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THE WAIT IS OVER LANDMARK PLAY MAKES DRAMATIC RETURN

THE PARADOX OF CATHY JONES

PLAYING POLITICS FOR LAUGHS

A CALGARY TAKE ON

CINDERELLA

2016 | 2017 SEASON

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     - visit or phone -

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CONTENTS

2016/2017 SEASON

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WELCOME

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LAUGHING AT HER DEMONS

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5 THINGS ABOUT DANIEL FONG

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WAITING FOR THE PARADE

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FAMILY TIES

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HEARD BUT NOT SEEN

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FRESH PRINTS

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‘A WORLD WE WANT TO LIVE IN’

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SLIPPING THROUGH TIME

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GETTING A RISE FROM A FALL

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FIVE W’S WITH CHIMA NKEMDIRIM

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45 YEARS OF ATP

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A DRAMATURG AND A SOMMELIER

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UP FOR THE CHALLENGE

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FINDING THE SWEET SPOT

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THE EXCHANGE

A message from Vanessa Porteous.

Cathy Jones turns the tables on her worries.

Young actor’s career started with an Eek!

How a little Calgary play triumphed.

Joan MacLeod focuses on polygamy.

Sound designer Peter Moller.

Launching fresh talent for over 30 years.

Donors Kerrie Penney and Don Swystun.

The story behind a holiday pantomime.

Michael Healey on Joe Clark’s stumble.

The Mayor’s Chief of Staff and ATP.

A snapshot of Alberta Theatre Projects.

Bonding over theatre and wine.

ATP Ticket Office Coordinator a bright light.

Jonathan Christenson of Catalyst Theatre.

Going in-depth with ATP.

ON THE COVER:

Cast from Waiting for the Parade KENNETH LOCKE

ALBERTA THEATRE PROJECTS |

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- for the A CATALYST THEATRE CREATION

Photo by Kenneth Locke

Cinderella

a distinctly Calgarian

Photo by Kenneth Locke

story

Photo by Kenneth Locke

WAITING FOR THE PARADE

FORTUNE FALLS WRITTEN, COMPOSED AND DIRECTED BY

SLIPPER: A DISTINCTLY CALGARIAN CINDERELLA STORY

JOHN MURRELL September 13 - October 1, 2016

JONATHAN CHRISTENSON October 18 - November 5, 2016

November 22 - December 31, 2016

by

by Rebecca Northan in collaboration with Christian Goutsis and Bruce Horak

      A CO-PRODUCTION WITH THE BELFRY THEATRE Photo by Kenneth Locke

CATHY JONES: STRANGER TO HARD WORK

CATHY JONES January 17 - January 29, 2017 WRITTEN AND PERFORMED BY

Photo by Kenneth Locke

GRACIE

1979

JOAN MACLEOD February 28 - March 18, 2017

MICHAEL HEALEY April 4 - April 22, 2017

by

by

Become an Alberta Theatre Projects Subscriber TODAY! 403-294-7402 | ATPlive.com ATP July 2016.indd 4

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WELCOME TAKE A SEAT

A VANESSA PORTEOUS Artistic Director

ATP’S ARTISTIC VISION Our aim at ATP is to make life more beautiful by creating and producing great contemporary theatre from Canada and beyond. Our work is about what’s now, what’s new and what’s next. In the welcoming oval of the Martha Cohen Theatre, right here in Calgary, we stretch as deep as life, as wide as the world.

Publisher: Alberta Theatre Projects in partnership with Postmedia Content Works Producer: Kelly Phelan Managing editor: Darren Oleksyn Editors: Kara Sturk, Vanessa Porteous Design director: Charlene Kolesnik Contributing designer: Mike Lohaus Writers: Zac Bolan, Jonathan Brower Laurel Green, Stephen Hunt, Matt Smith and Kara Sturk

lberta Theatre Projects turns 45 this year! It’s hard to believe that for more than four decades, Calgarians have enjoyed life-changing contemporary theatre from Canada and beyond, right here at ATP. Nowadays, Head Usher Andrea scans the ticket you bought online as you walk into the warm and welcoming Martha Cohen Theatre. Drink in hand, you settle into your well-upholstered seat (all new this season — even wider and more comfy). The stage lights fade up (more than 250 instruments, all co-ordinated by computer). The performers appear on a set designed by one of Canada’s top scenic designers and built by a team of Calgary craftspeople. They inhale, and so do you. The play begins. It hasn’t always been this way. Longstanding patrons tell great stories about the early days. Back in 1972, the shows were performed in the Canmore Opera House at Heritage Park. You know the one: the log cabin theatre just across from the old graveyard. No real heating, no fancy lighting or sound. Just a tiny stage and a hundred folding chairs. “The wind would come howling through the chinks in the logs,” one patron recalled. “One time there was a blizzard so bad the show was cancelled. I think I was the only audience member who showed up. I gave one of the actors a ride home.” What I like about these stories is how much love the patrons have for those early

Photography: Wil Andruschak, Jason Franson, Carys Richards Alberta Theatre Projects 220 9th Ave. S.E. Calgary, Alberta, T2G 5C4 Phone: 403-294-7475 atplive.com

days. We were all in it together: leaning in to listen — sometimes literally huddled together for warmth! — as the Canadian theatrical voice was born. Forty-five years later, the important things haven’t changed. ATP is still Calgary’s, and Canada’s, leading home for life-changing contemporary theatre. In the welcoming oval of our auditorium, we are one community, audience and artists alike, all gathered round to share stories of what it means to be alive right now. This special publication created with Postmedia will give you a taste of the stories behind the stories in our 2016/2017 All Canadian 45th Anniversary Season. We’re so proud to welcome Canada’s top theatrical talent this year. With John Murrell, Catalyst Theatre, Rebecca Northan, Cathy Jones, Joan MacLeod and Michael Healey, I’m not sure we’ve ever had a line-up with quite so many Canadian showbiz stars. I know you’ll enjoy hearing what they have to say. I hope you’ll join us in the theatre. We promise you a friendly vibe, comfy seats and a tasty pre-show drink. But most of all, we will enjoy each other’s company. We will create a feeling of community, as the lights go down and another great story begins.

Vanessa Porteous Artistic Director Alberta Theatre Projects

This content was produced by Content Works, Postmedia’s commercial content division, in conjunction with Alberta Theatre Projects. Statements, opinions and viewpoints expressed herein do not necessarily represent the views of the publisher. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the express written consent of the publisher. ALBERTA THEATRE PROJECTS |

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- for the Photo by Kenneth Locke

WAITING FOR THE PARADE by JoHN MURRELL

Directed By KATE NEWBY

SEPTEMBER 13 - OCTOBER 1, 2016 ATPlive.com | 403-294-7402

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SPOTLIGHT ON

CATHY JONES

SUPPLIED PHOTO

LAUGHING AT HER DEMONS CANADIAN TV ICON CATHY JONES FINDS RELEASE BY TURNING HER ANXIETIES AND STRUGGLES INTO COMIC FODDER IN ONE-WOMAN SHOW S T E PH E N H U N T

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athy Jones has a reputation as one of Canada’s funniest women. An original cast member from This Hour Has 22 Minutes and, before that, CODCO, the CBC comedy series launched in 1988, Jones knows how to make people laugh. But what many might not know is that her life has had its dark moments as she has faced both anxiety and depression. Her latest solo show, Stranger to Hard Work, touches on these subjects in a light-hearted way while dealing with the paradox that is being Cathy Jones. “I have a strange life,” Jones says, “where people expect me to be very social, but I think I’ve discovered since I’ve done this show that in my way, I’m an introvert — and I wrote a show that was honestly about what my experiences with my life are like.” Stranger to Hard Work — her third solo show — explores mental health, a spiritual quest, and nutrition, among other things, Jones says. “I feel,” she says, “like three-quarters

of my (life’s) work has been trying to be mentally stable. I’m a Buddhist. I do therapy if I have to. I take vitamins and try to keep myself healthy and balance myself and not be depressed. “I have a playful sense of my life,” she adds. “At the same time, I can be devastatingly lonely and panicked or worried about whether I’m going to be depressed. I’ve struggled my whole life with ADD (attention deficit disorder) and it’s been hard for me to focus and not panic and settle down and get some work done.” What helped get Stranger to Hard Work done was connecting with director Ann-Marie Kerr (The Circle, Enbridge New Canadian Play, ATP 2015), who gave Jones what she needed more than anything: a good listener. “Having Ann-Marie with me (listening to my stories) was just such a joy,” Jones says, “because she just looked at me with this big, open smile on her face and these beautiful eyes — and she just thought I was so funny! That gave me the freedom to go anywhere I wanted to go with the show.” The result is a solo show that’s one

part confessional, one part stand-up comedy and all parts hilarious. It also brought healing for Jones, who discovered that painful moments weaken once you turn them into stories. “They don’t really have that much power if you look more closely at them,” she says. The result is a unique solo show that might be as effective a prescription for Jones — and her audiences — as all the emotional, medical and spiritual remedies she seeks out in Stranger to Hard Work. “It’s an amazing show,” she says, “because people really laugh so much, and it’s such a joy to do it. It’s just really fun.” High Performance Rodeo Special Presentation CATHY JONES: STRANGER TO HARD WORK Written and Performed by Cathy Jones Directed by Ann-Marie Kerr January 17 to January 29, 2017

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THINGS

YOU ABSOLUTELY MUST KNOW ABOUT ACTOR

DANIEL FONG

The cast of Fortune Falls from a June workshop, from left, Braydon Dowler-Coltman, Jamie Tognazzini, Graham Mothershill, Shannon Blanchet and Daniel Fong. LAUREL GREEN

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High Performance Rodeo Special Presentation CATHY JONES: STRANGER TO HARD WORK Written and Performed by Cathy Jones Directed by Ann-Marie Kerr January 17 to January 29, 2017

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ONE-ON-ONE WITH

DANIEL FONG

Daniel Fong, who stars in Alberta Theatre Projects’ production of Fortune Falls, credits a high school teacher for fostering his love of theatre. CARYS RICHARDS S T E PH E N H U N T

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aniel Fong grew up in Calgary, where he discovered acting as a student at Winston Churchill High School. He studied theatre at MacEwan University, formerly Grant MacEwan College, in Edmonton, before returning to Calgary to perform the role of Puck in a Shakespeare in the Park production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. The 24-year-old has appeared in the award-winning The Apple Kingdom, which won best play at both the 2013 Calgary One-Act Play Festival and the Alberta One-Act Play Festival. He had a role in The Wasp, which was part of Sage Theatre’s 2013 IGNITE! Festival. He played Will in the Alberta Theatre Projects Enbridge New Canadian Play, Geoffrey Simon Brown’s drama The Circle in October 2015. Fong has also appeared on TV shows Fargo and Wynonna Earp. Fong is part of the cast of Catalyst Theatre’s Fortune Falls, an Enbridge New Canadian Play that has its world premiere at ATP this October. LIVE spoke with Fong about his introduction to acting. The first time I knew I wanted to be an actor was ... 9 | atplive.com Sitting in the audience of my big brother’s first show. It was Hound of the Baskervilles, I believe. A junior high

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production — I was sitting in the audience, his youngest brother, and thinking, man, he’s so cool. I want to do that when I get into junior high and high school. First play I performed in ...

