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Contents APRIL 2010 • VOL 23, NO 4 • WWW.MT-ONLINE.COM

M A I N T E N A N C E

TECHNOLOGY

®

YEARS

Your Source For CAPACITY ASSURANCE SOLUTIONS

FEATURES CAPACITY ASSURANCE STRATEGIES Determining The Actual Financial Costs Of Machinery Vibration Levels

© Infinite-source.net STU CORLETT — FOTOLIA.COM

14

In the first of several new articles, this icon of the maintenance and reliability field reminds us of something that we all should know by now. The message is clearest when you talk in terms of dollars and cents. Ralph T. Buscarello, Update International

A SPECIAL GREEN EDGE FEATURE 22

Meet The Flywheel: Green, Clean Energy-Storage Technology With brownouts and blackouts on the rise, businesses can’t afford to gamble on critical power protection capabilities. This approach offers a number of advantages for operations that really want to go “green.” Frank DeLattre, VYCON

UTILITIES MANAGER 27

■ Big Money Talks ■ Making Energy Audits Feasible

SPECIAL SHOWCASE 32

Vibration Solutions This month, we put the spotlight on products and services for dealing with this killer of equipment and processes.

LAST CALL for Registration!

MAINTENANCE and RELIABILITY TECHNOLOGY SUMMIT

April 27-30, 2010 Hyatt Regency O’Hare • Rosemont (Chicago), IL

www.MARTSconference.com APRIL 2010

DEPARTMENTS 6 8 12 31 36 37 38 38 39 40

JUST HOW GOOD ARE YOU?

My Take Uptime For On The Floor Lubrication Checkup Motor Decisions Matter Marketplace Information Highway Classified Supplier Index Viewpoint

Applications For

The 2010 NORTH AMERICAN MAINTENANCE EXCELLENCE (NAME) AWARD Are Available Online

www.nameaward.com MT-ONLINE.COM | 3


M A I N T E N A N C E

TECHNOLOGY

LAST CALL

®

YEARS

Your Source For CAPACITY ASSURANCE SOLUTIONS

April 2010 • Volume 23, No. 4

For MARTS Attendees!

ARTHUR L. RICE President/CEO arice@atpnetwork.com

You Can’t Afford To Miss The Biggest And Best Ever!

BILL KIESEL Executive Vice President/Publisher bkiesel@atpnetwork.com

JANE ALEXANDER Editor-In-Chief jalexander@atpnetwork.com

RICK CARTER Executive Editor rcarter@atpnetwork.com

Register TODAY at

ROBERT “BOB” WILLIAMSON KENNETH E. BANNISTER RAYMOND L. ATKINS

www.MARTSconference.com

Contributing Editors

RANDY BUTTSTADT Director of Creative Services rbuttstadt@atpnetwork.com

GREG PIETRAS Editorial/Production Assistant gpietras@atpnetwork.com

MAINTENANCE M AINTENANCE andd RRELIABILITY ELIABILITY TTECHNOLOGY ECHNOLOGY SUMMIT Space Is Still Available In Several Full-Day Pre- and PostConference Workshops! Check www.MARTSconference.com ASAP to see if your preferred Workshop is open. 32 One-Hour Conferences Will Cover 6 Tracks Of Critical Interest To You And Your Company. Make your plans now on which to attend. Don’t forget: The Applied Technology Publications All-Star Contributing Editor Team of Bob Williamson, Ken Bannister, Ray Atkins, Ray Thibault and Bill Livoti will be there to learn from and network with. 2 Keynote Speakers Will Inform & Inspire. Actor, author and director John Ratzenberger will discuss his successful efforts to connect U.S. youths with manufacturing careers. Bob Chernow, a futurist and financial professional will offer predictions on the evolving role of U.S. manufacturing. 2 Professional Development Courses Will Help You And Your Team Prepare For Critical Certification In The Fields Of Lubrication And Maintenance & Reliability. It’s no secret that employers and prospective employers have tremendous respect for those types of certifications!

TIME IS RUNNING OUT! SIGN UP NOW at www.MARTSconference.com

APRIL 27-30, 2010 Hyatt Regency O’Hare, Rosemont (Chicago), IL

www.MARTSconference.com Call Tom Madding at (847) 382-8100, ext. 108, to learn about group discounts and exhibitor opportunities.

ELLEN SANDKAM Direct Mail 800-223-3423, ext. 110 esandkam@atplists.com

EDWARD KANE Reprint Manager 800-382-0808, ext. 131 ekane@fostereprints.com

Editorial Office: 1300 South Grove Ave., Suite 105 Barrington, IL 60010 847-382-8100 / FAX 847-304-8603 WWW.MT-ONLINE.COM

Subscriptions: FOR INQUIRIES OR CHANGES CONTACT JEFFREY HEINE, 630-739-0900 EXT. 204 / FAX 630-739-7967

Maintenance Technology® (ISSN 0899-5729) is published monthly by Applied Technology Publications, Inc., 1300 S. Grove Avenue, Barrington, IL 60010. Periodicals postage paid at Barrington, Illinois and additional offices. Arthur L. Rice, III, President. Circulation records are maintained at Maintenance Technology®, Creative Data, 440 Quadrangle Drive, Suite E, Bolingbrook, IL 60440. Maintenance Technology® copyright 2010 by Applied Technology Publications, Inc. Annual subscription rates for nonqualified people: North America, $140; all others, $280 (air). No subscription agency is authorized by us to solicit or take orders for subscriptions. Postmaster: Please send address changes to Maintenance Technology®, Creative Data, 440 Quadrangle Drive, Suite E, Bolingbrook, IL 60440. Please indicate position, title, company name, company address. For other circulation information call (630) 739-0900. Canadian Publications agreement No. 40886011. Canada Post returns: IMEX, Station A, P.O. Box 54, Windsor, ON N9A 6J5, or email: cpcreturns@ wdsmail.com. Submissions Policy: Maintenance Technology® gladly welcomes submissions. By sending us your submission, unless otherwise negotiated in writing with our editor(s), you grant Applied Technology Publications, Inc. permission, by an irrevocable license, to edit, reproduce, distribute, publish, and adapt your submission in any medium, including via Internet, on multiple occasions. You are, of course, free to publish your submission yourself or to allow others to republish your submission. Submissions will not be returned. “Maintenance Technology®” is a registered trademark of Applied Technology Publications, Inc. Printed in U.S.A.

To receive a discounted room rate at the Hyatt Regency O’Hare hotel, book your stay at www.martsconference.com.

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MY TAKE

Jane Alexander, Editor-In-Chief

Stars Are Falling On Alabama Again

M

uch of my drive time into work one recent morning was spent in the draft of a big, yellow 18-wheeler belonging to TKX Logistics, a division of ThyssenKrupp Industrial Services. The truck and its cordial driver reminded me of some good news I had picked up earlier in the week, about another ThyssenKrupp business—and, more importantly, where it’s putting the finishing touches on a new $3.7 billion steel mill. But, first a little background… As someone who spent almost 20 years living and working in Alabama (moving from Auburn, to Birmingham, to Tuscaloosa, then back to Birmingham, before relocating to Illinois several years ago), I start each day by checking out “all things Alabama” at www.al.com. It’s where I pick up a wealth of critical information, most of it pertaining to the interests and pursuits of my adopted (and beloved) Auburn University/War Eagle family, as well as to those of the other persuasion—my good friends and associates who yell “Roll Tide.” I also count on this Website to keep me informed about what’s going on across Alabama from the standpoint of industry and commerce. Evidently, it’s quite a lot. Countless people who know and love Alabama—having been born and/or raised there or, like me, transplanted in as an adult due to family- or work-related circumstances—will tell you what we always knew: It would only be a matter of time before this jewel of a place for business investment was “discovered.” And why not? According to the Economic Development Partnership of Alabama (EDPA)*, the state offers, among other things, a skilled workforce (backed up by a highly successful state-sponsored, state-of-the-art industrial training network); an awesome sun-belt climate; five Interstate highways (soon to be six); seven commercial airports; five Class I railroads; and one of the finest deepwater, fullservice ports in the U.S. (not to mention one of the largest navigable inland-waterway systems in the nation). EDPA could go on and on and on, promoting Alabama as the great place for business that it is. And this is not just my opinion, either. In the March 13-19 edition of The Economist, an article entitled “Alabama’s Economy After Cotton,” described how the state’s small cities are poised for economic recovery (perhaps more than others). A case in point is that new ThyssenKrupp mill in Mobile, which represents “the largest German investment in America ever.” By the time it reaches full capacity (in 2012), the operation is expected to employ 2700 workers and turn out 5.1 million tons of carbon and stainless steel annually. The article noted something else of interest: a recent Moody’s Economy.com ranking of 378 U.S. metropolitan areas by job growth. In it, the Mobile region ranked only 12th. Three other Alabama regions ranked higher. The engineering hotbeds of Huntsville and Auburn/Opelika ranked 1st and 2nd, respectively, and the Columbus/Phoenix City area (straddling the Georgia border), ranked 7th. Achieving these enviable stats hasn’t been easy. As Wayne Flynt’s 1987 book, Mine, Mill & Microchip: A Chronicle of Alabama Enterprise pointed out, the journey from frontier and homestead to railroads and rocketry was not without some major turbulence. These days, the ride seems to be much smoother. While everything may not be right in Alabama, the state is clearly doing plenty of the right things. The stars falling on it today may have been a long time coming, but they’re ever so well deserved.

*www.edpa.org **www.economist.com/world/united-states/displaystory.cfm?story_id=15663940

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MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY

APRIL 2010


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UPTIME EDITOR’S NOTE: This month’s column, an update of his February 2008 Uptime, is the subject of Bob Williamson’s MARTS 2010 Conference presentation.

