Page 1

PARIS foR you! Walking guide for discovering Paris

(2011/2012)

Walking guide for discovering Paris

PARIS foR you!

2011/2012


PARIS FOR YOU! Just how you imagined it … Paris has something for everyone in a multifaceted, magical, mythical and sometimes surprising capital that is always exciting.

WELCOME!

People come to Paris to admire its exceptional architectural and cultural heritage, which makes it one of the world’s most beautiful cities. This dynamic heritage is constantly being updated and enriched. Paris is also the capital of gastronomy, fashion and shopping – a city where something is always happening. It is committed to the notions of quality of life and sustainable development and offers its inhabitants and visitors a particularly pleasant setting. Innovative, audacious and vibrant, Paris has leapt boldly into the 21st century. The Paris Convention and Visitors Bureau has created this guide to help you discover the many aspects of the city and the surrounding areas, to accompany you as you visit Paris, all of Paris, according to your time here, your interests or simply your spur of the moment impulses. Thirteen walks will take you on a relaxed discovery tour of different neighbourhoods, with their different atmospheres and lifestyles. And whatever you may feel like doing – going out, shopping, relaxing, etc. – you will get the most out of the French capital with pages on useful tips and addresses that alternate with the walks.

We are delighted to share the city’s treasures with you. So, here is Paris for you. Have a great stay!


FOREWORD bypar Bertrand Bertrand Delanoë, Delanoë, Maire Maire dede Paris Paris

This new edition of the Paris for you! guide invites you to choose how you would like to discover the French capital. It also reveals the places that are an essential part of the identity of our city. A dynamic city, Paris welcomes 28 million visitors each year, and with its 20 arrondissements it always has many surprises and discoveries in store. Cultural life in Paris boasts 180 museums and monuments, 145 theatres and 380 cinemas. Parisians and visitors have much to choose from: outdoors with Nuit Blanche, at the CENTQUATRE – an outstanding arts centre –, with the literary festival Paris En Toutes Lettres, at the Trois Baudets events venue opened in 2009, or at the Gaîté lyrique – a venue entirely devoted to digital culture. Nightlife in Paris offers night owls mythical venues: prestigious jazz clubs, Latino cafes, night clubs and cabarets … The website www.parisnightlife.fr will guide you around the Paris Nightlife scene with the new iPhone application. Everyone can find the typical Paris of yesteryear and the diversity of the Paris of today just around a street corner in districts like Montmartre, Belleville, the Marais, or in one or our 82 local markets. With the Vélib’ self-service bicycle hire network, everyone can explore our entire city in a relaxed way on a fun and environmentally-friendly means of transport. A similar service, Autolib’, will soon be available with self-service non-polluting cars for hire. Cosmopolitan Paris is also about creativity, fashion and design, and arts & crafts where you will encounter crafts people in Faubourg Saint-Antoine and at the Viaduc des Arts. On behalf of Parisians, and myself, I wish you a wonderful stay in our city, with many magical experiences and new discoveries.

3


Best Selling Shea Hand Cream 10ml:

Your Gift From L’Occitane ZLWKDQ\ƥSXUFKDVHDQGDFRS\RIWKLVERRNOHW Carrousel du Louvre 99 rue de Rivoli, Paris 1er Métro : Palais Royal Musée du Louvre Boutique Marais 17 rue des Francs Bourgeois, Paris 4ème Métro : Saint Paul

Boutique Arcole 1 rue d’Arcole, Paris 4ème Métro : Hôtel de Ville de Paris / Cité Boutique Rennes 93 rue de Rennes, Paris 6ème - Métro : Rennes

Boutique Rivoli 84 rue de Rivoli, Paris 4ème Métro : Rivoli

Spa L’Occitane 47 rue de Sèvres, Paris 6ème Métro : Sèvres - Babylone / Vaneau

Boutique Opéra 8 rue Halevy, Paris 9ème Métro : Opéra

Galerie des Champs-Elysées 84 avenue des Champs-Elysées, Paris 8ème - Métro : Georges 5 / Franklin D. Roosevelt

Offer Valid until May 31st, 2012 - Tax refund valid to non EU residents only - Code 594


WELCOME The Paris Convention and Visitors Bureau is your key contact for preparing your trip to Paris, and for helping you to have a wonderful stay when you arrive.

Website parisinfo.com All the latest events, museums, walks, hotels, transport, practical information, and more. Discover the destination and organize your stay with the help of the Bureau’s website (in French, English, German and Spanish). At the online boutique, book your accommodation and purchase all the essential tourist products. Maps and guidebooks In addition to this guide, the Bureau provides complimentary publications, notably: - the map-guide in ten languages (French, English, German, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, Japanese, Chinese and Korean); - the French-English Paris Shopping Book guide; - the French-English brochure of guided thematic visits Paris se visite/Visiting Paris; - the French-English Paris gourmand/Good food guide. Ask for these at the Bureau’s information centres! Information centres The Bureau’s reception staff will answer your enquiries and give you advice in your own language, in our offices (see below – times subject to change). At the information centres, you can: - purchase passes for cultural venues or theme parks; - choose a coach tour, a cruise on the Seine, an evening at a cabaret, etc; - book the accommodation of your choice, in Paris or Île-de-France. Main welcome centre

Gare de l’Est

25 rue des Pyramides (1st). M° Pyramides, Tuileries and Opéra; RER A Auber. 2 May to 31 Oct: daily, 9am to 7pm. 1 Nov to 30 Apr: daily, 10am to 7pm. Closed 1 May.

Place du 11-Novembre-1918 (10th). On the arrival side of the TGV international – Rue d’Alsace side. M° Gare-de l’Est. Daily: 8am to 7pm, except Sun and public hols.

Gare de Lyon 20 bd Diderot (12th). M° and RER A and D Gare-de-Lyon. Daily: 8am to 6pm, except Sun and public hols.

Anvers 72 bd de Rochechouart (9th). M° Anvers. Daily: 10am to 6pm, except 1 Jan, 1 May and 25 Dec.

Gare du Nord 18 rue de Dunkerque (10th). At the kiosk, under glass roof of train station. M° and RER B and D Gare-du-Nord. Daily: 8am to 6pm, except 1 Jan, 1 May and 25 Dec.

Paris-Expo Porte-de-Versailles 1 place de la Porte-de-Versailles (15th). Gate A, M° Porte-de-Versailles. 11am to 7pm during trade shows and fairs.

5


Welcome ambassador kiosks Daily during summer season, except 1 May.

• Champs-Élysées Clemenceau Corner of av. des Champs-Élysées/av. de Marigny (8th). M° Champs-Élysées – Clemenceau.

• Notre-Dame

Partner welcome centres • Paris City Hall 29 rue de Rivoli (4th). M° Hôtel-de-Ville. Mon to Sat: 10am to 7pm (during exhibitions) and 10am to 6pm (outside exhibitions). Tel: 39 75 (€0.15/min). www.paris.fr

Parvis de Notre-Dame (4th). M° Cité.

• Montmartre tourist office

• Hôtel de Ville

21 place du Tertre (18th). M° Abbesses. Daily: 10am to 7pm, except 1 May. Tel: 01 42 62 21 21. www.montmartre-guide.com

Place de l’Hôtel-de-Ville, rue de Rivoli side (4th). M° Hôtel-de-Ville.

• Bastille 4 place de la Bastille (11th). M° Bastille.

• Comité régional du tourisme Paris Île-de-France Tel: 01 73 00 77 00. www.nouveau-paris-idf.com

Disabled people Consult parisinfo.com for information on tourist facilities accessible to disabled people and adapted services essential for an enjoyable stay (transport, specialized equipment, toilets, etc.).

• Tourisme & Handicap The national Tourisme & Handicap label provides accurate information for disabled people on the accessibility of venues (physical, mental, auditive or visual disabilities). Cultural and leisure sites with the label are indicated in this guide by the logo showing accessibility for one or more categories of disability.

• Infomobi Infomobi is a free service of the Île-de-France transport authorities (STIF). It gives information on facilities for accessibility on the public transport system and helps people prepare their journeys according to their disability. Ask for the Parisian transport network free maps, adapted for disabled people, at the welcome office of the Bureau or by mail by telephoning 0 810 64 64 64 (price of a local call from a landline). Telephone answering service daily, 6am to 12-midnight. www.infomobi.com

Pictograms i

Paris Convention and Visitors Bureau.

i

Welcome ambassador kiosks (summer season).

+

Tickets on sale in the offices of the Bureau and/or on parisinfo.com

PASS

Sites included in the Paris Museum Pass (see p.68). Sites with activities for children.

Abbreviations M°: metro station. Mon: Monday, Tues: Tuesday, etc. Jan: January, Feb: February, etc. RR: reduced rate. W/e: weekend (Saturday, Sunday). Wk: weekday (Monday, Tuesday, etc.). 7th: 7th arrondissement. Sch hols: school holidays. Res: reservation. Public hols: public holidays. Info: information. EU: European Union.

7


CONTENTS Thirteen walks, useful suggestions and addresses to get the most out of the French capital.