Meet the Creeps — it was 2. kindIt was of an Addams Family, junior high

spinoff thing. I was so nervous that I auditioned a week later than everyone else. I went up to the drama teacher and said, I really want to be in a play, but I couldn’t audition when everyone else auditioned, so by the time I did, there was only one role left: which was Lady No. 2. So they changed it to Guy No. 2, but my only line in the whole play was ‘Eek.’ I walked on with a bunch of tourists. We saw a snake on the ground and I went ‘Eek!’ And that was my first-ever role. The teacher who changed how I

3. understood theatre was ...

Kathy Fraser. She was my drama teacher through (Sir Winston Churchill) high school and was the most incredible woman I’ve met. She’s just got a way of making acting and drama just — fun. It never felt competitive or bad. She just kept it fun and exciting to be a part of her class, and she really fostered that sense of community that I think everyone looks for in the arts… It was really what carried me on towards

post-secondary acting. She’s an incredible teacher and really changed my life. The hardest thing about being an

4. actor is ...

For me, the hardest thing is staying sane and proud of yourself when you’re not working — because there will be times when you’re not working, and you always think, how am I an actor if I’m not acting? It’s really about finding the pride and the commitment to your craft and your work and who you are as a person. It helps get you through those times — because the toughest thing is justifying (being an actor) to yourself all the time, when no one else is looking. As an actor, so much of it is out of your control and often it just boils down to (factors that are) kind of out of your hands, so it makes it a lot easier to not take it personally now than when I first started.

If I could only binge watch one show, that one show would be ... Recently, I’ve been into Daredevil — and I did binge watch that one. Both seasons, back to back. I missed the first one and then decided, it’s time, and watched them all the way through and it was really really cool to see. The inner fight nerd in me just loved it — it was great to see all the fights — and I’m a really big superhero sucker.

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PRODUCTION

40TH ANNIVERSARY

HOW A LITTLE CALGARY PLAY BECAME AN

TheYear of John Murrell Alberta Theatre Projects Waiting for the Parade Written by John Murrell September 13 – October 1, 2016 The Martha Cohen Theatre One Yellow Rabbit Fat Jack Falstaff’s Last Hour Written by and starring John Murrell October 25 – November 5, 2016 The Big Secret Theatre Calgary Opera Filumena By John Estacio and John Murrell February 4, 8 and 10, 2017 Southern Alberta Jubilee Auditorium

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INTERNATIONAL SENSATION - for the -

The original production of Waiting for the Parade was staged by Alberta Theatre Projects in 1977. ALBERTA THEATRE PROJECTS

S T E PH E N H U N T

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he instructions were simple enough: write a play that told the story of the Second World War through the lens of Alberta history. That’s what Calgary playwright John Murrell remembers about the commission from Alberta Theatre Projects that led to the creation of Waiting for the Parade. “Alberta Theatre Projects was very much in love with the idea of presenting western Canadian, Albertan history, to its audience made up largely of Albertans, in new plays,” says Murrell. “And now, it was time for a World War II play. They just said, ‘That’s the only prescription we’re giving you. It needs to concern the Second World War,’” he recalls. What they got was a subtly lyrical drama about how the lives of five Calgary women unfold during the war, while the men in their lives fight overseas. What started as a provincial commission of a cozy wartime domestic drama turned out to be a global hit that has been in continual production around the world ever since its 1977 debut. However, no one knew that back in 1975, when Murrell was just hatching the

The new ATP production of Waiting for the Parade includes, from left, Allison Lynch, Janelle Cooper, Elizabeth Stepkowski Tarhan and Selina Wong. KENNETH LOCKE

idea. When he informed ATP of his take on the Second World War, the response was muted. “I think they were a little puzzled about what that would look like. I didn’t have any answers for them for a while,” he says. And, when Waiting for the Parade premiered in the first week of February, 1977, the critical response was underwhelming as well. “The play is as unstructured as a raw egg spilled on a kitchen floor,” wrote Calgary Herald critic Brian Brennan, “and the finale, after about two and one half hours, is an anti-climactic copout. “This new play, from a Canadian-based playwright, is nothing more than mere historical reconstruction; well-done, mind you, with authentic hairstyles, costumes

and songs of the period, but without contemporary relevance. It has nothing to say to a person under 30 living in Canada today.” Now 40 years later, Murrell sits in the lobby of the Martha Cohen Theatre, as one of Canada’s most esteemed playwrights, with productions of both plays and operas at Stratford, Shaw, New York, Toronto and London. He chats about the return of Waiting for the Parade to Alberta Theatre Projects. The new production, directed by Kate Newby, features a culturally diverse cast of some of Calgary’s top actors (Janelle Cooper, Selina Wong, Allison Lynch and Elizabeth Stepkowski Tarhan) along with Toronto import Sabryn Rock — so expect a revival that feels as relevant to life in ALBERTA THEATRE PROJECTS |

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The cast of Chicago’s Steppenwolf Theatre Company’s 1981 production of Waiting for the Parade featured, from left, Rondi Reed, Joan Allen, Glenne Headly and Moira Harris. LISA EBRIGHT, COURTESY STEPPENWOLF THEATRE COMPANY

Actresses of note who have played in Waiting for the Parade include: Joan Allen, Susan Coyne, Martha Henry, Kelli Fox, Laurie Metcalfe and Fiona Reid contemporary Calgary as a debate about who pays for a new hockey arena. And while it may have been four decades between ATP productions, the show has never really gone away for Murrell. It’s been widely produced across the English-speaking world as well as in Japanese, and Afrikaans in South Africa. Murrell has gone on to write an abundant number of well-received plays in addition to Waiting for the Parade, including Memoir, Democracy, The Faraway Nearby and Taking Shakespeare, which was performed at both the High Performance Rodeo and at Stratford. He also wrote the libretto for a number of operas, including Filumena (which returns to Calgary in 2016-17). He’s also an award-winning translator, nominated for a Governor General’s Award for his translation of Carol Frechette’s Thinking

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of Yu, which premiered at Alberta Theatre Projects in 2012. Along the way, he has been named a Member of the Order of Canada, received the Alberta Order of Excellence and, in 2008, received the Governor General’s Performing Arts Award for lifetime achievement.

I have always loved writing roles for women. I find them more interesting, because as a man, they’re more mysterious to me.” — Playwright John Murrell That’s not the playwriting future Murrell saw that cold February Saturday in 1977, when the initial reviews of Waiting for the Parade came out. “The Calgary critics ... essentially said there’s no audience for this, nor should

there ever be,” says Murrell. “And you know that was very hurtful of course at the time. “I remember very well,” he says, “just walking with a friend the day after those reviews came out, saying, ‘Well, I guess I’m done. You don’t recover from anything this bad.’ “I put the play away,” he adds, “and just thought if I ever write another play — if I ever have the nerve to write another play — it will certainly have to be a play very different from this one.” What was overlooked by the critics then was that Murrell had gotten the voices of the women in Waiting for the Parade right on the money (thanks in part to a little help from a research assistant named Gael Blackhall, who conducted interviews with a number of Calgary women who lived through the Second World War). “I have always loved writing roles for women,” Murrell says. “I find them more interesting, because as a man, they’re more mysterious to me. There’s more that I have to discover and lots that remains undiscoverable by a male writer, so it’s a real challenge. “Plus I love seeing and hearing women