Bob Williamson, Contributing Editor

Where’s Your Reliability Policy? Policy: A deliberate plan of action to guide decisions and achieve rational outcome(s). Policy merely guides actions toward those behaviors that are most likely to achieve a desired outcome. I began writing about “reliability policies” in early 2000, when I realized that safety, health, environmental and quality policies were considered to be “uncompromizable” by company executives. They held everyone in their organizations accountable for establishing and achieving the results as specified in these policies. The major disconnect that I saw was the total ABSENCE of any form of policy that addressed equipment and process performance or reliability. The very assets that made these executives’ products, generated their revenues and grew their businesses were literally treated as unimportant—and the management of such assets was basically akin to “flying blind.” In other words, a company’s single largest investment was virtually adrift in a turbulent sea of competitiveness. If safety and quality were so important, why wasn’t equipment held in a similar regard? Where was the reliability policy? My July 2009 Uptime column, “Share This with Senior Operations Management,” essentially addressed “what every operations leader should understand about maintenance but is afraid to ask.” That piece ended with the following thoughts… Call to action: Without a clear policy, a set of expectations and dedicated resources safety, quality, and customer responsiveness WILL NOT HAPPEN. Employees understand the importance of safety, quality and customers. Likewise, without a clear policy, a set of expectations and dedicated resources, true maintenance will not happen. Employees do not understand the importance of maintenance and are unclear as to its roles and responsibilities. Imagine how unproductive and uncompetitive your business would be if employees had the same lack of respect for safety, quality and customer service as they do for maintenance. Maintenance must have a productive purpose in an era of a growing skills shortage (especially in maintenance jobs), an era of increasing competitiveness and an era of serious cost controls. Maintenance efficiency and effectiveness is crucial to 8|

MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY

business prosperity. That’s because maintenance is truly about sustaining a desired level of equipment, process and facility performance, NOT just fixing things that break or pursuing countless special projects. As a senior operations manager you can make the maintenance paradigm shift happen. If you already have done so, bless you and thank you. You are worth your weight in gold. One last thing to remember: Maintenance by the maintenance department alone will not necessarily lead to reliable equipment, processes and facilities. Entire organizations must share a new paradigm of reliability. Who needs a reliability policy? Any capital-intensive business that depends on equipment assets to generate revenue will benefit from a reliability policy that is deployed throughout the organization. Manufacturing, petrochemical processing, utilities, power-generation, transportation, distribution operations, mining and agriculture are just a few examples of business sectors that depend on equipment—reliable equipment—to produce and market competitive goods and services. Generally speaking, these types of businesses have numerous policies that set expectations and serve as operating guidelines. Unfortunately, most capital-intensive businesses do not have a formal “Reliability Policy” that serves as a guide for managing capital assets, maintaining, making decisions about and improving the performance and reliability of those assets. ‘If you don’t know where you’re going, any road will get you there.’ Over the years, the Cheshire Cat in Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland has been paraphrased time and again by those of us considering the “direction” of continuous improvement in our industrial operations. When there is NO POLICY, how does a company expect its employees to respond to equipment maintenance and reliability questions, problems, opportunities and improvements? If you want to improve the way your equipment and facilities are operated and maintained, how they are cared for and how their performance is improved, you need an actual Reliability Policy. APRIL 2010


UPTIME

While it should originate at the top levels of a company, it could be fairly general in regard to plans, schedules and tactics. A “guiding coalition” of formal and informal leaders should structure the policy statement.

■ How reliability improvement will be measured.

What should a policy statement contain? Your Reliability Policy should become more and more explicit as it is translated into actions from the top down through the organization. At the lowest leadership level (plant, area, department), it should be a specific plan or a strategy for taking action that is consistent with the Reliability Policy. A Reliability Improvement Policy statement should be clear and precise regarding :

Although there are countless unique Reliability Policies, the one on this page is worth serious consideration.

■ The compelling business reason for improving equipment and/or process reliability. ■ The acceptable maintenance and reliability work processes and standards. ■ What is to be improved.

■ The time frames in which reliability improvement should be made.

How do you deploy a reliability policy? A time-proven method for developing and establishing company-improvement policies is called, appropriately, “Policy Deployment.” The purpose of Policy Deployment is to enable the shift from the status quo so as to make major performance improvements by analyzing and addressing current business competition opportunities and operational problems. Policy Deployment methods called “Hoshin Planning” (Hoshin Kanri), a system of strategic and operational planning, were developed and refined in the 1960s by numerous Japanese companies, including Toyota, Nippon Denso and Komatsu, among others. They blended proven ideas from W. Edwards Deming (PDCA cycle),

Reliability Policy Example [COMPANY & PLANT SITE] is committed to being the best we can be with our equipment- and process-performance and reliability. Reliability is an integral component to the safety, health and environmental performance required to remain competitive in our marketplace. This Reliability Policy drives high-quality and on-time delivery to our customers, at the lowest manufacturing cost per unit produced. At [COMPANY & PLANT SITE] we are committed to: 1. Developing and deploying an Annual Reliability Improvement Plan to address the business case, goals, expectations and priorities for making focused improvements in equipment performance and reliability in ways that demonstrate sustainable gains. 2. Learning and using proven maintenance, reliability and operations-improvement methods to continually improve our plant performance and reliability. 3. Being the best in our company and the best in our industry by pursuing best-in-class levels of equipment performance and reliability consistent with our Annual Reliability Improvement Plan.

APRIL 2010

4. Developing a work culture where all employees and contractors hold each other accountable for doing their very best, doing the right things the right way, first time, every time. 5. Utilizing consistent, accurate, and reliable equipment performance and production data plus maintenance history data to identify and eliminate the major causes of problems. 6. Developing and adhering to “best practice” procedures, work processes and checklists for critical operations and maintenance tasks consistent with our Annual Reliability Improvement Plan. 7. Training and qualifying our employees on all crews to safely and accurately perform all required operations and maintenance tasks according to approved “best practices” consistent with our Annual Reliability Improvement Plan.

The bottom line: Without reliable equipment, we cannot compete.

MT-ONLINE.COM | 9


UPTIME

Any capital-intensive business that depends on equipment assets to generate revenue will benefit from a reliability policy. Joseph Juran (quality policy) and Peter Drucker (MBO) into strategic planning to create Hoshin Planning— something that many U.S. companies used since the 1980s to make significant and sustainable improvements. This Policy Deployment process continues to thrive in many successful Lean Enterprise businesses. Policy Deployment cascades— or deploys—top-management policies and targets down the management hierarchy. At each level, the policy is translated into policies, targets and actions for the next level down. Using a “Policy Deployment” strategy for establishing and infusing a Reliability Policy makes sense: It will connect the important factors of business success from the highest levels of the company to the plantfloor workgroups and then back to the top levels. Where’s your true north? As described above, the Policy Deployment “line of sight” acts as a compass, pointing north, keeping the entire organization heading in the right direction. In the absence of a common direction, focused leadership and engaged workgroups at all levels, almost any improvement process will be doomed to failure— or, at best, stagnation. Again, never forget: The maintenance department alone cannot make equipment reliable unless it is in absolute control of all of the causes of “unreliability.” By the way, I hope to see you and other loyal Readers at MARTS 2010, in Chicago. MT RobertMW2@cs.com For more info, enter 67 at www.MT-freeinfo.com

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MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY

APRIL 2010


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3/9/10 10:57 AM


FOR ON THE FLOOR An outlet for the views of today’s capacity assurance professionals Rick Carter, Executive Editor

Stretching The Maintenance Budget If a single word can instill apprehension, a top contender would have to be “budget.” Nearly any time it pops up these days, something negative follows. Maintenance pros know this just as well as those in other lines of work: Discussion of “the budget” is often a pretext for announcements about reductions or freezes in funding for projects and operations, while other company goals (production, efficiency, continuous improvement) stay the same. It’s the old, familiar “do more with less” syndrome that, in 2010, seems to have graduated from a conference presentation topic to standard business practice. With their unique analytical and practical skills, however, maintenance professionals may be among the best equipped to resourcefully ride out budget storms and other economic tempests. This is at least partly confirmed this month by the Maintenance Technology Reader Panelists, who answered our question: “What do you do to stretch your maintenance budget?” Here’s what they had to say: In-house expertise, a distributor’s assistance “I have utilized methods from the ’30s, ’40s and ’50s to make mechanical repairs that the older journeymen taught me when I was an apprentice machine repairman,” says a food-industry maintenance supervisor in the upper Midwest. Even today, he notes, “everything is not electrical or electronic,” and his ability to make complex mechanical repairs in-house saves money. This Panelist has also learned to tap sources of no- or low-cost outside help, such as the local branch of his MRO distributor. “This is one big item that has saved my company significant sums of money,” he acknowledges. “Dealing with the (distributor’s) manager there is like having an additional engineering department on staff. My reps are sharp on many subjects, plus this distributor has a multitude of sales

12 |

MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY

engineers and product experts that they bring in for actual problem solving, if needed. When we get stuck on something,” he adds, “they will have a solution.” PM extensions and inventory cutbacks For a maintenance supervisor at an imaging company in the South, 2009 was tough financially. A sales downturn prompted his company to undertake budget-stretching strategies on several fronts. “First, to reduce costs, we extended most PMs requiring parts,” he tells us. These included control-valve rebuilds, water- and air-filter changes and pump rebuilds. The extensions were possible without compromising equipment integrity because of lower production volumes in 2009. “Second,” he says, “we reduced stores inventories for spare parts. This was done in two ways: Materials we had previously ordered in larger volumes for EOQ (economic order quantity) reasons, we now order only in quantities for immediate use. Also, we reduced our stock of spare parts that are second-order critical, such as a mechanical seal, shaft sleeve or other pump-rebuild parts that are also available as an on-the-shelf complete spare pump.” Finally, he continues, “some failed parts were rebuilt instead of purchased new.” In the case of one needed production machine, he recalls, “we purchased it used from eBay.” While pursuing ways to save company funds, this Panelist faced another challenge when his plant was downsized. Avoiding layoffs of his skilled maintenance workers became an immediate priority, so he reassigned some to part-time operator positions. He also “partially reassigned two maintenance techs to cover routine security functions that were previously contracted to an outside firm.” He points out that this strategy has been a success, and that he hopes to end it this month.

