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O F F I C I A L J O U R N A L O F T H E A M A LG A M AT E D T R A N S I T U N I O N | A F L- C I O/C LC

NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2016

ATU DRIVING JUSTICE


INTERNATIONAL OFFICERS LAWRENCE J. HANLEY International President JAVIER M. PEREZ, JR. International Executive Vice President OSCAR OWENS International Secretary-Treasurer

NEWSBRIEFS

ATU wins ILCA media awards

INTERNATIONAL VICE PRESIDENTS RICHARD M. MURPHY Newburyport, MA – rmurphy@atu.org BOB M. HYKAWAY Calgary, AB – bhykaway@atu.org JANIS M. BORCHARDT Madison, WI – jborchardt@atu.org PAUL BOWEN Canton, MI – pbowen@atu.org KENNETH R. KIRK Lancaster, TX – kkirk@atu.org GARY RAUEN Clayton, NC – grauen@atu.org MARCELLUS BARNES Flossmore, IL – mbarnes@atu.org RAY RIVERA Lilburn, GA – rrivera@atu.org YVETTE TRUJILLO Thornton, CO – ytrujillo@atu.org GARY JOHNSON, SR. Cleveland, OH – gjohnson@atu.org ROBIN WEST Halifax, NS – rwest@atu.org JOHN COSTA Kenilworth, NJ – jcosta@atu.org CHUCK WATSON Syracuse, NY – cwatson@atu.org CLAUDIA HUDSON Oakland, CA – chudson@atu.org BRUCE HAMILTON New York, NY – bhamilton@atu.org MICHELLE SOMMERS Brooklyn Park, MN – msommers@atu.org JAMES LINDSAY Santa Clarita, CA – jlindsay@atu.org EMANUELE (MANNY) SFORZA Toronto, ON – msforza@atu.org

INTERNATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES DENNIS ANTONELLIS

Spokane, WA – dantonellis@atu.org

STEPHAN MACDOUGALL Boston, MA – smacdougall@atu.org ANTHONY GARLAND Washington, DC – agarland@atu.org ANTONETTE BRYANT Oakland, CA – abryant@atu.org SESIL RUBAIN New Carrollton, MD – srubain@atu.org

ATU CANADA PAUL THORP

Brampton, ON – president@atucanada.ca

ATU Communications is proud to announce that the Union again won 13 awards in the National/International Union category of the International Labor Communicators Association (ILCA) 2015 Media competition. ILCA says the “winners represent some of the best and most inspired work in labor communications and are to be congratulated in promoting the highest standards of labor journalism.” International President Larry Hanley congratulates all staff members involved in these award-winning communications.

FIRST PLACE Visual Communications - Best Cartoon: ATU Bus with Presidential Candidates by Mike Konopacki and ATU International Writing - Best Electronic Content: ATU International website by ATU International Writing - Saul Miller Awards, Political Action: ATU, progressive coalition shake up Chicago establishment in mayor’s race by ATU International Political Action/Organizing Campaign: Best Flyer: Chris Christie milk carton missing door-hang by ATU International Visual Communications Best Front Page/Cover: Magazines: In Transit, July/August cover by ATU International Political Action/Organizing Campaign Best Mail Piece: The Big Pig – Fix The T by ATU International Staff

SECOND PLACE Writing - Best Editorial or Column: A Streetcar Named Deception by ATU International President Larry Hanley

Political Action/Organizing Campaign Best Collateral: ATU Chuy Garcia campaign by ATU International General Excellence - Website: ATU International website by ATU International Staff Visual Communications, Best Design Website, App, or E Publication: ATU International Website by ATU International

THIRD PLACE General Excellence - Electronic Publication: ATU Dispatch by ATU International Staff Electronic Media - Best Issues/Advocacy Video: Bus driver bathroom breaks are a matter of human dignity and decency by ATU International

HONORABLE MENTION Writing - Saul Miller Awards, Collective Bargaining: NYC school bus Local struggles have long history by ATU International

INTERNATIONAL OFFICERS EMERITUS International President Jim La Sala, ret. International President Warren George, ret. International Executive Vice President Ellis Franklin, ret. International Executive Vice President Mike Siano, ret. Subscription: USA and Canada, $5 a year. Single copy: 50 cents. All others: $10 a year. Published bimonthly by the Amalgamated Transit Union, Editor: Shawn Perry, Designer: Paul A. Fitzgerald. Editorial Office: 10000 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20903. Tel: 1-301-431-7100 . Please send all requests for address changes to the ATU Registry Dept. ISSN: 0019-3291. PUBLICATIONS MAIL AGREEMENT NO. 40033361.RETURN UNDELIVERABLE CANADIAN ADDRESSES TO: APC Postal Logistics, LLC, PO Box 503, RPO, West Beaver Creek, Richmond Hill ON L4B 4R6.


CONTENT

N OV/ D E C

2016 Vol. 125, No. 6

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58TH INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION AFFIRMS ATU TRAINING, ACTIVISM AGENDA EXECUTIVE, INTERNATIONAL OFFICERS RE-ELECTED, SFORZA VOTED IVP 2 International Officers & General Executive Board

8 Legislative Agenda: Watching them at every turn

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News Briefs

3 Index Page 4 Finally, a Boss Who Gets It? New Seattle GM pledges to address safety, bathroom break concerns 5 International President’s Message: Ka Boom! 6

International Executive Vice President’s Message: ATU benefits from Union’s military veterans: Beleaguered voters reject mainstream of both parties

Strong election for public transit despite deeply divided country: Ballot measures pass, reaffirming that Americans wants, will pay for more public transit

21 Committees of the 58th Convention 26 Legal notice 29 Translations (Spanish) 31 In Memoriam 32 2016 ATU Election Mobilization

7 International Secretary-Treasurer’s Message: Don’t let up now

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Finally,

a Boss Who Gets It? NEW SEATTLE GM PLEDGES TO ADDRESS SAFETY, BATHROOM BREAK CONCERNS

In naming interim Metro General Manager Rob Gannon permanent GM, King County has selected a manager with a history of working with Local 587-Seattle, WA, on issues of concern to all ATU members.

Safety focus

ü Training and adjustments to reduce blind-spot threats at the A pillars, where windshield frames can hide people on foot from a turning bus driver. ü Metro says it will keep an open-door policy with ATU international safety expert Brian Sherlock. “Fundamentally, we want our operators driving safely, so the more we can eliminate those safety and security issues, the better it serves our entire system,” Gannon says.

We hope Gannon stays true to his word.

Gannon also wants to implement Metro’s long-range plan and strengthen the agency as “a great place to work,” adding, “It’s the best way to provide outstanding service to customers and embrace innovation.”

Among his priorities are issues that emerged during operator security summits he held with Local 587 earlier this year:

Gannon has also instituted a new safety program for the agency’s trolley workers, which includes new training for mechanics working with high-voltage electricity.

Gannon announced that safety would be his main focus as he took the helm of the King County Transit.

ü Seven deputies, a detective, and a communityresource officer would be added to the 64 uniformed transit police in next year’s budget. ü Security cameras on all buses. ü Longer layovers between trips, so that operators have time to use the restroom. ü Instructing operators to report all incidents to dispatch, allowing cellphones to be used in emergencies. ü A possible experiment with in-bus shields, at a driver’s discretion. “Many of our operators… have very positive interactions with our customers,” Gannon says. “Some of them are less secure, they run on troubled routes, they would like the option to deploy shields at the start of their shift.”

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Inclusion, diversity, excellence The new GM’s goals extend beyond the immediate challenges of running a transit system. In March when he was interim manager, Gannon responded to a problem with some employees who were deliberately punching out the image of Dr. Martin Luther King (King County’s logo) on transfers and covering the image on their uniforms. Gannon wrote that the image of Dr. King is “symbolic of the values that we embrace… the values of inclusion, diversity and excellence… I am urging all Metro Transit employees to display the County logo with great pride… affirming our commitment to equity and social justice in our workplace and the region we serve.” v


LARRY HANLEY, INTERNATIONAL PRESIDENT

Ka Boom!

That’s what America heard on election night. What it means is that workers are tired of being doubletalked by slick politicians – people who say they are with us, but voted over 40 years to turn our economy into a horror show for working people. This Union stood for change in 2016. We supported the fight by endorsing Bernie Sanders. When he failed to win the primaries, we supported Hillary Clinton. That was the best choice for workers in our view. Some of our own members disagreed. Donald Trump won this election in part, by appealing to the worst in people. To be really clear, we believe that most Americans do not support the hate speech he used to enflame people.

ATU will fight attacks on civil rights

It must be our job to unite workers around principles that will make all of our lives better.

Turbulent waters ahead Brace yourselves, however. We are likely to hit turbulent waters. Many of the programs we will see proposed and perhaps enacted could do the opposite of what Trump voters expect, and what he promised. And, we must resist attacks on our constitutional rights. That includes the rights of all Americans. Martin Niemöller  (1892–1984) was a prominent Protestant pastor who emerged as an outspoken public foe of Adolf Hitler and spent the last seven years of Nazi rule in concentration camps.  He is perhaps best remembered for the quotation:

ATU will stand strong to fight against efforts to attack civil rights, and we do expect extremist legislation from a Republican Congress. There is a very dark side to his victory.

First they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out—

We understand the parallels between our times and the wake of the last worldwide depression in the 1930s. We must be vigilant and perhaps courageous in pushing back against any efforts to strip any Americans of their human rights as a pretext for “making America great.”

Then they came for the Trade Unionists, and I did not speak out—

American workers turned a corner But, the silver lining, if there is one, is that American workers have turned a corner. They are saying through this revolt that the status quo has lost its status. That no longer will we nod our heads to the establishment while we all suffer.

Because I was not a Socialist.

Because I was not a Trade Unionist. Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out— Because I was not a Jew. Then they came for me—and there was no one left to speak for me.

ATU has said that from the beginning. We hope the Trump administration will make good its promise to help America’s working people. IN TRANSIT

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JAVIER PEREZ, JR., INTERNATIONAL EXEC. VICE PRESIDENT

ATU benefits from Union’s military veterans BELEAGUERED VOTERS REJECT MAINSTREAM OF BOTH PARTIES More of our members and their families have been visiting the DC area over the last several months. And, as I’m writing this on Veterans Day, I’m reminded that no visit to the region is complete without spending some quiet time at Arlington National Cemetery. People from all over the world come to the cemetery to see the tomb of the unknowns, the Kennedy gravesite, and Arlington House. Arlington is also a place where, every day, 25 families come to bury one of their own. The echo of history surrounds you walking through the graves that stretch out over Arlington’s rolling hills, as the Stars and Stripes flutter nearby. Your heart swells with pride and gratitude for all veterans.

Veterans and drivers Early in my career as a bus operator most of the senior drivers were veterans of World War II. It was a pleasure to work with them and learn about our Union from them. One who exemplifies all of them is now retired operator Harold Ambrocious. He is a youthful, robust man in his late eighties. Harold was always willing to explain a route, our contract, play ping pong, and be a friend. Even in retirement he still volunteers for the Local; most recently to bring streetcar work back within the ATU fold. Harold operated a streetcar earlier in his career.

Media culpa? I’m writing this three days after the U.S. presidential election, and all the media talking heads seem flabbergasted at the stunning outcome. But, they mostly missed what progressive filmmaker Michael Moore got right months ago.