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He H e wrote this beautiful story about five women in Calgary waiting i out World War II. He managed to capture a microcosm — a moment in Canadian history where the Canadian identity was being forged — and he did it with such a local perspective that it became universal.” — Alberta Theatre Projects Artistic Director Vanessa Porteous perform, more than I love seeing and hearing men perform, I guess. There are always exceptions, but I find the immediacy of a female actor — generally speaking — blows male actors out of the water.” That uncanny ear and ability to empathize with women has not been lost on several generations of Canadian actresses, says Alberta Theatre Projects Artistic Director Vanessa Porteous. “When you start talking to actresses,” says Porteous, “all of us have a Waiting for the Parade experience. We’ve either been in it, or done monologues from it. It certainly is universal and when you’re in the theatre scene.” When the time came to choose an ATP classic to celebrate the theatre company’s 45th birthday, Porteous says Waiting for the Parade was a slam dunk. “He wrote this beautifully universal story about five women in Calgary waiting out World War II. He managed to capture a microcosm — a moment in Canadian history where the Canadian identity was being forged — and he did it with such a local perspective that it became universal,” she says. Waiting for the Parade found its way out into the wider theatrical world when Marie Baron, who played Janet in the original Calgary production, used a monologue

from the play at an audition in Toronto, for Tarragon Theatre Artistic Director Bill Glassco. Baron didn’t land the part, Murrell says, “but he (Glassco) said, ‘I really like that speech. That’s pretty great writing. Who’s it by?’” Glassco, it turns out, had a hole in his programming calendar that he filled with the Toronto premiere of Waiting for the Parade. The show was well received there and soon was being produced across Canada, in the U.S. and, not too long after that, at the Lyric Hammersmith in London’s West End. “The (initial Calgary) reviews were like being smashed,” Murrell says, “and then suddenly, a hand reached out of the clouds and said, ‘You’re still alive.’” Now 70, and undergoing chemotherapy to treat leukemia, Murrell doesn’t sweat the critics so much, anymore. “It does make less difference to me now,” he says, “if my new work is liked or hated because more and more, I do it for me. It’s been a great life, to have been allowed to be a playwright and not have to do a lot of other work to support that work.” Come opening night on September 16, the whole city, Murrell included, can flash back to a period in Calgary’s theatre history when ATP shows were staged

inside the Canmore Opera House at Heritage Park and Murrell, then the company’s playwright-in-residence, occupied a unique sort of writing studio. “My office was in an ATCO Trailer,” he says, “which was the coldest place I’ve ever been in that could still call itself indoors — with a space heater — to keep me sort of alive. “And I loved it,” he says. “I loved that experience. It seemed like we were telling stories never told before. It seemed like we were up against odds that nobody since Shakespeare’s company had been up against in terms of space and lack of facilities and so forth — but it was a thrilling time, because we actually thought we were inventing professional Canadian theatre — and we were.” To watch video excerpts from this interview, visit ATPlive.com

40th Anniversary Production WAITING FOR THE PARADE Written by John Murrell Directed by Kate Newby September 13 to October 1, 2016 ALBERT ALB ALBERTA ERTA ERT A THEATRE THEATR THE ATRE ATR E PROJECTS PROJEC PRO JECTS JEC TS |

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FAMILY TIES JOAN MACLEOD

AWARD-WINNING PLAYWRIGHT JOAN MACLEOD TRAINS HER LENS ON THE FAMILY STRAINS FELT IN A POLYGAMOUS COMMUNITY IN GRACIE

I LIKE HANGING OUT WITH GRACIE.” 14

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PRODUCTION

GRACIE S T E PH E N H U N T

oan MacLeod has always found the poetry lurking in the dark corners of Canadian life. The Governor General’s Awardwinning playwright has a unique talent for blending the everyday details of life with extraordinary situations that force us to reconsider what we think of as conventionally Canadian. She explored the tension between a suburban police officer and the mother of the man he Tasered in 2013’s The Valley and cut to the core of community dynamics that led to the murder of 15-year-old Reena Virk in 2001’s The Shape of a Girl — both which premiered at Alberta Theatre Projects. Now, MacLeod details life in a polygamous community such as Bountiful, B.C., or Colorado City, Ariz., with Gracie, a solo show performed by Lili Beaudoin premiering on the ATP stage. “The polygamous community in South Eastern B.C. has always been interesting to me,” MacLeod says of Bountiful, “but it was never something I thought I would write about. And then I just started creating a character, reading as much as I could about the place. I did a couple of field trips and gave it a go.” Gracie is the character MacLeod created to tell the story. “Gracie is 15. It’s a oneperson show, and starts with her coming to Bountiful from Colorado City when she’s eight years old because her oldest sister is being married off to the community and her mother is marrying someone in Bountiful as well,” says MacLeod. What stuck out for MacLeod in her research about polygamous communities was that the victims aren’t just young girls — they are boys as well. “There’s a lot of women and a lot of little children (in the communities),” she says. “By the time you’re a teenage boy, unless you’re really close in a family way to one of the leaders, you’re not going to have much luck in Bountiful, or certainly Colorado City (the largest polygamous community in North America and the former home of Warren Jeffs, the now jailed leader of the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.) That has resulted in a generation of abandoned boys, she says, often called Lost Boys.

“In Colorado City, in its heyday, there were — they think — upwards of 400 boys (from Colorado City) working on the streets of Las Vegas as prostitutes.” One of those lost boys, it turns out, is Gracie’s brother. “Gracie’s brother, who she’s really close to, ends up leaving the community about a third of the way through the play,” MacLeod says, “and that really creates a lot of despair in her and I think — in a kind of unconscious way — that she starts thinking about how things (in Bountiful) work.” What makes MacLeod’s playwriting so powerful is that she can get inside the skin of characters living in a moral nightmare world and articulate their experiences in language that’s simple, eloquent, poetic and frequently beautiful. “A real breakthrough for me,” MacLeod says, “when I was writing the play, was when I realized that whatever happens to her in the play, she’s not going to stop loving her family, she’s not going to stop loving God, she’s not going to lose her faith. “But she is going to question the way she lives and what’s happened to her within that community and what happens to her brother as well.” The imaginative leap that MacLeod is forced to take with Gracie is trying to get inside the lives of people who do their best to keep the outside world at arm’s length, living in self-contained bubbles such as the communities they’ve created in Bountiful and Colorado City. “It’s interesting,” she adds, “to write about something that is essentially a secret.” That almost journalistic curiosity — she’s frequently inspired by stories she discovers in newspapers — coupled with a genius for language, has made MacLeod a master of the one-person show. “I love voice,” MacLeod says. “I love creating character, I love that blend of narration and drama that a one-person show is. It suits my particular style of writing — so I feel at home in the form. And that always feels great. “I like hanging out with Gracie,” she says. “She’s a great character to hang around with and try to figure out. Hopefully audiences will like her, too.”

World Premiere Enbridge New Canadian Play GRACIE

Written by Joan MacLeod Directed by Vanessa Porteous February 28 to March 18, 2017

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HEARD BUT NOT SEEN

CALGARY’S PETER MOLLER, THE MAN BEHIND THE MUSIC Z AC B O L A N

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he house lights go down and the curtain rises…” That is how a story about seeing a play usually starts. After the show, we talk about how the set was impressive and the costumes were beautiful. “The lighting in the dream sequence was really spooky,” we say. “I loved the sunset in the final scene.” We talk about what it looked like. Less often, we think about how it sounded. The use of sound effects has been an integral part of the theatre experience since Shakespeare, when they would hammer on a sheet of metal to create the sound of thunder. As recently as the 1960s, theatrical sound design consisted mainly of live sound effects, like shaking a box of broken glass backstage to create the effect of a window breaking, or snippets of pre-recorded music painstakingly spliced together and played back from reel-to-reel tape machines. In more recent times, an evolution in audio technology has greatly increased the importance and complexity of one of stagecraft’s newest disciplines — sound design. In 1967, a theatre lighting designer named Dan Dugan decided to change his focus to sound design while working on the Shakespeare Festival in San Diego. He went on to create complex soundscapes for San Francisco’s American Conservatory Theatre (ACT) during its 1968-69 season by using three stereo tape decks routing sounds to multiple speakers throughout the theatre. For his innovation, Dugan was credited by ACT as Sound Designer, and was possibly the first to bear this title. Calgary’s Peter Moller is a percussionist and a graphic designer who is the principal of Egg Press Co. But he is perhaps best known as a prolific sound designer for theatre. Moller has designed sound for several ATP productions including

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The Syringa Tree (2005, 2008), Tyland (Enbridge playRites 2010), Dust (Enbridge playRites 2013), Red (2013), The Motherf**ker with the Hat (2013) and most recently Butcher (2014). “I started doing sound design three decades ago, mainly in the form of live percussion,” explains Moller. “But when the digital revolution hit in the mid ’90s, I could see that everything to do with sound was going to go that way.”

I’ve heard it said that really great sound design should be the sound design you don’t notice.” Moller explains that while his job does have a very practical aspect, sound design is much more than simply using technology to create sound effects, or overseeing amplification to make sure the performers are heard from every seat in the theatre. Sound design nowadays involves selecting or creating sounds and music to deepen and support the emotions and themes of a production. The sound designer studies the play and becomes intimately familiar with the script. Then the real work begins. The sound designer and director work together to create a sound environment or musical style that will fit the world of the play. They then identify every sound cue in every scene, and the sound designer builds each cue one by one. “I’ll offer my insight and expertise to help facilitate what the director envisions,” continues Moller. “At that stage I’m pretty

much a creative partner, but the form my contribution takes depends on the director. There are many directors I work with repeatedly, because when they find designers they like to work with, they stick with them.” “Sound design takes many forms,” says Moller. “It could include anything from creating original music to going out and recording found sounds, in addition to the elements needed for sound effects. For example, I might have to take recording equipment into the field to capture sounds such as wind and trees rustling, or cars and traffic. “When I worked on Butcher for ATP, the script called for cello music. I worked with Calgary cellist Morag Northey to record several of her original ideas, which I later layered into tracks in my production studio. Then during rehearsals, the director, Morag and myself arrived at consensus on what music would be used in the play. Alternatively, some directors already have specific tunes that they want to use for transitions in the play — more of a soundtrack for the performance.” According to Moller, a sound designer needs to be in the rehearsal hall and in the theatre during technical rehearsals, to work out the cues for the sound with the director and actors, and to hear how the sound works within the performance. “At rehearsals I work with stage management who operate the controlling console,” says Moller. “I’ll be there to make necessary changes to the sound files, but it will be the stage management team that actually calls or runs the cues. “The beauty of doing sound with digital controllers is that you are able to make changes on the fly (while in technical rehearsals) — the same way you can correct lighting. The controller the stage manager uses can control sound, lights

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BEHIND THE SCENES

Sound design

I’LL OFFER MY INSIGHT AND EXPERTISE TO HELP FACILITATE Peter Moller was the sound designer on a number of ATP productions including Tyland, The Syringa Tree and most recently Butcher.

