Magesa

3113

MA School Counseling

Brad Hinman

3466

MA Clinical Mental Health Counseling

Nancy Carbonell

3472

MA/EdD/PhD Educational Psychology

Jimmy Kijai

6240

PhD Counseling Psychology

Carole Woolford-Hunt

6074

EdS School Psychology

Elizabeth Lundy

6251

MS Special Education

Luana Greulich

6332

Jimmy Kijai

6240

Tevni Grajales

3476

Clinical Mental Health Counseling

Dennis Waite

3136

School Counseling

Dennis Waite

3136

School Psychology Internship

Jeannie Montagano

3567

Counseling Psychology

Carole Woolford-Hunt

6074

Educational/School Psychology Practicum

Rudi Bailey

3346

Program Coordinators

Research/Statistics Consultants Fieldwork/Internship Coordinators

21


Whom to See for What Academic Issues Scheduling/questions about classes

Your Advisor

Course Plan/Candidacy Forms/Petitions

Get forms from Graduate Program. Take to your Advisor. Then get signature of program coordinator.

Comprehensives

See your Advisor and Program Coordinator.

Grades

Your class teacher and advisor

Issues related to classes

See the class teacher. If you cannot resolve the issue see Rudolph Bailey (Chair)

Issues your adviser cannot resolve See Program Coordinator

Employment of Graduate Assistants Paperwork related to job

Karen Benjamin

Job performance/scheduling

Your supervisor

Licensure/Certification Issues Requirements for certification

Jeannie Wolfer

Planning academic program for licensure/certification

Your Advisor

PLEASE NOTE: It is your responsibility to understand the licensure/certification requirements for the locations where you plan to practice and to plan your program to meet those requirements. It is also your responsibility to keep documents which you will later need to obtain your license/certificate (i.e., course outlines, Bulletin under which you graduate, course plan/candidacy forms, qualifications of faculty). The Department will verify as meeting licensure/certification requirements only those programs which intend to prepare for counseling or psychology licensure: School Counseling, Clinical Mental Health Counseling, School Psychology, and Counseling Psychology. Educational Psychology programs are not licensure programs.

22


Clearance for Internship Experience/Certification The Michigan State board of Education has authority under Part 10 Administrative hearings, of the Administrative Rules Governing the certification of Michigan teachers, to deny, suspend or revoke a teaching certificate (R 390.1201). Rule 101 States: 1. The state board may refuse to grant or renew, or may revoke or suspend for a fixed term, or may impose reasonable conditions on, a teaching certificate granted pursuant to these rules for the following reasons: a. Fraud, material misrepresentation, or concealment in the application for a certificate. b. Failure or ineligibility of the applicant or certificate holder to meet the criteria for eligibility for the certificate. c. Conviction, as an adult, of an act immoral conduct contributing to the delinquency of a child, or moral turpitude. Any applicant who reports having been convicted at any point in his or her academic program will be granted a hearing prior to a final decision. Such a hearing will be initiated by the School of Education through the Department of Educational & Counseling Psychology. The specific acts for which the state board may refuse to grant or renew, or may revoke or suspend for a fixed term, or may impose reasonable conditions on a teaching certificated are listed in the following public acts: Public Act 451 of the Public Acts of 1976 (as amended) Misdemeanors Required to be Reported In addition to reporting all felony convictions, Public Act 451 of the Public Acts of 1976 (as amended) requires that school districts report to the Michigan Department of Education, Office of Professional Preparation Services, any teachers, administrators, school counselors, school psychologists, school social workers and school nurses certificated or approved by the State Board of Education who have been convicted of the following misdemeanors:             

Criminal sexual conduct in the fourth degree Attempt to commit criminal sexual conduct in the fourth degree Child abuse in the third or fourth degree Attempt to commit child abuse in the third or fourth degree Cruelty, torture, or indecent exposure involving a child Delivery of a narcotic to a minor or student within 1,000 feet of school property (333.7410) Breaking and entering (750.115) Knowingly allowing a minor to consume or possess alcohol or a controlled substance at a social gathering (750.141a) Accosting, enticing, or soliciting a child for an immoral purpose (750.145a) Larceny from a vacant dwelling (750.359) Assault; assault and battery (750.81) Assault; infliction of serious injury (750.81a) Selling or furnishing alcoholic liquor to a person less than 21 years of age (436.33)

