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TUBAU | AMY PORTFOLIO_2018 1


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AMY TUBAU

VOLUME 01 | PORTFOLIO | 2018


AMY TUBAU

Contact

PERSONAL STATEMENT

EDUCATION

Hi! My name is Amy Tubau and I am a recent graduate from the University of Oregon’s College of Design. After graduation I took some time to travel around Europe and Australia. After two months I went back to Oregon to pack up my car and move back home to Southern California. Since moving I have been visiting museums and gaining perspective in differnt fields of design. Most recently, I had been working at University of Oregon’s Campus Planning department gaining experience through projects that involved master planning, schematic design and design development. I am passionate about learning about new innovations, technology, and ideas within the world of design. I believe there is always something to learn with every opportunity one takes.

DESIGN IDEOLOLGIES

2014 - 2018

Summer 2017

Architecture Design Studio Summer Abroad Danish Institute for Study Abroad (DIS)

2010 - 2014

High School Degree Distinguished Scholars Woodrow Wilson Classical High School

2.0 (years)

Public Spaces System Generation

6.0 (years)

CAPABILITES / SKILLS

01 Computer CAD / 3D Modeling -

Rhinoceros Revit Architecture Sketchup AutoCad 2D Grasshopper

Microsoft Office Adobe Suite -

Illustrator Photoshop Indesign

ARCH Map -

Bachelor of Architecture College of Design | School of Architecture and Environment University of Oregon

WORK EXPERIENCE

1

Commercial Design

amytubau@gmail.com (562) 310-2166

Geographic Information Survey (GIS)

.25 (years)

From 2016 to 2018 Campus Planning Student Intern University of Oregon Campus Planning & Facilities Managemnt

My responsibilities at the UO’s Campus Planning department is to create diagrams that respond to user transportation, human movements, and space development. I analyze user data and make analysis based off certain user groups.

From 2008 to 2014 Child Care Provider Long Beach, California

Supervising child’s safety, nutrition, and recreation. Ability to maximize productivity through planned activities. Organizing steady schedules for a structured environment.

Summer 2011 Research Assistant Ranchos Los Amigos Medical Center

Analyzing data from medical records and surveys. Entering data into a database using statistical software.

HOBBIES & INTERESTS

02 Knowledge Grid & Layout Good sense for typography

Color theory knowledge Web usability

Cinema

Games

Music

Theatre

Travelling

Photography

Tennis

Books

03 Character Resilience Organized Time Management

Team Player Perceptive


TABLE OF CONTENTS |

VOLUME 01 PORTFOLIO_2018


STUDIO PROJECTS

6 20

LANGELINE PAVILION 4.0 ARCH 484_DIS Copenhagen // Professor Hector Lantron // Summer 2017

DEXTER LAKE ROWING ARCH 484_University of Oregon // CENTER Professor Marziah Rajabzadeh // Spring 2016

30

EUGENE, OR Amy Tubau & Scarlet Weaver // SATURDAY MARKET ARCH 484_Univerity of Oregon //

42

[PACIFIC] NEST Allen Swardii & Amy Tubau // CAMP WESTWIND ARCH 484_Univerity of Oregon //

Professor Marziah Rajabzadeh & Mohsen Marizad // Fall 2016

Professor Kevin Nute // Winter, Spring 2018

44 [HUMAN] NEST - CABINS 52 [WESTWIND] LODGE 58 [SCIENCE RESEARCH] CENTER

ADDITIONAL WORK

66

DOMESTIC SCENES IARCH 407_Univerity of Oregon //

76

RECYCLED BASKET ARCH 284_Univerity of Oregon //

78

Professor Esther Hagenlocher// Winter, 2018

Professor Hans Minder// Winter, 2015

TECHNICAL DRAWINGS ARCH 471_Building Enclosures_Univerity of Oregon // Professor Donald Corner & Professor John Rowell // Fall, 2017


LANGELINE PAVILION 4.0 DIS COPENHAGEN // PROFESSOR H. LANTRON // SUMMER 2017

The reinvention of the Langelinie Pavilion 4.0 encompasses the ideals of the current New Nordic Cuisine reputation. The new program aligns closely to the vision of enhancing quality of food, while also making the dining experience accessible to all. The redesigned building embraces the ideology of flexibility, providing spaces with different functions throughout the complex. Divided into three individual components, the buildings form a public courtyard available for the people at all times.