WALKS p.12

RIVER SEINE PARIS Bridges / River Seine / Quays / Ports

p.18

TIMELESS PARIS Île de la Cité (4th) /Quartier latin (5th) / Île Saint-Louis (4th) / Jardin des Plantes (5th)

p.28

TRENDY PARIS Marais (4th) / Montorgueil (2nd) / Hôtel de Ville (4th) / Les Halles (1st)

p.36

GLAMOROUS PARIS Palais Royal (1st) / Madeleine (8th) / Opéra (9th) / Grands Boulevards (9th)

p.46

p.54

p.62

VILLAGE PARIS Montmartre (18th) / Pigalle (9th) / Saint-Georges (9th) / Trinité (9th) / Batignolles (17th)

p.84

UNDISCOVERED PARIS Viaduc des Arts (12th) / Place d’Italie (13th) / Bercy (12th), Tolbiac (13th) / Bois de Vincennes (12th) ➔ surrounding area: Val-de-Marne

p.92

COSMOPOLITAN PARIS Canal Saint-Martin (10th) / La Villette (19th) / ButtesChaumont (19th) / Belleville (20th) ➔ surrounding area: Seine-Saint-Denis

p.100 PEOPLE’S PARIS République (10th) / Bastille (11th) / Oberkampf (11th) / Père-Lachaise (20th) p.108 SIGHTSEEING IN ÎLE-DE-FRANCE p.112 INDEX

ARTISTS’ PARIS Musée d’Orsay (7th) / Saint-Germain-des-Prés (6th) / Luxembourg (6th) / Montparnasse (14th) MONUMENTAL PARIS Tour Eiffel (7th) / Champ-de-Mars (15th) / Invalides (7th) / Trocadéro (16th)

p. 70

CHIC PARIS Auteuil (16th) / Bois de Boulogne (16th) / Porte Maillot (16th) / Passy, La Muette (16th) ➔ surrounding area: Hauts-de-Seine

p. 76

MYTHICAL PARIS Concorde (8th) / Champs-Élysées (8th) / Tuileries (1st) / Louvre (1st)

USEFUL TIPS AND ADDRESSES p.16 p.25 p.34 p.44 p.53 p.60 p.68 p.75 p.82 p.90 p.98 p.105

Along the water Architecture and heritage Parisian nights Fashion and shopping Gourmet capital Artistic creation Culture and museums A taste for luxury Visiting the capital Outdoor city life Meeting the Parisians Music and shows

11


Following the Seine through Paris is a way of enjoying a thousand different escapades on the river, its bridges and islands. Daytime or night time, Left Bank or Right Bank, you will appreciate the buzz of activity along the quaysides and the lapping of the waves. There are any number of ways to relax – aboard a boat, cycling, walking briskly, sauntering lazily, or working out, dining, dancing on barges, exploring an area between two exhibitions, taking a post-shopping break, or sunbathing in a swimsuit. You never fail to be filled with wonder at these riverbanks, classed as a world heritage site by Unesco.

PARIS

RIVER SEINE

• Bridges • River Seine • Quays • Ports

Through the arch of a bridge you’ll catch sight of the Grand and Petit Palais, people fishing, mallard ducks circling in the water, the Louvre playing hide and seek with a pleasure boat, Notre-Dame looming up to the sound of a street musician playing a violin and, in the distance, the silhouette of a crane in a naval construction yard between weeping willow trees… Paris owes its motto to the Seine, fluctuat nec mergitur – ‘it is buffeted by the waves but does not sink’. The Seine tells the story of Paris, from its birthplace on the Île de la Cité to the transformation of the quays at Bercy upstream and the triumphant Eiffel Tower downstream.


AV. LE DR UR OL LIN

L’ARS ENAL

BASS IN DE

FAUBO URG SAIN T-ANTOINE

i

GARE DE LYON

ER

L

ÔP

TZ

I TA

LI

SS

N IL

E PÉ RA

ST

NA

ES

L'H

DE

BD

INS

Y RC BE DE AI QU

MINISTÈRE DES FINANCES

Pont-de-l’Alma (RER C) • Musée-d’Orsay (RER C) • Alma – Marceau (line 9) • Cité (line 4) • Sully-Morland (line 7) • Saint-Michel (line 4) • Quai de la Gare (line 5)

DON’T MISS Bridges of Paris These thirty-seven bridges offer stunning views of the city seen from the river and recount thirtyseven wonderful stories of kings, battles, legends etc, to discover with the wind in your hair. Since it was built in 1604, the Pont Neuf, Paris’s oldest bridge with its 385 sculpted masks and famous half-moon-shaped turrets, has seen the entire history of Paris go by. The Pont Alexandre III, star of the 1900 Exposition Universelle, is a celebration of Franco-Russian friendship with an exuberance of sculpted nymphs and garlands, bronze candelabras and gleaming gold equestrian statuary. The Pont des Arts – the haunt of lovers – is also a favourite place to linger for dreamers and picnickers, as is the Léopold-Sédar-Senghor footbridge, which links the Musée d’Orsay to the Tuileries gardens. The city’s most recent bridge is the Simone de Beauvoir

wooden footbridge, which links the weighty knowledge of the Bibliothèque Nationale library to the gardens of Bercy in a graceful, uplifting arch. That leaves thirty-two bridges: discover your favourite.

Seine riverside booksellers For four hundred years, booksellers offering an array of great and less familiar literature have lined the embankment walls on both sides of the river, from the Pont Royal to the Pont de Sully. Each of these small green boxes offers up a marvellous assortment of rare books, original editions, engravings, postcards, illustrated journals, comic strips, novels, or intriguing odds and ends, to passers-by.

Joséphine-Baker swimming pool Maybe you didn’t know, but floating baths were already fashionable in the 18th century. There were once several on the Seine. The Joséphine Baker swimming pool, moored on the Left Bank, reaffirms the genre in a version that is high-tech and ecologically-friendly, with all modern comforts. Facilities include a main pool and a 50 sq.m. paddling pool for children. There are also solariums, saunas, a hammam, a jacuzzi, and a fitness and weights room. Port de la Gare. Quai François-Mauriac (13th). M° Quai-de-la-Gare. Information (opening times, prices and activities): www.paris.fr

13

RIVER SEINE PARIS

S

BD RI CHAR D LEN

HAI BD BEA UMARC

OIR

OL

OP AS T

S ÉB

BD HEL M IC

S TBD

HEL

RE DE R.

DE

la Rapée

AU

PAR

PLACE LÉON BLUM

RUE D E CHARONNE

RUE DU

Ledru

D’

NT

E ETT QU RO LA DE E RU

LIN Rollin OL .R . L Gare de D D ID EROT V A B AV Lyon .D AU Quai de M

AI

N

i

Voltaire

Gare E B Portd’Austerlitz RU Royal VAL DE GRÂCE Censier GARE Daubenton E L D’AUSTERLITZ H E B C AR ST-VINCENT PORT- D DE PORT H H T- M Quai S Raspail DE H PAUL ROYAL ROYA H L BD LA PITIÉ - de la Gare COCHIN Gobelins SALPÊTRIÈRE L Denfert-Rochereau BD AR AG O RIO AU PLACE NT Chevaleret CE BIBLIOTHÈQUE N DENFERT-ROCHEREAU I V PLACE NATIONALE BD D’ITALIE DE FRANCE Place d’Italie

Vavin

EL

250 m

D

Breguet Sabin

LA DE AI QU

AN

O UFF

OB SG

ER

Cardinal Lemoine Jussieu JARDIN DES PLANTES

DE

O

SS

E

YM RA

LO

IN U MA AV. D

R.

ND

UNIVERSITÉS

PANTHÉON

Luxembourg

Sully Morland

A V.

R. J. ZAY

Pernety

S

QU

Edgar Quinet

GARE MONTPARNASSE

MO

Mutualité

OLE

E

H

Montparnasse PASTEUR Bienvenüe

DU

ÉC

IN

D

R. D ES

i

SE

EV AR

S

Falguière Pasteur

JARDIN DU LUXEMBOURG

SA

UL

M IC

Rennes

S T-

ES

NN

VR

'AS ED

Duroc BO

Odéon

ST-SULPICE MUSÉE DU LUXEMBOURG

RU IL A S PA BD R

XE

H

DE

IL

SA

ES

E .D AV

NECKER

E RU

Sèvres Babylone

Hôtel de Ville

i

HÔTEL PLACE Bastille DE VILLE DES VOSGES St-Paul NOTREIV Y DAME ÎLE NR HE Cluny OPÉRA ST-LOUIS BD La Sorbonne BASTILLE Maubert Cité

BD

HÔTEL MATIGNON

ÎLE DE LA CITÉ St-Michel

St-Germain E R des-Prés MA IN

ES

ST -G

R. ARCHIVES DE SF NATIONALES RA NC SPLACE DU BO URG CHÂTELET EOIS

E

MUSÉE RODIN

A B D R A SP

St-François Xavier

ÉCOLE MILITAIRE

BD

ID BOULEVARD DES IN VA L

Rue du Bac

ESPLANADE DES INVALIDES

Rambuteau

A IR LT

Châtelet

Musée d’Orsay

Solférino

Richard Lenoir

CENTRE POMPIDOU

VO

FORUM Louvre DES HALLES MUSÉE Rivoli DU LOUVRE

BD

JARDIN DES TUILERIES Assemblée Nationale


DISCOVER Square du Vert-Galant

PARIS SEINE

Henry IV was not considered a Don Juan or a Casanova, simply because they hadn’t been born when he was alive. However, this great king of France was well-known for his amorous exploits. This square, accessible from the steps on the Pont Neuf, carries its royal nickname to great effect and forms the western point of the Île de la Cité. The equestrian statue of the monarch dominates the small garden and forms an intimate haven of calm, or romance – if your heart be so inclined – from which to admire the two banks of the Seine, its bridges and monuments.

was a seaside harbour. Sheltered from the river’s ebb and flow by a lock, the canal basin of this former mercantile port links the River Seine with the Canal Saint-Martin. The port provides 180 mooring spots and a picturesque terraced garden where you can step back onto terra firma amid the roses.