APRIL 2010


FOR ON THE FLOOR

Discussion of ‘the budget’ is often a pretext for announcements about reductions or freezes in funding for projects and operations, while other goals (production, efficiency, continuous improvement) stay the same. More PM extensions, ‘outside the box’ thinking, free training At a utility in the upper Midwest, a mechanical maintenance supervisor prescribes, among other things, closer scrutiny of PMs. “During tough financial times, precision maintenance and Pd/ PM maintenance becomes even more important and a key to our company’s reliability and availability.” As he puts it, “Using these programs to drive the maintenance effort, we only repair what requires repairs. And when done correctly, we can expect an increase of mean time between failure.” This Panelist cautions that “good techniques of risk management” must be used to determine what items can be deferred. He also says it’s important to keep an open mind when wrestling with ways to trim expenses. “Think outside of the box,” he advises, “and look at different ways to accomplish the maintenance activities.” He believes that this also applies to training, noting that even though travel and training budgets may be cut, training should not suffer. According to him, you can work around this budget cut by turning to the many “good, free Web-based training sessions available. And be sure to make use of in-house expertise for refresher training.” In tough times, closer scrutiny should also be applied to the bidding process for work by outside contractors, he advises. “Bid and qualify both union and nonunion,” he urges, “and select the best value for the dollar.” He also offers these words of wisdom: “Share your budget concerns with the workforce and ask for their thoughts and input.” Beware the pitfalls Not all Panelists are fortunate enough to work in environments that encourage creative solutions and open communications. In situations where budget-stretching initiatives are begun without foresight and understanding of the processes they will affect, more problems can be created

APRIL 2010

than solved. An auto-industry PM leader in the Midwest, for example, explains how his company’s choice of a standard cost-cutting solution— reduction of in-house parts inventory—has been ineffective due to mismanagement of the chosen parts-replacement process. “Since we went to an off-site commoditiesmanaged crib, and pretty much took our cribs out of the plants,” he laments, “it has caused more delays and unnecessary downtime while waiting for parts. When parts are shipped, it is a crapshoot at times to see if the right parts are sent. Though this was done as a budget-saving measure,” he notes, “this has not yet been proven by us.” He further explains that usage-driven stockpart replenishment often fails at his plant because of a decision not to fully automate it. “We went to a two-bin system with parts being stocked by usage. The only problem with that is a lot of the parts that are not shown with a high use are not stocked because they are bought on a spot buy. But the ordering system they use is inadequate and does not show the part usage.” The result, he continues, is that “time after time, we are waiting for the same highly used parts. Many of the tradesmen have complained to upper management,” he says, “but we have not seen any improvements.” MT Join the MT Reader Panel! Have your comments and observations included in this column by joining the Maintenance Technology Reader Panel. Send an e-mail to rcarter@atpnetwork.com with the following: your name, title, contact information, years of professional experience and name and location of your company. If qualified, you’ll be admitted to the Reader Panel, and receive requests for your thoughts on industry topics approximately every other month. After one year of active participation, you’ll be entered into a drawing for a cash prize, as a token of our thanks.

MT-ONLINE.COM | 13


CAPACITY ASSURANCE STRATEGIES

At your own plant…for your own plant…

Determining The Actual Financial Costs Of Machinery Vibration Levels In the first of several new articles, this icon of the maintenance and reliability field reminds us of something that we all should know by now. The message is clearest when you talk in terms of dollars and cents.

Ralph T. Buscarello, CEO Update International

14 |

MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY

T

he economics of vibration problems were front and center during my visit to a certain pulp mill in Canada several years ago. The project was to implement a vibration-related machinery-improvement program. To that end, I received vibration data from various sources. A chart from a home-office executive vice president (Fig. 1), showed that the mill’s average vibration had been reduced from an indicated level of 0.25 in/sec down to 0.16 in/sec over the course of five years. (I could still hear my old boss asking, “Is that good?” [see Sidebar on page 15]). The vice president in charge of production, however, provided a much different chart (Fig. 2). It showed the cost of production during that same five-year period—production cost in $/ton was reduced to about half! I made transparencies of both charts and superimposed one on the other. The result, as shown in Fig. 3, seemed to be what I think my former boss would have appreciated. I’m not only much older than I was during that memorable, long-ago lunch with my boss—I’m much more experienced. I’ve learned that hard-nosed plant managers and maintenance managers would probably see something wrong. No manager today would move toward a further “reliability” program if the investment needed up front would take five years or so to show the financial results. As the old expression goes, “What can you do for me now?” APRIL 2010


CAPACITY ASSURANCE STRATEGIES

Just How Good Is ‘Good?’ As an introduction to this article, I have to first indicate where my approach to the financial side of machinery reliability really started. The following short story is true. It recounts what happened to me quite a few years ago, well before I became a specialist in machinery vibration. I was head of sales for a company that sold dynamic balancing machines. Over lunch one day, I was bragging to my boss about the success I had in the field using our newest product, a “portable” balancing instrument. Within an hour of a prospective customer’s request, I had field-balanced a badly vibrating fan (vibrating with an amplitude of 8 mils) down to just a half mil. “Is that good?” I was asked.

Show me the money!

Trying to answer, I proceeded to explain what a “mil” was (1/1000 of an inch) and that the fan’s initial vibration was 8 of those (which I proudly had reduced to .5). The question again was, “Is that good?” Assuming (perhaps incorrectly) that this man had no clue as to the profound importance of a difference between 8 mils and .5 mil, when it comes to vibration, I launched into a discussion about how every kid with a micrometer measures a single hair from his head and the usual measurement was 2 mils. “Before I started balancing (that fan),” I boasted, “its vibration was the back-and-forth motion equivalent to four hairs side by side, and in only one hour, I reduced it to

not just one hair, or even a half a thickness of a hair. I reached one quarter of diameter of a hair (.5 mil)!” Once more, the boss’s only question was, “Is that good?” At this point, I was feeling quite frustrated—and it must have shown. “That’s the trouble with you engineers and all your technical gobbledygook,” my boss shouted. “You try telling me what good you did by getting the vibration down to a half mil. But, I won’t believe you if you can’t tell me that you helped the fan’s owner make money, save money or get rid of a headache.” That conversation has influenced my approach to my work, ever since. . . . RB

Vibration History ips

Pulp & Bleach Area 0.25

0.25

0.23

ips

0.22

0.21

0.21 0.2

0.19

0.19 0.18

0.17

0.17 0.16

0.16 1

2

3

Fig. 1

4

5

Year

R&E Maintenance Expense Pulp & Bleach Area 44

44

42

Dollars / Ton

40 38 36

44 42 40 38 36 34 32 30 28 26 24

0.26

44

0.25

0.25

0.24 0.23 0.22

0.21

0.21

32

0.2

0.19

0.19

280.17

0.18 0.17

0.16

0.16

1

34

Fig. 3

32

32 30 28

28

26

24

24

Fig. 2

R&E Maintenance Expense Vibration History

0.24

Dollars / Ton Average Amplitude Velocity

Average Amplitude Velocity

0.26

1

APRIL 2010

2

3

4

5

2

3 Year

4

24

5

Vibration data compiled by two different sources at a Canadian pulp mill. Fig. 1 came from an executive VP; Fig. 2 was supplied by a VP of production. Superimposing Fig. 1 on Fig. 2 results in Fig. 3, a much clearer picture of the facility’s vibration reality.

Year

MT-ONLINE.COM | 15


CAPACITY ASSURANCE STRATEGIES

Vibration vs. Maintenance Costs

▲ Dollars, Thousands

Velocity, ips

0.3

50

0.25

40

1800 rpm pumps

0.2 30 0.15 20 0.1

Fig. 4. Plot of “overall” vibra- 10 tion readings measured “at the worst bearing housing” of 50 similar 1800 rpm pumps 0

0.05 0

Machine Today’s manager has a very tight budget. He/she also has probably “heard it all” through sales pitches for instruments, training courses, consulting work, etc. His/her ears may have become “dull of hearing.” Something better is needed. And now to the point At one time, a well-known pulp mill in New England focused only on its own plant’s data regarding the maximum amplitudes measured on 50 similar pumps (all with nominal 1800 rpm). No FFT measurements were used. Instead, a simple “overall” reading was measured “at the worst bearing housing” and recorded. After plotting the results on a graph (Fig. 4), the financial data for each pump was also investigated and recorded. (All were for the maintenance expenditures for that pump over the same two-year period.)

Vibration vs. Maintenance Costs 1800 rpm pumps

Upon examining those pumps with amplitudes below 0.03 in/sec (Fig. 5), maintenance costs were found to be less than $4500. (Warning: Your hard-nosed boss would still not be very impressed, even when he/she sees the low maintenance costs per pump.) Keep going… Pumps with “fairly good” vibration readings of approximately 0.05 in/sec were also compared (Fig. 6). Maintenance costs per pump were less than $7750 (still more than $3000 over costs for units with readings under 0.03 in/sec!). The real surprise was the pumps with amplitudes of approximately 0.1 in/sec (machines that most vibration experts consider to be “good,” “acceptable,” “OK,” etc.) They generated well over $1000 more in maintenance costs than those with what we now refer to as a “precision” vibration level (Fig. 7)—$17,000 or less per pump. Continue on page 18

▲ Dollars, Thousands

Velocity, ips

0.3

50

0.25

40

0.2 30 0.15 20 0.1 10

Fig. 5. In the pumps with amplitudes below 0.03 in/sec, maintenance costs were less than $4500.

0.05 0

0

< $4,500 16 |

MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY

Machine

0.03 in/sec APRIL 2010


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CAPACITY ASSURANCE STRATEGIES

Vibration vs. Maintenance Costs

50

▲ Dollars, Thousands

Velocity, ips

0.3 0.25

40

1800 rpm pumps

0.2 30 0.15 20

Fig. 6. In units with “fairly good” amplitudes (approx. 0.05 in/sec), the cost of maintenance was under $7750 (which was still over $3000 more than the same cost for pumps with levels below 0.03 in/sec).