SITE PLAN | LANGELINE PAVILION

Foot Paths

8

Vehicle Delivery Paths / Bicycle Road

Existing Building

Site Location


CONCEPT DIAGRAMS | LANGELINE PAVILION

BUILDING TYPES | PUBLIC VS. PRIVATE

DISTRIBUTION OF LIGHT

USING CIRCLES TO DEFINE PATHS

1.

Public

2.

Semi-Private

3.

Private

Bike Path Foot Path

AQUAPONIC FARMING Fish

Fish Produce waste

Dining

Hall

Microbes & Worms

Plants filter the water that is fed back to the fish.

Microbes and worms convert waste to fertilizer for plans

Produce

EXTERIOR CIRCULATION

Building Pedestrian Path

9


FROM GENERATION | LANGELINE PAVILION

RESTAURANT

Restaurant Kitchen (10 people) 78 m2

A

B

A

B

B

C

Restaurant Room (Divided in to 3 Areas) (max 120 people) 251 m2 A

Scale: 1:500 A

B A

B

B B

Scale: 1:500

PUBLIC BUILDING

Restaurant Kitchen - (10 people) 78m2

B

B

Scale: 1:500

Scale: 1:500

Scale: 1:500

Dining Room (Divided into 3 Areas) - (max 120 people) 251m2


BUILDING TYPES | PROGRAM

PUBLIC The largest building, open to the public, encourages people to walk around the greenhouses while also offering a smaller scale dining experience of a cafĂŠ and juice bar. There are three large green houses which grow produce the restaurants use in their kitchen.

SEMI-PUBLIC A food-lab and aquaponics greenhouse take up another building on the site. Placed as an educational opportunity, guests are encouraged to look at the research being done through food experimentation.

PRIVATE The third building functions as a formal dining restaurant and serves traditional multi-course meals throughout the day. This large restaurant can accommodate up to four private parties, while also providing different variations of room types within the building. ALAIN GILLES - Sound Absorbing Movable Room Partitions. Proposed Ceiling Track System

11


9

FLOOR PLAN PUBLIC

SEMI-PUBLIC

PRIVATE

1. 2. 3. 4.

5. LAB Kitchens 6. Aquaponic Farming

7. 8. 9. 10.

Café / Juice Bar Restaurant Kitchen Restaurant Seating Green Houses

Reception Bar Restaurant Dining Central Kitchen

A


B’

4

1 4

3

2

4

5 A’

10

5

7

6

6

8 5

B

6


NORTH | ELEVATION

NORTH ELEVATION Sale: 1:125

WEST | ELEVATION


15


A - A’ | SECTION

SECTION CUT A - A’ Sale: 1:125

B -B’ | SECTION

SECTION CUT B - B’ Sale: 1:125


17


PUBLIC GARDEN ENTRANCE | ELEVATION


PROCESS | DRAWINGS

19


DEXTER LAKE ROWING CENTER UNIVERSITY OF OREGON // PROFESSOR M. RAJABZADEH // SPRING 2016

This project emphasizes schematic concept development, subsequent architectural form, and the building’s relationship to the landscape. Through intensive site analysis, form generation was simulated from solar analysis and population density. By using analytical data to simulate building form, spaces were then created following the specific programmatic needs. Immersing the building form into the landscape allowed for a symbiotic relationship between the earth and the built form.


FORM | SUN ANALYSIS

ENVIRONMENTAL

CONTROLS

22

a.

69˚ June

b.

67˚ May & July

c.

58˚ April & Aug.

d.

46˚ Mar. & Sept.

e.