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People are hurting, and they blame both major political parties for not working together for the public good. They fear for the future, for themselves and their families – for the forgotten middle class. And that’s why so many voted for a candidate who rejected the mainstream of both parties, placing their hopes, no matter how unfounded, in his promise to provide them with good paying jobs.

And yet there is hope Lest anyone be tempted to lose hope, there is a silver lining. Voters approved a record number of transit referenda across the U.S., proving once again, that when ATU members and our allies talk about transit issues that affect everyone’s lives, ballot initiatives pass.

The beat goes on I was humbled and privileged to be reelected at our recently completed Convention to serve you for the next three years. Thanks to each of your for this extraordinary opportunity. v

Please visit www.atu.org for more information and the latest ATU news.


OSCAR OWENS, INTERNATIONAL SECRETARY-TREASURER

Don’t let up now Donald Trump’s election came as a shock to most of us who couldn’t imagine anything like this ever happening in America. But there were signs that something was afoot in the republic that the pollsters didn’t take seriously. First was the emergence of Senator Bernie Sanders who took the Democratic Party by surprise – just like Donald Trump took the GOP by surprise. And second was that so many union voters – usually the bulwark of the Democratic Party – supported the Republican nominee.

The only real issue These not-so-hidden factors in the election demonstrate that the struggle of the middle class was the only real issue in the campaign.

‘Buyer’s remorse’ But, these are only two of many things voters don’t know about Donald Trump, and “buyer’s remorse” will eventually overtake those who elected him, big time, when they find out that he cannot do, or never intended to do the things he promised. That’s why we cannot let up now. We must continue to fight for what we believe in, not only to prevent the worst from happening in the near-term, but to be ready to bring all of the workers who voted for Trump home after they realize they’ve been had. v

Please visit www.atu.org for more information and the latest ATU news.

Donald Trump deftly exploited the frustration and resentment so many Americans feel who are working harder than ever for less than they made before the recession. And he convinced at least half of union voters that he would do more for them than the candidate endorsed by their union. I’ll bet that the union members who voted for Donald Trump didn’t know that he ran on a Republican platform that would weaken, if not destroy unions, and end federal support for public transit (a matter of great concern to ATU members). If this is not a formula for disaster for workers in general, and ATU members in particular, I don’t know what is.

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LEGISLATIVE AGENDA

Watching them at every turn In 2000, when George W. Bush stole the presidential election from Al Gore in Florida, working families were scared. Our fears turned out to be justified, as Bush later flipped the tax code in favor of the rich, led us into the worst depression since 1929, and sent poor kids to their graves through endless wars in the Middle East. While our country sat on the brink of annihilation, somehow we managed to pull through. In 2010, Republicans took over in state capitals all across America. Soon after, Wisconsin stripped public employees of their collective bargaining rights, and Michigan – the center of the American Labor Universe for more than a century – went right-to-work. Many people predicted the end of unions. Yet, six years later, while we are bruised and battered – here we are still standing.

Reason for concern This year, America elected Donald Trump, and union members are joined by Muslims, Latinos, African Americans, women, disabled persons, reporters, the majority of American voters, countless foreign nations, and even the Pope, in worrying about our future. Without question, there is reason for concern. There will soon be people in charge of our government that do not have our best interests at heart.

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But if the short time since the stunning election results were announced is any indication of Americans’ fighting spirit, we are likely in store for a massive growth of progressive activism over the next four years. No matter who they voted for this year, the overwhelming majority of Americans will not accept heavy handed policies that turn back the clock on core issues such as race, religion, economic justice, and countless other matters. If our new leaders go too far, their time in office will be short. That’s the unique thing about our democracy: regardless of party affiliation, we hold people accountable for their words and actions.

Unions need to lead More than ever, the labor movement needs to be a key leader of this new progressive movement. But rather than just going along and supporting candidates that simply agree with us on most issues, we need to set the agenda for the political candidates of today and tomorrow. Only then, working with our coalition partners, can we slowly start to get people talking about issues that are important to working families.  Bernie Sanders’ campaign proved that there are millions of passionate people out there who believe in a more just America. While that campaign is now over, the ideas it hatched won’t go away any time soon, and neither will we. v


Strong election for public transit despite deeply divided country BALLOT MEASURES PASS, REAFFIRMING THAT AMERICANS WANT, WILL PAY FOR MORE PUBLIC TRANSIT After a long, bruising and nasty presidential campaign whether you voted for Hillary Clinton or President-elect Donald Trump one thing that was very clear is that our country is deeply divided. It was also clear that Americans want more and improved public transportation and are willing to pay for it as transit ballot initiatives and referenda passed all across the United States. There also were strong victories for working families and transit in the Senate as Congresswoman Tammy Duckworth beat incumbent GOP Senator Mark Kirk in Illinois, and Democratic Governor Maggie Hassan defeated Republican Senator Kelly Ayotte in New Hampshire. However, control of the Senate and House remained with Republicans. In other wins, voters in four more states raised their state minimum wages while in South Dakota voters trashed a business-backed GOP scheme to institute a youth subminimum wage. Arizona, Colorado and Maine each raised their state minimum wages to $12 an hour by 2020. Washington, with enthusiastic support from the state AFL-CIO, raised its statewide minimum to $13.50 an hour by 2020. The new law will allow all workers to earn paid sick leave to care for themselves and their families, will establish groundbreaking new protections for hotel workers in Seattle, and will make major forward-thinking investments in its mass transit systems in Spokane and the Puget Sound region. The biggest winner was transit where voters passed 33 out of 48 transit ballot initiatives and these “Voters have spoken through the ballot box, and they said they want more public transit and are willing to pay for it,” says ATU International President Larry Hanley. “Even Americans who don’t depend on transit themselves voted for it because they understand we all need better transit for economic opportunity, cleaner air and less congestion.” The following ballot initiatives passed:

• In Charleston, SC, Local Questions 1 & 2 to fund the region’s first bus rapid transit line, maintenance and improvements to the existing bus fleet and other transportation projects through a 0.5 percent tax increase was passed by voters. It will raise $2.1 billion over 25 years. • In Los Angeles County, CA, voters backed ballot Measure M to raise billions through taxes to fund a major expansion of rail, bus transit, 10 highway projects, and bike/pedestrian projects. • In Toledo, OH, voters passed Issue 18, a 10-year, 1.5 mill renewal levy to fund Toledo Area Regional Transport Authority (TARTA)’s bus service including personnel, facilities and maintenance. • In Atlanta, GA, voters passed the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA) Sales and Use Tax Referendum to upgrade buses, Beltline transit, MARTA extensions and stations, and create new bus rapid transit lines with a 0.5 percent tax increase that will raise $2.5 billion over 40 years. • In the Seattle/Tacoma area, WA, voters overwhelmingly passed Sound Transit Proposition 1. It will fund high quality transit through expanded light rail, new bus rapid transit (BRT), and other transit service to connect more of the region’s residents and workers. • In Marion County, IN, the Referendum for Transit Funding was approved by voters. The 0.25 percent income tax increase will raise $56 million per year to fund a regional rapid transit network of expanded bus service and bus rapid transit lines including the next phase of the Red Line. “These major victories send a strong message to President-elect Trump and the Republican Congress that investing in transit is the right thing for our nation and the Republican platform to defund public transit is wrong for America,” Hanley continued. “Public transit moves our nation and invigorates local economies, creates jobs, provides mobility for all, helps fight pollution and improves overall public health.” v IN TRANSIT

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58th International Convention affirms ATU training, activism agenda EXECUTIVE, INTERNATIONAL OFFICERS RE-ELECTED, SFORZA VOTED IVP Building on the theme Driving Justice, ATU set a strategic vision to build power for transit workers and riders, to fight for more and better public transit, and raise standards for working families as the Union held its historic 58th International Convention in Toronto, ON. The more than 670 delegates redoubled the Union’s commitment to fight private, multinational transit companies, to arrest climate change, to stand up to wealthy right wing elitists attempting to destroy unions and the middle class, and to continue to increase training opportunities for ATU leaders and members.

DAY ONE

(IST) Oscar Owens gaveled the proceedings to order Monday morning, October 3, at the Sheraton Centre Toronto.

An impressive “Presentation of the Colors” and singing of our national anthems got the Convention off to a rousing start, as Temporary Chair and International Secretary Treasurer

Brother Owens likened the proceedings to a “big family reunion,” adding, “I know that the reason you are here at this Convention is that you believe that the current attacks on our dignity and wellbeing must stop.”

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‘If you take on one of us…’ IST Owens introduced ATU Canada President Paul Thorp who reminded the delegates that they were all there because of the hard work and sacrifices of those who came before them. And because of that, we can now say to anyone who challenges us, that “if you take on any one of us – you take on us all.”

increased ATU membership by 3,000 to an all-time high of almost 198,000. Brother Hanley then gave a rundown of all that was accomplished over the previous three years. He reported that the Union has trained over 6,000 members (including 600 officers) in the last three years. Hanley described the creation of the new Joint Industry Council (JIC), and spoke about ATU’s public engagement training that has led to so much more proactive work for transit and workers by our members. The international president also noted the Union’s success in securing language in the U.S. FAST Act, which commits the federal government to investigating and taking action on bathroom breaks, blind spots, and assault; maintaining federal support for public transit; and its success in turning back a section of the bill that would have encouraged privatization.

Presentation of the gavel

Nina Turner

The IST introduced International President Larry Hanley, as a man who has led our Union “on a path never before seen at our Union… an aggressive path in which our Union has become more proactive, more involved, and more effective as an advocate for our members, our riders, and all workers throughout North America.”

The international president introduced former Ohio Democratic State Senator Nina Turner. Turner began by praising International Hanley and ATU for “taking the bold step” of endorsing Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-VT, for U.S. president when it seemed politically unwise to do so.

International President (IP) Larry Hanley accepted the gavel from Owens expressing his appreciation for the IST’s work. Brother Hanley commended the “maturity and grace” the IST brought to their relationship, adding that it was a pleasure to work with the veteran of the Vietnam War and civil rights movement.

Highest membership ever The IP congratulated ATU’s organizers whose hard work

Sister Turner not only took the stage – she took the entire hall – dramatically coming down to the floor to deliver a speech few have equaled in ATU convention history. Turner asserted that when everyday people put in just a little bit extra effort into changing things for the better, extraordinary things happen. “Be grateful, but get angry – angry about people still struggling in America,” she continued, “Elect candidates who will break the cycle of poverty and be part of the solution, not the problem. America is great but it can be better,” she said. The delegates gave Turner a long, standing ovation, with shouts of “Bravo!” IN TRANSIT

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Marie Clark Walker Marie Clarke Walker, executive vice president of the Canadian Labour Congress (CLC), addressed the delegates. She praised ATU Canada President Paul Thorp, for his active participation in the CLC.

“Bernie Sanders had an historic impact on Americans,” she said, adding, “we had an obligation to revamp the political process by focusing on people and our national infrastructure.”

Sister Walker described the CLC’s fight to overturn a law in which no-shows at union meetings are counted as “no” votes in elections. On pension plan reform, CLC’s goal, she said, is to push back the age requirement for full retirement from 67 to 65. On safety issues CLC is calling for a ban on asbestos in construction, which kills thousands of people each year. And CLC is working to stop the Trans-Pacific Partnership, which could end up sending as many as 20,000 auto industry jobs overseas.

In closing, she thanked ATU for always being in the forefront of so many fights. “You are the tip of the spear aimed at fixing America.”