WHAT THE DIRECTOR ENVISIONS. and even projections — so one cue can trigger three or more events at once. And the technology enables us to store the cues, making it consistent from night to night throughout the run.” For Moller, the biggest challenge facing any sound designer is to find a way to work collectively with everyone involved in

SUPPLIED PHOTO

the production to create the final product as the director envisions it. As a team, they must accommodate the end goal of the overall process — to produce a great show that puts patrons in the seats. “I’ve heard it said that really great sound design should be the sound design you don’t notice,” muses Moller. “Possibly

that’s true — but I think if a sound design is working in conjunction with all the other elements on both sides of the curtain, then you have a good show. You don’t necessarily have to remember the individual aspects — if the show pulls the audience member in, then all the elements are doing their job.”

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M FA ILY HO AY L ID !

N FU

C

a distinctly Calgarian

inderella story

Photo by Kenneth Locke

SLIPPER: A DISTINCTLY CALGARIAN CINDERELLA STORY by REBECCA NORTHAN IN COLLABORATION WITH

CHRISTIAN GOUTSIS and BRUCE HORAK

NOVEMBER 22 – DECEMBER 31, 2016 ATPlive.com | 403-294-7402

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LAUNCHING FRESH TALENT FOR OVER

30 YEARS J O NAT H A N B R OW E R

I Through the years many successful artists and arts enthusiasts have graduated from the program, including:

Mieko Ouchi: Edmonton-

based playwright, director, artistic director and performer, author of The Red Priest (Eight Ways To Say Goodbye), which was nominated for a Governor General’s Literary Award for Drama, and The Blue Light, both of which premiered at ATP’s Enbridge playRites Festival.

Bruce Horak: Calgary-born

performer, writer, musician, composer, improviser and painter, creator and performer of This is Cancer (Enbridge playRites Festival), which has toured for 10 years. He is also a co-creator of Legend Has It and Slipper — A Distinctly Calgarian Cinderella Story.

Rebecca Northan: Calgaryborn actor, writer, director and improviser, and the creator of Legend Has It (ATP world premiere Enbridge playRites Festival) the international hit Blind Date, and this season’s Slipper — A Distinctly Calgarian Cinderella Story. She is a regular performer at Montreal’s Just for Laughs festival and has performed in movies and TV series.

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Marc Kneppers:

After a B.Sc. and an M.Sc. in astrophysics, he went on to become the chief security architect at TELUS and is a former Board Member at ATP.

n 1986, ATP’s Artistic Associate Allen MacInnis, now Artistic Director at Toronto’s Young People’s Theatre, convened a group of high school students for one weekend to collectively create dramatic scenes. Thirty years later, the program now known as FRESH PRINTS has grown into a major component of Alberta Theatre Projects’ renowned youth engagement activities, affecting hundreds of kids and leading to an annual sold-out event. Nowadays, students meet weekly for a five-month playwriting program. They are considered honorary season artists, given tickets to all the shows, and are invited to all ATP Exchange events. In addition to the support provided by Calgary playwright Neil Fleming, who guides the students through the process, guest artists attend sessions to speak about their careers and students receive one-on-one consultations with a professional director/dramaturg followed by a workshop and a public reading with professional actors. With substantial time for mentorship, workshopping with professional actors and directors, dramaturgy and rewrites, the students polish their pieces into short plays that are presented during the FRESH PRINTS showcase. This showcase is the closing night feature during ATP’s Raucous Caucus Emerging Artists Assembly held in March each year.

Michaela Jeffery: Graduate of The National Theatre School of Canada’s Playwriting program in 2016; winner of the Enbridge Emerging Playwright Award and Ottawa Little Theatre National Playwriting Competition. Are you a high school student bitten by the theatre bug? Maybe FRESH PRINTS is for you. Meets Sept. 12, 2016 through March 6, 2017, on Mondays 7-9 p.m. Sign up before Sept 12. $100 fee, needs-based bursaries available. For more information about this and other Youth Engagement programs at ATP, contact Talore Peterson, tpeterson@atplive.com ALBERTA THEATRE PROJECTS |

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WHY KERRIE PENNEY AND DON SWYSTUN SUPPORT THE ARTS M AT T S M I T H

“G

oing to the theatre is good for our relationship,” say Kerrie Penney and Don Swystun. They like it because it allows them to schedule date nights throughout the year. They’ve been coming to Alberta Theatre Projects together for over ten seasons now and are regular Donors to the company. Kerrie was a personality in Calgary media for many years, producing and hosting shows on radio and Global television. She is also an entrepreneur, founding Calgary’s Freshwater Creative agency. Today she explores her passion for creative non-fiction on her blog graceandgoodfortune.com. Don enjoyed a career as a professional engineer before becoming a co-owner of Calgary’s The Beltliner, a popular restaurant on 12th Avenue S.W. What is it that inspires Kerrie and Don to donate? “We come to know ourselves through stories, and the stories we tell,” says Kerrie. “The more we can make sense of the world we live in and find things in common with people, or understand why people are different … That I think is fundamental — it’s foundational — to a society that’s going to work. So for us arts support is essential. It’s not a nice-to-have. A world without art is

not a world we want to live in.” Growing up in Calgary, Kerrie’s family had limited finances but her mother would bring her and her sister to dress rehearsals, and “whatever we could find that was cheap or free.” She remembers visiting the old Allied Arts Centre, in the building that would later become The Roadhouse nightclub. “It used to be on 9th Avenue… and I remember I came with my Mom, who was crazy about this actor Barry Morse who was in (British sci-fi drama) Space 1999. He was doing The Mousetrap at the time. I was younger than our daughter is now, going to see it, and it was like, ‘Arrgh! Do we have to go see a play?’ But it was so cool! Looking back it was really special.” Don, who hails from Edmonton where his father was a choir director and opera singer, agrees: “You get an appreciation for it. Whether you like it at the time — and a lot of times you don’t,” he says with a smile, “but as you grow older you say, well hey, I learned a lot actually. It was a great experience.You want to go back to that.” “That’s why we’re as passionate as we are today,” Kerrie says. “Because it was important to our parents.” They point out that donating is far from the only way to offer support. Kerrie was

on the Alberta Theatre Projects Board of Directors from 2009 to 2014. She had a small company and a small daughter at the time, but thought she owed it to herself to give it a try. She found the Board to be kinetic and attentive, and enjoyed the fact that she could make a real impact, while also modelling citizen engagement for their daughter, Annabelle. “You don’t have to be old,” she says. “You don’t have to be rich. It’s about being an engaged part of the community. If you believe in something, support it. Go to see the plays, and if you can give a bit of money, even better.” Don adds, “Not everybody can donate, that’s a big thing. For a lot of people it’s tough just to pay to go see a play. But a lot of the arts organizations look to find ways to make it more affordable… And I think that’s great. You don’t always have to be there on Opening Night and pay top dollar.” He points out that keeping tickets affordable for everyone in the community is only possible thanks to those who are able to give. He adds, “And of course the volunteers too. That’s another way to give back. That’s the perfect way to do it. You can be the Front of House volunteers that enjoy being there and helping others out.”

To learn more about becoming an ATP donor visit: atplive.com/support

ATP Donors Don Swystun and Kerrie Penney say attending plays is good for their relationship.

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SUPPORTING

ATP

g plays ALBERTA THEATRE PROJECTS |

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SLIPPING

THROUGH TIME

WITH PANTOMIME S T E PH E N H U N T

B

y the time Rebecca Northan and her merry band of comedic collaborators get through with the legend of Cinderella, the chances are good that the glass slipper may have morphed into a cowboy boot. That’s because Alberta Theatre Projects continues its holiday tradition of bringing new and creative works to the stage this year with Slipper — A Distinctly Calgarian Cinderella Story, a pantomime adaptation of Cinderella distilled through the comedic vision of Northan, the creator of the international hits Blind Date, Legend Has It and Kung Fu Panties. A pantomime, or panto as it’s commonly called, is a popular genre of family holiday theatre that features slapstick comedy, audience participation, gender-crossing actors, pop song spoofs and topical humour, all woven into an adaptation of a traditional fairy tale. LIVE caught up with three of the creative visionaries behind Slipper — ATP Artistic Director Vanessa Porteous, playwright Northan and award-winning set designer Narda McCarroll (Mary’s Wedding, The Circle) — to talk about what exactly a panto is, and how they plan to tackle the story of Cinderella, set in contemporary Calgary. Below is an edited oral history on the creation of Slipper — A Distinctly Calgarian Cinderella Story.

VANESSA:

Narda’s one of my best friends and even before I was Artistic Director at ATP, she would say, why doesn’t anyone in Calgary do panto? It’s the best!

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NARDA: I used to go see pantos in

Lethbridge! We moved to Lethbridge from California when I was four — so I think my mom tried to take me to anything she possibly could. We would go to the musical theatre and the pantomime. I remember pantos from the early days and loving it, and wanting to be a part of it.

VANESSA: I’ve thought for a long time that it would really be perfect for ATP, as our city’s contemporary theatre company here in Calgary, to take on the task of producing a panto, because we like to do slightly unusual things. We like to have fun at the annual family show. We like to be relevant. We like to talk about what life is like today. It just seemed like it would be the right time and place to have a panto as our holiday show. Then the question was, who should create it?

VANESSA: We have the right artists here in Calgary. We have these wonderfully inventive theatre creators and improvisers who make plays all the time that amuse all ages — and the leader of that band of crazies is Rebecca Northan. She’s got an incredible sense of theatricality and entertainment. She’s not afraid of anything. She knows how to please groups of all styles — and she’s a born and raised Calgarian. When I approached her about it, she proposed teaming up with two of her long-time collaborators, Bruce Horak and Christian Goutsis — they’re all Calgarians — and it just seemed like a great combination. We’ve actually creatively grown, fed and watered these people. Now, they’re ready to create a panto for us.

Panto might be newer to Calgary, but the panto comedic tradition is everywhere.

REBECCA: I never saw what’s

considered a traditional panto as a kid, but I realized the training I had at Loose Moose (Theatre Company, a Calgary improv company), doing kid’s shows there, borrowed a lot of conventions from panto. Like the tradition of addressing the audiences, at Loose Moose anyways, checking in with them and inviting them to yell stuff out is very panto. And then of course, in my training as a young actor, I’ve done commedia (Commedia dell’Arte, an improv sketch performance style from Renaissance Italy) and you go, ‘Wait a minute, commedia, that’s where panto comes from!’