0.1 10

0.05 0

0

< $7,750 Remember, though, that managers will still not be truly motivated to financially back any program to improve machinery reliability to such “precision” levels. You need to determine what is true on your own plant’s machinery, based on your own statistics, but with a quicker and easier, less costly approach. (It usually isn’t good enough to indicate that measuring “overall amplitudes” on about 50 similar machines takes only one mechanic about two days. Having a member of the office staff obtain maintenance costs takes only about one-half to, at most, a full day. Still not good enough—wow!)

Vibration vs. Maintenance Costs

50

Machine

0.05 in/sec

Take a look at amplitude versus maintenance costs that personnel at this mill measured in a very short “quickie” test based on only six machines (Fig. 8, pg. 20). Notice that only typical, easy-to-work-with machines were chosen for this test, based on vibration amplitudes (the worst and the best). The same was repeated for the “worst” approximately 1800 rpm pumps and the smoothest-running “best.” Again, the process was repeated for the worst and best pumps running approximately 3600 rpm. That was only a total of six machines for which financial data (over the same period of time) had to be obtained. Now, even your toughest, most skeptical

▲ Dollars, Thousands

Velocity, ips

0.3 0.25

40

1800 rpm pumps

0.2 30 0.15 20

Fig. 7. Pumps with vibration levels of approximately 0.1 in/sec had well over $1000 more in maintenance costs than the pumps with “precision” vibration levels.

0.1 10

0.05 0

0

< $17,000 18 |

MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY

Ma M achin hine

0.10 in/sec APRIL 2010


Why not make things even easier? Think about starting a true ‘precision-based’ reliability program. manager should be interested in getting the results—not from a sales pitch, but from his/her own machines and records. Note the results of the referenced pulp mill’s comparisons based on only three “worst” and three “best” machines. The difference between just those “worst” and “best” units was $68,000! If this doesn’t get you started on determining this simple data— which should take less than a half day measuring vibration and less than two hours obtaining financial costs— I would give up. Precision-based reliability Why not make things even easier? Think about starting a true “precisionbased” reliability program. Sure, we can talk about precision balancing, precision alignment, offsets for thermal growth, proper prevention of assembly errors, including proper installation of bearing, etc. But, there’s a more efficient way to obtain decreased vibration results that can be compared to the financial data you have gathered to plot your own graph or quickie chart. The easiest and fastest decrease in vibration levels for a high percentage of machines comes through teaching one to two mechanics to perform what I refer to as “foot-frame-related resonance” tests. This involves simply loosening and tightening only one machine “holddown” bolt at a time, and recording with a quick sketch, the bolts that made an appreciable difference. For bolts that do make an appreciable difference of over 30%, there are procedures for re-shimming at those feet.

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APRIL 2010 3409980_02333_ContEng, MainTech, EC-M.indd 1

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CAPACITY ASSURANCE STRATEGIES

Maintenance Expense vs. Vibration History Machine Type

Highest Maintenance Velocity, ips Cost, $

Lowest Velocity, ips

Maintenance Cost, $

Pump 1800 rpm

0.15

10298

0.012

2668

Pump 3600 rpm

0.26

46383

0.021

2603

Fan

0.338

16793

0.052

226

Total

Highest

73474

Lowest

5397

Ralph Buscarello is CEO of Update International, based in Denver, CO. The company is a global provider of machinery-improvement training and technologies that enable industrial and utility customers to improve operating life and productivity while substantially lowering costs. E-mail: Ralph@updateinternational.com.

Difference in maintenance costs for 3 machines with highest vibration vs. 3 machines with lowest vibration. Difference in same period maintenance costs=

Coming up Future articles in this series will shed light on other effective techniques for dealing with vibration levels in your operations, and include key instructions for working on the most vulnerable rotating machines found in industrial facilities. Based on his many years of experience in the field, the author will also take the opportunity to debunk some of the more popular myths and widely held misconceptions associated with the issue of vibration. MT

$68,077

Fig 8. Information gleaned from a very short “quickie” test on only six machines.

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APRIL 2010


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EENERGY NERGY S SYSTEMS YSTEMS

There’s a new kid in town...

Meet The

FLYWHEEL: Green, Clean Energy-Storage Technology With brownouts and blackouts on the rise, businesses can’t afford to gamble on critical powerprotection capabilities. This reliable and costeffective approach offers a number of advantages for operations that really want to go “green.”

Frank DeLattre VYCON

22 |

MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY

P

ower disturbances pose a colossal problem for all businesses. The Electrical Power Research Institute (EPRI) estimates that such disturbances cost U.S. industry as much as $188 billion per year in lost data, material and productivity. Efforts to minimize these losses have taken on their own monumental proportions. According to industry analysts at the Darnell Group, annual spending on backup-power systems exceeds $5 billion worldwide.

Traditional backup-power solutions include uninterruptible power systems (UPSs) with valve-regulated lead acid (VRLA) batteries to provide energy during short-term power disturbances, diesel generators (gensets) for longerterm outages and control electronics to bridge the two. Therein lies a real challenge for businesses that are seriously concerned about matters of sustainability: It’s all those batteries. The lead-acid batteries that provide ride-through, or temporary power, for the UPS are commonly viewed as the most unreliable and most costly element of conventional power quality and reliability solutions. In fact, one might be surprised at how many buildings striving to be green have hundreds or thousands of pounds of toxic lead and gallons of dangerously corrosive sulfuric acid on their premises—thanks to lead-acid batteries. It’s also rather surprising that the current LEED standards make no allowance for mitigation of these extremely hazardous materials.

APRIL 2010


EENERGY NERGY S SYSTEMS YSTEMS

Backup Generator

UPS Bypass

ATS

Rectifier AC/DC

Inverter AC/DC

Critical Loads

Utility 208-600v AC Flywheel DC Energy Storage

Fig. 1. Power infrastructure with flywheel and UPS

The weakest link Today’s facilities simply can’t tolerate an instance of downtime. To ensure that critical processes operate without interruption, large-scale UPS systems continually take the frequent fluctuations and disturbances of utility power and condition the power, delivering clean energy to critical systems. NFPA 99 regulations for Emergency Power Systems stipulate that gensets must be able to assume the load within 10 seconds. While batteries can perform this function, their reliability is always in question. Are they fully charged? Has a cell gone bad in the battery string? When was the last time they were checked? Besides being a formidable source of hazardous material, lead-acid batteries are expensive and unreliable. One bad cell in one battery of a chain of four dozen “maintenance-free” lead-acid batteries is enough to bring down the whole set. They also require an excessive amount of testing, monitoring and maintenance to ensure against such occurrences. Unfortunately, facility and maintenance personnel do not seem to test these batteries as often as they should—and may not have testing/monitoring systems in place to do so properly. Ironically, even testing batteries helps to degrade their useful life. Moreover, every four years or so, the batteries have to be hauled away (hopefully to a recycling center) and swapped out with all new, lead-based replacements. According to EPRI, “Batteries are the primary field-failure problem with UPS systems.” Predicting when one battery in a string of dozens will fail is next to impossible, even with regular testing and frequent individual battery replacements. Fortunately, facilities now have a viable alternative to batteries: It’s the flywheel energy storage system.

APRIL 2010

Flywheel basics A flywheel system replaces lead-acid batteries and works like a dynamic battery that stores energy kinetically by spinning a mass around an axis. Electrical input spins the flywheel rotor up to speed, and a standby charge keeps it spinning 24/7 until called upon to release the stored energy. The amount of energy available and its duration is proportional to its mass and the square of its revolution speed. In the flywheel world, doubling mass doubles energy capacity, but doubling rotational speed quadruples energy capacity. During a power event, the flywheel will provide backup power seamlessly and instantaneously (Fig. 1). The nice thing is that it’s not an “either/or” situation, as the flywheel can be used with or without batteries. When used with batteries, the flywheel is the first line of defense against damaging power glitches—protecting against the frequent cycling of the batteries and prolonging their life. Since batteries are the weakest link in the power continuity scheme, flywheels with batteries reassure facility managers that their batteries are safeguarded against premature aging and unexpected failures. When the flywheel is used alone, the system will provide instant power to the connected load as it does with batteries. If, however, the power event is longer than a couple of minutes, the flywheel will gracefully hand off to the facilities’ engine-generator. It’s important to know that EPRI’s research shows that 80% of all utility power anomalies/disturbances last less than two seconds and 98% last less than 10 seconds. In the real world, the flywheel energy storage system has plenty of time—up to a couple of minutes—to gracefully hand-off to the generator.

MT-ONLINE.COM MT ONLINE COM | 23


EENERGY NERGY S SYSTEMS YSTEMS

Specifications

Run Times*

UPS Output Power Rating (kVA)

Model 1 Number of Flywheels 1 2 3 4 5

40 99.8

60 67.0

80 50.3

100 40.3 80.0

160 21.9 48.8 72.3

225 11.7 34.8 51.5

Run Time in Seconds

275 6.4 26.6 42.2 55.6

450

550

750

1100

11.3 23.2 34.1

6.2 16.8 26.1 34.8

8.5 16.0 23.0

6.0 11.7

450

550

750

1100

16.8 26.1 34.1

11.4 21.5 28.0 34.8

6.1 13.9 20.8 25.8

6.2 11.1 17.1

UPS Output Power Rating (kVA)

Model 2 Number of Flywheels 1 2 3 4 5

120 33.6 65.0

40 99.8

60 67.0

80 50.3

100 40.3 80.0

120 33.6 65.0

160 25.6 48.8 72.3

Run Time in Seconds

225 17.4 34.8 51.5

275 11.7 28.6 42.2 55.6

* Backup times are typical using .9 Output Power Factor, 80% Full Load Rating, 96% Inverter Efficiency

Fig. 2. In either of these flywheel models, the units exceed the goal of meeting a 20-second run-time requirement as a minimum.