Rules Committee Report The Chair of the Rules Committee, Jeannie Garbett, 508-Halifax, NS, read the report of the Rules Committee, which was adopted unanimously.

DAY TWO Privatization Video Monday’s afternoon session opened with a video on “Privatization” which revealed the problems for workers as well as the riders of First Transit, with their “money-saving” policies resulting in cuts in maintenance, disgraceful management raises, forced 12-hour and 16-hour shifts, no training, and late pickups. After the video, President Hanley announced that ATU was revamping the way it dealt with privatizing public transportation. A new ATU campaign will be rolled out in 2017, which he hoped would put privatizers out of business.

‘You are the tip of the spear’ Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-HI, spoke next, thanking ATU members for the work they do everyday transporting people safely where they need to go.

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ATU-COPE COMMITTEE REPORT At the recommendation of the ATU-COPE Committee, the Convention adopted the following (in this and in all following resolutions, the “Whereas” clauses have been omitted due to space limitations. The full resolutions will be available in the published Proceedings of the 58th Convention).

Building ATU-COPE “… RESOLVED, that the ATU International shall provide legal, legislative and political support to each Local to facilitate the negotiation of ATU-COPE check-off as part of their collective bargaining agreements; and… that the ATU International shall encourage locals to contribute to ATU-COPE.”


‘Chuy’ García International President Hanley introduced Jesús ‘Chuy’ García, a member of the Cook County, IL, Board of Commissioners. With ATU’s support, García forced Chicago’s first runoff election in history with his lastminute 2015 campaign for mayor against incumbent Rahm Emanuel.

He also reminded delegates that economists say that progress comes about as a result of “creative destruction” of economic structures, but that unions end up picking up the pieces. Cohen ended by saying that ATU has real leadership in Larry Hanley. “Don’t take that kind of leadership for granted,” he urged the delegates.

DAY THREE Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Day Three began Wednesday morning, October 5, with a video message from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau who addressed the delegates in English and French, saying:

“I wanted to express my gratitude, for myself and my wife,” said the Illinois commissioner. “Thank you, thank you, thank you!” García finds hope amidst the hardening political landscape, observing that nations often become better during difficult moments in their history, and like César Chávez, and Barack Obama, he believes we can create real change – “Sí, se puede –Yes, We Can!”

Larry Cohen Brother Hanley then introduced Larry Cohen, retired international president of the Communications Workers of America, who is now heading up “Our Revolution,” an organization created to carry on the work of the coalition that supported Sen. Bernie Sanders’ campaign for U.S. president.

“We both know that safer, more reliable public transit means a stronger middle class, and more quality time for Canadians to spend with their families. … Together, I know we can make public transit more efficient and safe for everyone, while reducing our carbon footprint and growing the economy.”

APPEALS COMMITTEE REPORT The Appeals Committee made its report to the Convention: The Committee considered Appeal No. 1, of Frank Lacey, 26-Detroit, MI. Brother Lacey asserted that the Local Union improperly failed to hold elections for two offices, which had been vacated as a result of resignations. For both offices, only one eligible candidate was nominated for office. International President Hanley found that the Local Union acted properly because in such a case a member is appropriately elected by acclamation. The delegates voted concurrence with the committee’s recommendation to deny the appeal.

Cohen exhorted delegates and all of Labor to “Stand up, and fight back – not just moan and groan and whine.”

The committee also considered Appeal No. 2, of Carlos Harris, 241-Chicago, IL, et al. who appealed the 2014 IN TRANSIT

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decision of the GEB to impose discipline on the appellants under the Constitution and General Laws (CGL) “Section 12.5, Discipline: LU Members” placing Local 241 into trusteeship. The appellants were found guilty of financial malpractice and malfeasance by failing to manage properly the finances and affairs of the Local Union, engaging in self-dealing and refusing to repay the Local Union for amounts they improperly received while serving on the executive board. The appellants were suspended from membership in the Union until they reimbursed the money they owed Local 241 members. The delegates voted concurrence with the committee’s recommendation to deny the appeal.

Blind spot campaign International President Hanley introduced a video on the Union’s campaign against blind spots on buses that have been causing needless death and injury across the U.S. and Canada. Sadly, Brother Hanley reported that a pedestrian was struck and killed by a bus in Edmonton, AB, the previous evening.

helping hand, without thinking about it. … On behalf of the federal government,” he said, “I want to say ‘Thank you’.”

ATU training videos International President Hanley spoke about the challenge of providing training for many small Locals who can’t afford to send someone to training. Hanley showed a video featuring Bill Barry, a labor studies professor working with TDCC, who has produced six videos of ATU training that can be shown in Locals.

Jonathan Lange International President Hanley introduced Jonathan Lange, a senior organizer with the Industrial Areas Foundation, who has worked closely with ATU Locals on critical campaigns.

Amarjeet Sohi Local President Steve Bradshaw, 569-Edmonton, AB, and IVP Bob Hykaway, introduced Amarjeet Sohi, MPEdmonton Mill Woods, minister of infrastructure and communities in the  federal government, and member of Local 569, who organized his property, years ago, for the Edmonton Local.

Lange said an entire generation of union leaders has been “playing defense” since the Reagan administration. “I’m here to tell you,” Lange said, “it’s time to ‘play offense,’ and yours is a union that can do this.” Lange praised ATU for taking the offense across North America; and said that when ATU began the TDCC it sent a strong message about the Union’s intentions. “I’m tired of playing defense,” Lange said with emotion. “I want to play offense with ATU. Let’s get to it!”

Clayola Brown Sohi, an immigrant from India, described how ATU changed his life, providing both transportation to places that helped him improve his life, and employment. Public transit, he explained, saves time, and helps us enjoy the time we have to live happier, healthier lives. “Each of you,” he declared, “have helped someone, offered them a

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IST Owens introduced Clayola Brown, president of the A. Philip Randolph Institute, who spoke of the endurance of members who continue to do their job serving the public even when under assault by passengers. “That’s not unusual,” she said, “that’s who ATU is.” She also wanted the delegates to know how union leaders took notice when


ATU-COPE AWARDS IEVP Javier Perez, Jr., presented ATU-COPE awards for outstanding achievement in raising funds for COPE.

CHAIRMAN’S AWARD For Local’s raising the highest dollar amounts

ATU bought the Labor College and turned it into the TDCC – a “great facility.” She praised the Union’s leadership for backing Bernie Sanders. “We salute you for that,” Brown said. “ATU – you should be proud of yourself,” she declared, “ATU truly drives justice!”

Membership

Local

50 or less

519-La Crosse, WI

51 – 200:

1395-Pensacola, FL

201 – 800:

1287-Kansas City, MO

801 – 1,500:

618-Providence, RI

1501+:

726-Staten Island, NY

PRESIDENT’S AWARD Lara Skinner The delegates heard from Dr. Lara Skinner, associate director of the Worker Institute at Cornell University, director of the “Labor Leading on Climate Institute,” and co-author of Strong Unions – Sustainable Transport. Dr. Skinner led the delegates through a presentation affirming the reality and rising danger of climate change.

For Local’s with the highest percentages of member participation Membership

Local

50 or less

1209-New London, CT

51 – 200:

704-Little Rock, AR

201 – 800:

1575-San Rafael, CA

801 – 1,500:

694-San Antonio, TX

1,500+:

85-Pittsburgh, PA

PATRIOT’S AWARD For highest individual contribution Local President Michael Breihan

788-St. Louis, MO

Gary Mauer Organizing Awards But, she said that the crisis offered a real opportunity for ATU, and unions in general. Buses are 10 times more efficient than cars. The biggest bang for the buck is in the transit industry. So, for ATU the potential exists for more work in expanded transit that would significantly reduce CO2 emissions. That would also reduce economic inequality through good union jobs, and more transit also means more access to jobs for the poor, she reminded the Convention.

International President Hanley presented the Gary Mauer Awards for outstanding achievement in organizing:

GARY MAUER ORGANIZING AWARDS Local

City

Local 689

Washington, DC

Local 1027

Fresno, CA

Local 1577

West Palm Beach, FL

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LAWS COMMITTEE REPORT Laws Chair and Local President Jackie Jeter, 689Washington, DC, presented the Laws Committee Report:

Amendment 1 The Convention adopted the committee’s recommendation of concurrence with Amendment No. 1, submitted by the international president, which gives Locals the option of increasing their initiation fee for membership to as much as $500, if they so desire.

Brother Urata congratulated the Union on adding 3,000 new workers over the last three years, and looked forward to the ITF’s use of the new Tommy Douglas Conference Center next year. “We are in a global economy where an injury to one is an injury to all,” he said. He closed his remarks declaring, “Long live the ATU!”

DAY FOUR

Amendment 2 After some debate, the Convention adopted the committee’s recommendation of concurrence with Amendment 2, submitted by the international president, which revises Section 48 of the Constitution and General Laws as necessary to conform to the bylaws of ATU Canada.

Amendments 3 and 4 The Convention adopted the committee’s recommendation of concurrence with Amendments 3 and 4, submitted by the international president, that revise the language in the ATU Obligation and the CGL to include transgender, transsexual and intersex persons, in addition to the current inclusion of our lesbian, gay and bisexual members.

Resolution 5 The Convention adopted the committee’s recommendation of non-concurrence with Resolution 5, submitted by Local 1320-Peterborough, ON, which would have amended Section 19.3 Strike Benefits of the Constitution and General Laws to permit Locals to pay the per capita tax of their retired members.

Mac Urata The delegates heard from Mac Urata, secretary of the ITF Inland Transport Section, who thanked ATU for its support of its international campaigns on behalf of transport workers.

Video presentations Day Four began Thursday morning, October 6, with a special video message from Local 589-Edmonton, AB, member and Alberta NDP minister of both Infrastructure and Transportation Brian Mason. That was followed by a video greeting from Emmy-award winning actor Kiefer Sutherland – grandson of Tommy Douglas.

ATU ‘Oscars’ International Secretary-Treasurer Oscar Owens presented the “Oscars” – ATU’s award for exceptional performance as a local financial secretary, named after the longtime IST (below):

FINANCIAL SECRETARY ‘OSCAR’ AWARDS 2013 - 2015 0 – 100 Active Members Local

Financial Secretary

779-Sioux City, IA

Joseph W. Krapfl

801-Altoona, PA

David James

1749-Orlando, FL

Jayne A. Walker

101 – 300 Active Members 846-St. Catharines, ON

Claire Camden

1164-Knoxville, TN

Betty Cahill

1603-Bethlehem, PA

Mark A. Obert

301 – 1000 Active Members 448-Springfield, MA

David Tancrati

823-Elizabeth, NJ

James E. Davis

1001+ Active Members

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November/December 2016 | IN TRANSIT

LU 113-Toronto, ON

Kevin Morton

819-Newark, NJ

Clarise Tabron

1374-Calgary, AB

Amanda K. West


ELECTION OF EXECUTIVE OFFICERS

workers and riders. Billionaires and their political stooges are attempting to destroy democracy, gut public services, marginalize workers and debilitate communities. Our delegates have pledged to fight back more than ever.”

International Executive Vice President International Executive Vice President Javier M. Perez, Jr., was nominated for re-election by Local President Jonothan Walker, 1287-Kansas City, MO. There being no other nominations, Javier M. Perez, Jr., was unanimously re-elected to a second full term.

International President

International Secretary-Treasurer

International President Larry Hanley was nominated for re-election by Local President Danny Cassella, 726-Staten Island, NY. There being no other nominations, International President Hanley was unanimously re-elected to a third term.