DID YOU KNOW?

Jardin Tino-Rossi

Port de l’Arsenal The port has everything from landing stages and little boats to a harbour master’s office, gulls, and seafood restaurants. Without the Colonne de Juillet rearing its head nearby, one would almost think this marina

FAUNA AND FLORA Good news! Fish and aquatic flora are returning to the Seine and the canals of Paris thanks to an improvement in water quality, which gets better every year. Some thirty-two species are now present (compared to only three in 1970): chub, gudgeon, pike, bream, roach … and even salmon! Keeping them company, and sometimes in competition with the fishermen, common gulls, black-headed gulls, grey wagtails and kingfishers animate the riverbanks, not forgetting mallard ducks, and even coots in winter.

?

Those firemen are everywhere, even near the Pont Neuf, on a floating fire station. From here, they can patrol the Seine in dinghies or in light watercraft. Rescue, evacuation, assistance to boats, floods, fire along the waterside – whatever the emergency, they’re on the alert.

The Saint-Bernard quayside on the Left Bank, between Pont de Sully and Pont d’Austerlitz, has been turned into a pleasant garden featuring works by contemporary artists like Brancusi, César and Gilioli. During the day this outdoor sculpture museum is a paradise for joggers and walkers, while on spring and summer evenings, it becomes an open-air dance floor. Aficionados and beginners from all over the world meet up here to dance the salsa, rock and tango by the waterside. Magical moments guaranteed! Péniche de l’eau The “water barge” aims to provide information to young people and the public on aquatic environments, on the management of water as a resource in Paris and on the challenges in preserving it. Pedagogical workshops enable children to carry out experiments. 31 quai de l’Oise (19th). M° Corentin-Cariou. Tel: 01 71 28 50 56. Every Sunday, except pub. hols. Apr to Sept: 1.30pm-6.30pm. Oct to Mar: 1.30pm5.30pm. Nov to Feb: 1.30pm-5pm. Free. www.paris.fr

Péniche du Cercle de la Mer For ocean lovers. This boat moored at the quayside, fires an enthusiasm for the sea and related maritime activities with its library, exhibitions, visits, lunch or dinner discussion sessions, the organization of private receptions, etc. Port-de-Suffren (7th). M° Bir-Hakeim. Tel: 01 45 56 19 35. www.cercledelamer.com

14


ALONG THE WATER

Don’t miss the River Seine! There are lovely long walks along its banks. But even better is a boat trip on the water. For navigating the Seine and the picturesque canals in the north-east of Paris, you have a choice of vessels: barges, panoramic boats, paddle boats, shuttle boats, small yachts and more. You also have a wide choice of tours: trips with commentaries translated into numerous languages to ensure you learn everything about the history of the French capital, lunch cruises or even a candlelight dinner cruise. And for those who are not keen ‘sailors’, there are some thirty or so boats and barges transformed into cafes, restaurants, discos and entertainment venues. These floating establishments welcome the public aboard for exhibitions, theatre plays, concerts … and are a complete change of scene! Addresses and programmes: see www.paris-ports.fr, the website of the Paris port authorities.

16

Lunch and dinner cruises, trips with commentary Bateaux Mouches® + Port de la Conférence (8th). M° Alma – Marceau. Tel: 01 42 25 96 10. www.bateaux-mouches.fr • Cruises with commentary: 1 Apr to 30 Sept: every 45 min from 10.15am-7pm and every 20 min from 7-11pm. 1 Oct to 31 Mar: every 45 min from 11am-9pm. (10.15am w/e). €10. Under 12s: €5. Under 4s: free. • Lunch cruises: every Sat, Sun and public hols: 1pm. €50. Under 12s: €25. • Dinner cruises: every evening: 8.30pm. €95 and €135.

Bateaux Parisiens + Port de la Bourdonnais (7th). M° Trocadéro, Bir-Hakeim. Tel: 0 825 01 01 01 (€0.15/min). www.bateauxparisiens.com • Cruises with commentary: Apr to Sept: every 30 min from 10am-10.30pm. Oct to Mar: every hour from 10am-10pm. Except 1.30pm and 7.30pm. €11. Under 12s: €5. Under 3s: free. • Lunch cruises: daily (except 1 Jan): 12.45pm. €54, €64, €80. • Dinner cruises: daily: 8.30pm. €98, €125, €160, €188. Children’s sightseeing cruise.

Canauxrama Bassin de la Villette. 13 quai de la Loire (19th). M° Jaurès. Tel: 01 42 39 15 00. www.canauxrama.com Reservations necessary. • Canal Saint-Martin: daily, 9.45am and 2.30pm from Port de l’Arsenal or 9.45am and 2.45pm from Bassin de la Villette. €16. RR: €12; 4-12 yrs: €8.50; under 4s: free. • Cruise Bistrot on Seine (May to Sept): Wed to Sat: 6pm and 9pm from Port de l’Arsenal. €16, 4-12 yrs: €8.50, under 4s: free. • Banks of the River Marne Day (Apr to Oct): 9am from Port de l’Arsenal. €35 (meal not included). • Cruise Atmosphère – Evenings on the Canal Saint-Martin (July and Aug, Fri and Sat): 6pm from the Bassin de la Villette or 9pm from the Port de l’Arsenal. €16. 4-12 yrs: €8.50; under 4s: free.

Compagnie de la Seine – Capitaine Fracasse + Île aux cygnes (15th), port de Grenelle. M° Bir-Hakeim. Tel: 01 46 21 48 15. www.lecapitainefracasse.com • Jan and Feb: Tues to Thurs and Sun: 8.30pm. Fri and Sat: 7pm and 9.45pm. • Mar, Apr, May, Oct and Nov: Mon to Thurs and Sun: 8.30pm. Fri and Sat: 7pm and 9.45pm. • June, July, Aug, Sept and Dec: Mon to Thurs: 7pm and 9.30pm. Fri and Sat: 7pm and 9.45pm.


Compagnie de la Seine – Paris en scène + Quai des Orfèvres (1st). M° and RER Saint-Michel – Notre-Dame. Tel: 01 41 41 90 70. www.paris-en-scene.com One-hour dinner-cruise. Daily except Mon: 6.15pm, 8pm, 9.30pm. Fri and Sat: 11.30pm. €29 €39. Sun: dinner-cruise by starred chef. €39 (check for information). Leather armchairs facing the Seine.

Compagnie Joce – Les croisières spectacles de Paris

• River Marne: w/e in July and Aug, 9.30am. €35 (lunch not included). • Canal Saint-Martin and the Seine (1hr30). 9.30am (depart from Musée d’Orsay). €13. 4-11 yrs: €10.

Vip Paris Yacht Hôtel Port de la Rapée (12th). M° Gare-de-Lyon. Tel: 01 48 84 45 30. www.le-vip-paris.com Dinner-cruises with accommodation aboard. Every w/e except during privatization or special events. From €159, €229, €279. http://store.le-vip-paris.com

Paris Yacht Marina

Port-de-la-Gare (13th). M° Gare-de-Lyon. Tel: 01 45 85 07 43. www.joce.fr Thematic dinner cruises: Parisian cabaret; partying to the sound of the French West Indies; live concert.

Port de Grenelle (15th). M° Bir-Hakeim. Tel: 01 40 58 00 00. www.clipperparis.com Up-market discovery of Paris aboard luxury boats (2 to 6 people).

Marina de Paris (La) +

Port de Suffren (7th). M° Bir-Hakeim. Tel: 01 44 18 19 50. www.vedettesdeparis.com • One-hour multilingual cruises with commentary: €12. 4-12 yrs: €5. Under 4s: free. • Themed cruises (€7 to €45): Sparkling, Sweet, Aperitif, Champagne tasting, Secrets of Paris for children.

Port de Solférino (7th). RER Musée-d’Orsay. Tel: 01 43 43 40 30. www.marinadeparis.com • Lunch cruises: Fri to Sun, 12.30pm. €53. Under 12s: €40. • Dinner cruises: 6.45pm: €49 or €64. Under 12s: €40. 9.15pm: €64; €79. Under 12s: €40.

Vedettes de Paris

Along the water

Sun: 1pm and 8.30pm. €50, €69, €79, €89.

Apr, May, June and Sept: from 11am-10pm, every 30 min. July, Aug, Easter hols: from 10.30am-11pm, every 20 min. Jan, Feb and from Oct to Dec: from 11am-7pm, every 45 min. • Dinner-cruises: Sat, at 8pm. €80. Under 12s: €40.

Yachts de Paris Port Henri-IV (4th). M° Sully-Morland. Tel: 01 44 54 14 70. www.yachtsdeparis.fr Upscale and bespoke lunches and dinners. Dinner-cruises: 8.30pm (boarding at 7.45pm), €198. Cruises of 45 min and 1hr15 for groups from 20 people.

Shuttle boat Batobus + Tel: 0 825 05 01 01 (€0.15/min). www.batobus.com Seasonal transport service on the Seine with 8 stops. (Tour Eiffel, Musée d’Orsay, Saint-Germain-des-Prés, Notre-Dame, Jardin des Plantes, Hôtel de Ville, Louvre, Champs-Élysées). Daily, every 17 to 35 min. 1-day ticket: €14; under 16s: €7. 2-consecutive-day ticket: €17; under 16s: €9. 5-consecutive-day ticket: €20; under 16s: €10.