VANESSA: The influence of the panto style is seen all over pop culture. It’s so ubiquitous, you don’t even know you recognize it — like, for example, villains who are charming and fascinating and kind of more interesting than the leads. In every Hollywood animated movie, there’s a wonderfully charming villain — and villains who address the audience directly, who have a direct, intimate relationship with the audience. If you think about Peter Pan, it’s basically a panto. Is Slipper improvised, like Blind Date or Legend Has It?

REBECCA: This is not me doing

spontaneous theatre. This is me being a playwright. The show is scripted. There is room for improvisation in the panto genre, so for sure there will be moments of the actors playing with the audience. There are places for kids to get up onstage — but

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FAMILY

HOLIDAY SHOW

SHUTTERSTOCK

the work I normally do is about 60 per cent improvised and 40 per cent structured. This is more like 80 per cent scripted, with a 20 per cent window for improvised play. How do you fit Cinderella into a holiday show set in Calgary?

VANESSA:

Rebecca went away to write the script with the idea of Cinderella and came up with this notion that it could be about Edward, a young man who comes from turn-of-the-century Calgary, using a time machine given to him by his inventor uncle. He is plunged into the Calgary of 2016 where he thinks he’s on the journey of Cinderella. But, when he meets her, she’s Cindy. She’s got a job. She’s got places to go, and is totally not interested in being someone’s princess. And so Edward, who comes to Calgary with all his old-fashioned ideas about chivalry and romance, is

really thrown for a loop. Then there’s Uncle George, who thought he would play the king in the Cinderella story and ends up as the fairy godmother! Mayhem ensues. Our version of the story centres on a talent competition at the Stampede where everyone ends up competing — and people get more than they bargained for. Do you have to think about designing a panto differently than a more traditional holiday production?

NARDA: It’s important to embrace the style of panto — the lightness and the theatricality of it all. It’s a bit over the top. Frothy. You just have to have fun with it. One of the things we tried to do was just dream big and try to come up with as many awesome things as we could to put onstage, and then tried to figure out which things we could actually do.

What should Calgary audiences expect from Slipper — A Distinctly Calgarian Cinderella Story?

REBECCA: I would imagine a lot of

Calgarians probably aren’t familiar with the term panto, but when they see it, it isn’t going to be foreign. Really, what it means is a heck of a lot of fun and making sure the audience is with you and playing along the whole time.

World Premiere SLIPPER — A DISTINCTLY CALGARIAN CINDERELLA STORY Written by Rebecca Northan in collaboration with Christian Goutsis and Bruce Horak Directed by Rebecca Northan November 22 to December 31, 2016 For ages 6 to 106 ALBERTA ALBERT ALB ERTA ERT A THE THEATRE THEATR ATRE E PROJECTS |

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GETTING A RISE

FROM A FALL

MICHAEL HEALEY FINDS LAUGHS IN THE BACKROOMS OF PARLIAMENT HILL AS CANADA’S YOUNGEST PM FACES THE BATTLE OF HIS LIFE IN 1979

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There is comedy to be had in the distance between what they believe and what they’re obliged to say.” — Playwright Michael Healey, on politicians

MICHAEL HEALEY

S T E PH E N H U N T

F

or most Canadians, 1979 probably wasn’t a particularly memorable year — but Michael Healey isn’t most Canadians. He’s the award-winning Canadian playwright (The Drawer Boy, Plan B) who has turned a unique political moment into an unforgettable comedy featuring some of Canada’s great political legends as its main characters. As it turns out, 1979 was the year that 39-year-old Albertan Joe Clark — Canada’s youngest prime minister — won and lost his minority government. He allowed a parliamentary vote on an unpopular budget he knew he wouldn’t win, setting in motion the defeat of his six-month-old government. It was either a massive political blunder or an unblinking demonstration by an idealistic politician that he believed his role was to reflect the will of all Canadians, whether his government survived or not. It’s that motivation — or miscalculation — that Healey speculates about in 1979, his latest no-holds barred comedy of Canadian political manners. “The question (everyone asks),” Healey says, “has always been why did he allow his budget to come to a vote, knowing he didn’t have a majority, without making a special arrangement with other people? I’m

speculating in the play about his motives, mostly, because I’m interested in what constitutes integrity in a politician — what it meant then and what it means now.” He says the spot where integrity, naivety and even foolishness intersect is a great place for comedy. The play brings to theatrical life some of the most memorable Canadian political figures of the past 50 years, including Clark, Brian Mulroney, John Crosbie, Flora MacDonald and their arch-nemesis — the man Albertans loved to hate more than any other — Pierre Trudeau. “I don’t think anybody’s not had a good time writing (the character of) Pierre Trudeau,” says Healey. “Particularly when you’re using him for comedic ends. He’s just such a rich, funny guy. And the myth (of Trudeau) is so enormous. You really just need to dab with the paintbrush, because everybody knows who you’re talking about.” Healey is a Governor General’s Award-winning playwright, whose drama The Drawer Boy is considered a Canadian theatrical classic. More recently, he penned a trilogy of political comedies including Proud, a character study of the most recent Conservative prime minister, Stephen Harper, who also makes an appearance in 1979 as an eager young Tory. “This is where the play moves from history play, strictly speaking, to a kind of commentary on current politics,” Healey says. “The play is premiering at ATP around the (same) time the Conservative Party is going to be choosing a new leader next spring and one of the central questions in the play revolves around a conversation between a young Steve and Joe Clark. “You’ve got a supply-side hard-line economist (Harper), who’s a Thatcherite, having a conversation with a real Red Tory (Clark), who happens to be in the middle of a crisis,” explains Healey. “So the crux

of the play is (essentially) whither conservatism in the country at this point — and that’s what makes the play contemporary.” Healey believes politics and theatre are close cousins. “The act of standing in public,” he says, “and taking a (political) position (on an issue) is something characters have done onstage since Shakespeare’s time.” Also, he says “politicians are often putting on a facade, which again is inherently theatrical.” “There is comedy to be had in the distance between what they believe,” he says, “and what they’re obliged to say.” So what year in Canadian political life might Healey tackle next? “I don’t know, really,” he says. “The play before this, in 2012, was about Stephen Harper — so maybe I’m just working backward. Maybe it’ll be Diefenbaker next, and then we’ll move to the ’50s and I’ll (finally) give up once we get to Sir John A. Macdonald!” There’s somewhat of a tradition of political journalists jumping into politics themselves. Vaclav Havel made the transition from political playwright to president of what was then Czechoslovakia. Would you believe Prime Minister Healey? “No I wouldn’t,” says Healey. “I have too much fun where I am and I have too much respect for Parliament to subject myself on it.”

World Premiere Enbridge New Canadian Play 1979 Written by Michael Healey Directed by Miles Potter April 4 to April 22, 2017 ALBERTA THEATRE PROJECTS |

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BEHIND THE SCENES

ON THE ATP BOARD

ATP Board Member Chima Nkemdirim says his role is like that of a theatre ambassador. SUPPLIED PHOTO

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THE

FIVE W’s CHIMA NKEMDIRIM

WITH S T E PH E N H U N T

Who: Lawyer Chima Nkemdirim was one of the architects of Naheed Nenshi’s Purple Revolution, which saw the former university professor charge into the Mayor’s seat in 2010. Nkemdirim is now entrenched in the world of municipal politics, serving as Nenshi’s Chief of Staff. But that doesn’t stop him from getting out. He’s also a member of Alberta Theatre Projects’ Board of Directors. LIVE sat down with Nkemdirim at his office in City Hall to talk about his other life at the theatre.

W

hen was the first time you were introduced to theatre?

It started when I was quite young, in high school. We had a school trip and went to see Theatre Calgary. We went to see The Black Bonspiel of Wullie MacCrimmon, which is the most-produced play in Canada, apparently. It’s a great play, by W.O. Mitchell. It’s about a bonspiel with the devil — and they had a curling rink on the Max Bell stage, and they had fires (burning onstage), and I thought that was the best thing ever. I was amazed. It was so cool — and so I started going to theatre.

W

here did you get involved with your first Board of Directors?

I was asked to join the Sage Theatre Board of Directors by a friend who was on the board, who ironically didn’t tell me he was going off the board. It was really interesting, because at the time Sage — it’s a really small company — was about to go out of (business). That was really fun — how can we make this thing sustainable? We rebuilt the board and retained Kelly Reay as Artistic Director, and really helped build up the brand of the theatre. Now I’m

Levonne Louie (ATP Board Member), Corey Hallisey (ATP Donor) and Chima Nkemdirim at an ATP event. JEFF YEE

on ATP’s board. This my fourth year.

creative stuff — that’s what I try to do.

W

W

hat does a Board Member do anyways?

I’m kind of like a theatre ambassador. I take people who’ve never been to shows. There’s lots of people in Calgary who will easily decide — “Hey let’s go to New York City for a weekend and see a bunch of shows.” But they will never see anything here, and they don’t realize the quality of the performing arts, the quality of the theatre here. It’s as good — if not better — than the stuff you’ll see in the major theatre centres. There are so many times I’ve taken people (to see a show at ATP), and they say, “Oh my God, that was a great show. Where’s that company from?” I tell them they’re from here. “Really? Where are the actors from?” From here! They don’t know. We can help get people to grow the pie, people who support the arts here, to keep that industry growing so we’ll see more

hy be on a Board of Directors for a not-for-profit theatre?

I don’t think I have any artistic talent, so this is the way I can contribute! It actually is really interesting. It’s really hard — because in Canada, it’s a not-for-profit model, so putting on theatre and performing arts is actually incredibly challenging and how do you get the resources to do it? I’m a lawyer by training, so one of my things is to add some value by helping theatre do that kind of stuff. It’s been really rewarding personally, but it’s certainly not easy. There’s a lot that goes on behind the scenes to allow the creative people to do what they do. That’s how I can contribute. Being on a Board of Directors for a theatre company is incredibly rewarding, because you learn so much about what it takes to put that magic onstage. It’s a remarkable experience to see something being created.