Proper sizing Normally, the sizing of UPSs and flywheels is done based on actual load. Most engineers size the UPS at 30-40% larger than the actual load to allow for growth. Once the UPS is sized, the flywheel needs to be sized to the UPS. All UPS ratings are based on kVA and kW numbers; the rating used for power applications is the kW rating. When this kW number is established, it will be labeled as the full load kW rating. For example: A 275kVA UPS rating with a power factor rating of .9 power factor (pf) equates to 248kW of UPS power. Since the majority of loads are sized to UPSs at about an 80% load factor, along with inverter efficiency of 96%, this equates to 207kwb. Consequently, this is the rating used to size the flywheels to assure proper power rating and proper amount of run time requirement. To make it easier to size flywheels, most manufacturers supply customers with run-time charts that match kVA with run time.

As shown in Fig. 2, by using two flywheels, Model 1 will achieve 26.6 seconds of run time, and by using two flywheels, Model 2 will achieve 28.6 seconds of run time. In either case, the flywheels exceed the goal of meeting a 20-second run-time requirement as a minimum. This provides a solution that fits most facilities’ needs and ample time to transfer to an engine genset if a longer power outage occurs. Return on investment When one compares the life-cycle cost (LCC) of flywheels with the LCC of battery systems (Fig. 3), it’s clear which technology has a longer cost savings over the life of the technology. ROI for the flywheel occurs in three to four years—quicker than that shown for a battery system. The purchasing decision, though, is not necessarily an “either/or” option. That’s because the flywheel can be used with or without batteries.

In the flywheel world, doubling mass doubles energy capacity, but doubling rotational speed quadruples energy capacity. 24 |

MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY

APRIL 2010


Assuring power quality From 40kVA to a megawatt, flywheel systems are increasingly being used to assure the highest level of power quality and reliability in a diverse range of applications. The flexibility of these systems allows a variety of configurations that can be custom-tailored to achieve the exact level of power protection required by the end-user based on budget, space and environmental constraints. In any of these configurations, the user will ultimately benefit from the many unique benefits of flywheel-based systems, including:

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3/12/10 10:14 AM


EENERGY NERGY S SYSTEMS YSTEMS

Cumulative Costs (Thousands)

$180

Lifecycle Cost of Battery System

$160 $140 $120 $100 $80 $60 $40 $20

Flywheel implementations comply with the highest international standards for performance and safety, including those from UL and CE. They also incorporate a host of advanced features that users expect to make the systems easy to use. These days, data centers, broadcasters, hospitals, airports, industrial processes, military facilities and other crucial operations around the world are hardening battery strings— or even eliminating them altogether—by applying clean flywheel energy storage to their UPS systems. This “new kid in town” technology truly offers a green choice in protecting

Air Conditioningg Costs

Steady State Electric Usage

Total Space Cost

Financing Option

Disposal

Annual Maintenance e

Removal

Initial and Replacementt Costs

Installation

$0

Fig. 3. A 15-year life-cyclecost (LCC) analysis of battery systems

mission-critical applications by finally providing industries everywhere with a truly reliable, long-lasting and virtually maintenance-free DC power solution. MT Frank DeLattre is president of VYCON, a company based in Yorba Linda, CA. As noted on www.vyconenergy.com, “VYCON’S mission is to deliver energy storage systems into applications where the need for energy storage has not been met by any existing technology…including other flywheels.” For more info, enter 02 at www.MT-freeinfo.com

For more info, enter 74 at www.MT-freeinfo.com

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MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY

APRIL 2010


BIG MONEY TALKS XX UM William C. Livoti

Understanding Power Factor

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f your organization is focusing to any extent on cutting energy consumption, driving sustainable growth and reducing operating costs, it’s a good idea to review power factor. Here’s a very brief explanation. The power factor (PF) of an AC electric power system is defined as the ratio of the real power flowing to the load to the apparent power, and is a number between 0 and 1 (frequently expressed as a percentage, e.g. 0.5 pf = 50% pf). Real power is the capacity of the circuit for performing work in a particular time. Apparent power is the product of the current and voltage of the circuit. A PF of 1.0—or “unity power factor”—is the goal of every electric utility. If the PF is less than 1.0, the utility has to supply more current to the user for a given amount of power use. In so doing, it (the utility) incurs more line losses. Industrial facilities tend to have a “lagging power factor,” where the current lags the voltage (like an inductor). This is primarily the result of having lots of electric induction motors; as seen by the power supply, their windings act as inductors. Capacitors have the opposite effect; they can compensate for the inductive motor windings. The significance of power factor lies in the fact that utility companies supply customers with voltamperes, but bill them for watts. The relationship can be stated as:

watts = volts x amperes x power factor Power factors below 1.0 require a utility to generate more than the minimum volt-amperes necessary to supply the power (watts). This increases generation and transmission costs. Utilities may impose penalties on customers that do not have good power factors on their overall buildings. Watts—or real power—is what a customer pays for. VARS (volt-ampere reactives) are the extra “power” transmitted to compensate for a power factor less than 1.0. The combination of the two is called “apparent” power (VA or volt-amperes).

VOLUME VOLUME 52 // NO. NO. 22

A low PF is expensive and inefficient—some utility companies may charge additional fees when it’s less than 0.95. A low PF reduces the electrical system’s distribution capacity by increasing the current flow and causing voltage drops.

The significance of power factor lies in the fact that utility companies supply customers with volt-amperes, but bill them for watts. Think of it this way: Based on personal experience, many of us would acknowledge that a mug of draft beer typically has a “head” on it. Let’s say your favorite pub institutes a new policy—you pay only for beer, not foam. While foam is simply aerated beer, it’s not really usable. So, if your mug is half full of foam, you’ll pay half the price. This is the same principle as electricity generation: The consumer pays just for the beer (real power), not the foam. Main benefits from power factor correction ■ The utility’s electrical load is reduced, thereby allowing it to supply surplus power to other consumers, without increasing generation capacity. ■ Most utilities impose low PF penalties; by correcting the power factor, penalties can be avoided. ■ High PF reduces load currents, which leads to considerable savings on hardware, such as cables, switchgear, substation transformers, etc. UM Bill Livoti is a fluid power and power industry engineer with Baldor Electric Company. He also is vice chair of the Pump Systems Matter (PSM) initiative. Telephone: (864) 281-2118; e-mail: wclivoti@baldor.com

| UM1 | 27 UTILITIES UTILITIES MANAGER MANAGER


UM ENERGY AUDITS

On the hunt for big bucks...

ENERGY

Making Energy Audits Feasible Target in on these tools, techniques and useful resources. Kate Anderson, ActionEco, with support from Colin Plastow, Fluke

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omewhere, there’s a technician climbing up onto a facility roof with a thermal imager. Inside, the head of operations and the HVAC person are calculating the effect of raising or lowering indoor temperatures just a bit. Someone else is over in the side office with six months of electricity bills, analyzing usage patterns and rate fluctuations. They’re all on a hunt—but not for critters. The big bucks these hunters are hoping to harvest are associated with increased operating efficiencies and reduced energy consumption. They’re tracking everything, looking for savings anywhere they can find them…hidden in a vent that’s stuck open…in inefficient lighting…in a chiller that’s running an hour a day more than necessary… We’ve all heard and/or read the exhortations: “You can find annual savings of $200,000, $500,000 or more, in the unlikeliest of places.” “You can save 18% on energy costs with minimal capital investments.” “You can discover enough immediate savings to pay for an energy audit and the recommended system upgrades.” Alas, many people have dismissed such claims as fantasy. Some may think that their operations are too lean and don’t have the budget or the staff to find the savings. “We’ve already cut everything we can cut. Management will never approve this use of time and money.” On the flip side, contractors may be hearing “not now” from clients that are already stretched too thin. Here’s the missing ingredient: We know more now than we did, even a few years ago, about where to look for unnecessary waste. We also know how to quantify the dollar value of that opportunity. That allows you to create a more accurate proposal that’s more likely to be approved and achieved. 28 | UTILITIES MANAGER

Size for who you are The big dollars are usually associated with audits at large facilities with lots of heavy machinery and little preventive maintenance. The energy audit team collects data ahead of time, spends three to five days inspecting, decides what to change, then implements fixes, updates and process improvements. Depending on the facility, the inspections may cover everything from motors and drives to electronic equipment usage patterns to wastemanagement practices. If you can do a comprehensive audit, you should—and not just because the overall dollar amount will be larger and quicker to achieve. By inspecting multiple areas in the same time period, you’ll also notice common waste patterns and find ways to leverage improvements across multiple systems. But some facilities find that three days and a full team of experts and tools is just too much. For them to get started, it might make more sense to tackle one system at a time. This is fine, as long as you circle back to see how changes in one system have affected other areas. VOLUME 5 / NO. 2


ENERGY AUDITS UM

$$

$ $$$

$ $$$ $

Top Places To Look For Energy Waste The leanest companies often find the best value in outsourcing all or part of their energy inspection to a contractor that specializes in energy audits. Then, as improved practices reduce the immediate troubleshooting load, existing staff can retrain on system upgrades and inspection practices. Contractors can add particular value by knowing all the local, regional and national tax incentives, providing ROI for system upgrades, mastering the more complex power-logging tools and, simply, having enough tools, expertise and people to get the job done. Build and pitch your plan If you run into opposition in getting a complete audit approved, you may need a more convincing proposal. What you may not realize is that much of the savings can be discovered up front, using a power logger and your computer.

Almost all audits find equipment turned on but not in use, inefficient lighting technologies or usage and HVAC systems that are not optimized.

$$$ $$ $

Biggest opportunities: Lighting, compressed air, steam systems Medium opportunities: HVAC, motors and drive Smaller long-term opportunities: Building envelope, waste/recycling, IT/electronics

Applying Energy-Audit Tools Tool

Application

Power logger

Conduct load studies; perform energy consumption testing

2. Review utility bills.

Clamp meter or clamp accessory

Make branch circuit and individual load evaluations; take quick power measurements

3. Plug that data into energy calculators.

Thermal imager

Scan electrical, electro-mechanical, process, HVAC and other equipment for hotspots noting inefficiencies; scan buildings for leaks

Logging digital multimeter

Monitor power usage cycles; measure pressure and temperature

Infrared thermometer

Scan motors, insulation, steam pipes, ducts, breakers, connections and wires

Air meter

Evaluate and adjust ventilation levels; verify HVAC controls

1. Tabulate the kind of equipment in use and log how often itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s deployed.