Paris Canal

PARIS-PLAGES (PARIS-BEACHES) From mid-July to mid-August, the banks of the Seine close to traffic and are transformed into a free beach resort with sand, palm trees, deckchairs and parasols. On the right bank it extends from the Louvre to the Pont de Sully, and includes the La Villette canal basin, and on the left bank, from the Pont de Tolbiac to the Simone-de-Beauvoir footbridge. Paris-Plages also offers sporting activities and cultural events. Informations: www.paris.fr

EVENT

Bassin de la Villette. 19-21 quai de la Loire (19th). M° Jaurès. Tel: 01 42 40 96 97. www.pariscanal.com • Canal Saint-Martin and the Seine: daily on reservation: 9.30am (departure Musée d’Orsay) or 2.30pm (departure Parc de la Villette). €18. 12-25 yrs and over 60s: €15. 4-11 yrs: €11.

17


• Île de la Cité (4th) • Quartier latin (5th) • Île Saint-Louis (4th) • Jardin des plantes (5th)

Who said that ancient stone wasn’t exciting? In the Latin Quarter and on the Île de la Cité and Île Saint-Louis, which form the historic heart of Paris, they are charged with emotion, light and magical shadows. Embark on a treasure hunt and discover the impressive sculpted facade of Notre-Dame or the sublime series of stained-glass windows of SainteChapelle.

PARIS

TIMELESS

Venture through the labyrinth of alleyways on the Left Bank, once bustling with hawkers, charlatans, already rebellious students, and cut-throats. Or like Baudelaire and Camille Claudel, opt for a gentle walk past private mansion houses on the Île Saint-Louis. On this walk, you will pass bishops, rare birds and tulips at a little flower market, a queen, several poisoners, and the Girondins assembled for their last banquet at the Conciergerie. You will come across scientists from the Museum, mammoths and Japanese cherry-blossom trees, the jewellery of fine ladies of times gone by at the Hôtel de Cluny, Gallo-Romans at a grand event or the baths, and the patron saint of Paris … Bon voyage.


i

TIMELESS PARIS

i

i

i

Cité (line 4) • Saint-Michel (line 4) • Odéon (lines 4, 10) • Jussieu (lines 7, 10) • Censier-Daubenton (line 7) • Cluny-la-Sorbonne (line 10) • Cardinal-Lemoine (line 10)

DON’T MISS Notre-Dame de Paris The beginning of its long construction coincided with the choice of Paris as a capital and, on the square in front of the cathedral, a bronze star inscribed ‘zero kilometre’ indicates the centre of the country in terms of travelling distances. A symbol of Gothic art, its harmonious layout seems to be the work of just one architect, yet dozens followed on from the 12th to the 19th century, the date of its restoration by Viollet-le-Duc. The cathedral has witnessed Saint Louis, barefoot, wearing the Crown of Thorns in 1239, the coronation of Napoléon in 1804, the celebration of the Liberation of Paris in 1944 … and you too, as you climb the 422 steps leading to the top. Like Victor Hugo’s Quasimodo, you will then find yourself face to face with some of its grimacing gargoyles. You will also be able to make the acquaintance of the thirteen-ton bell named Emmanuel, and enjoy

a breathtaking view across the rooftops of Paris. Parvis Notre-Dame. Place Jean-Paul-II (4th). M° Cité. Cathedral

Archaeological crypt of the parvis Notre-Dame PASS Tel: 01 55 42 50 10. Daily: 10am-6pm, except Mon, Easter Sun and Whit Sun. €4 – RR: €2, €3. Under 14s: free. www.crypte.paris.fr

DID YOU KNOW? Tel: 01 42 34 56 10. Mon to Fri: 8am-6.45pm. Sat and Sun: 8am-7.15pm. Limited access on Sun due to services. www.cathedraledeparis.com Towers PASS Tel: 01 53 10 07 00. Daily except 1 Jan, 1 May and 25 Dec. 1 Oct to 31 Mar: 10am-5.30pm. 1 Apr to 30 Sept: 10am-6.30pm. Sat and Sun, from 1 May to 31 Aug: 10am-11pm. €8 – RR: €5. Under 18s, 18-25 yrs EU and 1st Sun of the month (from Nov to Mar): free. www.monuments-nationaux.fr

?

It was here on the Île de la Cité that the centre of Paris first developed, in Gallo-Roman times: you can see vestiges of its remains in the crypt. Île de la Cité and Île Saint-Louis

Despite being the birthplace of Paris, these two neighbouring islands, embraced by the arms of the Seine, are very different. On the Île de la Cité, amid a flurry of uniforms and lawyers’ gowns, you go from one historic site to another: Place Dauphine, the Conciergerie, Sainte-Chapelle, 19


Hôtel-Dieu, Notre-Dame … The Pont Saint-Louis marks the boundary – often with music – beyond which lies the tranquility of sumptuous mansion houses. A refuge for artists and poets, the Île Saint-Louis is also a haven for gourmets judging by the profusion of restaurants, cafes, ice-cream makers and confectioners, whose tempting windows line the rue Saint-Louis-en-l’Île.

Under 18s, 18-25 yrs EU and 1st Sun of month from Nov to Mar: free. www.monuments-nationaux.fr

DID YOU KNOW?

?

Léon Foucault set up an experiment with a pendulum, under a cupola of the Panthéon, to prove the rotation of the Earth. Quartier Latin

Panthéon +

PASS

Its dome dominates the Latin Quarter and gives its name to the similarly solemn square, at the centre of which it stands. This colossal civic temple worthily upholds the motto inscribed on its pediment that honours the nations great men. An irony of history, this monument dedicated to Republican liturgies was commissioned by Louis XV in 1744 to honour Sainte-Geneviève. But with the Revolution underway, the scarcely finished basilica was transformed into a civic temple in 1791 and consecrated as the national Panthéon in 1885, at the funeral of Victor Hugo. A synthesis of neoclassical and Gothic-style architecture, it also houses the tombs of Pierre and Marie Curie, Alexandre Dumas, Jean Jaurès, André Malraux, Jean Moulin, Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Voltaire. Place du Panthéon (5th). RER Luxembourg. Tel: 01 44 32 18 00. Summer: 10am-6.30pm. Winter: 10am-6pm. Daily except 1 Jan, 1 May and 25 Dec. Colonnade: from 1 Apr to 31 Oct. €8 – RR: €5.

20

On the Left Bank, in the vicinity of the University founded in the 12th century, Latin was the language most commonly spoken by professors and students. This tradition seems to have died out but the name remains. Around the Sorbonne, the Collège de France, prestigious schools and the Sainte-Geneviève library, there are still numerous bookshops, publishers, and cafes, where students revise for their exams, as well as tiny art-house cinemas. Of course, the Saint-Michel fountain is not only a meeting point for students, many businesses have now moved into the area, but the memory of Professor Abélard and the paving stones of May 1968 still linger here and there.

Sainte-Chapelle +

PASS

Next to the Palais de Justice (law courts), Sainte-Chapelle and the Conciergerie are the precious remains of what was once the palace of the kings of France from the 10th to the 14th century. The Sainte-Chapelle, a triumphantly flamboyant example of the Gothic style, was commissioned by Saint Louis. In the lower chapel,

dedicated to the Virgin, gilded lilies on an azure-blue star-studded vault are a wonderful sight. But reserve your praise for the upper chapel, designed to house the relics of Christ’s Passion, dispersed during the French Revolution, and lined with predominantly red and blue stained-glass windows – the largest expanse of 13th century stained glass in the world. 6 bd du Palais (1st). M° Cité. Tel: 01 53 40 60 80. Daily except 1 Jan, 1 May and 25 Dec. Summer: 9.30am-6pm. Winter: 9am-5pm. Wed (mid-May to mid-Sept): 9.30pm. €8 – RR: €5. Combined ticket with the Conciergerie: €11 – RR: €7.50. Under 18s, 18-25 yrs EU and 1st Sun of the month (from Nov to Mar): free. www.monuments-nationaux.fr

Conciergerie +

PASS

The Conciergerie was once a royal palace. Imagine the enormous Salle des Gens d’Armes with two thousand persons sitting down to eat, and kitchens buzzing with kitchen boys. Above all the Conciergerie was a prison up until the 19th century: the regicidal Ravaillac, Marie-Antoinette and many others, especially during the darker days of the French Revolution, spent their last days here. Palais de la Cité. 2 bd du Palais (1st). M° Cité. Tel: 01 53 40 60 80. Daily: 9.30am-6pm. 1 Jan, 1 May and 25 Dec: closed. €7 – RR: €4.50. Combined ticket with the Sainte-Chapelle: €11 – RR: €7.50. Under 18s, 18-25 yrs EU and 1st Sun of the month (from Nov to Mar): free. www.monuments-nationaux.fr


DISCOVER xxx Institut du monde arabe

PASS

Arab-Muslim civilization is showcased at the centre of timeless Paris in this superb glass and steel building, designed by Jean Nouvel and Architecture Studio, and built in 1987. Behind the mobile moucharabiyah screens that regulate the amount of sunlight entering the building, tradition and modern technology work together to set the tone. An ultra-modern oriental gentleness reigns over the museum, exhibition rooms, auditorium, library and media library for young people, language centre, bookshop, restaurant and literary cafe. One can also enjoy temporary exhibitions, mint tea and concerts, dance and cinema, conferences, sugar-covered shortbread crescents, art workshops and more.

DID YOU KNOW?

?

Before coming back down to earth, you can prolong the enchantment on the terrace and take in all of Paris in one glance! Collections of the IMA

The museum’s collections showcase the very essence of Arab-Muslim art, from ancient history to the 20th century and from the far reaches of central Asia to the shores of the Atlantic. Phoenician amphora and Yemenite perfume burners bear witness to the pre-Islamic era before the flourishing dynasties of Damascus and Baghdad, and the blossoming of science. And finally, explore the treasures of the golden age: glass, metal, ceramics, wood encrusted with ivory, shell, pewter, and mother of pearl, and the ideal, sacred world of carpets.