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45

YEARS

|

A SNAPSHOT OF ATP HISTORY

The Canmore Opera House.

1972 — Alberta Theatre Projects is founded by Douglas Riske and Lucille Wagner, along with playwright Paddy Campbell. ATP’s first home was the Canmore Opera House in Heritage Park.

1972

1977 — John Murrell’s Waiting for the Parade premieres at ATP.

The Martha Cohen Theatre.

1985 — ATP moves from the Canmore Opera House to the Martha Cohen Theatre.

1977

1983

1983 — D. Michael Dobbin becomes ATP’s Producing Director.

1985

1987

1987 — The first ever playRites Festival. From 1987 to 2014, the annual playRites Festival produced more than 120 world premieres of Canadian plays.

Poster from the first ever playRites Festival. Original playbill cover from the 1977 production of Waiting for the Parade.

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D. Michael Dobbin.

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Kate Newby in Unidentified Human Remains and the True Nature of Love.

Jenny Young in The Shape of a Girl.

1989 — Brad Fraser’s groundbreaking Unidentified Human Remains and the True Nature of Love premieres during the playRites Festival and goes on to international acclaim.

1989

2001 — Joan MacLeod’s The Shape of a Girl premieres at the playRites Festival. It will see more than 30 subsequent productions, and counting, around the world.

1996/97

1996/97 – ATP causes a sensation with its production of Tony Kushner’s Angels in America (Parts One and Two).

Elinor Holt and Kent Staines in Angels in America Part One – The Millenium Approaches.

2000

2001

2000 — Bob White becomes ATP’s Artistic Director.

Bob White. ALBERTA THEATRE PROJECTS |

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John Kirkpatrick in Age of Arousal.

2007 — Landmark Canadian plays Linda Griffiths’ Age of Arousal and Colleen Murphy’s The December Man (L’Homme de Decembre) premiere during the Enbridge playRites Festival.

2007

2009

2009 — Vanessa Porteous becomes ATP’s Artistic Director.

PRODUCTION PHOTOGRAPHY BY TRUDIE LEE ALL PHOTOS: COURTESY OF ALBERTA THEATRE PROJECTS

2014/15

2014/15 — ATP continues its commitment to new Canadian work, launching the Enbridge New Canadian Plays program with long-time supporter, Enbridge.

Vanessa Porteous.

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Interested in bringing your group to the theatre? Parties of 8 to 418 guests qualify for exciting benefits! Personally designed to enhance your shared theatre-going experience, benefits include discounted ticket prices, flexible payment plans and assistance in planning your entire event. - for more information visit or phone -

ATPlive.com • 403.294.7402 Photo by Jeff Yee

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Ann-Marie Kerr, left, who directs Cathy Jones this season in Stranger to Hard Work, gathers with ATP dramaturg Laurel Green and sommelier Michael Bigattini of Willow Park Wines and Spirits. JEFF YEE

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A DRAMATURG AND A SOMMELIER WALK INTO A BAR…

I Laurel green

ATP Artistic Associate

Wines of ATP Thursday, September 29, 2016 An exclusive wine tasting inspired by our 2016/17 Season. Paired with delicious hors d’oeuvres.

Cocktails in the Commons Thursday, April 20, 2017 An exclusive cocktail tasting inspired by the fascinating figures of Canadian politics in 1979 by Michael Healey. Paired with delicious hors d’oeuvres. Enjoy a toast with the cast after the show.

’ve been in love with theatre since I was a kid, directing my friends in radio dramas, which we recorded on a tape deck for posterity, and staging elaborate musical numbers in the backyard. As I grew up, my passion for performance grew too, and so did my theatrical taste buds. Eventually they led me to a career here at Alberta Theatre Projects. As ATP’s Artistic Associate and dramaturg I support the development of new plays, explore innovation in theatre making, and work closely with playwrights as they develop their scripts. I also run The Exchange, our program of events that connect ATP’s audience to the plays on our stage and the artists who make them. We share context about the stories we’re telling, and draw connections to our present day. We have conversations about where the plays come from, what they’re all about, and how they make us feel. The more I learn about a play, the deeper I appreciate it, and that appreciation is what I try to share with our audience. As you can imagine, some Exchange events can go quite deep — and others are just for fun. For the past two seasons I have worked closely with sommelier Michael Bigattini to co-host Exchange events that playfully pair ATP’s productions with fancy drinks. Bigattini knows a thing or two about having great taste. As the senior product consultant for Willow Park Wines & Spirits, trusting his palate is how he makes a living. While his childhood friends were all dreaming of being firemen and astronauts, he knew he wanted to be a bartender.

Drinks with drama Try out these delicious cocktails created by Michael Bigattini of Willow Park Wines and Spirits and guest bartender Chelsey Coulson from Turner Valley’s Eau Claire Distillery from last season’s Cocktails with Babs event, themed to Buyer & Cellar by Jonathan Tolins.

BEHIND THE SCENES

ATP EVENTS

He made his first wine at the age of nine with a kit he gave his dad for Father’s Day. A tasting with Bigattini includes stories of exotic vineyards, ancient recipes, and local artisans. He has an encyclopedic knowledge of food, wine, beer and spirits, and how they work together in delicious harmony. Working with “Bigs” (as he’s affectionately known) I have swirled, sniffed, and tasted, learning more about what goes into my glass than I ever thought was possible. We talk about flavours, characters, colours, varietals, genres and stemware. Who’d have thought a wine buff and a theatre nerd would get along so well? Next season, Bigs and I have created two fun events that combine drinking and dramaturgy: Wines of ATP, in the fall, and Cocktails in the Commons, in the spring, which is themed to the world premiere Enbridge New Canadian Play 1979 by Michael Healey. How do we prepare? We talk about the shows, and then I challenge Bigattini to put his palate to the test. He selects wines and creates cocktails that capture the essence of the plays in our season. He challenges me to put it into words, to distill and describe the spirit of each show. Together we concoct a delectable event that complements a great night out for our audience. Here, we are all tastemakers. It turns out there are more than a few similarities between a sommelier and a dramaturg. A good play and a fine drink are both something to be savoured, contemplated and, ultimately, remembered. I’ll raise a glass to that.

The Babs

The Malibu

1.5 oz. Eau Claire Distillery Parlour Gin 1.5 oz. Lemon Juice (Bigattini takes pride in squeezing them himself) 1.5 oz. Simple Syrup 1 oz. Egg White

1 oz. Eau Claire Distillery Three Point Vodka ½ oz. Eau Claire Distillery Prickly Pear EquinOx ¾ oz. Lavender syrup ¾ oz. Lemon juice Top with Prosecco

Method: Combine all ingredients into a shaker. Shake and strain over ice. Top with soda

Method: Fill Collins glass with ice, build drink inside. Stir to combine. Garnish with lemon peel and Saskatoon berries. ALBERTA ALBERTA THEATRE THEATRE PROJECTS PROJECTS ||

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ATP PROFILE

MANISHA DANGOL

UP FOR THE CHALLENGE

ATP TICKET OFFICE COORDINATOR MANISHA DANGOL CONQUERS CULTURE SHOCK AFTER ARRIVING FROM NEPAL

INSIGHTS FROM A THEATRE ROOKIE Before coming to Canada and working at ATP, Manisha Dangol had never been to the theatre. So what does she think after seeing a little over two full seasons’ worth of shows? “I’ve learned that there are two different sides to the theatre: one is entertainment and one is a lesson. Every time I come to the theatre, there is a different experience that I go away with, and something different I take a lesson from.” What was your first ATP show? “You Will Remember Me (2014 Enbridge playRites Festival, a play about a family dealing with a father’s decline into dementia) brought tears to my eyes. I have a grandfather who is also suffering from dementia. Seeing (the actor) performing in front of me … it brings life to you when you are inside the theatre. You get to know something really different, or something that is happening within the community.”

Manisha Dangol provides a warm welcome to ATP patrons. WIL ANDRUSCHAK

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What has been your favourite ATP show? “Cockroach (2016 Enbridge New Canadian Play, a story about the struggles of a newcomer to Canada). I’m not saying, ‘That’s me [the character],’ but it’s something that reflects my experience. And it’s not only about being an immigrant. I just felt the play, the direction, the actor’s performance, the way that it was done — I love everything about that play... And putting myself in his position, seeing things differently, it was very special. “I remember when the character mentions something about the ice cream flavour ‘vanilla.’ That’s the same thing for me! I see things differently. Canadians see things differently. I have to change my vision just to (understand what they mean by) ‘vanilla ice cream.’ “Also The Circle (2015 Enbridge New Canadian Play, a hard-hitting drama about five young Calgarians looking for a place to belong). Seeing The Circle, I had goosebumps. I saw my son, 14 or 15 years later — what would I do if my son were one of the characters? I am a young mom. I was never one of those kids. Even now, I don’t drink, I don’t smoke — so I don’t know. And seeing The Circle? So different. Seeing those kids at their age being so much left alone. I do not want my son to feel the way the characters were feeling.”