International Secretary-Treasurer Oscar Owens was nominated for re-election by Local President Ron Jackson, 268-Cleveland, OH. There being no other nominations, Oscar Owens was unanimously elected to a sixth term.

“I am honored and humbled to be re-elected to lead a Union of leaders and activists who make a difference in their communities,” said Hanley. “Our leaders recognize we face many challenges. Multinational companies are trying to take over transit systems at the expense of

International Vice Presidents Those pictured below were unanimously elected to the position of international vice president. They were the sole nominees for their office:

First International Vice President Richard Murphy

Second International Vice President Bob Hykaway

Third International Vice President Janis Borchardt

Fourth International Vice President Paul Bowen

Fifth International Vice President Kenneth Kirk

Sixth International Vice President Gary Rauen

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Seventh International Vice President Marcellus Barnes

Eighth International Vice President Ray Rivera

Ninth International Vice President Yvette Trujillo

Tenth International Vice President Gary Johnson, Sr.

Eleventh International Vice President Robin West

Twelfth International Vice President John Costa

Thirteenth International Vice President Chuck Watson

Fourteenth International Vice President Claudia Hudson

Fifteenth International Vice President Bruce Hamilton

Sixteenth International Vice President Michele Sommers

Seventeenth International Vice President James Lindsay

Eighteenth International Vice President Emanuele (Manny) Sforza

Eighteenth International Vice President The Balloting Committee conducted an election by secret ballot as two individuals were nominated for 18th international vice president – a position that opened up following the retirement of IVP Larry Kinnear. ATU Canada President Paul Thorp nominated Local President Bob Kinnear, 113-Toronto, ON, on behalf of the Canadian organization. Local President Jackie Jeter, 689-Washington, DC, nominated International Representative Manny Sforza, 113-Toronto, ON, for the position. Subsequently, Brother Sforza was elected 18th IVP by a vote of 371 to 244.

Delegates and alternates to the AFL-CIO convention Five delegates and alternates to the AFL-CIO convention, were elected as follows:

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November/December 2016 | IN TRANSIT

Delegates & Alternates to the AFL-CIO Convention Position First Delegate

Delegate & Local Local President Julio Rivera, 1001-Denver, CO

Local President Curtis Howard, 732-Atlanta, GA Chair Raymond Greaves, Third Delegate New Jersey State Council Rec. Secretary James Hedge, Fourth Delegate 1181-New York, NY Local President Kenneth Day, Fifth Delegate 1338-Dallas, TX Local President Shirley Block, First Alternate 757-Portland, OR Local President Mark Henry, Second Alternate 1056-Flushing, NY Local President Yvonne Williams, Third Alternate 192-Oakland, CA Second Delegate


Fourth Alternate Fifth Alternate

Rec. Secretary Brenda Thomas, 689-Washington, DC Local President Danny Cassella, 726-Staten Island, NY

FURTHER, BE IT RESOLVED, that ATU shall support amending criminal statutes to treat physical attacks on school bus drivers, including attacks by students, gang members, and others, in the same manner as attacks on transit operators.

Opposing the Trans-Pacific Partnership

DAY FIVE Day Five began Friday morning, October 7, with a presentation of the Climate Change Committee Report:

CLIMATE CHANGE COMMITTEE REPORT At the recommendation of the Climate Change Committee, the Convention adopted the following resolution:

… RESOLVED, that ATU shall oppose consideration and passage of the TPP and similar “free trade” deals and encourage pursuit of transparent, fair, and democratic trade policies.

Demanding Free Universal Education … RESOLVED, that ATU shall vigorously campaign to make public community colleges, universities, and technical schools free for all residents of the United States and Canada.

Opposing Fossil Fuel Dependency

Strengthening Employee Rights in the Workplace

… RESOLVED, that the ATU shall encourage Congress and Parliament to create jobs in infrastructure and renewable energy development.

… RESOLVED, that ATU shall work with the AFL-CIO in support of the Workplace Action for a Growing Economy (WAGE) Act.

Demanding Free Universal Healthcare RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE REPORT At the recommendation of the Resolutions Committee, the Convention adopted the following resolutions:

… RESOLVED, that ATU shall vigorously campaign to establish a public, Medicare-for-All system in the United States and support candidates and elected officials who commit to the same.

Implementing the FAST Act

Establishing a Right to a Secure Retirement

… RESOLVED, that ATU will push to fully implement the provisions of the FAST Act to the greatest extent possible, working with Locals and transit riders to improve transit service and improve the quality of life for ATU members.

… RESOLVED, that ATU shall resist all efforts to eliminate defined benefit pension plans, fight to improve the condition of members without pension plans, and campaign for the establishment of a right to secure retirement for all.

Rightsizing Streetcar Development

Supporting the ‘Fight for $15’ and One Fair Wage

… RESOLVED, that ATU will work with transit rider groups to educate the public about the pitfalls of modern streetcar projects; and

… RESOLVED, that ATU shall support the fights for a national $15 minimum wage and for one fair minimum wage for all.

FURTHER, BE IT RESOLVED, that ATU will fight to ensure that streetcars will not redirect public dollars from bus services, resulting in service cuts and fare increases to transit riders.

Supporting School Bus Members

Overturning ‘Citizens United’ and Ending Corporate Influence in Politics … RESOLVED, that ATU shall support municipal, state, and federal legislation, including a Constitutional amendment, to eliminate corporate personhood.

… RESOLVED, that ATU shall support mandating trained monitors to be present on all school buses; and FURTHER, BE IT RESOLVED, that ATU shall support requiring training for school bus drivers and aides on managing student behavior, safety and security awareness, and emergency preparedness and response; and IN TRANSIT

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HEALTH & SAFETY COMMITTEE REPORT At the recommendation of the Health & Safety Committee, the Convention adopted the following resolutions:

• Reasonably sized “A” pillars which allow operators, regardless of size, to adequately view pedestrians crossing in front of the bus; and • An overall drivers’ area, which eliminates blind spots to the greatest extent possible.

Ending Bus Operator Assaults … RESOLVED, that the ATU shall work at the federal, state, and provincial levels to demand full implementation of new protection rules, will aggressively advocate for voluntary and compulsory redesign of workstations by manufacturers, and will assist Local Unions in making assaults a priority in their negotiations and ongoing discussions with employers.

Making Clean, Safe Bathroom Access an Employee Right … RESOLVED, that the ATU shall advocate for federal affirmation of a worker’s right to access clean, safe restrooms and will assist Local Unions and employers in developing model contract language to ensure timely access to restrooms.

Preventing Intercity Bus Driver Fatigue … THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that ATU in the U.S. shall increase efforts to pass the Driver Fatigue Prevention Act. THEREFORE, BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that ATU Canada will continue to call for the maximum day in intercity bus operations to be reduced to 14 hours from 16, and the maximum number of hours behind the wheel should be 10 rather than current 13, putting in place a mandated 10 hours core rest period for operators.

Eliminating Blind Spots on Buses … RESOLVED, that ATU shall continue to educate policy makers and the general public about the dangerous design of transit buses; and BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that ATU will push for minimum safety performance standards for public transportation vehicles used in revenue operations in the U.S and Canada that to the extent practicable, take into consideration recommendations of, and best practices standards developed by, transit labor representatives for the purpose of eliminating blind spots by requiring in all new vehicles and vehicles currently in revenue service – • Low mounted, reasonably sized left side mirrors which allow operators, regardless of size, to adequately view pedestrians crossing in front of the bus; and

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November/December 2016 | IN TRANSIT

ORGANIZING COMMITTEE REPORT At the recommendation of the Organizing Committee, the Convention adopted the following resolution: Confronting and Organizing TNCs … RESOLVED, that ATU shall endeavor to support and organize TNC workers fighting for dignity; to support ATU members already employed by TNCs; to resist efforts to divert transit funding or control to TNCs; and to encourage development of public software that harnesses the service benefits of TNC technology for all.

Oscar Owens’ Golden ATU Anniversary Brother Hanley next surprised International SecretaryTreasurer Oscar Owens, by officially recognizing his 50th anniversary as an ATU member. Owens told the delegates that he was “shocked and thrilled,” by the honor, and that he had “reached this milestone because of people like you. Thank you for all you have done for me.”

Motion to Rescind Rejection of Appeal to Reinstate Suspended Local 241 Officers A motion was made by Toi Bowers, 241-Chicago, IL, to rescind the previous action by the Convention that rejected the appeal of former Local 241 officers seeking to overturn their suspension by the GEB until they made restitution of funds they were not entitled to receive while in office. The delegates rejected the motion to rescind.

INSTALLATION OF OFFICERS All of the international officers were then installed by International President Emeritus Jim La Sala, and the 58th International Convention officially adjourned. v


COMMITTEES OF THE 58TH CONVENTION Like Congress and Parliament, committees of delegates do a lot of work evaluating and preparing all of the items that come before the Convention. The committees had a heavier workload at this Convention than at most others. ATU salutes the committee members below, who executed their duties with distinction and helped the Convention make the right decisions for ATU’s future. We apologize for those committee members who are not included in their committee photo.

INTERNATIONAL PRESIDENT’S REPORT COMMITTEE Chair, John Lee (Local 589), Secretary, Michael Carlisle, (Local 268), Anthony Watson (Local 113), Rick Rideout (Local 113), Bill Chrisp (Local 113), John Courtney (Local 265), Yogi Sharma (Local 279), John Koldan (Local 308), Harry Lew (Local 583), Steven Richardson (Local 639), Carroll Thomas (Local 689), Romoan Bruce (Local 689), Carly Allen (Local 697), Paula Purifoy (Local 732), Earl Hardy, Jr. (Local 821), Norman Brewster (Local 1028), Lydia Moore (Local 1342), Christine Davis (Local 1356), Amanda West (Local 1374), David Pouliot (Local 1415), Percival Patterson (Local 1493), Daniel Kaufmann (Local 1505), Tony Tasillo (Local 1572), Gayle Capp (Local 1573), Blake Lewis (Local 1575), Mario Ferrante (Local 1587).

INTERNATIONAL SECRETARY-TREASURER’S REPORT COMMITTEE Chair, Sabatino Di Nardo, Jr. (Local 85), Secretary, Joyce Willis (Local 192), Paul Doucette (Local 107), Kevin Morton (Local 113), Steve Muniz (Local 256), Mary Parent (Local 279), Kim Mitchell (Local 308), Norman Blessant (Local 382), Mark Tetterington (Local 569), Zul Vira (Local 583), Patrick Brady (Local 587), James Evers, Jr. (Local 589), Kevin Cole (Local 618), Mary Longoria (Local 757), Deborah Brown (Local 758), Reginald Cavitt (Local 788), Clarise Tabron (Local 819), John Campanella (Local 880), John Groh (Local 998), Michael Harvey (Local 1001), Tommy Bellfield (Local 1005), Frank Carlisi (Local 1179), Jean Claude Calixte (Local 1181), Adolfo Soto (Local 1277), Robert Roach (Local 1287), Thomas Hutchinson (Local 1338), Timothy Geary (Local 1447), Violet Williams (Local 1564), Terry Bartlett (Local 1572), John Sainz (Local 1576), Christine Broeze (Local 1587), Oscar Owens, IST, Chuck Watson, IVP.