1 rue des Fossés-Saint-Bernard (5th). M° Jussieu. Tel: 01 40 51 38 38. Daily: 10am-6pm, except Mon and 1 May. Museum closed for work until September 2011. Collections may visited in the Galeries d’art et d’essai during this time. www.imarabe.org

Musée du Moyen Âge – Thermes et hôtel de Cluny

PASS

Since 1843, the Musée National du Moyen Âge has encompassed two architectural marvels: the Gallo-Roman baths, dating from the end of the 2nd century BC, and the Hôtel des Abbés de Cluny, built in the 15th century. The main building and the wings of the hôtel reveal the layout of subsequent centuries, but the Middle Ages is resplendent … and even more so inside. Sculpture, gold and silver plate, ceramics, tapestry, furniture, and everyday objects provide a unique picture of medieval art and society. Between the little chapel sculpted with foliage and the secular sanctuary dedicated to the La Dame à la Licorne (The Lady with the Unicorn) tapestries, there is an extensive collection of golden crowns, Byzantine ivory, daggers and coats of chain mail. Of the ancient Gallo-Roman baths, one can see the remains of the tepid baths and the caldarium, a kind of sauna. However, the best conserved part is the frigidarium. Here one was sprayed with cold water after passing through the steam baths. See also the impressive fifteen-metre-high vaults and the remains of the sculpted pillars of tritons that pay tribute to the corporation of Nautes (Gallic boatmen).

LADY WITH THE UNICORN Up until the 19th century, this series of six tapestries adorned the walls of a chateau in the Creuse region. Each represents a lady surrounded by a lion, a unicorn and a monkey on a vermillion background strewn with flowers. The first five tapestries are allegories of the senses with a sweetmeat, an organ, a mirror, flowers and the unicorn’s horn held by the lady. The sixth, entitled À mon seul désir (to my only desire) depicts jewels placed in a casket, symbolising what lies beyond our passions.

22

6 place Paul-Painlevé (5th). M° Cluny-la-Sorbonne. Tel: 01 53 73 78 16. Daily: 9.15am-5.45pm, except Tues, 1 Jan, 1 May and 25 Dec. €8 – RR: €6. Under 18s, 18-25 yrs EU and 1st Sun of month: free. www.musee-moyenage.fr Medieval garden

The museum’s gardens, of medieval inspiration, prolong the journey in the Unicorn Forest. Take a walk through the ménagier (a kitchen garden for pot plants), observe the medicinal plants, and admire the inner courtyard dotted with flowers, the Heavenly Garden and the Garden of Love.


This has been one of the favourite walks of Parisians … since 1640! It was in this year that the Jardin Royal des Plantes Médicinales (Royal Medicinal Plants Garden), created by Louis XIII in 1633, became the first public garden in Paris. Under the influence of Buffon and the Jussieu botanist brothers, the garden was enlarged and an emphasis placed on research. Renamed Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle in 1793, exhibition galleries were added in the 19th and 20th centuries. The Natural History Museum is set within over 23 hectares of plants and trees and harmoniously combines the natural sciences with candy floss and sweets kiosks. But what exactly is there to do here?

TIMELESS PARIS SEINE PARIS

Muséum national d’histoire naturelle

À DÉCOUVRIR Greenhouses

Fully renovated and reorganized, the greenhouses of the Jardin des plantes delight the public. They are laid out in such a way that the visitor is guided like an explorer through a discovery of the different environments and learns about their fragility and the current challenges for preserving them.

Wed to Mon: 10am-5pm in winter; 10am-6pm (6.30pm Sun and public hols) in summer. 1 May: closed. €5 – RR: €3. Grande galerie de l’évolution

57 rue Cuvier (5th). M° Jussieu. Tel: 01 40 79 56 01. www.mnhn.fr

Jardin des plantes

Wander peacefully among the statues, lime trees from Russia, the olive trees from Bohemia, and twenty or so trees over one hundred years old. The oldest – a Cedar of Lebanon – was planted in 1734. Climb to the belvedere, at the top of a little hill named Labyrinthe, for a romantic embrace. You’ll pass school children out on the trail of dinosaurs or here to learn about gardening. Explore the greenhouses, the educational vegetable garden, the Alpine garden, and the rose, iris, rock and peony gardens. Daily: 8am-6pm. Free.

In subdued lighting under a huge glass roof, one can see a spectacular parade of stuffed animals – and you would swear that they were about to move! The surrounding permanent exhibition provides an educational journey through our diverse living world, the evolution of organisms and the effect of man on his environment. Daily, except Tues and 1 May: 10am-6pm. €7 – RR: €5. Under 26s: free. With the temporary exhibition: €9 – RR: €7. Under 4s: free. With the Galerie des enfants: €9 – RR: €7. Under 4s: free (res. necessary). www.galeriedesenfants.fr

Galeries de paléontologie et d’anatomie comparée

In a building dating back to 1900 characterized by girders and metallic sculptures, visitors learn the alphabet of vertebrates and invertebrates. Admire the skeleton of Louis XV’s rhinoceros and hundreds of fossilized exhibits, including dinosaurs, mammoths, etc. Wed to Mon: 10am-5pm. Sat, Sun and public hols: 10am-6pm (from 1 Apr to 30 Sept). 1st May: closed. €7 – TR: €5. Under 26s: free.

Ménagerie

This little zoo is home to Sichuan takins, Seychelles turtles and almost one thousand mammals, birds and reptiles, in a landscape with footbridges and small pavilions. Visitors can picnic here. Not to be missed are the monkey house and wild-cat house – major architectural feats from the 1930s – nor the white storks and black-crowned cranes, under the finely netted dome of the great aviary, which dates from 1888.

Galerie de minéralogie et de géologie

Discover over 600,000 rocks and minerals, gigantic crystals, meteorites and even precious stones from former royal collections. Closed for renovation work. Daily: 9am-6pm (6.30pm Sun and public hols) in summer. €9 – RR: €7. Under 4s: free.

23


PARIS SEINE

SAINTE GENEVIÈVE, PATRON SAINT OF PARIS Born in Nanterre, Geneviève (422-512) was a member of the Gallo-Roman aristocracy. When the Francs invaded Gaul and besieged Paris in 451, she ensured supplies got to the city. Later, she encouraged Clovis to be baptised and, so it is said, accomplished many miracles. Buried at the top of the hill which carries her name (on the present site of the Pantheon), Geneviève was canonized in the 8th century. She is invoked especially whenever any ill threatens the city and she is always the object of the greatest devotion, particularly at the church of Saint-Étienne-du-Mont, situated behind the Panthéon.

Arènes de Lutèce In the 1st and 2nd centuries BC, this amphitheatre held up to 15,000 people, who came to see plays, comedies, gladiator combats and wild beasts fighting. Together with the forum and the baths, the amphitheatre constituted the centre of the Gallo-Roman city. Rediscovered in 1869, while building rue Monge, the restored amphitheatre has been reopened, offering its stone terracing and stage to the city – impromptu football matches take place here after school, as well as games of pétanque and just general lazing around in the sun.

Rue Mouffetard and Place de la Contrescarpe A saunter down the gentle slope of montagne Sainte-Geneviève along rue Mouffetard is a delightful experience and full of picture-postcard views of Paris. In the small paved Place de la Contrescarpe, restaurant and cafe terraces encircle the ‘village’ fountain. The Pomme de Pin store, still visible at no.1, is a reminder that the area was once filled with cabarets. It is here that the rue Mouffetard, once the only road leading from Lutetia (Paris) to Rome, starts to trace its medieval line; today it is the place to pause for an affordable bite to eat in the lively pubs and cafes. But good food is making its mark again, and under many a sloping facade you’ll find window displays of traditional breads and cakes, stalls of charcuterie, and mounds of fruit and vegetables, leading to the small and colourful market that stretches from the bottom of the street to the Saint-Médard church bell tower.

Ancienne abbaye royale du Val-de-Grâce Anne of Austria, the young queen abandoned by her husband Louis XIII, vowed to ‘build a magnificent temple to God if he sent her a son’. Her wish was granted with the birth of the future Louis XIV, in 1638, after over twenty years of marriage. She had to wait another seventeen years to see the beginning of the building work, which was completed after her death, in 1669. Magnificently preserved thanks to the military hospital established here since 1796, the royal abbey of Val-de-Grâce is a unique gem of 17th century religious architecture. Rue Saint-Jacques (church court entrance) (5th). RER B Port-Royal. Tues, Wed, Sat and Sun: 12-noon-6pm. €5 – RR: €2.50.

49 rue Monge (5th). M° Cardinal-Lemoine. Opening times vary according to season. Free.

24


The splendour of Paris’s monuments and the diversity of its architecture are a source of constant fascination. Centuries of magnificent works have left masterpieces like the Louvre palace, the cathedral of Notre-Dame, the Eiffel Tower and the basilica of Sacré-Cœur. But in addition to these legendary sites, the capital offers an incomparable historical treasure trove for visitors, who only have to look around them … or peep through gates into the former carriage courtyards of hôtels particuliers. The city unveils its treasures in palaces, splendid town houses, churches and chapels, the metro, covered arcades, train stations, warehouses and industrial wasteland. Even certain street numbers or plaques merit a look. From the remains of Lutetia (the city’s first name in Roman times) to the great contemporary projects of today, each era has left its special mark. To discover this wonderful heritage, a good pair of shoes is recommended together with a map of Paris, insatiable curiosity and, why not the insight of a guide. Did you know, for example, that at night, one can stroll through “phantom”, that is disused, metro stations?