| atplive.com

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KARA STURK

M

anisha Dangol is a people person. Most of ATP’s patrons know her only as the friendly voice on the phone when they call the Ticket Office, but if you’ve ever met her in person, you’ll know that she has a warm smile and personality that makes even strangers feel welcome. “I love to talk with people — I’m very talkative, even from my childhood. I love talking to patrons and hearing their perspectives on all the shows. That is the best part of my job,” says Dangol. It’s hard to imagine someone better suited to being one of the public voices of ATP. But communication hasn’t always been easy. Less than five years ago, Dangol hardly spoke English. Born and raised in Kathmandu, Nepal’s capital city, Dangol was brought up in a middle-class family surrounded by a network of relatives. She describes herself and her life in Nepal as, “a frog in a well,” living comfortably within the borders of Kathmandu. “Nepal and Canada are very different. In Nepal you do not have to start earning once you turn 18, you can live with your parents’ earnings.” Dangol earned a bachelor’s degree in statistics, followed by a master’s degree in finance while living under her parents’ roof. After graduation, she helped her father run the family grocery business. But it wasn’t long before Dangol chose to step away from the family business and find her own path. “I wanted to earn and explore for myself.” This one step opened the door to many others that shaped the next several years of her life in Nepal. She worked for two years in various sales positions. She got married. Had a baby. And when her son was two years old, her husband, working as a clinical psychologist in Nepal, applied for the Skilled Workers Program in Canada. At the age of 30, with husband at her side and young son in tow, Dangol left everything she knew to start a new life in Calgary. “I came (to Calgary) thinking, I will be OK… I won’t miss anything, and I would know everything… but it’s been such a vast journey… a big step in my life. It’s the bravest thing I’ve ever done.” When they arrived in Calgary, a Nepalese friend had already found them an apartment. Another friend worked at the Canadian Catholic Immigration Society (CCIS), a non-profit organization that provides settlement and integration services to immigrants and refugees in southern Alberta. The organization set Dangol up

with a one-month course designed to help newcomers to Canada get acquainted with life in Calgary. It was during this course that she learned about the Calgary Immigrant Women’s Association (CIWA) and a six-month program it offers to equip immigrant women with the skills they need to enter the Canadian workforce. Dangol signed up for the office administration program. The first three months are spent in classes while the final two-and-a-half consist of a work placement with a partnering company. This first year presented Dangol and her family with tremendous challenges — the culture shock, the language, the hourslong transit trips. And the expense of living in Calgary. CIWA can provide its program participants with child-care allowances and monthly transit passes, but as a non-profit organization, it can offer little else in terms of remuneration.

I left my home, I left my family, I left my friends, but when I got to Calgary … I got another home and another family in ATP.” “The very first year … now, when I remember, it brings tears to my eyes. My husband worked full time for $11 an hour [as a cook in a fast food restaurant], and I had to pay the rent for $1,100. (They had) $200 for groceries per month. We survived by eating very little, and eating nothing that we wanted to eat.” After a moment, she laughs and adds, “I lost seven kilograms (15.4 pounds) that first year. That’s a plus.” When it came time for Dangol’s CIWA work placement, her very first interview was with Alberta Theatre Projects. Following her placement period, she was hired part-time in the ATP Ticket Office. Now heading into her third season with ATP, she reflects back on her early days with the company. “I was very, very nervous my first day. I thought I had to be perfect, but that was not the case. (The people at ATP) are always there for you, they’re always ready to answer any questions and they’re always ready to help.” The greatest challenge for Dangol didn’t come from the work environment, or the need to digest volumes of information, it came when she picked up the phone or a patron walked up to the desk. It was communication itself. “Even if I knew what I wanted to say, I just

didn’t know the appropriate language. You have to be ready to hear comments, as well as to solve whatever problem (a patron) may have. If I do not perceive what they are trying to tell me, then how am I able to help them? But, I think I am very focused and very hard-working, so if I have to do something, then I will get it done.” She credits her improved English and communication skills to this hard work and focus. She credits Google and Microsoft Word (“I would search for synonyms. You can say the same thing with five different words!”). She also credits her co-worker in the Ticket Office, Talore Peterson. “I would listen to her very carefully, the way she is with the patrons — I got to learn a lot from her... Every day I’m learning. Every call I make, I’m learning. But now, I’m confident to keep learning and I’m confident to communicate. I’m not nervous anymore.” While Dangol is glad she came to Calgary, she still misses her life and family back in Nepal. And in April 2015, when a catastrophic earthquake struck the country, the distance between her and her family hit her the most. While her relatives managed to remain safe, her father fell ill shortly thereafter. And though her large extended family has been able to care for him, Dangol would like nothing more than to visit. But with airfare to Kathmandu starting around $1,200, a trip home at this point is an impossibility. “I just wish I could go,” she says. “But I do not regret coming here at all. “I know what struggle is. I know what life is... I just want to keep on learning forever. I do not want to say I didn’t learn anything in Nepal — that is not true at all. But I would say that I had not taken my life seriously and my work seriously in Nepal. “You need to know why you exist in this world. I got to know that in Canada. I know why I exist, and what the value of my existence in this world is. What I can do — not only at ATP — but in our community. It’s such a great feeling to know that you are capable, and that you’re independent, even if you have none of your family support. I am surviving, I am living, I am living a similar life to what my Canadian colleagues are living. I might not have much money, but I live the same life. I learned how to be independent at ATP and being in Calgary — that’s the most important thing.” She smiles. “I left my home, I left my family, I left my friends, but when I got to Calgary … I got another home and another family in ATP.”

ALBERTA THEATRE PROJECTS |

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FINDING THE

SWEET SPOT JONATHAN CHRISTENSON, ARTISTIC DIRECTOR OF EDMONTON’S CATALYST THEATRE, CREATES ELABORATE DREAM WORLDS S T E PH E N H U N T

E

dmonton’s Catalyst Theatre has wowed crowds with richly imaginative productions such as Frankenstein, Vigilante and Nevermore, a musical inspired by the life of Edgar Allan Poe that has been produced at the Barbican Theatre in London, off-Broadway in New York and as part of the High Performance Rodeo in Calgary. Catalyst’s lavish, moody productions, with eye-popping sets and costumes, have toured Canada and internationally, receiving more than 60 local, national and international awards and nominations. Most recently Nevermore earned a trio of 2015 Lucille Lortel Award nominations which honour the best of New York off-Broadway theatre. Some of the items used in Catalyst productions are currently on display at

Edmonton’s Citadel Theatre as part of an installation entitled All Our Unworldly Possessions. It offers whimsical glimpses of the items, which are partially packed in moving crates, alluding to Catalyst’s move to the Citadel Theatre location in 2015. The company’s newest production, making its world premiere at ATP, is Fortune Falls. It tells the story of the last employee of a shuttered chocolate factory, and the ghosts that haunt a once picture-perfect, fictional company town. The darkly whimsical musical is the brainchild of Artistic Director Jonathan Christenson who wrote and directed the play, while also composing the music. LIVE spoke with the multi-talented Christenson about the creative process and where he finds inspiration.

ON THE DRAMATIC POSSIBILITIES OF INNOVATIVE DESIGN

Scott Walters, Robert Markus and Molly Flood from Hunchback. DAVID COOPER

Over the years, I’ve felt like it is a political act to create a space that asks the audience to bring their own imagination to a process. We’re (living) in an age when we’re spoon fed so much stuff, and we’re asked to numb our own imagination — so to awaken people’s imaginative spaces is really important.”

World Premiere Enbridge New Canadian Play FORTUNE FALLS A Catalyst Theatre creation Produced by Alberta Theatre Projects Written, composed and directed by Jonathan Christenson October 18 to November 5, 2016

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| atplive.com

ATP July 2016.indd 36

David Leyshon and Jan Alexandra Smith in Vigilante. DAVID COOPER

Scott Shpeley in a scene from Nevermore. JOAN MARCUS

2016-07-11 11:14 AM


I want to invite people to see things in a new way. Sometimes, when you give people something unexpected, you can open up your thinking in a new way — the invitation is there to do that anyways.”

CATALYST THEATRE

Ryan Parker from Nevermore. DAVID COOPER

A scene from Vigilante. DAVID COOPER

Shannon Blanchet and Scott Shpeley in a scene from Nevermore. DAVID COOPER

Jonathan Christenson. RYAN PARKER ALBERTA THEATRE PROJECTS |

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Catalyst Theatre Artistic Director Jonathan Christenson.

RYAN PARKER

HOW DO YOU DECIDE WHAT’S GOING TO BE A SONG AND WHAT ISN’T? Ava Jane Markus, Robert Markus and Molly Flood in Hunchback. DAVID COOPER

I don’t set out for it to be a song, but then I go back into it and say, what if this part of the story was a song? I set it to some music, and then the text starts to shift in response.”

Ava Jane Markus and Robert Markus in Hunchback. DAVID COOPER

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A scene from Nevermore. DAVID COOPER

ON THE INSPIRATION FOR THE PROTAGONIST OF FORTUNE FALLS

A scene from Vigilante. DAVID COOPER

Hershey’s [the chocolate company] actually hired a guy — a security guard — to watch over a factory after they abandoned it. I found that idea really interesting; this last remaining employee who wanders the halls of this lonely, old factory and what that would have been like for that person — so he’s become the centrepiece of our show.”

| atplive.com

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A CATALYST THEATRE CREATION Photo by Kenneth Locke

FORTUNE FALLS WRITTEN, COMPOSED AND DIRECTED BY

JONATHAN CHRISTENSON OCTOBER 18 – NOVEMBER 5, 2016 ATPlive.com | 403-294-7402 ALBERTA THEATRE PROJECTS |

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Events That Mix Audiences and Artists to Talk Theatre and Think Big WAITING FOR THE PARADE

FORTUNE FALLS

Thursday September 15 6:30pm

Tuesday September 20 7:30pm

October 18, 19 & 20 After the Show

Tuesday October 25 After the Show

PIZZA NIGHT AT ATP FREE WITH TICKET

THAT $10 TICKET THING Presented by TD

MEET THE DRAMATURG FREE WITH TICKET

MEET THE CAST FREE WITH TICKET

Enjoy Papa John’s Pizza and a conversation with director Kate Newby. Hosted by Artistic Director Vanessa Porteous. Friday September 16 After the Show

CELEBRATE OPENING NIGHT! FREE WITH TICKET

Mingle with the artists, talk about the show, and toast with a glass of sparkling wine compliments of Barefoot Wine & Bubbly. Sunday, September 18 1:00pm

THE ART OF WOMEN IN WARTIME FREE WITH TICKET

Explore the art and science of women in wartime. In a pre-show event, celebrate the vital role that women played and their contribution to innovation. In association with Beakerhead, a smash up of art, science and engineering.