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GENERAL EXECUTIVE BOARD COMMITTEE Chair, Calvin Kennedy (Local 1324), Secretary, Satnam Gill (Local 265), Perri Lile-Barrett (Local 26), Deirdre Osborne (Local 107), Cliff Piggott (Local 113), Elyse McKeown (Local 113), Carmen Lint (Local 113), Danell Pender-Bey (Local 241), Debra Doaty (Local 268), John Remias (Local 272), Joe Kang (Local 279), Yolandas Dixon (Local 312), Todd Strasser (Local 519), Jody Trotman (Local 583), Neil Armitage (Local 583), Herman Brown (Local 689), Courtney Williams (Local 689), Felix Avila (Local 1056), Willie Moorer (Local 1056), S. Bryant Hope (Local 1300), John Zahreddine (Local 1573), Maria Carrera (Local 1596), Gary Rauen, IVP.

CREDENTIALS COMMITTEE Chair, Eric Tuck (Local 107), Secretary, Ken Kephart, Jr., (Local 22), Pino D’Armiento (Local 113), Tracy Brown (Local 192), Shontrell Bowen (Local 241), Mark Weems (Local 308), Michael Cribb (Local 540), Michael Shea (Local 587), Felix Gendron (Local 591), Diane Boyd (Local 689), Travis Oberg (Local 987), Kathryn Smith (Local 1212), William Howard (Local 1267), Marilyn Archie (Local 1277), Robert Burley (Local 1300), Donald Brooks (Local 1321), Russell Pompa (Local 1338), Jeffrey Richardson (Local 1342), William Frees (Local 1345), Gil Mendonca (Local 1363), Muwafaq Al-Khafajy (Local 1415), Paul Churchill (Local 1462), Chris Scott (Local 1505), Andrew Woods (Local 1512), Charles Ryan III (Local 1548), Jesse Hunt (Local 1555), Joseph Prier, Jr. (Local 1560), James Moore (Local 1564), Robert Goudie (Local 1573), Daniel Silva (Local 1593), Ismael Rivera (Local 1596), Steve Holt (Local 1624), Robert Kyler (Local 1633), Donald Turner (Local 1701), Jeff Caldwell (Local 1704), Scott Lovell (Local 1722), Marcellus Barnes, IVP, Kenneth Kirk, IVP.

RULES AND ORDER COMMITTEE Chair, Jeannie Garbett (Local 508), Secretary, Jeffery DiPerna (Local 85), Robert Doucette (Local 107), Frank Malta (Local 113), Frank Grimaldi (Local 113), Suzanne Pelletier (Local 279), Tony Langevin (Local 425), Walter Moodie (Local 583), Thomas Mason (Local 726), Felicia Clayton (Local 788), Joseph Grandioso (Local 822), Robert Llord (Local 846), James Macon (Local 998), Dan Abramowicz (Local 1005), Thomas Leighty (Local 1015), Kathleen Kelley (Local 1039), Gladys McDaniel (Local 1056), Roy Luster, Jr. (Local 1070), Joneth Wyatt (Local 1091), Angela Cain (Local 1095), Amanda Sawyer-Malone (Local 1177), Andrew Cleary (Local 1189), Dwayne Russell (Local 1197), Lisa Fair (Local 1309), Michael Lowery (Local 1395), Kimberley Donaldson (Local 1505), Eryn Yula (Local 1555), David Sayre (Local 1742), Jamie Larkin (Local 1760), Robin West, IVP, Richard Murphy, IVP, Dan Smith, International Staff.

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November/December 2016 | IN TRANSIT


APPEALS COMMITTEE Chair, Esker Bilger, Jr. (Local 689), Secretary, Freda Braylock (Local 996), Fred Westbrook, Jr. (Local 26), Geoffrey Devlin (Local 134), Eric Carvalho (Local 174), Ralph Buccitti (Local 281), Jacques Chapman (Local 282), Cheryl Wolfe (Local 441), Sean Grigsby (Local 685), Brian Tansy (Local 741), Pablo Gonzalez (Local 820), Richard Stark, Jr. (Local 825), RiChard Jackson (Local 836), Steven Oss (Local 883), Peter Schiraldi (Local 1145), Thomas McGraw (Local 1182), Jaroslaw Pizunski (Local 1209), John Habanec (Local 1241), Mustafa Salahuddin (Local 1336), Michael Cornelius (Local 1433), Effrem Green (Local 1464), Katharine Crawford (Local 1602), Sammie Howard, Jr. (Local 1700), Janis Borchardt, IVP, Paul Bowen, IVP.

COPE COMMITTEE Chair, Troy Miller (Local 627), Secretary, Philip Swanhorst (Local 1310), Jose Colon (Local 241), Marqueal Williams (Local 241), Corina DeLaTorre (Local 256), Dorotha Adams (Local 308), Karen Maxwell (Local 589), Kevin Connolly (Local 589), Sheila Quarles-Alston (Local 689), Faye Lawson (Local 689), George Okie (Local 726), Charisse Wall (Local 757), William Jones (Local 788), David Gosha (Local 1005), Vincent Casella (Local 1027), Herman Green (Local 1700), Gerard Wyse (Local 1709), Michelle Sommers, IVP.

LAWS COMMITTEE Chair, Jackie Jeter (Local 689), Secretary, Raymond Greaves, (New Jersey State Council), Paul Thorp (ATU Canada), Christopher Bruce (Local 22), Stephen Palonis (Local 85), Bob Kinnear (Local 113), Yvonne Williams (Local 192), Tommy Sams, Jr. (Local 241), Ronald Jackson, Sr. (Local 268), Kenneth Franklin (Local 308), Rodney Dunn (Local 382), Ronald Cox (Local 416), Richard Gardner (Local 448), Kenneth Wilson (Local 508), Steve Bradshaw (Local 569), Kenneth McCormick (Local 587), Donald Baker (Local 588), Peggy LaPaglia (Local 589), Thomas Cute (Local 618), Daniel Cassella (Local 726), Curtis Howard (Local 732), Shirley Block (Local 757), Michael Breihan (Local 788), Veronica Cobb (Local 819), Julio Rivera (Local 1001), Mark Lawson (Local 1005), Gary Pires (Local 1037), Mark Henry (Local 1056), Bennie Caughman (Local 1179), Michael Cordiello (Local 1181), Arturo Aguilar (Local 1277), Jonothan Walker (Local 1287), David McClure (Local 1300), Kenneth Day (Local 1338), Robert Bean (Local 1433), John Callahan (Local 1505), Donnie Small, Sr. (Local 1535), Christopher Finn (Local 1555), Daniel Harris (Local 1587), Jimmie McCoy (Local 1700), Pennie Johnson (Local 1733), Claudia Hudson, IVP.

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RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE Chair, Clint Crabtree (Local 279), Secretary, Kathleen Custer (Local 1576), Bryon Shane (Local 85), Manjit Matharu (Local 113), Sandra Lee (Local 192), Carlos Acevedo (Local 241), Carl Haymore (Local 241), Tanno Muhammad (Local 241), Ralph Niz (Local 256), Alan Wagner (Local 276), Wilson Rios (Local 308), Denise Meyer (Local 569), Harvey Woo (Local 583), Shawn Anderson (Local 583), Brenda Thomas (Local 689), Quincy Jones (Local 689), Derrick Mallard (Local 689), Britt Dunams (Local 732), Angela Hamby (Local 732), Nancy Spence (Local 823), Nanette Ruffin (Local 859), Ken Koza (Local 966), Eric Carr (Local 1374), Darrell Munroe (Local 1572), Mary Fuller (Local 1575), Yvette Trujillo, IVP.

BALLOTTING COMMITTEE Chair, James Hedge (Local 1181), Secretary, Dwight Mattingly (Local 1577), Theodore Kielur (Local 85), Tony Ultimo (Local 113), Scott Gordon (Local 113), Mark Gifford (Local 168), Richard Potvin (Local 279), Gurdev Atwal (Local 569), Rick Ratcliff (Local 583), Lisa Carter (Local 587), John Clancy (Local 589), Raymond Jackson (Local 689), Anthony Barnes (Local 689), Marlene Flemmings-McCann (Local 689), Chris Waymer (Local 726), Rick Scott (Local 779), Gary Hernandez (Local 757), Melvia Summers (Local 788), Darrell Lampley (Local 819), Paul Lowney (Local 820), Retheena Goodwin (Local 825), Earl Cox, Sr. (Local 1093), Jose DeJesus (Local 1179), Jeffrey Shaffer (Local 1277), Leroy Carpenter (Local 1300), Michael Lawson (Local 1474), John Adams (Local 1563), Tracey Tredway (Local 1614), Robert Chitrenky (Local 1724), Gersham Flynn (Local 1763), Louie Lowis (Local 1767), Jim Lindsay, IVP, Bob Hykaway, IVP, Dan Smith, International Staff.

HEALTH AND SAFETY COMMITTEE Chair, Mathias Hamilton (Local 1447), Secretary, Margaret Gilbert (Local 1582), Kevin Barrett (Local 85), Vickie Johnson (Local 241), Crystal Lee (Local 256), Dawn Metcalf (Local 282), Doug Underwood (Local 382), Veronica Chavers (Local 443), John Renwick (Local 568), Cheryl Rowe (Local 587), James Atkins (Local 732), Ashley Coleman (Local 732), Joe Ruffin (Local 757), Gordon Duncan (Local 757), Anthony Forrester (Local 757), Orlando Riley (Local 819), Cheryl Marx (Local 842), Timothy Lawrence (Local 842), Donald Ritchheart (Local 847), John Campanella (Local 880), Chris Moralez (Local 1001), Michael Ashford (Local 1277), Phil Scherer (Local 1287), Christopher Todd (Local 1309), Steven Moquin (Local 1321), Gerald Duncan (Local 1385), Rhonda Rivers (Local 1447), Jack Jackson (Local 1572), Zefnia Durham (Local 1579), Sean Wilson (Local 1587), April Williams (Local 1591), Christine St. Louis (Local 1596), Brian Sherlock, International Staff, Ed Watt, International Staff.

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November/December 2016 | IN TRANSIT


ORGANIZING AND STRATEGIC CAMPAIGNS COMMITTEE Chair, Patrick Green (Local 1235), Secretary, Diane Stambaugh (Local 1743), Marvin Alfred (Local 113), Enrico Signore (Local 113), Woodrow Eiland (Local 241), Toi Bowers (Local 241), Perry Osbey, Sr. (Local 268), Eric Dixon (Local 308), James Bradley (Local 589), Inga McGlothin (Local 627), John Boland (Local 628), John Gaines (Local 689), James Hill (Local 725), Paul LaPolla (Local 726), Antonie Maiben (Local 770), Daniel Delin (Local 1001), Richard Steitz (Local 1027), Renee Jean-Louis (Local 1181), Ken Walker (Local 1225), Mauro Varela (Local 1277), Robert Roach (Local 1287), Alan McGrath (Local 1290), Siddiqu Shaikh (Local 1574), Ray Rivera, IVP.

CLIMATE CHANGE COMMITTEE Chair, Raymond Greaves (New Jersey State Council), Secretary, Christopher Bruce (Local 22), Yvonne Williams (Local 192), Joyce Willis (Local 192), Jacques Chapman (Local 282), Veronica Chavers (Local 443), Pablo Gonzalez (Local 820), Nancy Spence (Local 823), Gary Pires (Local 1037), Mark Henry (Local 1056), Gladys McDaniel (Local 1056), Bruno Angel (Local 1277), Douglas Kurowski (Local 1277), Mustafa Salahuddin (Local 1336), Eryn Yula (Local 1555), Oswaldo Chin (Local 1622), Pennie Johnson (Local 1733), Bruce Hamilton, IVP.