4. Quantify and monetize the savings opportunity. With reasonably solid numbers and a return-on-investment schedule, management is more likely to approve and support an energy audit. For calculators and other tools to estimate ROI and build your proposal, see the reference list on the next page. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no need to reinvent the wheel! Learn what others have done and apply their best practices. UM Continued on page 30 VOLUME 5 / NO. 2

UTILITIES MANAGER | 29


UM ENERGY AUDITS

Online Resources While the Internet is full of great information on energy audits, finding it can take some time. Here’s a head start. Use these sites to get reports on successful audits, online tools, best practices, technology evaluations, even financial incentives. • EPA Energy STAR, www.energystar.gov, has calculators, guidelines, checklists, schedules, how-tos and many other tools for designing and implementing energy plans and audits.

• Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency, www. dsireusa.org, is a comprehensive source of information on state, local, utility and federal incentives that promote energy efficiency.

• American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy, www.aceee. org, convenes conferences and workshops for energy-efficiency professionals, conducts technical and policy analyses and offers advice for program managers.

• U.S. Department of Energy, www.energy.gov, is the gateway to thousands of pages of how-to energy-audit information.

• Building Owners and Managers Association, www.boma.org, offers a sustainable operations Webinar series for training on operational cost savings and evaluating green building opportunities. • Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE), www.cee1.org, has a database of companies that manufacture CEE and Energy STAR equipment. An energy and efficiency think tank, CEE is a good source for technology reviews. • Commercial Building Tax Deduction Coalition, www.efficient buildings.org, explains tax deductions for energy-efficient building expenditures made by a building owner.

• U.S. Department of Energy’s Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Network, www.eere.energy.gov. Click on “Industry” on the left of the page for industrial and operations information and research. • Tax Incentives Assistance Program, www.energytaxincentives. org, provides information about federal income tax incentives for energy efficient products and technologies. • OpenEco, www.openeco.org, has assembled helpful news, resources and calculators. • FacilitiesNet, www.facilitiesnet.com/energyefficiency, is focused squarely on facilities.

Kate Anderson is editor of ActionEco. org, an online education and advocacy community that demonstrates the business benefits of sustainable business operations and maintenance best practices.

KRYTOX® FLUORINATED LUBRICANTS AIR SAVING BLOWOFF IS SUPER QUIET The low cost Super Air Knife™ dramatically reduces compressed air usage and noise when compared to other blowoffs. It delivers a uniform sheet of laminar airflow with hard-hitting force across the entire length. Energy use is comparable to a blower without the maintenance or downtime. Many sizes in aluminum or stainless steel. Applications include blowing liquid, chips, and contaminant from parts and conveyors, cooling hot parts, and air screening.

EXAIR CORPORATION 11510 GOLDCOAST DRIVE CINCINNATI, OHIO 45249-1621 TOLL FREE 800-903-9247 PHONE 513 671-3322 FAX 513 671-3363 E-MAIL: TECHELP@EXAIR.COM INTERNET: WWW.EXAIR.COM/48/123.HTM

For more info, enter 75 at www.MT-freeinfo.com

30 | UTILITIES MANAGER

Krytox® Fluorinated Greases and Oils are: Chemically inert. Insoluble in common solvents. Thermally stable. Wide temperature range (-103º to 800º F). Nonflammable. Nontoxic. Oxygen Compatible – safe for oxygen service. Low Vapor Pressure. Low Outgassing. Useful in Vacuum Systems. Krytox® offers Extreme Pressure, Anticorrosion and Antiwear properties. Contains no silicones or hydrocarbons. Mil-spec, Aerospace and Food Grades available! 203 743-4447 or 800 992-2424 www.miller-stephenson.com

Colin Plastow is industrial product manager for Fluke. To learn more about the products and services referenced in this article, including Fluke’s energy audit training offered through the company’s Energy Answers program, e-mail: colin. plastow@fluke.com

ENERGY

MILLER-STEPHENSON CHEMICAL CO. For more info, enter 76 at www.MT-freeinfo.com

For more info, enter 251 at www.MT-freeinfo.com VOLUME 5 / NO. 2


Lubrication Checkup Aftermarket Additives By Dr. Lube, aka Ken Bannister

Symptom: “I am an instructor in a college Industrial Maintenance program. Do you have any information regarding testing and comparison of aftermarket oil additives and their use?”

Diagnosis: Yours is probably one of the most frequently asked questions in my lubrication training seminars—and one of the most difficult to answer since there is little available research that can be used to rate and compare the popular “supermarket” additive products that are currently available. Fortunately, we can classify additive products in two categories: 1. Industrial additive products—marketed as an enhancement or replenishment to a known compatible industrial base oil stock. They’re sold primarily through industrial representatives to meet your specific need, come with a published specification and compatibility testing data sheet, and are often backed up with a manufacturer’s engineering service. 2. Consumer additive products—what many people think of as additives. They’re what we typically see on midnight infomercials. Although these types of products are often targeted at the consumer automotive market, many of them find their way into the industrial world.

Prescription: Users must carefully weigh their decision to use these types of products against a number of facts: Why are you considering using them in the first place? If an engine or device has an underlying internal-wear problem, why not just move to a higher-viscosity regular oil and raise a planned repair work order to fix the problem? If you’re looking for better fuel mileage or energy savings, consider a synthetic lubricant. Is the product compatible with your host oil? If testing and comparison data is difficult to attain, and no product engineering service is available, contact the manufacturer directly and ask for a compatibility statement along with instructions on how to blend the additive prior to use. In a best-practice lube program, we never advocate mixing lubricants due to a good chance of incompatibility. Remember, there is no maintenance panacea, especially in the world of lubrication. When failure consequences can be high, the rule of thumb is to always let the additive manufacturer recommend the use of the additive. MT Lubrication questions? E-mail: doctorlube@atpnetwork.com. Dr. Lube, aka Ken Bannister, is a featured speaker at MARTS 2010. To register for and/or learn more about his value-added Pre-Conference workshop “Liquid Gold: Implementing a Winning Lube Strategy for Maximum Gain,” visit www.MARTSconference.com. For more info, enter 03 at www.MT-freeinfo.com APRIL 2010

“IMPROVED COMPRESSOR LUBRICATION HAS RESULTED IN MAINTENANCE SAVINGS OF $800,000 PER YEAR...” Francisco J. Gonzales Enterprise Products

Receive the complete story about attaining the ‘Lowest Total Cost of Ownership’ from your lubricant purchases, that includes extensive corroborating case studies, call 866-447-5173 . . .

www.royal-purple-industrial.com For more info, enter 77 at www.MT-freeinfo.com MT-ONLINE.COM | 31


A SPECIAL VIBRATION SHOWCASE

Vibration Solutions Keep The Blades Turning

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roper alignment of the drivetrain and balancing of the rotor blades are important to condition monitoring of wind turbines. Now, thanks to Ludeca’s VIBXPERT® and its OMNITREND® PC software, windturbine vibration signals are no longer a problem to measure and evaluate. For details, check in with LUDECAwind. It provides a variety of system support services for wind-energy operations, including installation and start-up of condition monitoring systems, telediagnosis services with remote monitoring, laser alignment and geometric measurement systems, continuous alignment monitoring and consulting. LUDECAwind A Division of Ludeca, Inc. Doral, FL For more info, enter 30 at www.MT-freeinfo.com

Protection & Monitoring In One Device

S

New Smart Demo Practice System From Update International

L

earn and practice critical mechanical skills and see your results right away in a powerful, integrated visual display. Update International’s Smart Demo is a variable speed motor/shaft/bearing trainer integrated with four triaxial accelerometers, tachometer and a 13-channel vibration acquisition and analysis system. This training platform is based on Update’s experience in training thousands of students in vibration analysis, machinery installation, alignment, resonance and balancing skills. Update International Denver, CO (800) 530-4215 www.updateinternational.com

KF’s Multilog On-line System DMx is a multi-featured vibration monitor for both conventional and hazardous environments. Awarded ATEX, IECEx and cULus certifications, the system can be directly installed within a hazardous area, removing or reducing cabling, cabinets and isolation barriers and, ultimately, saving time and money during installation. According to the manufacturer, DMx combines both protection and conditionmonitoring functionality in a single device, making it ideal for use with critical machinery such as gas turbines, generator sets, motors, pumps and compressors in a wide range of industries. SKF Group San Diego, CA For more info, enter 32 at www.MT-freeinfo.com

For more info, enter 31 at www.MT-freeinfo.com

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MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY

APRIL 2010


DEALING WITH IT

Vibration Institute Certification

C

ertification adds credence to any professional skill and acknowledges the capability and motivations of individuals. It provides professional recognition by clients, employers and colleagues. Certification activities have increased and broadened the knowledge and skills of vibration analysts. A certifying body—which assesses the capability and knowledge of individuals against a published body of knowledge—must achieve a recognized credibility. The Vibration Institute certification program, initiated in 1993, is based on ISO 18436. ■ Part 1 defines how a vibration certification program is administered.

To be credible, the certifying body must have a scheme committee comprised of technical experts to develop exams that fairly assess the knowledge and skills of candidates. In order to assure the public that a certification program is credible, a certifying body should be accredited. The Vibration Institute is accredited by the American National Standards Institute to ISO/IEC 17024—which pertains to accreditation of personnel certification bodies. Rules for operation of a credible certification program require a certifying body to be a financially viable, transparent organization; to have any training totally separated from the certification process; and to have both statistically and cognitively based examinations related to a credible body of knowledge.

■Part 2 contains a body of knowledge divided into skill categories.