Public Act 451 of the Public Acts of 1976 (as amended): Immediate Suspension upon Conviction Public Act 451 of the Public Acts of 1976 (as amended): Section 1535 (a)(2): a. Criminal sexual conduct in any degree, assault with intent to commit criminal sexual conduct, or an attempt to commit criminal sexual conduct in any degree. b. Felonious assault on a child, child abuse in any degree, or an attempt to commit child abuse in any degree. Cruelty, torture, or indecent exposure involving a child. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Manufacturing/delivering controlled substance (7401(2)(a)(i)) Possession of a controlled substance (7402(2)(a)(i)) Recruiting, inducing, soliciting, or coercing minor to commit felony (333.7416) Assault with intent to commit murder (750.83) Assault with intent to rob or steal armed (750.89) Attempt to murder (750.91) First degree murder (750.316) 23


8. Second degree murder (750.317) 9. Armed robbery aggravated assault (750.529) 10. Misdemeanor - Delivery You are asked to sign the following statement regarding conviction of an act involving moral conduct as defined above in section (c) of (1) under Rule 101 of the Michigan State Board of Education Administrative Rules governing certification of Michigan teachers. Students preparing to be school psychologists are required to sign the statement prior to (1) admission to the program, (2) internship placement, and (3) applying for school psychologist certification. If you as a student in the Ed.S. in School Psychology Program and as a candidate for school psychology credentials indicate a conviction, have pled guilty or no contest to any of the items listed above, you may be denied admission or may not be recommended for certification. ___ I have not been convicted, of (or pleaded no contest to) a misdemeanor or felony. ___ I have been convicted, of (or pleaded no contest to) a misdemeanor or felony.

I certify that the answer given on this form is complete and accurate to the best of my knowledge.

________________________________ Student Name (Please Print)

______________________________ Student Signature

________________________________ Student ID Number

______________________________ Date

FORM B Name ______________________________________________________AU ID# _________________ E-mail ___________________________________________________ Local Phone # ______________ The following questionnaire provides an opportunity to evaluate your computer knowledge and skills for success in course work in your program. Given your past computer usage, please select the response most appropriate.

24


Self-Assessment of Computer Competencies Number of Times you Have Done This 0

1-5

5-10

11+

Windows Operating System Create a folder/directory Maximize/minimize a window Close/restore a window Switch between windows/programs Move files to another place Use “save as” and “save” for different word processing files Used or manipulated the following files: .jpg, gif, tif Determine level of virus protection Word/Word Perfect Format text (font size, color, typeface) Use Spell Checking Set margins Insert page numbers Insert a table Join/split cells Insert an outline Edit text using cut/paste Change paper layout Password protect work

PowerPoint/Presentations Add/delete slides Rearrange slides Add transitions Create bulleted slides Create title slides Create table slides Play a slide show Number of Times You Have Done This 0 Excel Enter data in cells Format cells (bold, currency, shade, etc.) Write formulas 25

1-5

5-10

11+


Use functions Create a chart Sort data Add/delete rows & columns Hide columns The Internet Use a browser to go to a web page Use web search engines Send/receive email Send a file attachment with an email

26


FORM C

Required Technology Competencies for School Psychology Able to operate a computer system (Macintosh or Windows). Knows desktop controls for printing, saving, and file management. Skills in word processing including (a) entering and editing text & copy, cut and paste text (b) Can import & incorporate graphics into a text based document, and (c) convert text files between the most common word processing formats. Familiarity with characteristics of currently available types of information storage such as CD ROMs. Can operate a TV, CD/DVD/VCR, laptop, and projector Can develop a template for psychological reports and test data Can evaluate at least two test-scoring and interpretation software programs for commonly available intelligence & achievement measures (include in portfolio) Can create spreadsheet applications using the following (a) formulate to analyze data, (b) create test score matrix (for example, creating a summary of performance data of Curriculum-Based Measures), (c) use data to draw graphs (for example, to show progress). Included hard copy in portfolio. Creates desktop presentations (e.g., PowerPoint) and includes transitions, text animation and graphics for instructional purpose, such as professional presentation to colleagues (include in portfolio on CD) Uses computer based telecommunications to access information & enhance personal and professional productivity by (a) subscribe to listserv or to several relevant services (example: NASP listserv), and (b) evaluate professional web sites. Research the Internet using a variety of web search engines. Can download files, FTP files to a site, attach files in email, unzip files, open .pdf files, and capture web images to disk. Practices responsible, professional, ethical, and legal use of technology, information, and software resources. Is familiar with the use of distant learning technologies, and has personally experienced distance learning of a professionally relevant skill. Can select and evaluate computer software to match a particular instructional need for special needs children and their parents, adult educators, and professional peers. Demonstrates an extensive awareness of resources for adaptive assistive devises for students with special needs. 27