SAVE THE DATE ATU CAN-AM CONFERENCE Caesars Palace Las Vegas Las Vegas, Nevada, USA September 10 - 14, 2017 For more information contact: Danny Cassella Kevin Morton President Treasurer Tel: 917-831-6474 Tel: 416-938-8515 Email: dcasella@atu726.com Email: kmorton@atu113.net No member or officer is required to attend. Local Union participation, and related expense is up to each Local Union membership.

IN TRANSIT

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LEGAL NOTICE

TO: Employees represented by ATU Locals in U.S. bargaining units who are subject to union security arrangements Employees working under collective bargaining agreements which contain a union security clause are required, as a condition of their employment, to pay monthly dues or fees to the Union. Formal union membership, however, is not mandated. Those who are members of the ATU pay monthly union dues. Nonmembers, or “agency feepayers,” meet their obligation through the payment of an equivalent “agency fee.” Nonmembers subject to a union security clause have the additional legal right to file objections to their funding of expenditures which are “unrelated to collective bargaining, contract administration, or grievance adjustment” and/or are otherwise “nongermane to the collective bargaining process.” Union security clauses are negotiated and ratified by your coworkers based upon the principle that everyone who benefits from the collective bargaining process should share in its costs. The wellbeing of all bargaining unit employees is improved immeasurably when the union obtains higher wages, better health care and retirement benefits, fairness in the discipline system, and the many other improvements realized in contract negotiations. But it would be difficult to provide such effective representation at the bargaining table without the influence earned through the “nongermane” political activities of the trade union movement. There are considerable benefits of being a member of the ATU. Only members have the right to attend and participate in union meetings; the right to run in local union elections and to otherwise nominate and vote for any candidates for union office; the right to participate in the formation of ATU bargaining demands; the right to vote on

The following ATU Statement of Law and Procedures Concerning Union Security Objections applies only to the International per capita tax charged to objectors as part of local union fees (unless a local union exercises the option of presuming that the International percentage of chargeable activities applies to the local union with regard to employees working for private-sector employers). 1. Any ATU-represented nonmember employed in the United States who is subject to a union security clause conditioning continued employment on the payment of dues or fees has the right to become an objector to expenditures not related to collective bargaining, contract administration, grievance adjustment, or other chargeable expenditures. A current ATU member who chooses not to tender the full periodic dues and assessments paid by members of the union, but who instead opts to become an objector, must assume nonmember status prior to filing an objection through these procedures. An objector shall pay reduced fees calculated in accordance with Section 5. 2. To become an objector, an ATU-represented nonmember employee shall notify the International Secretary-Treasurer in writing of the objection within thirty (30) days of receiving this notice via the November/ December issue of In Transit, within thirty (30) days of resigning from membership, or within thirty (30) days after first becoming subject to union security obligations and receiving notice of these procedures. The objection shall be signed and shall specify the objector’s current home mailing address, name the objector’s employer with which the applicable union security arrangements have been entered into, and identify the ATU local union number, if known. All objections should be mailed to the International Secretary-Treasurer, 10000 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20903 or transmitted by facsimile to (301) 431-7116 with a separate cover page directing such to the attention of the International Secretary-Treasurer and specifying the subject thereof to be the “Election of Fee Objector Status.” 3. The following categories of expenditure are chargeable to the extent permitted by law:

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contract ratification questions; and the right to enjoy the many benefits of the Union Plus Benefits Program, which offers low-interest credit cards, legal and travel services, prescription drug cards, and life insurance. The Notice of Statement of Law and Procedures applies to the International Union expenditures and to the per capita tax portion of local union dues. Because the portion of local union expenditures which are spent on “chargeable” activities is at least as great as that of the International Union, with regard to employees working for private-sector employers, Local Unions may exercise the option of presuming that the International Union’s percentage of chargeable activities applies to the Local Union. It remains our opinion that all of our organizing and all the legislative, litigation, and similar activities undertaken by the ATU – some of which tribunals have indicated may in part be nonchargeable – are essential to improving the working conditions of all the employees we represent.

Lawrence J. Hanley International President

a. All expenses concerning the negotiation agreements, practices and working conditions;

of

b. All expenses concerning the administration of agreements, practices and working conditions, including grievance handling, all activities related to arbitration, and discussion with employees in the bargaining unit or employer representatives regarding working conditions, benefits and contract rights; c. Convention expenses and other normal union internal governance and management expenses; d. Union business meeting expenses; e. Publication expenses to the extent coverage is related to otherwise chargeable activities; f. Expenses of litigation before the courts and administrative agencies related to contract administration, collective bargaining rights and internal governance; g. Expenses for legislative, executive branch and administrative agency representation on legislative and regulatory matters closely related to contract ratification or the implementation of contracts; h. All expenses for the education and training of members, officers, and staff intended to prepare the participants to better perform chargeable activities; i. All strike fund expenditures and costs of group cohesion and economic action, e.g., general strike activity, informational picketing, etc.; j. All funeral or dismemberment benefits; and k. A proportional share administrative expenses.

of

all

overhead

and

4. Each December, the International Union shall publish these policies and procedures in In Transit to provide to ATU-represented employees notice of their right to object and of the procedures for objecting.

November/December 2016 | IN TRANSIT

5. The International retains an independent auditor who submits an annual report for the purpose of verifying the percentage of expenditures that fall within the categories specified in Section 3. Similarly, if the local union has adopted these procedures, the local union will arrange for the audit of the records, enabling the local union to verify annually the percentage of its total expenditures other than the International per capita tax that is chargeable to objectors. If a local union has objectors employed by a private-sector employer (but has no objectors employed by public-sector employers), it may exercise the option of presuming that the International Union’s percentage of chargeable activities applies to the local union and forego arranging an audit. The amount of the International and local union expenditures falling within Section 3 made during that fiscal year which ended in the previous calendar year shall be the basis for calculating the reduced fees that must be paid by the objector for the current calendar year. For each objector, an amount equal to the reduced fees paid by the objector shall be placed in an interest-bearing escrow account. 6. The report(s) of the independent auditor(s) shall be completed prior to the publication of these policies and procedures in December. The report(s) shall include verification of the major categories of union expenses attributable to chargeable and nonchargeable activities. Local unions which have not exercised the option of presuming that the International Union’s percentage of chargeable activities applies to the local union shall provide a copy of their independent auditor’s report to each nonmember employee represented by the local union. 7. In the absence of an exclusive statutory review procedure, each objector may challenge the legal and arithmetical bases of the calculations contained in the independent auditor report(s) by filing an appeal with the International Secretary-Treasurer. Any such appeal must be made by sending a signed letter to the International Secretary-Treasurer postmarked or transmitted via facsimile no later than the earlier of thirty (30) days after the International Secretary-Treasurer has sent a letter to the objector acknowledging receipt of the objection, or thirty (30) days after the International Union has, for the first time, sent a copy of this Legal Notice the objector.


8. Except where state law provides an exclusive statutory review procedure as discussed in Note 3 below, all such appeals received by the union within the time limits specified above shall be determined by expeditious referral to an impartial arbitrator appointed by the American Arbitration Association (AAA) under its rules for impartial determination of union fees and these procedures.

substantial evidence on the record considered as a whole and on other findings legally permitted to be binding on all parties.

a.

9. Under Section 18.1 of the ATU Constitution and General Laws, each local union will be responsible for collecting and transmitting to the International Union each month from those who have made an objection the amount of the per capita tax certified as due under these procedures. In addition, each local will be responsible for developing a system covering local union fees that will meet the legal requirements relative to the objectors in the local. If the local union adopts the International procedures concerning fee objections on an integrated basis, no multiple notice (other than providing its independent auditor’s report to nonmember employees represented by the local union if the local union has not exercised the option of presuming that the International Union’s percentage of chargeable activities applies to the local union), objection, challenge or appeal procedures will be necessary, provided that any challenges to the International calculation pursuant to paragraph 7 of this ATU Statement of Law and Procedures Concerning Union Security Objections must still be filed timely and any delay in the provision of a local union’s report shall not toll the thirty-day period for challenging the International calculation. If, however, the local union adopts an independent system covering local union expenditures other than per capita tax, such arrangements must, by law, be included in the local’s procedures.

All appeals shall be consolidated for submission to the arbitrator. The presentation of evidence and argument to the arbitrator shall be either in writing or at a hearing, as determined by the arbitrator. The arbitrator shall receive and consider the evidence of witnesses by affidavit, giving it such weight as seems proper after consideration of any objection made to its admission. If a hearing is held, it shall be scheduled as soon as the arbitrator can schedule the hearing, and shall be at a location selected by the arbitrator to be the most convenient for those involved in the proceeding.

b. Each party to the arbitration shall bear its own costs. The challengers shall have the option of paying a pro-rata portion of the arbitrator’s fees and expenses. The union shall pay the balance of such fees and expenses. c. Challengers may, at their expense, be represented by counsel or other representative of choice. Challengers need not appear at any hearing and shall be permitted to instead file written statements with the arbitrator no later than the beginning of the arbitration hearing. Post-hearing statements may be filed in accordance with the provisions of Section 8(g). If a hearing is not held, the arbitrator will set the dates by which all written submissions will be received and will decide the case based on the evidence and arguments submitted. d. If a hearing is held, fourteen (14) days prior to the start of the hearing, a list of all exhibits intended to be introduced at the arbitration by the union and a list of all witnesses the union intends to call, except for exhibits and witnesses the union may introduce for rebuttal. Where a list of exhibits has been provided, challengers shall have a right to receive copies of such exhibits by making a written request for them to the International Secretary-Treasurer. Additionally, copies of all exhibits shall be available for inspection and copying at the hearing. e.

A court reporter shall make a transcript of all proceedings before the arbitrator. This transcript shall be the only official record of the proceedings and may be purchased by the challengers. If challengers do not purchase a copy of the transcript, a copy shall be available for inspection by challengers at the International headquarters during normal business hours.

f.

The arbitrator shall have control over all procedural matters affecting the arbitration in order to fulfill the dual needs of an informed and an expeditious arbitration. The arbitrator shall set forth in the decision the bases for the decision, giving full consideration to the legal requirements limiting the amount objectors may be charged.

i. Upon receipt of the arbitrator’s award, any adjustment in favor of the challenger will be made from the escrow account.

10. The provisions of this procedure shall be considered legally separable. Should any provision or portion hereof be held contrary to law by a court, administrative agency or arbitrator, the remaining provisions or portions thereof shall continue to be legally effective and binding.

NOTES 1. ATU-represented public employees in Illinois, Minnesota, Montana, or Oregon who are not members of the union are automatically considered objectors and are not required to make a filing under the provisions of Sections 2 and 4 of this Statement of Law and Procedures. The collective bargaining statute applicable to New Jersey public employers (with the significant exceptions of New Jersey Transit and NJT-Mercer) has the same impact. Similarly, except where a more stringent union security arrangement was in place on January 1, 1970, and has been continued in accordance with the “grandfathering” provisions of state law, the Pennsylvania public employee bargaining statute only permits a fair share union security clause under which every nonmember is obligated to pay only a reduced fee based upon prior chargeable expenditures. Local unions representing such members shall forward the names of all such nonmember objectors to the International Secretary-Treasurer, including the objector’s current home address and employer. 2. In accordance with applicable state laws, the reduced per capita tax owed by nonmember public employee objectors in Minnesota and New Jersey (except those working for New Jersey Transit or NJT-Mercer) shall be computed utilizing either the percentage of chargeable expenditures as verified by the report of the independent auditor retained by the International or eighty-five (85%) percent, whichever is lesser. 3. State statutes covering public employees in Minnesota and New Jersey (again, other than those workers employed by New Jersey Transit or NJT-Mercer) require that any person wishing to challenge the fees file an action with the state public employment board (Minnesota) or with a three-member board appointed by the governor specifically to hear fair share challenges (New Jersey). Where these statutes are applicable, any local union procedure must provide that the binding expeditious review be through the applicable state process.