35˚ Feb. & Oct.

f. g.

26˚ Jan. & Nov. 22˚ Dec.


RESPONDING TO POPULATION DENSITY ON SITE

15

24 20 40

3

12

30

28

11

28 0

length a 20

39

PROCESS DIAGRAMS

9

9

a

a a

length b

b

length c

c

length d

d

length e N

length f

e f

23


FORM | GENERATION

BASE LINE EXAMPLE

24

1

Defining Bounding Form & Origin Points

2

Deriving Anchor Points from Form Analysis

3

Defining Attractor Points though Extending Anchor Points

4

Manipulating Bounding Form from additional analysis

APPLIED GENERATION


BUILDING ON SITE

ROOF FORM GENERATION a a b c

f d

FIELDS & FLOW

e

WIND PATH

a

SOLAR ANALYSIS

b

c

Date: 06/21 Time: 09:00

Date: 06/21 Time: 16:00

d

e

Date: 12/21 Time: 09:00

Date: 12/21 Time: 16:00

f

25


25’-9”

GROUND | FLOOR PLAN

2

49’

3 1

4

6

7

1. Coaches Offices

2. Lobby 3. Public Restrooms 4. Cafe

26

5. Public Seating 6. Indoor Viewing Area 7. Deck Viewing Area

5


LOWER LEVEL | FLOOR PLAN

36' -7

"

9

24

10

30'- 4"

'- 5

"

10

11

44'

23

8

'

5'-10

"

5'-2"

12

7'- 3"

31'-

58

'-

9"

2"

16'-9"

'-

37 8" 33'

-10

8. Shell Storage

9.

"

Study Area

12. Athletic Area

10. Locker Rooms 11. Athlete Lounge

27


WEST | ELEVATION

SOUTH | ELEVATION

A A’

A - A’ | SECTION


INTERIOR BOAT STORAGE

occupied space prior construction occupied space post construction

CONCEPT DIAGRAM

29


EUGENE, OREGON SATURDAY MARKET AMY TUBAU & SCARLET WEAVER UNIVERSITY OF OREGON // PROFESSOR M. RAJABZADEH & M. MARIZAD // FALL 2016 This 484 studio focused on conducting research using systematic processes to evaluate patterns. Mathematical based systems were used to calculate the possibilities of habitable space. This research looks at the effects of architectural geometry within the context of minimal surface design. The goal was to establish a set of parameters that can respond to manipulation and therefore creating an adaptable architectural prototype. With the help of digital software, such as Rhinoceros and Grasshopper, this was achieved through minimal surface experimentation leading to a well-developed catalog of shapes, which through their combination could be used successfully to create any type of architectural space.

MINIMAL SURFACE ? IS a surface that locally minimizes its area, resulting in a mean curvature of zero. Physical models of area-minimizing minimal surfaces can be represented by dipping a wire frame into a soap solution, forming a soap film, which is a minimal surface whose boundary is the wire frame.


REASONS FOR SELECTION SIMPLE SYSTEM

SPATIAL POSSIBILITIES

Geometry

SPATIAL POSSIBILITIES SPATIAL POSSIBILITIES

1. Spatial Possibilities

Stacking Layers SIMPLE SYSTEM SIMPLE SYSTEM

2. Simple System SPATIAL POSSIBILITIES

Geometry SIMPLE SYSTEM Stacking Layers

Geometry

+

Stacking Layers

Geometry

Stacking Layers

+

+

+

Stacking Layers

Geometry COMPREHENSIVE CONTROL FACTORS

DIRECTIONLESS, ROTATIONAL MODULES

COMPREHENSIVE FACTORS 4. Direction-less, DIRECTIONLESS, ROTATIONAL MODULES 3. Comprehensive Control Factors Rotational Modules Deleting Faces COMPREHENSIVE CONTROLCONTROL FACTORS DIRECTIONLESS, ROTATIONAL MODULES