Can design, deliver, and assess student learning activities that integrate computers & technology for diverse student populations.

28


FORM D

SED Candidate Disposition Evaluation Andrews University Candidate’s Name:

ID:

Program: EdS School Psychology Date:

Department: Educational & Counseling Psy

Rating Scale: 5. Exceptional 4. Proficient 3. Satisfactory 2. Emerging 1 Unsatisfactory n/o. Not Observed

The Educational Professional . . . 5

4

1. Believes that all students can learn by      

Showing respect Supporting incremental learning Speaking often of students’ ability to learn Ensuring that each student is given reasonable opportunities to learn Supporting teachers in their efforts to help students learn Showing patience and seeking support for even the most difficult student, or for teachers who are dealing with them

Comments:

2. Values fairness by    

Demonstrating equitable treatment of others Seeking to understand others’ needs Trying to respond to requests Showing no discrimination Using consistent processes and policies to ensure fair treatment of others

Comments:

     

Using appropriate oral or written communication skills Listening thoughtfully to others’ views, including opposing ones Modifying writing and speaking to be more accurate and effective Using appropriate tone and affect in communication Demonstrating appropriate levels of self-disclosure Interacting positively with others, with corresponding body language Initiating communication to resolve conflict

Comments:

    

Building trust between students and colleagues Interacting in ways that recognize the worth of all individuals Validating the uniqueness and strengths of each individual Soliciting those who may be under-represented Welcoming and trying to understand diverse views to gain a more comprehensive understanding Using diverse views and differences to facilitate group growth

Comments:

Being aware of one’s positional and personal influence on others Taking initiative Following up well Developing one’s own voice and opinion Planning, prioritizing tasks, and managing time effectively Pursuing excellence for self and others Demonstrating flexibility

Comments:

 3. Values respectful communication by

 4. Values diversity by

 5. Recognizes personal leadership responsibility by      

29

3

2

1

n/o


6. Values personal and professional growth by    

Seeking opportunities to learn new skills and knowledge Wanting to improve performance Seeking and using feedback Demonstrating spiritual, physical, mental, and emotional balance Securing and using a range of personal and professional resources Reflecting on professional experiences

Comments:

   

Manifesting inquisitiveness and academic curiosity Asking questions Soliciting opposing views Tracking down information Engaging in research (primary and secondary)

Comments:

  

Engaging in activities that will benefit others Seeking to understand others’ needs Trying to respond to requests Being involved in professional organizations

Comments:

Adhering to school psychology ethical standards, including appropriate confidentiality Does not engage in plagiarism or cheating Exhibits truthfulness and fairness in all areas

Comments:

Easily engaging in group situations making others feel accepted/comfortable Works Collaboratively on group projects

Comments:

  7. Is committed to inquiry

 8. Is committed to service by

 9. Values ethical behavior by  

 10. Is committed to team/group relations by 

11. Written Communication 

Is able to integrate assessment information and other knowledge bases and present a clear, concise and grammatically correct reports; research papers

Comments:

12. Assessment Competency 

Demonstrates proficiency in administration, scoring, and interpreting standardized and non standardized measures

Comments:

Student feedback and recommendations for program improvement: Signature of Advisor: _______________________________Date _________________________ Signature of Student: _______________________________Date ________________________ FORM E

30


Notice of Concern Department of Graduate Psychology and Counseling Andrews University Student:

Date:

Program Coordinator:

Program:

Professor Concerned:

Course:

What is the concern?