Calling all students! Buy a ticket to the show for only $10 and be entered to win a door prize. Stay afterwards to meet the cast. Student ID is required. Tuesday September 20 After the Show

MEET THE CAST FREE WITH TICKET

Join us after the show for a conversation with the cast of Waiting for the Parade. Sunday September 25 1pm

AFTERNOON TEA FREE WITH TICKET

Thursday October 20 6:30pm

PIZZA NIGHT AT ATP FREE WITH TICKET

Enjoy Papa John’s Pizza and a conversation with Catalyst Theatre’s Artistic Director Jonathan Christenson. Hosted by production dramaturg Laurel Green. Friday October 21 After the Show

CELEBRATE OPENING NIGHT! FREE WITH TICKET

Journey back in time to historic Calgary and talk about our city then and now. Hosted by Artistic Director Vanessa Porteous. Enjoy a cup of gourmet Tea Trader and a delicious pastry from Patisserie du Soleil.

Mingle with the artists, talk about the show, and toast with a glass of sparkling wine compliments of Barefoot Wine & Bubbly.

Thursday September 29 6pm

Tuesday October 25 7:30pm

WINES OF ATP $35

THAT $10 TICKET THING Presented by TD

ATP’s Sommelier Michael Bigattini of Willow Park Wines & Spirits hosts an exclusive wine tasting inspired by our 2016/17 Season. Paired with delicious hors d’oeuvres.

Cheers to Wines of ATP Photo by Jeff Yee

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Talk about the world premiere of Fortune Falls with production dramaturg Laurel Green.

Calling all students! Buy a ticket to the show for only $10 and be entered to win a door prize. Stay afterwards to meet the cast. Student ID is required.

Join us after the show for a conversation with the cast of Fortune Falls. Saturday October 29 7:30pm

HALLOWEEN PARTY FREE WITH TICKET

Trick or treat in your finest Halloween attire, and be entered to win a prize for best costume judged by the cast of Fortune Falls. Sunday October 30 1pm

AFTERNOON TEA FREE WITH TICKET

Artistic Associate Laurel Green takes you inside the work of award-winning Catalyst Theatre. Enjoy a cup of gourmet Tea Trader tea and a delicious pastry from Patisserie du Soleil. Sunday October 30 After the Show

MEET THE CAST FREE WITH TICKET

Join us after the show for a conversation with the cast of Fortune Falls.

A Cockroach Sees Everything: A Conversation with the Creators

Photo by Jeff Yee

| atplive.com

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SLIPPER: A distinctly Calgarian Cinderella story

CATHY JONES: STRANGER TO HARD WORK

Tuesday November 22 7:30pm

Thursday January 19 6:30pm doors

TWEET NIGHT AT ATP FREE WITH TICKET

PIZZA NIGHT AT ATP FREE WITH TICKET

For one night only, audiences and artists tweet live during the performance! Tuesday November 22 7:30pm

Enjoy Papa John’s Pizza and a conversation with the artists behind Stranger to Hard Work. Hosted by ATP’s Producer Dianne Goodman. Friday January 20 Post Show

THAT $10 TICKET THING Presented by TD

Calling all students! Buy a ticket to the show for only $10 and be entered to win a door prize. Student ID is required.

CELEBRATE OPENING NIGHT! FREE WITH TICKET

Thursday November 24 6:30pm

Mingle with the artists, talk about the show, and celebrate with a glass of sparkling wine compliments of Barefoot Wine & Bubbly.

PIZZA NIGHT AT ATP FREE WITH TICKET

Tuesday January 24 7:30pm

Enjoy Papa John’s Pizza and a conversation with the creators of Slipper: Rebecca Northan, Christian Goutsis and Bruce Horak. Hosted by Artistic Director Vanessa Porteous. Friday November 25 After the Show

CELEBRATE OPENING NIGHT! FREE WITH TICKET

Mingle with the artists, talk about the show, and celebrate with a glass of sparkling wine compliments of Barefoot Wine & Bubbly.

403-294-7402 ATPlive.com

HAYSAM KADRI, MAYOR NENSHI & DANIELA VLASKALIC AT THE OPENING OF COCKROACH

Photo by Jeff Yee

THAT $10 TICKET THING Presented by TD

Calling all students! Buy a ticket to the show for only $10 and be entered to win a door prize. Stay afterwards to meet the cast. Student ID is required. Tuesday January 24 After the Show

MEET THE CAST FREE WITH TICKET

GRACIE February 28, March 1, 2 After the Show

Tuesday March 7 7:30pm

MEET THE PLAYWRIGHT FREE WITH TICKET

THAT $10 TICKET THING Presented by TD

Talk about the world premiere of Gracie with acclaimed Canadian playwright Joan MacLeod.

Join us after the show for a conversation with Cathy Jones.

Thursday March 2 6:30pm

Sunday January 29 1pm

PIZZA NIGHT AT ATP FREE WITH TICKET

AFTERNOON TEA FREE WITH TICKET

Meet funny women of Calgary comedy in a gut-busting pre-show standup act! Enjoy a cup of gourmet Tea Trader tea and a delicious pastry from Patisserie du Soleil.

Tuesday March 7 After the Show

Enjoy Papa John’s Pizza and a conversation with Gracie playwright Joan MacLeod and director Vanessa Porteous. Hosted by Artistic Associate Laurel Green. Friday March 3 After the Show

Mingle with the artists, talk about the show, and celebrate with a glass of sparkling wine compliments of Barefoot Wine & Bubbly. Fri March 3 & Saturday March 4

A remarkable weekend that connects, motivates and inspires the next generation of emerging theatre artists in our community. Includes a ticket to the opening night of Gracie.

Expand The Circle: A Community Conversation

Photo by Jeff Yee

MEET THE CAST FREE WITH TICKET

Join us after the show for a conversation with the cast of Gracie. Sunday March 12 1pm

AFTERNOON TEA FREE WITH TICKET

CELEBRATE OPENING NIGHT! FREE WITH TICKET

RAUCOUS CAUCUS FOR EMERGING ARTISTS $50

Calling all students! Buy a ticket to the show for only $10 and be entered to win a door prize. Stay afterwards to meet the cast. Student ID is required.

Artistic Director Vanessa Porteous takes you inside the work of Gracie playwright Joan MacLeod. Enjoy a cup of gourmet Tea Trader tea and a delicious pastry from Patisserie du Soleil. Wednesday March 15 6:00pm

GROWING UP GIRLS: A COMMUNITY CONVERSATION FREE

Meet leaders in our community who support young women in developing their confidence, self-esteem, and cultural identity. Hear from the young women who inspire them. Share your stories of growing up and finding yourself. Lend your voice to the conversation, or just come to listen.

ALBERTA THEATRE PROJECTS |

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1979 Tuesday April 4, 5 & 6 After the Show

Tuesday April 11 After the Show

MEET THE PLAYWRIGHT FREE WITH TICKET

MEET THE CAST FREE WITH TICKET

Talk about the world premiere of 1979 with internationally celebrated Canadian playwright Michael Healey.

Join us for a conversation with the cast of 1979.

Thursday April 6 6:30pm

AFTERNOON TEA FREE WITH TICKET

PIZZA NIGHT AT ATP FREE WITH TICKET

Enjoy Papa John’s Pizza and a conversation with 1979 playwright Michael Healey and director Miles Potter. Hosted by Artistic Director Vanessa Porteous. Friday April 7 After the Show

CELEBRATE OPENING NIGHT! FREE WITH TICKET

Mingle with the artists, talk about the show, and celebrate with a glass of sparkling wine compliments of Barefoot Wine & Bubbly. Monday April 10 7:30pm

PECHAKUCHA NIGHT $11

Calgary’s funkiest speaker series returns to ATP by popular demand! Creative Calgarians share their stories using only 20 images for 20 seconds each. Uncover the unexpected -- unexpected talent, unexpected ideas.

Sunday April 16 1pm

Enter the halls of Canadian political power and the true tales of 1979. Hosted by Artistic Associate Laurel Green. Enjoy a cup of gourmet Tea Trader tea and a delicious pastry from Patisserie du Soleil. Thursday April 20th 6pm

COCKTAILS IN THE COMMONS $35

ATP’s Sommelier Michael Bigattini of Willow Park Wines & Spirits hosts an exclusive cocktail tasting inspired by the fascinating figures of Canadian politics in 1979. Paired with delicious hors d’oeuvres, enjoy a toast with the cast after the show. Saturday April 22 After the Show

HARRY AND MARTHA COHEN AWARD FREE WITH TICKET

Honouring a distinguished Calgarian for their significant and sustained contribution to theatre in our community.

Tuesday April 11 7:30pm

THAT $10 TICKET THING Presented by TD

Calling all students! Buy a ticket to the show for only $10 and be entered to win a door prize. Stay afterwards to meet the cast. Student ID is required.

Thank you to all of the exchange supporters & community partners

Joi

THE ATP TICKET OFFICE IS OPEN MONDAY TO FRIDAY 403-294-7402 | ATPlive.com PACKED HOUSE AT PECHAKUCHA 2015

Photo by Jeff Yee

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| atplive.com

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Local celebrities and amazing hors d’oeuvres from the city’s finest restaurants Saturday, April 8th 2017 • Doors 6:30 pm Willow Park Wines & Spirits Tickets $100

Join us for Calgary’s Famous Food Frenzy! 403-294-7402 | ATPlive.com

Photography by Jeff Yee ALBERTA THEATRE PROJECTS | 43

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ATPlive.com Ticket Office Arts Commons Box Office ATP Administration

403-294-7402 403-294-9494 403-294-7475

Martha Cohen Theatre 215 - 8th Avenue SE Calgary, AB T2G 0K8

ATP Office 220 - 9th Avenue SE Calgary, AB T2G 5C4

For exclusive news and contests follow us on: facebook.com/AlbertaTheatreProjects

@ATPlive

@ATPlive

ALBERTA THEATRE PROJECTS THANKS OUR PARTNERS

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2016 2017 LIVE Magazine  

Check out ATP's 2016-2017 LIVE Magazine for all sorts of stories, interviews and behind-the-scenes tidbits surrounding ATP and the shows in...

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