Deleting Faces

COMPREHENSIVE CONTROL DeletingFACTORS Faces

DIRECTIONLESS, ROTATIONAL MODULES 90

90

90

Deleting Faces

90

90

90

Deleting Faces

90

90

90

Scripted Geometry 90

90

90


SYSTEM CONTROLS | PROTOTYPE SYSTEM CONTROLS GEOMETRY

AMY TUBAU + SCARLET WEAVER // ARCH 484 // PROFESSORS: M. RAJABZADEH + M. MARIZAD

GEOMETRY

LAYER 1

LAYER 1

LAYER LAYER 2 2

3 LAYER LAYER 3

ARRANGEMENT 1

ARRANGEMENT 1

ARRANGEMENT 2

ARRANGEMENT 2

ARRANGEMENT 3

ARRANGEMENT 3

ARRANGEMENT 4

ARRANGEMENT 4

PHYSICAL MODEL

METSYS ELPMIS

L gnikcatS

SEITILIBISSOP LAITAPS

yrtemoeG

+

32 M LANOITATOR ,SSELNOITCERID

SROTCAF LORTNOC EVISNEHERPMOC


CATALOG | MINIMAL SURFACE

DELETING FACES

1. no faces deleted

2. top & bottom deleted faces

3. exterior adjacent faces deleted

4. interior adjacent 5. interior & exterior faces deleted adjacent faces deleted

EXTENDED CATALOG | MINIMAL SURFACE

33


FORM GENERATION | FINAL

2. CREATE BASE GEOMETRY

3. CREATE OPEN BOX GEOMETRY

90'-0"

1. DEVELOP GRID

336'-0"

4. DELETE FACES

34

two or more parallel or adjacent surfaces deleted

5. SCRIPTED GEOMETRY


FLEXIBILITY | DESIGN GOAL Flexibility of space within this project is a key aspect of design to ensure user needs are fulfilled throughout the entire life-cycle. Because buildings have a significant impact on the environment this project focuses on adaptable spaces in order to prevent premature deconstruction. Flexibility has been achieved through three main design aspects.

LARGE

LARGE

MEDIUM

MEDIUM

SMALL

SECTION CUT D

SECTION CUT A

LARGE

LARGE

SMALL

MEDIUM

MEDIUM

SECTION CUT B

SECTION CUT E

1. VARIETY OF SPACES

MEDIUM

LARGE

small, medium, large

MEDIUM

SMALL

2. DEGREE OF ENCLOSURE enclosed

open

MEDIUM

free space

MEDIUM

SECTION CUT C

SECTION CUT F

3. FREE SPACE Used for circulation and social space, yet adaptable for future use

A

B

C

D

E

F

INCLUSIVE | DESIGN GOAL Inclusive design is a fundamental aspect of this project in order to ensure every member of the community has the same ability to access and participate in the spaces created. On the top floor, privacy is created through use of smaller, enclosed spaces. The ground floor is inclusive through the use of circulation, open courtyard spaces, and direct contact with the surrounding green space.

CIRCULATION

COURTYARD

GREEN SPACE CONNECTION

35


PROGRAM |

FP 3

FP 2

FP 1

ADMINISTRATION (4,850 ft2)

PERMANENT RETAIL (12,700 ft2)

Intended as small private practice spaces, administration, and other secluded spaces.

Incorporates window shopping and attracts pedestrians into the site.

SATURDAY MARKET (10,000 ft2)

PERMANENT FOOD COURT (4,000 ft2)

The Saturday market is intended to be half indoors and half outdoors, incorporating the landscape. The current outdoor feel of the Saturday market is a very successful and a continuation of that feeling is provided with this design.

Permanent spaces have been dedicated for eateries. Food trucks are intended to be placed on the lawn near the market stalls.

PARKING (15,250 ft2) Parking on site is limited to promote green transportation. This will also be successful because of the many public parking lots near the site.

UTILITY (3,000 ft2) Mechanical equipment and storage.

CIRCULATION ( 30,000 ft2) Provides free space and incorporates an aspect of inclusivity and flexibility.