The metro The Métropolitain was inaugurated at the Exposition Universelle of 1900 and linked its major sites. Designed by the engineer Fulgence Bienvenüe, it was Hector Guimard who designed the 84 art nouveau entrances, two of which still exist at the Abbesses and Porte-Dauphine metro stations. White earthenware tiles and sculpted frames are the hallmark of the Parisian metro. Over the years, the metro has accumulated works of art: the Kiosque des Noctambules by Othoniel, in Place Colette (the entrance to the Palais-Royal – Musée-du-Louvre) metro station; the Constitution written on the walls on the platforms of Concorde metro station; a revolutionary fresco at Bastille; the Nautilus submarine as seen by Jules Verne at Arts-et-Métiers; the history of the 20th century in pictures at Tuileries, and more.

Train stations In the 19th century the railway was the definitive symbol of modern times and the train station its temple. Built in 1851, then rebuilt thirty years later, Saint-Lazare, with its metal structure and glass roofs – avant-gardist in their time- inspired artists. The Orsay train station (today a magnificent museum) was inaugurated for the Exposition Universelle of 1900. The Lyon train station was given a new makeover for the same occasion; the prestige of the train, a new way of travel, is still apparent in the luxurious

Architecture and heritage

ARCHITECTURE AND HERITAGE

salons of its restaurant Le Train Bleu. The train stations are the gateways of Paris. They bore witness to the first departures of paid holidays and saw the arrival of the first troops back from the front in times of war; they saw the arrival of inhabitants from the Alsace, the Auvergne, and Brittany, who came to seek work as servants or building workers, or even open brasseries. These places, charged with history and endowed with architectural splendours and the latest technology, are well worth a visit!

Private mansions (hôtels particuliers) One has to go back to the Middle Ages to find the origins of the Parisian hôtel. The residence of a powerful lord or rich bourgeois was set around an interior courtyard. In the 16th century the U-shaped plan became the fashion: a main building, looking on to both the courtyard and the garden, was flanked by two wings. In the 17th century, the model spread to the Marais and the faubourgs Saint-Germain and Saint-Honoré, giving rise to wonderful architectural mansions. Although the hôtels Biron, Carnavalet, de Cluny, Dassault, Matignon, Salomon de Rothschild and de Sully are the most well-known, there are countless others to be discovered as you walk around.

25


Squares Designed for gatherings and celebrations, the places (squares), of royal or republican origin, are highly symbolic places. Their layout was artfully thought out to glorify the statue of a king or the emblem of power erected at their centre. Place Dauphine was thus linked to Henri IV, Place des Vosges to Louis XIII, and Place des Victoires to Louis XIV. Louis XV was replaced in Place Vendôme by the column of Napoléon, and dethroned at Concorde by the obelisk of LouisPhilippe. As their names indicate, the Place de la Bastille, Place de la République and Place de la Nation seek rather to exalt revolutions and values of citizenship.

Historic streets How many streets of Paris have witnessed major events? Their name or commemorative plaques keep history alive. So, boulevard Saint-Germain is inextricably linked to May 68, just like the Champs-Élysées is to the jubilation of the Liberation of Paris. The boulevard des grands magasins (of major department stores) bears the name of Baron Haussmann, who transformed the capital in the 19th century with wide avenues. Sometimes, small streets have their story to tell.

NUIT DES MUSÉES (MUSEUM NIGHT) On 14 May 2011, this Europe-wide event enabled an ever greater number of people to visit Parisian museums for free, between 6pm and midnight. The secret of its success? It is free in most museums, it is night time, but above all it is the opportunity for chance encounters in museums discovered in the moonlight. Establishments vie with each other for unusual ideas, searching their collections to present a rich programme of special events around the annual theme. Visitors who have not yet explored Museum Night should go along to the 8th edition in May 2012. In May 1610, the carriage of Henri IV entered the small street de la Ferronnerie, which was narrow and full of stalls. The royal equipage had to slow down and Ravaillac took advantage of the occasion to stab the king who died on his return to the Louvre. To relive these great historical moments consult the brown plaques that relate these fascinating episodes of the history of Paris in the places that they actually happened.

Street furniture The stamp placed on the Parisian landscape by Haussmann and Guimard is quite familiar. However, it is the architect Davioud who gave the city its street furniture, be it functional or decorative and which still characterizes the capital today. The circular cast-iron

EVENT

EUROPEAN HERITAGE DAYS (JOURNÉES EUROPÉENNES DU PATRIMOINE) Each year, on the 3rd weekend in September (17 and 18 September 2011), public and private buildings open exceptionally for this occasion. In Paris, you can visit the Élysée Palace (the official residence of the French president), the Sénat (the upper house of the French parliament), certain ministries and embassies, the backstage of theatres… Visits to public heritage sites are free, private sites often charge a reduced fee.

26

frameworks that encircle trees are identical to those created at the time of the Second Empire. Some lamp posts, lanterns and double benches, as well as the Morris columns (where the programme of shows are displayed) and the Wallace fountains also date from this period.

Places of worship Paris has two hundred churches and among these the most emblematic and most visted: the Sacré-Cœur, the Madeleine, Notre-Dame cathedral, etc. Tourists and Parisians come together during church services or for programmed concerts. Other faiths are also represented with the orthodox cathedral Saint-Alexandre-Nevsky, the Grande Mosquée or the Grande Synagogue of the community de la Victoire.


• Marais (4th) • Montorgueil (2nd) • Hôtel de Ville (4th) • Les Halles (1st)

PARIS

TRENDY

Take a gentle stroll between the Place du Châtelet and Place des Vosges to enjoy a spot of shopping, or discover local heritage … in fact, everything is possible as long as you know how to juggle with different styles. The medieval Jean-sans-Peur Tower surges out from amongst Haussmanian buildings, while the flamboyant Gothic architecture of the Saint-Jacques Tower is just a stone’s throw from the fountain at Châtelet, built in praise of Napoléon I. The square in front of the neo-Renaissance Paris City Hall is also an impromptu venue for beach-volleyball. The church of Saint-Eustache, where Molière was christened, stands next to the metallic footbridges of the Les Halles gardens – due to be completely revamped between now and 2016. A few steps away from the Renaissance bas-reliefs of the Fountain of the Innocents is the Pompidou Centre, symbol of 20th-century architecture and home to modern and contemporary art collections. The Marais district combines a whirl of creative design with the delights of the Jewish Quarter, around rue des Rosiers, and a magnificently preserved historic centre. Busy streets give way to tiny enclosed squares and gardens and numerous museums, including the Carnavalet, Picasso and the National Archives, housed in mansion houses that rival each other in splendour.


TRENDY PARIS i

Saint-Paul (line 1) • Hôtel-de-Ville (lines 1, 11) • Rambuteau (line 11) • Arts-et-Métiers (lines 3, 11) • Châtelet (lines 1, 4, 7, 11, 14) • Étienne-Marcel (line 4) • Les Halles (line 4)

DON’T MISS Place des Vosges and Maison de Victor Hugo Formerly known as the Place Royale, this square has remained intact – miraculously so – since it was commissioned by Henri IV in 1604. The thirty-six townhouses have constituted a perfect symmetry from the day they were built, with their brick facades, deep-pitched slate roofs and the ground floor made up of a gallery of arcades for walking. Add a few musketeers and you’d think you were in a swashbuckling adventure film … or back to the splendid carrousel that inaugurated the square in 1612 to celebrate the wedding of Louis XIII and Anne of Austria. Since then, each house has boasted a rich history of art, literature and many a famous name. Madame de Sévigné was born at the Hôtel de Coulanges; Cardinal Richelieu, Théophile Gautier, Alphonse Daudet, and the tragic actress Rachel, also

lived there, as well as Victor Hugo, from 1832 to 1848. Transformed into a museum, his apartment in the Hôtel de Rohan-Guéménée reveals the story of his life, from the antechamber of his youth to his death bed, not forgetting a visit to the Chinese salon, where he played out his love affair with Juliette Drouet. If you look closely, you’ll see their initials in trompe-l’œil.

Hôtel de Rohan-Guéménée. 6 place des Vosges (4th). M° Saint-Paul. Tel: 01 42 72 10 16. Daily: 10am-6pm, except Mon and public hols. Permanent collections free. www.musee-hugo.paris.fr

Pompidou Centre

PASS

‘This will cause a stir‘ President Pompidou is rumoured to have said about the contemporary cultural design centre that bears his name. In fact, when the project was completed by Renzo Piano and Richard Rogers in 1977, it was described as a factory and a refinery. The architects had envisaged it as a futuristic vessel. Made of glass and steel, an escalator zigzags up its exterior in a transparent tube, matched by vertical pipes, also on the outside, representing blue for air, green for water, yellow for electricity and red for the elevators. The interior has a surface area of 7,500 sq.m. on each of its five floors. Contemporary culture is 29


foreveryone, and the choice here is impressive: exhibition rooms, performance spaces, a cinema, and a gallery for children, etc. and, of course, the national museum of modern art. Design in the 20th century and current movements are explored via a thematic approach that combines all forms of visual art and audiovisual expression. Place Georges-Pompidou (4th). M° Hôtel-de-Ville. Tel: 01 44 78 12 33. 11am-9pm, except Tues and 1 May. The entrance ticket “Musée et expositions” gives access to the Musée National d’Art Moderne, the exhibitions and panoramic terrace. €10 to €12 according to period. RR: €8/9. Under 18s (museum and exhibitions), 18-25 yrs EU (except exhibition) and 1st Sun of the month (except exhibition): free. www.centrepompidou.fr

Around Beaubourg

Beaubourg, which takes its nickname from the name of the district, has blended into the landscape, and is a great success with millions of visitors each year, extending its popularity to the esplanade and the Place Stravinsky that surround it. In the former, which feels rather like a mini Woodstock, you can sit around jugglers, listen to guitar music, and visit the Brancusi workshop. In the second, you can take in the multicoloured mobile fountain by Jean Tinguely and Niki de Saint Phalle.