Vibration Institute Willowbrook, IL

(630) 654-2254 www.vibinst.org

For more info, enter 33 at www.MT-freeinfo.com

NATIONAL TECHNICAL TRAINING SYMPOSIUM (34th ANNUAL MEETING)

Vibration Institute A NOT-FOR-PROFIT CORPORATION

June 22-25, 2010 The Hyatt Lodge at McDonald’s Campus Oak Brook, Illinois 60523 One-Day Training Resonance in Mechanical, Electrical, and Fluid Acoustic Systems Balancing of Rotating Machinery

Keynote Address From Vibration Measurements to Condition-Based Maintenance John Mitchell x x x x x

Fan Structural Analysis Fan Dynamic Testing Fan Rotor Dynamics Signal Processing and Full Spectrum Analysis Electric Motor Analysis

x x x x x

Gearbox Analysis Fluid-Induced Vibration Random Vibration Analysis Electrical Signal Analysis Shop Balancing

See Web Site: http://www.vibinst.org for details For information: Phone: (630)654-2254 Fax: (630)654-2271 Email: vibinst@att.net

THE VIBRATION INSTITUTE 6262 South Kingery Highway, Suite 212 Willowbrook, Illinois 60527 For more info, enter 78 at www.MT-freeinfo.com

APRIL 2010

MT-ONLINE.COM | 33


A SPECIAL VIBRATION SHOWCASE

Industry’s Partner In The Vibration Trenches Since 1918

V

SC has been helping prevent machinery failures and unnecessary repairs since 1918. The company notes that it balanced Thomas Edison’s turbines and generators and Henry Ford’s Model T crank shafts. Today, using state-of-the-art instrumentation (now developed in-house), it offers 24-hour machinery diagnostics, balancing and alignment, at your site or in the VSC Balancing Center. Service personnel are accustomed to evaluating rotating equipment in both land-based and marine applications. The Balancing Center is able to accommodate rotors weighing up to 20,000 lbs. in-house and up to 400,000 lbs. on-site. A complete line of condition-monitoring products and training services also are offered. Vibration Specialty Corp. (VSC) Philadelphia, PA

For more info, enter 34 at www.MT-freeinfo.com

Bundled Condition-Monitoring Services

A

zima DLI’s WATCHMAN™ Reliability Service Plans are a series of simplified, pre-packaged programs that offer a fresh alternative to traditional, complex á la carte maintenance programs. These three allinclusive offerings are tailored to address specific requirements for lean and reliable plant operations. Each includes an evaluation of the plant environment and risk profile along with a clearly defined set of solutions and deliverables to meet uptime, compliance and cost-avoidance objectives. Azima DLI also provides data acquisition tools. Azima DLI Woburn, MA

M12-Connector Accelerometers

M

eggitt Sensing Systems, makers of Wilcoxon vibration sensors and sensor networks, is offering three new accelerometers with M12 connectors to its line. The M12 connector makes it easy to implement vibration monitoring where existing infrastructure is already built around the M12 standard, such as in the process industries. The new products are hermetically sealed using a fused glass-to-metal connector, feature all welded construction and are rated for temperatures up to 120 C. Wilcoxon Research Germantown, MD For more info, enter 37 at www.MT-freeinfo.com

For more info, enter 35 at www.MT-freeinfo.com

Collect, Store, Analyze & Transmit

First-Alert Wireless Vibration Sensors

P

I

ProvibTech, Inc. Houston, TX

IMI Sensors A Division of PCB Piezotronics Depew, NY

rovibTech’s PCM360 machine condition management system can collect, store, analyze and transmit machine status monitoring information over local or wide-area networks. The product provides static, dynamic and transient data collection and analysis, such as graphical indication of vibration level, trend, waveform, spectrum, bode plots, cascade plots and more. Any ProvibTech monitor and transmitter can be quickly and easily integrated to upload machine status and its dynamic data to the PCM360.

For more info, enter 36 at www.MT-freeinfo.com

34 |

MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY

MI’s Echo™ Wireless Vibration Sensors can safely “look” at a machine’s health several times a day and provide data to existing vibration- or plant-monitoring systems. The Echo operates in the 902 to 928 MHz unlicensed ISM band, has a -155 dBm noise floor and -145 dBm sensitivity. It can detect RF signal levels down to a millionth of a billionth of a milliwatt. Actual field-testing has achieved signal transmission distances of 1/3 mile through buildings. Outdoor transmission has been measured in miles.

For more info, enter 38 at www.MT-freeinfo.com For more info, enter 75 at www.MT-freeinfo.com APRIL 2010


for LA MA ST REG MRi TS A CALL IST ss The Btten ER igges dee Rig t & Be s! ht N st Eve MAINTENANCE and RELIABILITY TECHNOLOGY SUMMIT ow r ! Don’t Miss The Capacity Assurance Conference! You Can ’t A ffo rd T o

New Speakers!

Critical Topics!

Powerful Presentations!

The premier educational event for maintenance professionals, MARTS 2010 covers the widest range of topics in its history. With 30 one-hour Conferences and 17 full-day Workshops, MARTS offers valuable, job-critical information for:

MARTS 2010 Highlights: * Keynote Speaker John Ratzenberger – the actor, author and manufacturing activist will speak about Nuts, Bolts & Thingamajigs, his foundation that brings students and manufacturing together.

Plant and Facility Managers Maintenance Engineers and Managers Maintenance Team Leaders and Members Plant Operators and Engineers Reliability Engineers and Managers ... at the comfortable Hyatt Regency O’Hare hotel, 10 minutes from O’Hare Airport in Rosemont, IL.

* Futurist and financial professional Bob Chernow, who will offer predictions for manufacturing, technology, the economy and other key issues. * A special “Reliability Gives Voice to Autism” event that kicks off MARTS 2010 with a worthy cause. It will feature dinner and live entertainment while raising awareness and funds for autism. * Solid representation from industry experts such as Christer Idhammar, Bob Williamson, Doc Palmer and many others, including Enrique Mora, who will present a Spanish-only Workshop on TPM.

APRIL 27-30, 2010 Hyatt Regency O’Hare, Rosemont (Chicago), IL

www.MARTSconference.com Or Call Tom Madding: 847.382.8100 x108 APRIL 2010

PRESENTED BY: ®

MT-ONLINE.COM | 35


BOOSTING YOUR BOTTOM LINE

Building Blocks Of Motor Management otor management—understanding your motors, their operating conditions and costs and what you are going to do when they fail—can reduce downtime, save money and lower carbon emissions at your facility. Some facility managers have already mastered the practice. They know how many motors they have, where they’re located, their size and nameplate efficiencies, their load factors and number of runhours. They keep track of each motor’s age and maintenance history and have plans in place for what is going to happen with every one of those units when they fail. Yes, such facility managers definitely are out there… For the rest of us, the following set of motor management building blocks from the Motor Decisions MatterSM Campaign can help.

M

Motor inventory A motor inventory is a list of every motor in a facility, its size, nameplate efficiency, operation, load factor, run-hours and maintenance history. With this resource alone, you can ensure that the most efficient motors are the most often used; track “problem” motors (those with histories of repeated failure); and identify candidates for cost-effective replacement. Many vendors and service providers can help facilities assemble motor inventories. Ask a vendor or service provider in your area for assistance. Check out http://www.easa.com/find/active_members for motor service providers. Repair/replace decision guidelines It is easier to manage a plan than a crisis. Know in advance what will be done with every motor upon failure, and label the motor accordingly. The information in your motor inventory— nameplate efficiency, age, run-hours and maintenance history—will assist you in determining the cost-effective choice. (A free Motor Decisions Matter calculation spreadsheet can help you do this in three easy steps.)

36 |

MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY

Purchasing specification Once the decision to replace a motor has been made, know what type of unit you’ll be purchasing as the replacement. Because energy costs represent 95% of the lifetime costs for most motors, NEMA Premium® efficiency motors may save your facility money in many applications. Keep in mind that a motor failure is also a good opportunity to make sure the size and type of motor are appropriate for the application. Best-practice repair specification Ensure that motors are returned to their nameplate efficiency by specifying best-practice repair. Without this type of specification, a repair could result in a unit that operates less efficiently. Take the time to check out the best-practice repair resources that are available through the Motor Decisions Matter initiative, and contact your motor service provider to develop a specification for your facility. Motor Decisions Matter provides motor users with a variety of free tools and information, including the “Simple Savings Calculator,” “Motor Planning Kit” and numerous case studies from facilities throughout the United States and Canada, at www.motorsmatter.org. MT For more info, enter 04 at www.MT-freeinfo.com

The Motor Decisions Matter (MDM) campaign is managed by the Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE), a North American nonprofit organization that promotes energysaving products, equipment and technologies. For further information, contact MDM staff at mdminfo@cee1.org or (617) 589-3949.

APRIL 2010


MARKETPLACE

Motor Brakes With Oil Shear Technology

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ncorporating proven oil shear technology, the new MagnaShear motor brake from Force Control Industries provides a number of benefits. Torque is transmitted between lubricated surfaces, thus eliminating wear on friction surfaces. The technology also provides a smooth “cushioned” stop that reduces shock to the drive system. A patented fluid recirculation system dissipates heat, a common problem in dry-braking systems. These brakes are well suited for demanding applications where a motor is reversed each cycle.

Force Control Industries Fairfield, OH For more info, enter 39 at www.MT-freeinfo.com

Detect Air Leaks In Pipes & Pressurized Systems

For more info, enter 80 at www.MT-freeinfo.com

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RC’s Leak Detector is an aerosol spray that works by forming highly visible bubbles over points of air leakage. The product’s non-flammable,water-based formula contains no oils, silicones or harmful solvents, making it suitable for use on a variety of surfaces for almost all types of gas. It’s NSF P1 Registered for use in meat and poultry plants.