OPEN SPACE (10,000 ft2) To fulfill our flexibility design goal a portion of our building has been left open. These spaces can be adapted into more permanent spaces in the future or left open.

TOTAL (90,000 ft2)


THIRD

48'-0"

48'-0"

48'

24'-0"

34'-0"

37'-0"

72'-0"

27'-0"

30'-0" 30'-0"

90'-0"

FP 3

30'-0"

27'-0" SECOND 22'-8 3/4"

48'-0"

22'-7"

24'-0"

48'

49'-5"

25'-9"

23'-9"

29'-9"

20'-6"

338'-10"

48'-0"

48'-0"

24'-0"

32'-4 1/2"

20'-6"

20'-6"

21'-2 1/2"

25'-5"

48'-3 1/2"

49'-7 1/2"

30'-0" 90'-0"

30'-0"

FP 2

30'-0"

FIRST

47'-8 1/4"

27'-0"

22'-8 3/4"

22'-7"

24'-0"

49'-5"

72'-0"

23'-9"

49'-8"

338'-10"

47'-4"

24'-8"

163'-3 1/2"

32'-1 3/4"

42'-0 1/4"

27'-1 1/4"

30'-0" 90'-0"

30'-0"

FP 1

30'-0"

97'-5"

22'-7"

123'-1 3/4"

22'-3 1/4"

72'-0"

37


24'-0"

20'-0" 10'-0"

42'-0"

12'-0"

97'-5"

WEST 73'-5"

120

46'-6 3/4"

EAST | ELEVATION

20'-0" 10'-0"

42'-0"

12'-0"

25'-5"

WEST | ELEVATION

47'-2 1/2"

24'-9 1/2"

48'-0"

24'-0


144'-0"

24'-0"

0'-7 1/4"

0"

24'-0"

25'-5"

98'-2 3/4"

47'-7 1/4"

24'-9 3/4"

97'-0 1/4"

39


CONSTRUCTION | DIAGRAM

1. B - B’

2.

3.

A - A’ | SECTION

A truss wall is created out of a metal mesh. This skeleton structure follows the contours of the building’s organic form.

A spray-able concrete is applied in two layers. The first layer is applied in bulk to create the general massing of the structure.

A second layer is then plastered over to get the desired texture.


TOP VIEW | PHYSICAL MODEL

A

A’

B

B’

Laser Cut Physical Model | Layered Construction

3D Printed Model on Site

Final Studio Review at University of Oregon

41


[PACIFIC] NEST U. OREGON // PROFESSOR K. NUTE // WINTER, SPRING 2018 The Interface Terminal studio gave this project the opportunity to rethink how campers can inhabit space amongst Oregon’s natural habitat. Three structures were designed throughout the terms: Cabins, Reception/Lodge, and a Science Research Center. All three structures were designed with the intention of providing occupants with a more educational interface with the natural environment by actively including native plants and wildlife. This project studied the geotechnical, wind, and seismic forces that would impact the structures on site. The threat of rising sea levels and more immediately a major tsunami stemming from the Cascadia Fault has made it necessary to relocate most of Westwind’s building above the 80 ft. tsunami inundation zone. This project tackles natural forces and looks at the impact humans have on the natural environment.


Science Research Center

Cabins

Reception / Lodge


[HUMAN] NESTS OBJECTIVE The Westwind sleeping quarters are designed to immerse occupants in nature and to blur the line between the built environment and the natural environment. Rather than creating boundaries that separate human activity and what is existing, the cabin structure moves around what is already there and inhabits the space between the trees and foliage. The result is to limit the disruption of the natural environment and lessen the number of times the structure alters the site. DESIGN INTENT The 8’ x 8’ modular design creates a system that can be implemented anywhere within the site’s location. With four different unit types, each cluster of modules creates a village where camp members and visiting guests are grouped together, but housed separately. Each village is designed with accessible quarters for those with limited mobility. Within each module, sleeping spaces were configured around a communal hub creating a hearth unique to each space. A changing room and storage for each sleeping pod fit within the modular constraints. Each of the sleeping pods fit either one or people and provides them with views to the ocean, sky, forest and hearth.