Voted actions the student must take:

Voted timeline for resolution of the concern and date when the concern will be reevaluated:

Voted immediate and/or future consequences:

Please see attached information about the Appeal Process should you choose to appeal. Within 7 days of a receipt of this Notice of Concern, the student must contact his/her faculty advisor and arrange an appointment to discuss the recommended actions.

31

Student Retention Policy proposed revision02.docx

4/24/12 1:20 PM

4/24/12 1:18 PM


FORM F

Probationary Contract Department of Graduate Psychology and Counseling Student’s Name: __________________________________ Instructor: _______________________________________ The following conditions must be met:

Student’s Signature: _______________________________________Date: __________________ Instructor’s Signature: ______________________________________Date: __________________

32


DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

Superintendent of Public Instruction School Psychologist Certificate Filed with the Secretary of State on July 6, 2006 These rules take effect immediately upon filing with the Secretary of State unless adopted under section 33, 34, or 45a(6) of 1969 PA 306. Rules adopted under these sections become effective 7 days after filing with the Secretary of State. (By authority conferred on the superintendent of public instruction by section 15 of 1964 PA 287, MCL 388.1015, section 1251 of 1976 PA 451, MCL 380.1251, and Executive Reorganization Order Nos. 1996-6 and 1996-7, MCL 388.993 and MCL 388.994, R 380.203, R 380.204, R380.205, R380.206, and R 380.208 of the Michigan Administrative Code are amended; and R 380.206a is added to the Code as follows: R380.203 Role of school psychologist. Rule 3. A school psychologist may function in the following roles: (a) Provide school psychological services to any pupil (b) Conduct interviews and collect direct and indirect measures of behavior for the purposes of understanding academic and behavioral problems, implementing appropriate evidence-based interventions, and evaluating the effects of those interventions. (c) Collaborate with staff in planning educational intervention,, curriculum, behavioral management, and teaching strategies, including early intervention and response to intervention approaches. (d) Consult, counsel, and collaborate with pupils, parents, school personnel, and appropriate outside personnel regarding mental health, behavioral, and educational concerns utilizing psychological principles. (e) Provide psychological interventions that include both individual and group interventions using psychological principles. (f) Provide direct psychological interventions that include both individual and group interventions using psychological principles. (g) Conduct behavior assessments, including functional behavior assessments. (h) Perform systematic direct observations of pupils. (i) Administer tests which may include intelligence, achievement, personality, adaptive behavior, observations, checklists, interviews, and curriculum-based assessment or measures. (j) Interpret the psychological and other diagnostic data for professionals, parents, pupils, and appropriate others. (k) Collaborate in program planning and evaluation services for decision-making purposes which may include eligibility decisions and data-based problem solving. (l) Design and implement instructional support and assessment systems, such as response to intervention approaches and curriculum-based assessment or measurement. (m) Contribute to and evaluate the effects of prevention, early intervention, and crisis intervention programs, including systems level mental health programs such as school wide positive behavior support plans. (n) Conduct research and program evaluations for the purpose of improvement services. R380.204 Preliminary school psychologist certificate. Rule 4. (1). An applicant for preliminary school psychologist certificate shall meet both of the following requirements: (c) Have completed a minimum of 45 graduate semester hours in an approved program toward the school psychologist certificate. An internship shall not be considered a part of the 45 semester hours. (d) Have completed not less than a 600-clock-hour, supervised internship with school-age pupils in an approved school psychologist program, 300 clock hours of which shall be in a school setting under the supervision of a person who holds a Michigan School Psychologist certificate. (2). Officials of a Michigan institution that has an approved program shall recommend to the department, on a form provided by the department, the issuance of a preliminary school psychologist certificate. The recommendation to issue the preliminary school psychologist certificate shall be made when an applicant has completed the requirements approved by the board as defined in these rules. An application to an institution with an approved program for a preliminary school psychologist certificate shall be considered a certification requirement. An applicant shall meet the requirements for a preliminary school psychologist certificate when his or her application has been received and approved by the institution and the department. The department shall review the recommendation made by the officials of an institution before the certificate is issued to determine that certification requirements are met. 33