CRC Industries Warminster, PA For more info, enter 40 at www.MT-freeinfo.com

‘Next-Day’ Custom Seals

H

ercules Sealing Products’ Same Day Seals On Demand program can provide custom seals, manufactured on the day of order. Shipped via UPS red service for guaranteed next-day delivery, styles include piston, rod and rotary shaft seals, wipers, back-up and guide rings in over 125+ standard profiles. Custom profiles are available within a few days. Hercules Sealing Products Clearwater, FL For more info, enter 41 at www.MT-freeinfo.com APRIL 2010

For more info, enter 81 at www.MT-freeinfo.com MT-ONLINE.COM | 37


INFORMATION HIGHWAY For rate information on advertising in the Information Highway Section Contact your Sales Rep or MIKE ANTELL at: Phone: (978) 282-1959 / Fax: (978) 282-9749 / E-mail: mantell@atpnetwork.com Web Spotlight: SIEMENS

PIP is a consortium of process plant owners and engineering construction contractors harmonizing member’s internal standards for design, procurement, construction, and maintenance into industry-wide Practices. PIP has published over 450 Practices. A current listing of published Practices is available on the PIP website at: http://pip.org/practices/index.asp. For more info, enter 83 at www.MT-freeinfo.com www.pip.org

SIEMENS - How can maintenance costs be cut, while increasing availability? With our SPPA-D3000 Diagnostic Suite, “preventive” maintenance can become reality. Whether using the “Machinery Protection”, “Machinery Analysis”, “Plant Monitor” or “Combustion Dynamics Monitoring” solution, you can predict where and you’re your system might fail, allowing you to avoid unscheduled outages. For more info, enter 82 at www.MT-freeinfo.com www.siemens.com/energy/controls

RY! W! R HU R NO STE I G RE The Maintenance & Reliability Technology Summit is the #1 learning venue and source of practical solutions for anyone concerned with the reliability, maintenance and the overall capacity assurance of critical equipment systems in a plant or facility. Mark your calendars! MARTS 2010 is taking place April 27-30, 2010 at the Hyatt Regency O’Hare in Rosemont, IL. For more info, enter 84 at www.MT-freeinfo.com www.MARTSConference.com

CLASSIFIED Need Help? Need A Job? Contact Lisa – LISA LINEAL:

ATP List Services

LINEAL

Recruiting Services

TOLL FREE 877-386-1091

lisalineal@lineal.com www.lineal.com Electromechanical • Electronic Electrical Service & Systems Specialists

Se Habla Español

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Customized, Targeted Lists For Your Marketing Needs www.atplists.com Contact: Ellen Sandkam 847-382-8100 x110 800-223-3423 x110 info@atplists.com esandkam@atplists.com 1300 S. Grove Ave., Suite 105, Barrington, IL 60010

For rate information on advertising in the Classified Section Contact your Sales Rep or MIKE ANTELL at: Phone: (978) 282-1959 Fax: (978) 282-9749 e-mail: mantell@atpnetwork.com

APRIL 2010


M A I N T E N A N C E

Index ADVERTISER

TECHNOLOGY

®

YEARS

Your Source For CAPACITY ASSURANCE SOLUTIONS

April 2010 Volume 23, No. 4 •

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1300 South Grove Avenue, Suite 105 Barrington, IL 60010 PH 847-382-8100 FX 847-304-8603

AB SKF ..................................................www.skf.com/lubrication.............................. 69 ............................17 Baker Instument Co............................www.bakerinst.com ....................................... 74 ............................26 CRC Industries ....................................www.crcindustries.com/ei ............................ 71 ............................20 Des-Case Corporation........................www.descase.com........................................... 67 ............................10 Energy Summit....................................www.energysummitonline.com .................. 85 ......................... IBC Eventure Events - STO........................www.stoconference.com ............................... 72 ............................21 Exair Corporation ...............................www.exair.com/48/123.htm ......................... 75 ............................30 FLIR Systems, Inc.................................www.flir.com ................................................... 62,65......................1,5 Fluke.......................................................www.fluke.com/newti ................................... 68,70,73....... 11,19,25 Generac Power Systems, Inc. .............www.generac.com/mt4 ................................. 61 ..........................IFC Inpro/Seal Co........................................www.inpro-seal.com...................................... 86 ...........................BC MARTS..................................................www.martsconference.com .......................... 79 ............................35 Miller-Stephenson Chemical Co. .....www.miller-stephenson.com ....................... 76 ............................30 Process Industries Practices ...............www.pip.org .................................................... 81 ............................37 Royal Purple, Inc..................................www.royal-purple-industrial.com .............. 77 ............................31 Siemens AG ..........................................www.siemens.com/energy/controls ............ 66,82....................7,38

SALES STAFF OH, KY, TN 135 N. Rocky River Road Berea, OH 44017 440-463-0907; Fax 440-891-1254 JOHN DAVIS jdavis@atpnetwork.com

AL, CA, CO, DE, FL, GA, MD, MS, NC, NJ, SC, PA, VA, WV, DC 1750 Holmes Drive West Chester, PA 19382 610-793-3093; Fax 610-793-3094 JIM HANLEY jhanley@atpnetwork.com

AR, AZ, NV, NM, OK, UT 1300 South Grove Avenue, Suite 105 Barrington, IL 60010 847-382-8100 x116; Fax 847-304-8603 BILL KIESEL bkiesel@atpnetwork.com

Sulzer Management Ltd. ....................www.sulzerts.com........................................... 63 .............................. 2 The Vibration Institute .......................www.vibinst.org.............................................. 78 ............................33 Tri Tool Inc............................................www.tritool.com............................................. 80 ............................37

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CT, ME, MA, NH, NY, RI, VT, ON, QC P.O. Box 1059 Osterville, MA 02655 508-428-3331; Fax 508-428-2545 VINCENT LeGENDRE vlegendre@atpnetwork.com

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VIEWPOINT Poul Jeppesen President and CEO, SKF USA Inc.

Getting Closer To Customers

D

emand remains constant in today’s global economy for industrial plants to increase asset efficiency, reliability and productivity. Operations seek viable product and service solutions that will effectively equip them for the challenges and deliver positive impact. From our perspective, a significant part of the process involves listening to customers, learning from them, applying our expertise and then responding with solutions that can make the difference. Now, a new and unprecedented SKF venue in North America has been established to bring our many resources still closer to customers and to promote the type of dynamic interaction that is at the heart of strong and thriving customer partnerships. The first SKF Solution Factory in the U.S. opened last month in Houston, TX. Its central mission is to provide a wide range of integrated, valueadded solutions “under one roof.” This facility joins eight others around the globe—with more planned as a unique network to serve customers with an ever-growing portfolio of products and services. The potential for our customers and the furthering of our valued relationships is virtually limitless. Competencies at this Solution Factory include: ■ Applications engineering ■ Spindle and ball-screw repair ■ Sealing solutions ■ Lubrication-system expertise ■ Remote condition monitoring and diagnostics ■ Engineering consultancy services ■ Operator and worker training ■ Mechanical-equipment services (including mounting, alignment and balancing) Offering all of these resources at one strategic location enables us to advance our commitment to deliver customized and timely service packages tailored for particular operations.

Of course, our Solution Factories stand as just one of many avenues available to our customers across industries—including more than 10,000 SKF industrial distributor locations worldwide. They also represent a highly significant destination underscoring our pivotal role as a technological leader and knowledge engineering company for more than 100 years. In many ways, the Solution Factory extends and expands that all-important dialogue with customers. We have been successful in acquiring knowledge by working closely with leading customers; understanding their industries to develop new products and solutions; and contributing value by improving performance and increasing production efficiency. The process has allowed us to address the entire lifecycle of a particular asset from the design phase to services and service-related products. This all-encompassing focus, in turn, sharpens our customer focus and our offerings. In the foreseeable marketplace, implementing optimized maintenance strategies and cost-effective solutions will continue to be crucial. For example, in a thriving economy, failed machinery is typically replaced outright, usually with considerable expense and downtime. Those days, for the most part, are gone, since, in the current economic climate, every day and every dollar counts. As a result, increasing attention is being put on equipment upgrades, refurbishment and postmaintenance testing to mitigate otherwise high capital costs. It’s along these lines that the SKF Solution Factory offers yet another path toward realizing overall asset efficiency and, just as importantly, supports a highly advantageous business practice—getting even closer to our customers. Poul Jeppesen has responsibility for coordinating the SKF Group’s U.S.-based operations. E-mail: Poul.Jeppesen@skf.com

The opinions expressed in this Viewpoint section are those of the author, and don’t necessarily reflect those of the staff and management of MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY magazine.

40 | MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY

APRIL 2010


& Innovation Summit 2010 Energy & Innovation Summit 2010 is designed to help participants understand energy efficiency, build successful business models, get practical advice on funding as well as implementing efficiency efforts. Attendees will learn what really works from global and national leaders and how to get on the path to success in the energy efficient economy. Day 1: INNOVATION SUMMIT Hear from experts and learn from case studies and skill training on energy innovation in products, processes, and new business models Day 2: ENERGY EFFICIENCY SUMMIT Get latest updates on energy efficiency initiatives including ISO-50001and learn from case studies and manufacturers of energy efficiency products Day 3: ENERGY TRAINING SEMINAR Get hands-on training from industry experts to meet the new ASME/ANSI standards

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Inpro/Seal Company has been in the business of bearing protection for rotating equipment for 32 years and counting. We have been supplying bearing protection for the IEEE-841 motors since they were first introduced. It is only logical that we would expand into the field of motor shaft current mitigation to protect motor bearings. The CDR is:

ROBUST Machined entirely out of solid corrosion resistant

and highly conductive bronze, the CDR/MGS is capable of carrying 12+ continuous amps. They are made exclusively by the Inpro/Seal Company in Rock Island, IL, to ensure consistent quality and same-day shipments when required.

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products were developed in our own Research and Experimentation Laboratory and then extensively tested and evaluated by professional motor manufacturing personnel. Our standard guarantee of unconditional customer satisfaction of product performance applies. We stand behind our products.

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MT April 2010  

Maintenance Technology April 2010. Your Source For Capacity Assurance.