Challenging the perspective of human dwelling, the sleeping structure creates a home for both people and animals among the trees.


CONCEPT MODELS | CABINS

ROW 1

ROW 2

ROW 3

Sleeping within a Pod. Separation between Functions

Sleeping within the Trees. Built Environment vs. Nature

Subtracted Space. Solid Void Relationship


UNIT TYPES | CABINS

1 Unit Module

2 Unit Module

6 Unit Module

8 Unit Module

or

HIERARCHY | THE VILLAGE

Sleeping Module

(2) 1 Unit Module

Unit Module

(2) 2 Unit Module

The Village

(2) 6 Unit Module

(1) 8 Unit Module


DIAGRAMS | THE VILLAGE

Environmental Control

48

Accessibility

Structural Control


VIEWS | CABINS

View to the Ocean

View to the Sky

View to the Forest

View to the Hearth


SECTION PERSPECTIVE | CABINS

Japanese Sukiya Structural Joint


Nature inhabits the built environment. Blurring the boundary between US vs. THEM

51


[WEST WIND] LODGE The West Wind Lodge functions as a communal hub for gathering, dining, and relaxing. Administration offices, bathrooms, multipurpose rooms, and medical supplies are housed within this building. The site’s location is situated at higher elevation within a clearing, cantilevering over the side of the mountain. Structural posts are embedded into the bedrock to ensure the building’s safety against wind, erosion, and earthquakes. Similar in form to the rest of the buildings on site, the lodge’s interior spaces take up the programmatic requirements within, while the circulation and open gathering spaces make up the remaining floor plan. Glazing throughout enhances the spaces that are perceived as both inside and outside.


53


RECEPTION / DINING | ELEVATION


55


RECEPTION / DINING | SECTION 56


RECEPTION / DINING | SECTION

Lobby Entrance into the Westwind Reception.

Public space located on the lower level provides unobstructed views of the Oregon Coast.

57


[SCIENCE RESEARCH] CENTER The purpose of this building is to provide Westwind with research facilities to study the local wildlife and habitat. The building was constructed atop the existing foundation from the former lodge. Keeping consistent with the transparency between inside and outside, a series of rooms were constructed within the confines of the existing square footage. The classrooms, laboratories, and offices are meant to define the built environment, while the exhibition space and circulation provides a medium between nature and structure. Continuous glazing informs the users of thus established relationship. A habitat wall and bat homes help inform researchers of the local species population, while also encouraging visitors to discover the species that live among them.


59


SCIENCE RESEARCH CENTER | SECTION 60


SCIENCE RESEARCH CENTER | SECTION

Path leading towards the Science Research Center.

Central stairway leads towards additional offices, laboratories, and exhibition space

61


USER DIAGRAM | [AMINAL] HABITATION

THE BEE HIVE Mud 5/16” Diameter Cardboard Tubes with Paper Liners

62


CONSTRUCTION MODEL | [ANIMAL] HABITATION

CONSTRUCTION PROCESS | PHYSICAL MODEL


PHYSICAL MODEL | SCALE : 1/8” = 1’


DOMESTIC SCENES

ENTERING + WELCOMING

KITCHEN + LIVING

WORKING + RELAXING

SLEEPING

BATHING

BATH | AXON


WELCOME HOME U. OREGON // PROFESSOR E. HAGENLOCHER // WINTER 2017 The content within this series explore the interior spatial qualities of a cabin located along the forested Oregon coast. This project works to analyze natural human behavior in a built environment. The intent is to design for site specific functions while optimizing the spatial conditions for each room. The scenes analyzed spatial responses specific to room type while each space merged technical and functional requirements defined by human patterns. This process created an understanding that the relationship between external environment and interior space directly impact the way humans behave.