(3). A preliminary school psychologist certificate shall be valid for 3 years. A preliminary school psychologist certificate expires on June 30 of the expiration year indicated on the certificate. (4). A person employed under the preliminary school psychologist certificate shall have local supervision provided by a fully certificated Michigan school psychologist with a minimum of 2 hours per week of supervision. (5). An applicant and an employer shall be familiar with the specific requirements of the preliminary school psychologist certificate. (6). A preliminary school psychologist certificate may be renewed for an additional 3 years upon completion of not less than 6 semester hours of credit in an approved program. Credit shall be in courses appropriate to a school psychologist as determined by the institution. A preliminary school psychologist certificate may be renewed once. (7). Correspondence credit is not acceptable for meeting the requirements of an initial preliminary school psychologist certificate, or its renewal. Online and distance learning coursework is acceptable for renewal if attending a state, regional, or nationally accredited institution. Coursework shall be applicable to the school psychologist position. R380.205 Out-of-state applicants for preliminary school psychologist certificate. Rule 5. (1) An out-of-state applicant for a school psychologist certificate shall first apply for a Michigan preliminary school psychologist certificate unless the applicant meets criteria in R 380.206a. (2) The board may accept a comparable school psychologist certificate from another state or foreign country or national certification as a school psychologist basis for the issuance of a Michigan preliminary school psychologist certificate. (3) The board may accept credits presented for certification from accredited institutions or agencies located in other states or foreign countries. Proof of credit shall be submitted to the department directly from the institution, on official transcripts. (4) An applicant for a preliminary school psychologist certificate in this state who has been educated in an approved school psychology program in another state shall present evidence of having fulfilled all of the requirements established for applicants who have been educated in the approved Michigan universities. R380.206 School psychologist certificate. Rule 6. (1). An applicant for a school psychologist certificate shall meet all of the following requirements: (a) Hold a valid Michigan preliminary school psychologist certificate. (b) Possess a specialist’s degree or its equivalent in school psychology from an institution with an approved program. (c) Have completed a minimum of 15 graduate semester hours in school psychology, including an internship, in addition to the 45 semester hours required for the preliminary certificate. (d) In addition to the 600 clock hours required for the preliminary certificate, have completed not less than a 600-clock-hour, supervised internship with school-age pupils in an approved school psychologist program, 300 clock hours of which shall be in a school setting under the supervision of a person who holds a valid Michigan school psychologist certificate or its equivalent. (e) Meet the requirements of this rule and in R380.208. (f) Have completed 1 year of successful experience employed as a school psychologist with direction from a fully certificated Michigan school psychologist with a minimum of 2 hours per week of supervision. (2). Officials of a Michigan institution that has an approved school psychologist program shall recommend, to the department, on a form provided by the department, the issuance of a school psychologist certificate. The recommendation to issue a school psychologist certificate shall be made when an applicant has completed the requirements of these rules. An application to an institution that has an approved program for a school psychologist certificate shall be considered a certification requirement. An applicant shall meet the requirements for a school psychologist certificate when his or her application has been received an approved by the institution and the department. The department shall review the recommendation made by the officials of an institution before the certificate is issued to determine that certification requirements are met. (3). A school psychologist certificate shall be valid for 5 years. 34


(4). All certificates issued within a calendar year expire 5 years from June 30 of that year. (5). An applicant and an employer shall be familiar with the specific requirements of the school psychologist certificate. (6). The renewal of a school psychologist certificate requires the completion of 6 semester credit hours of academic credit at any 4-year college or university or Michigan community college recognized by the department, or the equivalent in approved 18 state board continuing education units. Credit shall be towards an individual’s professional development as a school psychologist. A combination of semester hours and state board continuing education units may be used to meet requirements for renewal. Three state board continuing education units are equivalent to 1 semester credit hour. Additional semester credit hours beyond the required 6 semester credit hours or equivalent state board approved continuing education units earned during any certificate validity span shall not be applied toward any later renewals. (7). All renewal credit shall be completed after the date of issuance of a school psychologist certificate and within the 5 calendar-year period before applying for renewal. (8). Correspondence credit is not acceptable for meeting the requirements of the school psychologist certificate or its renewal. Online and distance learning coursework is acceptable for renewal if attending any 4-year college or university or Michigan community college recognized by the department. Coursework shall be applicable to the school psychologist position. (9). Credit earned toward renewing a school psychologist certificate may be used for renewing a professional education teaching certificate or occupational and vocational certificate. (10). To renew a school psychologist certificate that has expired for more than 5 years, 12 semester hours of credit shall be required. Coursework shall be applicable to the school psychologist position. (11). To renew a school psychologist certificate that has been expired for more than 10 years, 18 semester hours of credit shall be required.