Amalgamated Transit Union Analysis of Objectors’ Expenses (Modified Cash Basis) - Year Ended June 30, 2016

g. If a hearing is held, the parties to the arbitration shall have the right to file a post-hearing statement within forty-five (45) days after both parties have completed submission of their cases at the hearing. Such statements may not introduce new evidence nor discuss evidence not introduced in the arbitration. The arbitrator shall issue a decision within forty-five (45) days after the final date for submission of post hearing statements or within such other reasonable period as is consistent with the applicable AAA rules and the requirements of law. h. The decision of the arbitrator shall be final and binding on all findings of fact supported by

IN TRANSIT

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Amalgamated Transit Union - Analysis of Objectors' Expenses (Modified Cash Basis) - Year Ended June 30, 2016

To the Chair and Members of the General Executive Board of the Amalgamated Transit Union. We have audited the accompanying Analysis of Objectors’ Expenses (modified cash basis) (the Analysis) of the Amalgamated Transit Union (the Union) for the year ended June 30, 2016 and the notes to the Analysis. Management’s Responsibility for the Analysis Management is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of the Analysis in accordance with the modified cash basis of accounting, as described in Note 1 and the factors and assumptions discussed in the notes; this includes determining that the modified cash basis of accounting is an acceptable basis for the preparation of the Analysis in the circumstances. Management is also responsible for the design, implementation, and maintenance of internal control relevant to the preparation and fair presentation of an Analysis that is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. Auditors’ Responsibility Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Analysis based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the Analysis is free from material misstatement. An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the Analysis. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgment, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the Analysis, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the entity’s preparation and fair presentation of the Analysis in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of that entity’s internal control. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of significant accounting estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the Analysis. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion. Opinion In our opinion, the Analysis referred to above presents fairly, in all material respects, the includable expenses of the Amalgamated Transit Union for the year ended June 30, 2016, and the allocation between chargeable and non-chargeable expenses, on the modified cash basis of accounting described in Note 1 and significant factors and assumptions described in Note 2. Basis of Accounting As described in Note 1, the Analysis was prepared on a modified cash basis of accounting, which is a comprehensive basis of accounting other than generally accepted accounting principles in the United States. Our opinion is not modified with respect to that matter. Other Matter We have audited, in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America, the consolidated financial statements of the Amalgamated Transit Union as of and for the year ended June 30, 2016 and our report thereon dated September 16, 2016, expressed an unmodified opinion on those consolidated financial statements. The total net (U.S.) includable expenses presented in the Analysis agree to the expenses in the audited consolidated financial statements of the Union for the year ended June 30, 2016, modified as discussed in Note 3. The allocations of expenses between chargeable and non- chargeable are based on the descriptions and the significant factors and assumptions described in Note 2. The accompanying Analysis was prepared for the purpose of determining the

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amount of the Union’s expenses that are chargeable or nonchargeable to fee objectors. The accompanying Analysis is not intended to be a complete presentation of the Union’s consolidated financial statements.

• All expenses concerning the negotiation of agreements, practices and working conditions; • All expenses concerning the administration of agreements, practices and working conditions, including grievance handling, all activities related to arbitration and discussion with employees in the bargaining unit or employer representatives regarding working conditions, benefits and contract rights;

Intended Use of This Letter This report is intended solely for the information and use of the Amalgamated Transit Union and its fee objectors and is not intended to be and should not be used by anyone other than these specified parties..

• Convention expenses and other normal Union internal governance and management expenses;

Bethesda, MD November 14, 2016

• Social activities and Union business meeting expenses; • Publication expenses to the extent coverage is related to chargeable activities;

Note 1. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies Method of Accounting - Analysis of Objectors’ Expenses (modified cash basis) (the Analysis) is presented using a modified cash basis of accounting. Generally, expenses are recognized when paid rather than when the obligation is incurred. However, accruals of expenses are recorded for certain transactions with local unions, funeral benefits and other items. Depreciation - Depreciation of property and equipment is charged to operations over the estimated useful lives of the assets using the straight-line method. Benefit Payments - The Amalgamated Transit Union’s (the Union) Constitution and General Laws provide for the payment of a $1,000 funeral or dismemberment benefit on behalf of members and fee payers in good standing with one or more years of continuous membership or fee payment at the time of their death or dismemberment. An expense is recognized for the benefit for life members at the time they become life members. The costs associated with this benefit for other members and fee payers are accounted for upon disbursement of the benefit.

• Expenses of litigation before the courts and administrative agencies related to contract administration, collective bargaining rights and internal governance; • Expenses for legislative, executive branch and administrative agency representation on legislative and regulatory matters closely related to contract ratification or the implementation of contracts; Note 2. Purpose of Analysis Of Objectors’ Expenses and Significant Factors and Assumptions Used In Determining Chargeable and Non-Chargeable Expenses (continued) • All strike fund expenditures and other costs of group cohesion and economic action, e.g., demonstrations, general strike activity, informational picketing, etc.; • All expenses for the education and training of members, officers and staff intended to prepare the participants to better perform chargeable activities;

Estimates - The preparation of this Analysis requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of expenses during the reporting period. Actual results may differ from those estimates.

• All funeral and dismemberment benefits; and • An allocable amount of all net building expenses.

Note 2. Purpose of Analysis Of Objectors’ Expenses and Significant Factors and Assumptions Used In Determining Chargeable and Non-Chargeable Expenses The purpose of this Analysis is for the determination of the percentage of fee objector dues (or their equivalent) expended by the Union for chargeable activities. Expenses for chargeable activities are those deemed “necessarily or reasonably incurred” to execute the representational duties of the Union. The percentage of the Union expenses deemed not chargeable is used for determining advance dues (or their equivalent) reduction for fee objectors for the subsequent calendar year. The procedures followed in the preparation of this Analysis include categorization of each classification of expenses by chargeable and non-chargeable activities. This is accomplished by analyzing each classification of expenses and identifying amounts which are either chargeable or non-chargeable. The Union engaged professional assistance to determine criteria for identifying chargeable and non-chargeable expenses. The procedures and significant factors and assumptions used in this Analysis in determining these expenses are as follows: A.

All expenses are identified by fund and reconciled to the Union’s annual financial statements.

B.

Canadian expenses within each fund are eliminated.

C.

Certain interfund transfers are recorded to more accurately reflect the Union activity for which certain expenditures were made.

D.

Expenses are analyzed to identify chargeable and non-chargeable amounts using the following criteria: 1.

Chargeable expenses include:

November/December 2016 | IN TRANSIT

2. E.

Non-chargeable expenses include all other expenses.

For those expenses which have both chargeable and non-chargeable aspects, allocations are made using certain ratios. Significant ratios used for these allocated expenses include ratios based on salary costs supported by time records and other ratios such as printed line ratios for allocation of certain publication costs.

Note 3. Reconciliation of Analysis to Audited Financial Statements The expenses included in this Analysis are based upon the total expenses of $33,229,842 reported in the audited consolidated financial statements of the Amalgamated Transit Union modified for the following: $4,854,699 in expenses relating to the ATU Training Center, Inc., a related consolidated entity, which have been excluded from this Analysis. $2,237,719 in Canadian expenses has been excluded from this Analysis. $132,326 relating to various expenses which have been offset by corresponding revenue items have been excluded from this Analysis. Note 4. Subsequent Events Review Subsequent events have been evaluated through November 14, 2016, which is the date the Analysis was available to be issued. No material events or transactions which would require an additional adjustment to or disclosure in the accompanying Analysis was noted in this evaluation.


¡Ka Boom! Eso fue lo que escucharon los Estados Unidos en la noche de las elecciones. Lo que significa es que los trabajadores están cansados de escuchar el lenguaje ambiguo de políticos escurridizos gente que dice que está con nosotros, pero que votó más de 40 años para convertir nuestra economía en un espectáculo de terror para los trabajadores. Este Sindicato representó el cambio en 2016. Apoyamos la lucha al apoyar a Bernie Sanders. Cuando no logró ganar las primarias, apoyamos a Hillary Clinton. Esa era la mejor opción para los trabajadores en nuestra opinión. Algunos de nuestros miembros no estuvieron de acuerdo. Donald Trump ganó estas elecciones, en parte apelando a lo peor de la gente. Para ser realmente claros, creemos que la mayoría de los estadounidenses no apoyan el discurso de odio que usó para inflamar a la gente.

Nos esperan aguas turbulentas Sin embargo, estén preparados. Es probable que nos topemos con aguas turbulentas. Muchos de los programas que veremos propuestos y tal vez promulgados podrían provocar lo contrario de lo que los votantes de Trump esperan, y de lo que él prometió. Y debemos resistir los ataques a nuestros derechos constitucionales. Eso incluye los derechos de todos los estadounidenses. Martin Niemöller (1892-1984) fue un prominente pastor protestante que destacó como enemigo público de Adolf Hitler y pasó los últimos siete años del gobierno nazi en campos de concentración. Tal vez sea mejor recordarlo por esta cita: Primero vinieron a por los socialistas, y yo no dije nada Porque yo no era un socialista. Entonces vinieron a por los sindicalistas, y yo no dije nada Porque yo no era un sindicalista.

ATU luchará contra los ataques a los derechos civiles

Luego vinieron a por los judíos, y yo no dije nada -

ATU se mantendrá fuerte en la lucha contra los esfuerzos para atacar los derechos civiles, y anticipamos una legislación extremista por parte de un congreso republicano. Hay un lado muy oscuro de su victoria.

Luego vinieron a por mí -

Entendemos el paralelismo entre nuestros tiempos y el despertar de la última depresión mundial en los años treinta. Debemos mantenernos vigilantes y quizás valientes al rechazar cualquier esfuerzo para despojar a los estadounidenses de sus derechos humanos con el pretexto de “making America great”.

Los trabajadores americanos han doblado la esquina Pero, el revestimiento de plata, si es que hay uno, es que los trabajadores estadounidenses han dado la vuelta a la esquina. Están diciendo a través de esta revuelta que el statu quo ha perdido su estatus. Que ya no vamos a asentir con la cabeza al establecimiento mientras todos sufrimos. ATU ha dicho eso desde el principio. Esperamos que la administración Trump cumpla su promesa de ayudar a los trabajadores estadounidenses. Debe ser nuestro trabajo unir a los trabajadores en torno a principios que harán todas nuestras vidas mejor.

Porque yo no era judío. y ya no quedaba nadie para hablar por mí.

No hay que rendirse ahora La elección de Donald Trump fue una sorpresa para la mayoría de nosotros que no podíamos imaginarnos algo así ocurriendo en Estados Unidos. Pero había señales de que algo estaba ocurriendo en la república que los encuestadores no se tomaron en serio. Primero fue el surgimiento del senador Bernie Sanders que tomó por sorpresa al Partido Demócrata - al igual que Donald Trump tomó por sorpresa al Partido Republicano. Y, en segundo lugar, que muchos votantes sindicales -por lo general el baluarte del Partido Demócrata- apoyaban al candidato republicano.