ENTRY The entry into this welcoming space encompasses a modern take on a traditional Japanese genkan. Stepping up onto an elevated platform, the user walks into a space meant to function as a transition from outside to inside. A foot wash constructed from local stones brings part of the exterior environment inside, while also containing any dirt brought in. Shoe cubicles were built beneath the window and a padded bench sits to its right. The top of the bench opens up to provide additional storage for outdoor equipment.


69


KITCHEN + LIVING FURNITURE Bar Stool

- HAY (Hee Welling)

Sofa Cushion - HAY (Mags)

TABLE WARE Mugs

- LITTLA (Teema)

Soup Bowls - LITTILA (Tiimi) Glass Bowl

KITCHEN + LIVING

- LITTILA (Kastehelmi)

An open concept is introduced into the kitchen living space to encourage family interaction. KITCHEN Rather than keeping theAPPLIANCES kitchen behind closed doors, the users are able to interact with the rest of the people in the living room whether Refrigerator - SMEG (FQ60XPE) they are seating at the bar or down below. A Sinkarea constructed - BOFFIout (Case System 5.0) recessed seating of birch wood brings the occupants together into one Stove Top - BOFFI (Case System 5.0) space. A wrapped around bench provides 365 Hood degree seatingRange into the rest- BOFFI of the (Aprile) cabin with views towards Stand the outside. A cork strip Mixer - KITCHENfunctions AID as a coaster for hot liquids for the seated users.


71


WORKING + RELAXING In interplay between heights define the function of spaces throughout the cabin. The recessed seating area is mimicked with a drop down ceiling to bring light into the rest of the cabin. A wood burning fire place allows for the open space to be kept at a comfortable temperature. The concrete wall retains the displaced heat to keep the interior warm when the fire is extinguished. Accordion doors separate the interior space with the outdoors, creating a transparent barrier between the two.


73


SLEEPING The master bedroom sits at the front of the cabin to the left of the entry hallway. The mullions on the exterior glazing define the organizational structure of the room. A lofted area within the bedroom results in a compressed entryway. This space functions as additional bedding for guests or young children as well as a place for storage. Behind the sliding door is the shared bathroom. The interior functions solely as a place for sleeping. All other activities are encouraged to be performed outside the bedroom to promote engagement with one another and with the outdoors.


BATHING The bathroom, located behind the master bedroom, is also accessible from the living room. A step in shower provides the users to use the space as a bathing area for young children. The form of the exterior glazing continues from the sleeping area into the bathroom, its mullions are used to define the interior space.

75


RECYCLED BASKET Utilizing recycled resources on hand, the objective of this project was to create a basket made out of paper material. No fastenings such as glue, staples, or tape were used. Because of its modular design and flexibility, origami triangles were used to construct the basket. The triangles determined the diameter, height, and design of the project. Color was sourced from additional scrap paper and highlights what materials were available.

THE PROCESS | ORIGAMI FOLDS

6�

3�


77


ENCLOSURES A DOUBLE FACADE FOR ACCELERATING SCIENTIFIC IMPACT The Knight Campus for Accelerating Scientific Impact is a new initiative with a specific focus on facilitating innovation and accelerating the pace of societal benefit and impact of this research. This effort therefore needs to be supported by physical infrastructure that similarly elevates the university to new heights. The schematic design vision is for the main body of the building to be clad in a double facade, terra cotta rain-screen, with large expanses of glass punctuating the cladding plane to mark the lab bays. The detail drawings focus on the development of the double façade at the lab bay, and the adjacent terra cotta cladding and punched window openings. MATERIALS, ASSEMBLIES & SYSTEMS • • • •

The energy target is 35% below Oregon Code. The primary structure is reinforced concrete frame with a 10” post-tensioned floor plate. Solid portions of exterior wall are 6”, 20 gage metal stud walls with USG Densglas exterior gypsum sheathing. Insulation is to be 3” mineral wool external to Densglas sheathing. Barriers are liquid applied or selfadhered.