R380.206a Out-of-state applicants for school psychologist certificate. Rule 6a. The board may accept national certification as a school psychologist and 1 year of work experience beyond the internship as a basis for the issuance of a Michigan school psychologist certificate to an out-of-state applicant. R380.208 School psychologist competencies. Rule 8. A candidate seeking approval for a school psychologist certificate shall be recommended by an approved college or university has having demonstrated all of the following competencies: (a) Knowledge of the organization and administration of local and state agencies and their services for pupils. (b) Knowledge of federal and state special education laws and other legal aspects of the role of the school psychologist. (c) Knowledge of data-based decision making used to evaluate the outcomes of intervention services. Databased decision making is applied at the individual level to evaluate student response to intervention services and at the broader system level, as in the evaluation of systems-level practices. (d) Skills in the ability to consult, counsel, and collaborate with pupils, parents, school personnel, and appropriate outside personnel regarding mental health, behavior, and educational concerns utilizing psychological principles. (e) Knowledge of varied assessment practices useful in identifying student strengths and needs, in understanding problems, and in measuring progress and accomplishments. Methods include interviews, formal and informal test administration, behavior assessment, curriculum-based assessment, and measurement and ecological and environmental assessment. (f) Understanding the rationale of assessment, testing and measurement, and skills in the administration of assessments including tests, including those which measure intelligence, achievement, personality, and adaptive behavior. (g) Ability to carry out systematic direct observations of pupils. 35


(h) Skills in integrating data obtained from tests and from other sources of information and the ability to communicate these findings to other professionals, parents, and pupils in a meaningful way. (i) Skills in psychological report writing and other written communication. (j) Knowledge of human learning processes, techniques to assess those processes, and direct and indirect services applicable to the development of cognitive and academic skills. (k) Knowledge of human development, psychopathology, stressors, and crises in schools and the skills to apply this knowledge to such areas as crisis prevention and intervention, and functional behavior assessment. (l) Knowledge of human behavior and behavior management techniques and the capacity to plan and implement classroom management procedures pertaining to the behavior of pupils. (m) Comprehensive understanding of personality development and the assessment of human behavior. (n) Knowledge of family systems, including family strengths and influences on development, learning, and behavior, and of methods to involve families in education and service delivery. (o) Knowledge of how cultural and ethnic differences influence behavior and affect evaluation. (p) Competency in the planning and prescribing of teaching and curriculum strategies for pupils. (q) Knowledge of research methods, statistics, and program evaluation methods. (r) Knowledge of computer technology necessary to implement computer applications for management, to understand the computer’s instructional value, and to develop the computer skills needed in the delivery of educational and psychological services. (s) Knowledge of the ethical standards of the profession of school psychology.

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EdS Degree Course Requirements Psychological Foundations - 11 ___ GDPC 514 Psychology of Learning - 3 ___