30

DID YOU KNOW?

Completed in 1882, the current building reflects the splendour of the 3rd Republic. A sumptuous interior boasts chandeliers, gilding and wood panelling, while the external neo-Renaissance facades are decorated with a profusion of niches and no less than 378 sculpted works.

?

It is possible to surf on the Place Pompidou! There is a free Wi-Fi connection in and around the Centre and at more than 260 municipal sites (gardens, town halls, etc.). Hôtel de Ville

Do you know the Maison aux Piliers? Of course you do – it’s on the Place de Grève! On this square, you can ice-skate in winter, watch top match events on big screens, and take part in free activities every summer when the banks of the Seine turn into Paris-Plages. Feeling lost? Well actually, that’s understandable. In the 12th century, the administration of Paris was entrusted to the corporation of water merchants, who controlled navigation on the Seine. Étienne Marcel, the provost of the merchants, transferred the seat of the municipality to the Maison aux Piliers – the current site of the Paris City Hall – in 1357. The square – then Place de Grève – became a spot for popular merrymaking … and public punishment. Crowds congregated to witness all sorts of executions until 1830. Workers also used to wait for work here, giving rise in the 19th century to the expression être en grève (to be on strike). As for the Hôtel de Ville (Paris City Hall), which replaced the Maison aux Piliers, it burnt down over eight days, in 1871, during the events of the Commune.

Mairie de Paris (4th). M° Hôtel-de-Ville. Tel: 01 42 76 50 49. Free guided tours (French, English) of the salons of the Hôtel de Ville, by prior appointment only, according to official events. Rooms accessible to disabled people. www.paris.fr

Musée Picasso

PASS

Completed in 1659, the mansion which houses the museum has retained the cheeky nickname “Salé” (salty) in memory of the ostentatious tastes of its first owner who made a fortune by taxing salt. Behind its monumental facade, you can admire a unique collection of works by Picasso. 203 paintings, 158 sculptures, more than 3,000 engravings and drawings, sketchbooks, etc.. Hôtel Salé. 5 rue de Thorigny (3rd). M° Saint-Paul. Tel: 01 42 71 25 21. Closed for renovation work until 2012. www.musee-picasso.fr


TRENDY PARIS

DISCOVER Musée Carnavalet – histoire de Paris The museum of the history of Paris takes its visitors from the Neolithic canoes of the Gallic Parisii tribe to the bedroom of Marcel Proust. Two resplendent adjoining townhouses offer the perfect setting for this fascinating story. The Hôtel Carnavalet, built in 1548, traces the the Paris of the Renaissance, the wars of Religion and the city in the 18th century. In the Hôtel Le Peletier de Saint-Fargeau, it is Paris-Revolution, then Napoléon leaving on one of his campaigns with his personal effects in gilded silver. And again it is the Paris of Mucha, art nouveau, a ballroom from the roaring Twenties, etc.

23 rue de Sévigné (3rd). M° Saint-Paul. Tel: 01 44 59 58 58. Daily: 10am-6pm, except Mon, Easter Sun and Whit Sun. Permanent collections free. www.carnavalet.paris.fr

Hôtel de Sully ‘Ploughing and grazing are the two teats of France‘ affirmed Maximilien of Béthune, Duke of Sully and superintendent of the finances of Henri IV. Nevertheless, in 1634, he opted for a sumptuous pied-à-terre in the Marais – completed four years earlier – rather than the greenery of the countryside. This archetypal 17th-century Parisian mansion house wowed fashionable society before housing a dairy and a shop for the latest goods in the 19th century. Today, it houses the Centre des monuments nationaux.

62 rue Saint-Antoine (4th). M° Saint-Paul, Bastille. Information centre for the Centre des monuments nationaux. Tel: 01 44 61 21 50. Mon to Fri: 9am-5.30pm. www.monuments-nationaux.fr

Place du Châtelet

Don’t come here looking for tranquillity – this is one of the busiest crossroads in Paris. There are however many lovely things to see, including the Châtelet or ‘Palm’ Fountain, erected in 1806 to commemorate the victories of Napoléon I, and two Italian Renaissance-inspired theatres, designed by Davioud in 1862. The Théâtre du Châtelet, with over two thousand seats, is devoted primarily to opera and music. The Théâtre de la Ville – almost its twin – was for a long time named after the actress Sarah Bernhardt, who performed there for over twenty years. Today, its programme is divided between drama, dance and music. Musée des Arts et Métiers

PASS

The metro station sets the tone. Since the bicentenary of the museum, in 1994, the Arts et Métiers metro station has taken on the appearance of Jules Verne’s submarine the Nautilus, complete with copper walls and portholes. In this faithfully-renovated abbey, the history of technology from the 16th century onwards is split into seven domains: communication, construction, energy, scientific instruments, materials, mechanical engineering, and transport. Visitors will learn all about great inventions and stand in wonder before the automatons and velocipedes, Lavoisier’s late-18th-century laboratory or Clément Ader’s airplane, just a century older.

60 rue Réaumur (3rd). M° Arts-et-Métiers. Tel: 01 53 01 82 00. Daily: 10am-6pm, except Mon and some public hols. Thurs: 10am-9.30pm. €6.50 – RR : €4.50. Under 18s, 18-25 yrs EU, 1st Sun of the month and Thurs: (6pm to 9.30pm): free. www.arts-et-metiers.net

31


SHOPPING STREETS AND LATEST TRENDS

Musée d’art et d’histoire du Judaïsme PASS

From the Montorgueil neighbourhood to the busy winding narrow streets of the Marais, you will find unconventional fashion, up-and-coming galleries, and small designers rubbing shoulders with big names and richly-coloured boutiques decked out with curious, original, ethnic and poetic objects. In rue Montorgueil, market gardeners and delicatessens share this delightful street with gourmet bistros. Also in the area, discover the stream of designers and fashionable labels that have moved into the workshops of the former clothing factories on rue Montmartre and rue Étienne-Marcel. A few minutes’ walk away, the Forum des Halles shopping mall has more affordable stores. In the Marais, young designers and artists have opened boutiques and workshops in rues des Blancs-Manteaux, des Francs-Bourgeois, Vieille-du-Temple, Charlot … not forgetting, of course, rue Charlemagne and rue Saint-Paul. This avant-gardist paradise is also bursting with trendy canteens!

The culture and traditions of the Jewish community come to life in this rich collection of art objects, such as paintings by Chagall, Modigliani and Soutine that are stunning, popular, religious, everyday, humble, precious, ancestral and near contemporary.

Église Saint-Eustache Built over a century, this church features Gothic and Renaissance influences combined with an 18th-century classical facade, along with traces of a questionable restoration after 1840. Nevertheless, Saint-Eustache is truly beautiful and houses treasures like a Rubens painting and a statue of Pigalle. And it has an impressive celebrity line-up, including the baptism of Richelieu, Molière and Mme de Pompadour, Louis XIV’s first communion, the mariage of Lulli, the funeral of La Fontaine and Mirabeau as well as Colbert, Marivaux and Rameau, who found their final resting places here. Place du Jour (1st). M° Châtelet-les-Halles. Tel: 01 42 36 31 05. Mon to Fri: 9.30am-7pm. Sat and Sun: 10am-7pm.

32

Hôtel de Saint-Aignan. 71 rue du Temple (3rd). M° Rambuteau. Tel: 01 53 01 86 53. Daily: 11am-6pm, except Sat. Sun: 10am-6pm. Closed 1 Jan, 1 May for Rosh ha-Shanah and Yom Kippour celebrations. €6.80 – RR: €4.50. Under 25s: free. www.mahj.org

Mémorial de la Shoah Opened on the site of the tomb of the Unknown Jewish Martyr, the Memorial is a place of remembrance and documentation about the Shoah and also a “museum of vigilance”, designed for teaching, learning and experiencing. A bastion against oblivion, the Wall of Names, perpetuates the memory of the 76,000 Jewish victims deported from France with the cooperation of the Vichy government. 17 rue Geoffroy-l’Asnier (4th). M° Saint-Paul. Tel: 01 42 77 44 72. Daily, except Sat:10am-6pm. Thurs: late opening until 10pm. Public hols and certain Jewish holidays: closed. Free. www.memorialdelashoah.org

Tour Jean-sans-Peur Let’s step back in time for a moment. During an interlude in the One Hundred Years War, Jean, Duke of Burgundy, took advantage of the situation to order the assassination of his cousin Louis d’Orléans and seize power. He ruled from his Parisian mansion, in which, in 1409, he had the tower built – the only remaining vestige of the building today. A magnificent spiral staircase with a vault sculpted in oak, hop, and hawthorn leads to the meeting rooms. Today, a permanent exhibition in the six rooms of the tower portrays the history of early-15thcentury society and architecture; and temporary exhibitions show daily life in the Middle Ages.