Drawing 1: Window Head in Terra Cotta Detail. Drawing 2: Wall Section at Base of Double Facade Drawing 3: Window Jamb in Terra Cotta Detail Drawing 4: Section at the Lab Floor Level at Double Facade Drawing 5: 3-D Cutaway Drawing showing Glazing/Wall relationship

(p. 79) (p. 80) (p. 82) (p. 84) (p. 86)


INTERIOR 5/8” Gypsum Board Finish 6” Metal Stud w/ Fiberglass Batt Insulation 3/4” Plywood Sheathing (Taped) Fluid Applied Air, Water & Vapor Barrier 3” Continuous Mineral Wool Insulation 1/2” Metal Furring Strips NBK Horizontal Support w/ Clips NBK Terracotta Panels EXTERIOR

10” Concrete Slab

6” 20 Gage Metal Stud w/ Fiberglass Batt Insulation

Flashing Wood Trim Exterior Shading Device

Kawneer 1600 Curtain Wall

Air & Vapor Barrier Water Barrier

DRAWING 1

79


80 DRAWING 2


Aluminum Metal Fin Kawneer Triple Pane Exterior Glazing Metal Grate Catwalk Supported on 8”x4” Beam Cast in Concrete & Supporting Secondary Facade (fastened by bolt) 10” Concrete Slab 20” Square Column

INTERIOR 5/8” Gypsum Board Finish 6” Metal Stud w/ Fiberglass Batt Insulation 3/4” Plywood Sheathing (Taped) Fluid Applied Air, Water & Vapor Barrier 3” Continuous Mineral Wool Insulation 1/2” Metal Furring Strips NBK Horizontal Support w/ Clips NBK Terracotta Panels EXTERIOR

Aluminum Extruded Carrier Track NBK Soffit Clip Air & Vapor Barrier Water Barrier


INTERIOR 5/8” Gypsum Board Finish 6” Metal Stud w/ Fiberglass Batt Insulation 3/4” Plywood Sheathing (Taped) Fluid Applied Air, Water & Vapor Barrier 3” Continuous Mineral Wool Insulation 1/2” Metal Furring Strips NBK Horizontal Support w/ Clips NBK Terracotta Panels EXTERIOR

Air & Vapor Barrier Water Barrier

82 DRAWING 3


20 Steel Metal Gage

Kawneer 541 Storefront - Double Pane Window

Terra Cotta Baguette Screen Continuous Aluminum Carrier Plate


INTERIOR 3/4” Gypsum Board Finish 6” 20 Gauge Metal Stud w/ Fiberglass Batt Insulation 3/4” Plywood Sheathing (Taped) Fluid Applied Air, Water & Vapor Barrier 3” Continuous Mineral Wool Insulation 1/2” Diagonal Steel Furring Metal Panel Siding EXTERIOR Base Board

Shelve Angle Bolt in Place Flashing Exterior Shading Device

84 DRAWING 4


Steel Suspension Rod

Welded Fastener Attached to glass

Metal Grate Catwalk Supported on 8�x4� Beam Cast in Concrete & Supporting Secondary Facade (fastened by bolt) Air & Vapor Barrier Water Barrier


Kawneer 541 Storefront - Double Pane Window

INTERIOR 5/8” Gypsum Board Finish 6” 20 Gauge Metal Stud w/ Fiberglass Batt Insulation 3/4” Plywood Sheathing (Taped) Fluid Applied Air, Water & Vapor Barrier 3” Continuous Mineral Wool Insulation 1/2” Metal Furring Strips NBK Horizontal Support w/ Clips NBK Terracotta Panels

EXTERIOR 10” Concrete Slab Metal Grate Catwalk Supported on 8”x4” Beam Cast in Concrete & Supporting Secondary Facade (fastened by bolt)

86 DRAWING 5


Metal Panel Siding

Kawneer Triple Pane Exterior Glazing Steel Suspension Rod Aluminum Metal Fin


AT

AMY TUBAU

VOLUME 01 | PORTFOLIO | 2018

Amy Tubau - Architecture Portfolio - 2018  
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