GDPC 615

Advanced Human Development – 3

___

GDPC 640

Multicultural Issues for Counselors & Psychologists – 2

___

GDPC 676

Theories of Personality – 3

Professional Core - 46 ___

GDPC 525

Psychology and Education of Exceptional Children – 3

___

GDPC 540

Behavioral and Emotional Problems of Children - 3

___

GDPC 555

Early Childhood Issues in Assessment – 1

___

GDPC 618

Legal and Ethical Issues in Schools – 3

___

GDPC 625

Biopsychology – 3

___

GDPC 626

Cognitive Psychology – 3

___

GDPC 635

Theories and Techniques of Counseling –3

___

GDPC 644

Psychological Testing – 3

___

GDPC 651

Behavioral and Educational Assessment – 3

___

GDPC 652

Cognitive Assessment – 3

___

GDPC 654

Practicum in School Psychology – 3

___

GDPC 672

Psychoeducational Consultation – 3

___

GDPC 686

Therapies and Diagnosis of Psychopathology in Children – 3

___

GDPC 753

Advanced Psychological Decision Making & Intervention – 3

___

GDPC 810

Internship in School Psychology – 6

Interdisciplinary Area - 3 ___

SPED 645

Advanced Diagnoses & Educational Therapy in Reading – 3

Educational Foundations - 3 ___

EDFN 500

Philosophical Foundations of Education & Psychology – 3

Research/Statistics/Measurement – 6 ___

EDRM 505

Research Methods & Statistics in Education & Psychology I – 3

___

EDRM 611

Research Methods & Statistics in Education & Psychology II – 3

TOTAL EdS degree credits – 69

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Program Requirements for Graduation Student: ___________________________________________ Projected Graduation Date: ____________________________ Candidates for the Specialist degree in School Psychology must accomplish the following:

___ ___ ___ ___

___ ___ ___ ___

Complete a minimum of 69 credit hours that include required courses (no outstanding DGs) Maintain a grade point average of not less than 3.20 on a 4.00 system during the program Satisfactorily pass the Ed.S. comprehensive examination Satisfactorily complete 1200 clock hours of internship in an approved setting Pass the Praxis II -- School Psychology Specialty Exam (0400) Submit a Professional Portfolio rated at either Proficient or Exemplary for all sections Sign a clearance statement in regards to moral conduct toward children Satisfactory GPC faculty evaluation of Personal & Professional Development (Semester 4)

Signed Moral Conduct Clearance form _____ yes _____ no

Attached Faculty Evaluation

____ yes _____ no

RECOMMENDATION____ Ready for graduation ____ Not ready for graduation

_________________________________________________ Signature of Student

_____________________________ Date

_________________________________________________ Signature of Program Coordinator

_____________________________ Date

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Ed.S. School Psychology: Recommended Course Fall #1 GDPC514 Psychology of Learning 3CR GDPC615 Advanced Human Development 3CR GDPC618 Legal & Ethical Issues in Schools 2-3CR GDPC618-P01 LAB GDPC644 Psychological Testing 3CR Spring #1 GDPC540 Behav & Emotional Probs Children GDPC525 Exceptional Children GDPC525-P02 LAB GDPC652 Cognitive Assessment 3CR GDPC652-P04 LAB GDPC640 Multicultural Issues Summer #1 GDPC626 Cognitive Psychology 3CR SPED645 Adv Diag & Ed Thr Rdg 3CR SPED645-P06 LAB EDRM505 Research Methods & Stats I Fall #2 GDPC651 Educational Assessment 3CR GDPC651-P03 LAB GDPC635 Theories & Tech of Counseling 3CR GDPC625 Biopsychology 3CR GDPC686 Therapies for Children 3CR Spring #2 GDPC555 Early Childhood Issues GDPC555-P05 LAB GDPC753 Psy Decision Making & Interv GDPC753-P07 GDPC654 Practicum GDPC672 Psychoeducational Consult EDFN500 Philosophical Foundations Summer #2 EDRM611 Research Methods & Stats I GDPC676 Theories of Personality

Notes:

 Log 25 lab hours for GDPC618 1CR Notes:

 File MA ATC form  Log 25 lab hours for GDPC525  Log 50 lab hours for GDPC652

3CR 3CR

2CR Notes:

 Log 25 lab hours for SPED645 3CR Notes:

 Take MA Ed Psy Comps  Apply for Spring Practicum by October 1  File EdS ATC form  Log 50 lab hours for GDPC651 Notes:

 Arrange Internship  Log 50 lab hours for GDPC753  Log 12 lab hours for GDPC555

1CR 3CR 3CR 3CR 3CR

Notes: I 3CR

 Take EdS Comps  Turn in working portfolio prior to internship placement

3CR

Fall #3 GDPC810 Internship

3CR

Spring #3 GDPC810 Internship

3CR

Notes:

 Take PRAXIS II 0400  Turn in Fall supervisor evaluation Notes:

 Apply for graduation  Turn in completed portfolio by July  Turn in Spring supervisor evaluation  1st for August graduation

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EdS School Psych Handbook  

EdS School Psych Handbook