El único problema real Estos factores no tan ocultos en la elección demuestran que la lucha de la clase media fue el único problema real en la campaña. IN TRANSIT

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Donald Trump aprovechó hábilmente la frustración y el resentimiento que muchos estadounidenses sienten de que están trabajando más duro que nunca por menos de lo que ganaban antes de la recesión. Y convenció al menos a la mitad de los votantes sindicales de que haría más por ellos que el candidato respaldado por su sindicato. Apuesto a que los miembros del sindicato que votaron a favor de Donald Trump no sabían que compitió sobre una plataforma republicana que debilitaría, si no destruiría, a los sindicatos, y acabaría con el apoyo federal al transporte público (un asunto de gran preocupación para los miembros de la ATU). Si esto no es una fórmula para el desastre para los trabajadores en general, y los miembros de la ATU en particular, no sé qué es.

‘El remordimiento del comprador’ Sin embargo, éstas son sólo dos de muchas cosas que los votantes no saben acerca de Donald Trump, y el “remordimiento del comprador” eventualmente superará a aquellos que lo eligieron, y no de forma leve, cuando descubran que no puede o no tiene la intención de hacer las cosas que prometió. Por eso no podemos rendirnos ahora. Debemos seguir luchando por lo que creemos, no sólo para evitar que lo peor ocurra en el corto plazo, sino para estar listos para traer a todos los trabajadores que votaron por Trump de vuelta a casa cuando se den cuenta de lo que han hecho.v Por favor visite www.atu.org para más Información y las últimas noticias de ATU.

Vigilándolos en todo momento En 2000, cuando George W. Bush ganó las elecciones presidenciales a Al Gore en Florida, las familias trabajadoras estaban asustadas. Nuestros miedos resultaron ser justificados, ya que Bush más tarde volteó el código de impuestos en favor de los ricos, nos llevó a la peor depresión desde 1929, y envió a pobres niños a sus tumbas a través de guerras sin fin en Oriente Medio. Mientras nuestro país se encontraba al borde de la aniquilación, de alguna manera logramos salir adelante. En 2010, los republicanos asumieron el control en las capitales estatales por todos los Estados Unidos. Poco después, Wisconsin despojó a los empleados públicos de

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November/December 2016 | IN TRANSIT

sus derechos de negociación colectiva, y Michigan - el centro del Universo Laboral Americano durante más de un siglo - se volvió “right-to-work” (“derecho-al-trabajo”). Muchas personas predijeron el fin de los sindicatos. Sin embargo, seis años más tarde, aunque heridos y golpeados - seguimos en pie.

Motivos de preocupación Este año, Estados Unidos eligió a Donald Trump, y los miembros de sindicatos se unen a musulmanes, latinos, afroamericanos, mujeres, discapacitados, reporteros, la mayoría de los votantes norteamericanos, innumerables naciones extranjeras e incluso el Papa, en la preocupación por nuestro futuro. Sin lugar a dudas, hay motivos de preocupación. Pronto habrá personas a cargo de nuestro gobierno que no apoyan a nuestros intereses en su corazón. Pero si el corto tiempo transcurrido desde que los sorprendentes resultados de las elecciones fueron anunciados es en cualquier forma indicio del espíritu luchador de los estadounidenses, es probable que nos espere un crecimiento masivo de activismo progresista durante los próximos cuatro años. Independientemente de a quién votaron este año, la abrumadora mayoría de los estadounidenses no aceptarán políticas opresivas que retrasen el reloj en temas fundamentales como la raza, la religión, la justicia económica y muchos otros asuntos. Si nuestros nuevos líderes van demasiado lejos, su tiempo en el cargo será corto. Esta es la característica única de nuestra democracia: independientemente de su afiliación al partido, hacemos responsables a las personas por sus palabras y acciones.

Los sindicatos necesitan liderar Más que nunca, el movimiento obrero debe ser un líder clave de este nuevo movimiento progresista. Pero en lugar de seguir adelante y apoyar a los candidatos que simplemente están de acuerdo con nosotros en la mayoría de los temas, necesitamos establecer la agenda para los candidatos políticos de hoy y mañana. Sólo entonces, trabajando con nuestros socios de la coalición, podemos empezar lentamente a hacer que la gente hable sobre los temas que son importantes para las familias trabajadoras. La campaña de Bernie Sanders demostró que ahí fuera hay millones de personas apasionadas que creen en unos Estados Unidos más justos. Mientras que esa campaña ha terminado, las ideas que de ella surgieron no desaparecerán en el corto plazo, y tampoco nosotros.v


In Memoriam

Death Benefits Awarded September 1, 2016 - October 31, 2016 1- MEMBERS AT LARGE MARSHALL L COOK CAMPBELL CURRISTON ELVIN E HORNER SR ELWIN L HORTON REUBEN KURTZ HIRAM J MC QUEEN ROBERT L NASH LOUIS E WHITE 22- WORCESTER, MA RICHARD SHULTEN JOHN D SIREN 26- DETROIT, MI JOHN H BOWNES JOE H CALLOWAY JAMES L MOORE 85- PITTSBURGH, PA DAVID Z BACHOWSKI DANIELLE L BOYD THOMAS L BRADFORD THOMAS M DANCISIN KEITH S GODOR JAMES E HOPKINS JEFFREY V KAREL PETER MANCINE JR GARY E MOODY JOHN R SECHOKA LEONARD SIKORA WAYNE SUPRANO SR ROBERT V WADE

DAVE L MAYBERRY JOHNNY SHIELDS JAMES E TURNBOUGH EDDIE J WEBBER 425- HARTFORD, CT DONALD W JOHNSTON BENJAMIN SMITH 508- HALIFAX, NS IRVIN BURKE TROY J PARKER BRIAN D WALTERS 568- ERIE, PA RICHARD L WHITBY 569- EDMONTON, AB LORNA DURAND NIRMAL S GILL THOMAS M HADLEY GEORGE NADEMA 580- SYRACUSE, NY MICHAEL V AIELLO RAYMOND BRAYEN 583- CALGARY, AB WAYNE KEIL 587- SEATTLE, WA JOHN L PEDERSEN STEVEN V ROWLEY

192- OAKLAND, CA ALAN J BERNER BILLY F CUMMINGS AMOS DEMES ROBERT L GAMBER GEORGE ALBIN JOHNSON DARWIN C KENDALL BRADLEY D LUCERO

589- BOSTON, MA CHARLES R RICKER JAMES RUSS

241- CHICAGO, IL RONALD COLEMAN MARY A CRENSHAW JOSE A GALLOZA FRANK S GREEN VERLIN D JONES MICHAEL T REYNOLDS GERALDINE P ROCHON JIMMIE C SMITH EARL D TERRY DONALD THICKLIN TONY C WHITE RAYMOND WILEY ROBERT L WOODS

685- BRANTFORD, ON RONALD WESTBROOK

265- SAN JOSE, CA ANTHONY CASTRO PAUL R RUSSO 279- OTTAWA, ON DANIEL M DROUIN 281- NEW HAVEN, CT JOSEPH A NIGLIO 308- CHICAGO, IL GEORGE CLARK MATTIE R GRAVES ELBERT HARRIS PEARL V HENDRIX WILLIE C JOHNSON

618- PROVIDENCE, RI ROBERTO J DOS REIS ANTONE T PIMENTAL ROBERT E RITCHIE

689- WASHINGTON, DC ROBERT C BEALES MOONKUK HAM ELMO L KELLER WILLARD C MC CLAIN THEODORE H PARRISH CURTIS REED WALTER L THRASHER GARTH F TODD EARL E WATKINS SR 697- TOLEDO, OH MONICA M CONINE CYNTHIA HARPER 704- LITTLE ROCK, AR ROBERT DOYNE JORDAN 726- STATEN ISLAND, NY DOUGLAS DOVNER 732- ATLANTA, GA JAMES T SIMS 741- LONDON, ON JOHN A ADAMS EDWARD E CAMERON RADFORD W DONALDSON

LAURA C FARRELL MICHAEL W TRICKETT

1235- NASHVILLE, TN CHARLES R RIPPETOE

757- PORTLAND, OR GARY E BUNDY BARBARA M CHRISTENSEN SCOTT D HOGGARD HAROLD M WYMORE

1267- FT. LAUDERDALE, FL JOHN F BUELOW

819- NEWARK, NJ SAMUEL GLOVER ANTHONY RADICE

1277- LOS ANGELES, CA DAVID W GOEMAERE THEODORE C HUSTAVA 1279- JOHNSTOWN, PA JOHN W SWEENEY

820- UNION CITY, NJ LEO F LOCORRIERE

1287- KANSAS CITY, MO JOHN M DONNELL

822- PATERSON, NJ FRANK GREEN JR

1293- LINCOLN, NE KENNETH W CHALLQUIST

823- ELIZABETH, NJ JOSEPH BARTHELUS JOHN A POWELL

1300- BALTIMORE, MD WILLIAM A BOUYER REGGIE L TOWNES

824- NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ HERBERT L DELEVERY

1309- SAN DIEGO, CA ROSEMARY WELLS

825- ORADELL, NJ DOUGLAS A ELLIOTT

1338- DALLAS, TX MAX ADCOCK DONALD RILEY

880- CAMDEN, NJ FRANK P CIFONI DAVID M HENDRY ALFRED W ZAKROCKI

1342- BUFFALO, NY JOSIAH BRISTOL KENNETH COY CHARLES SHALLOWHORN

883- EVERETT, WA DONALD L LORDS 956- ALLENTOWN, PA GEORGE M BELCAK JR 966- THUNDER BAY, ON GEORGE F CULLY DAVID P EDEN 998- MILWAUKEE, WI JOHN KROPFL JAMES T MOORE GERALD F SPIELVOGEL ABBAS Q YASIN 1005- MINNEAPOLIS & ST. PAUL, MN HOWARD B FOXX JILLENE R SCHUSTER 1119- WILKES-BARRE, PA JEAN GARRY JACQUES 1145- BINGHAMTON, NY CARL BOGART

1374- CALGARY, AB BRUCE MURRAY CHALMERS RALPH POPADYNEC 1462- ST. JOHN’S, NL ARTHUR W HART RODERICK P RYAN KENNETH J STEVENSON 1505- WINNIPEG, MB RUBIN W BATKE KLAUS A GRABA ERNEST JOHN SECK 1587- TORONTO, ON STEPHEN TRESTRAIL 1763- ROCKY HILL, CT RANDALL ROBERTS 1765- OLYMPIA, WA GARY GARD

1181- NEW YORK, NY HENRIETTE BELIZAIRE MINNIE BOONE NICK DI GIGLIO VINCENT ISIDORE FRITZ F JEAN JONAS KADISH NICHOLAS MUSTO FRANK J NOCERITO BRIDGET PIRONE JERRY E SAVAS JAMES J SWEENEY EUGENIE THELUSMA

IN TRANSIT

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Amalgamated Transit Union

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2016 ATU

ELECTION MOBILIZATION ATU Locals mobilized for the 2016 election to support Hillary Clinton, transit-friendly candidates, and ballot initiatives to expand and improve public transit.

In Transit - November/December 2016  

ATU Driving Justice

In Transit - November/December 2016  

ATU Driving Justice