Centre historique des Archives nationales – musée de l’histoire de France As their name suggests, the National Archives preserve the records of France, from the Merovingians to 1958, and house the Musée de l’Histoire de France. Located in the Palais de Soubise since 1808, with its extravagant rocaille-style decoration behind a fine classical facade, the National Archives have continued to grow, and now extend into the superb Hôtel de Rohan. Hôtel de Soubise. 60 rue des Francs-Bourgeois (3rd). M° Hôtel-de-Ville. Tel: 01 40 27 60 96. Mon to Fri, except Tues and public hols: 10am-12.30pm and 2-5.30pm. Sat and Sun: 2-5.30pm. €3/6 – RR: €2/4. Under 26s and 1st Sun of month: free. www.archivesnationales.culture.gouv.fr

Tour Saint-Jacques What a history! This curious Gothic belfry is the only remaining vestige of the church of Saint-Jacquesde-la-Boucherie, a meeting point for pilgrims journeying to Santiago de Compostela in Spain in the Middle Ages. In the 17th century, Pascal experimented here with gravity. The tower escaped demolition in 1797 and was converted into a meteorological station in 1891, where air quality is measured. The little garden in which it stands is much appreciated by Parisians and visitors. Square de la tour Saint-Jacques (1st). M° Hôtel-de-Ville.

Musée de la Curiosité et de la Magie This labyrinth of vaulted cellars was said to have been as a place of debauchery for the Marquis de Sade. Today, it is a perfectly commendable place for those with a sense of curiosity and lovers of tricks, and recounts the history of magic, illusionists and conjurers from the 18th century onwards. Indian mail, automatons, unusual boxes of surprises and secrets, magic wands, distorting mirrors: everything is here! 11 rue Saint-Paul (4th). M° Saint-Paul. Tel: 01 42 72 13 26. Wed, Sat, Sun: 2-7pm. €9 – RR: €7. www.museedelamagie.com

Forum des Halles and its garden

From the 12th century until 1969, the “belly of Paris” and its colourful population, so well depicted in the novels of Émile Zola, supplied the capital with food. Transferred to Rungis, the covered market was replaced by galleries including a shopping centre, a swimming pool, a tropical hothouse, numerous cinema auditoriums … On the garden side, there are lawns, fountains, and children’s play areas to enjoy, with a new renovation of the whole area planned for 2016 and code named “project Canopy”, by the architects Patrick Berger and Jacques Anziutti. 1-7 rue Pierre-Lescot (1st). M° Châtelet-les-Halles.

Musée de la Poupée

Musée Cognacq-Jay

First, came dolls dressed like perfect little Parisian ladies in the elegant outfits of a marchioness. In 1878 after the Exposition Universelle, came the porcelain doll. In the twentieth century, baby dolls in celluloid were all the fashion … until a certain blonde-haired doll with the svelte figure of a model appeared on the scene. Happy daydreaming in the world of little girls!

The couple Cognacq-Jay, founders of the Samaritaine department stores, devoted part of their great wealth to buying works and objects of art (paintings, sculptures, furniture, etc.) with a preference for those of the French 18th century.

Impasse Berthaud (3rd). M° Rambuteau. Tel: 01 42 72 73 11. Daily: 10am-6pm, except Mon and public hols. €8 – RR: €5/3. Under 3s: free. www.museedelapoupeeparis.com

TRENDY PARIS

20 rue Étienne-Marcel (2nd). M° Étienne-Marcel. Tel: 01 40 26 20 28. Apr to Nov: Wed to Sun. Nov to Mar: Wed, Sat, Sun: 1.30-6pm. €5 – RR: €3. www.tourjeansanspeur.com

8 rue Elzévir (3rd). M° Saint-Paul. Tel: 01 40 27 07 21. Daily: 10am-6pm, except Mon and public hols. Permanent collections: free. www.cognacq-jay.paris.fr

33


PARISIAN NIGHTS

This capital never sleeps. From ‘happy hour’ – the bell rings in some bars between 6pm and 8pm for a reduced-price aperitif –, to the rest of the night for those who like to dance until dawn, one-off night revellers or regular night birds will find everything they could wish for on the Paris night scene. Night transport Taxis are available at any of the 134 taxi ranks around the city (indicated by a sign marked with a ‘T’ on a blue background). They can also be ordered by telephone or haled in the street if the light shows green. The Parisian metro operates from 5.30am or 6am in the morning, according to line. In the week, the last metro runs between 12.40am and 1.15am, according to line, and between 1.40am and 2.15 am on Friday, Saturday and the night before public holidays. This is also the case for the RER and the tramway. On certain occasions (31 December, Fête de la musique, 14 July – Bastille Day) it is even free and operates all night! Information at: www.ratp.fr The Noctilien is a night bus service with 42 lines operating from 12.30am to 5.30am, throughout Île-de-France. In Paris, the network is linked to the 5 major stations (Châtelet, gares de l’Est, de Lyon, Montparnasse, Saint-Lazare) and services the Champs-Élysées, Bastille, République, Place d’Italie, etc. Information at: www.noctilien.fr

34

Discos

Machine du Moulin Rouge (La)

Fans of house and techno, as well as tango, mambo and disco will find clubs for dancing from 11pm to dawn, in atmospheres that cover all the ranges: select, off-beat, musette, electric, tropical, etc. Many nightclubs organise theme nights, or afternoon dances that are sometimes free for ladies. A few addresses:

90 bd de Clichy (18th). M° Blanche. Tel: 01 53 41 88 89. www.lamachinedumoulinrouge.com

Arc Paris (L’) 12 rue de Presbourg (16th). M° Charles-de-Gaulle – Étoile. Tel: 01 45 00 78 70. www.larc-paris.com

Bains Douches (Les) 7 rue du Bourg-l’Abbé (3rd). M° Étienne-Marcel. Tel: 01 53 01 40 60.

Baron (Le) 6 av. Marceau (8th). M° Alma – Marceau. Tel: 01 47 20 04 01.

Bus Palladium 6 rue Fontaine (9th). M° Blanche. Tel: 01 53 21 07 33.

Duplex 2 bis av. Foch (16th). M° Charles-de-Gaulle – Étoile. Tel: 01 45 00 45 00.

El Globo 8 bd de Strasbourg (10th). M° Strasbourg-Saint-Denis. Tel: 01 42 41 55 70.

Queen (Le) 102 av. des Champs-Élysées (8th). M° George-V. Tel: 01 53 890 890.

Regine’s 49-51 rue de Ponthieu (8th). M° Franklin D.-Roosevelt. Tel: 01 43 59 21 13.

VIP Room Theater 188 bis rue de Rivoli (1st). M° Palais-Royal – Musée-du-Louvre. Tel: 01 58 36 46 00.

Bars There are ‘lounge’ atmospheres and velvet settees, the lively Irish pubs, bars of top hotels, live music performances and more … Except in the case of special dispensation, bars close at 2am in the morning. Information at parisinfo.com, rubric “Restaurants & Cafes”.

Gay discos and bars Paris is an open and tolerant city, where everyone can be themselves. There is a vast number of gay or gay-friendly addresses, often situated around Châtelet, the Hôtel de Ville, and especially in the Marais district. Information at parisinfo.com, rubric “Practical Paris”.


Paris loves cinema and film shoots regularly take place in the streets and apartments of the capital (920 in 2010). The capital has almost 110 cinemas. In addition to mainstream films, many cinemas screen art-house films, documentaries and films for children. And for cinema fans, the festival Paris cinema (from 2 to 13 July 2011) is the not-to-bemissed summer event. At the price of €5 for every film, it is possible to enjoy previews, and short and full-length films. Information on www.pariscinema.org

Forum des Images

PARISNIGHTLIFE.FR In Paris the night belongs to those who go to bed late! Parisnightlife.fr, devised by the Paris City Council in collaboration with the federation of cabarets and night clubs, is a unique bilingual (French/ English) information resource about the Paris nightlife scene. It combines a map-guide – available at art, music and entertainment venues, the Paris Convention and Visitors Bureau information centres, train stations, youth hostels, etc. – and an innovative website www.parisnightlife.fr offering multiple search criteria (dates, hours, arrondissement, type of music and public …) and a map of places and events for nightlife in the capital. Everything you need to know about Parisian nightlife at your fingertips!

MK2 Bibliothèque 128-162 av. de France (13th). M° Bibliothèque-François-Mitterrand. Tel: 0 892 69 84 84 (€0.34/min). www.mk2.com

Porte Saint-Eustache. Forum des Halles (1st). M° Châtelet-les-Halles. www.forumdesimages.fr

Pagode

Géode

Paris Story ! +

Cité des sciences et de l’industrie. 26 av. Corentin-Cariou (19th). M° Porte-de-la-Villette. Tel: 0 892 68 45 40 (€0.34/min). www.lageode.fr

Parisian nights

Cinema

57 bis rue de Babylone (7th). M° Saint-François-Xavier. Tel: 01 45 55 48 48.

Ask for the programme! The weekly magazines Pariscope (€0.40) and L’Officiel des spectacles (€0.35), on sale at kiosks and in newsagents, give the programmes for all Parisian cinemas. The bimonthly Paris-Mômes (free supplement with the Libération newspaper) lists entertainment for children.

11 bis rue Scribe (9th). M° Opéra. Tel: 01 42 66 62 06. www.paris-story.com See p.42.

Les Étoiles du Rex – Grand Rex 1 bd Poissonnière (2nd). M° Bonne-Nouvelle. Tel: 0 892 68 05 96 (€0.34/min). www.legrandrex.com See p.40.

L’Archipel 17 bd de Strasbourg (10th). M° Strasbourg-Saint-Denis. Tel: 0 826 02 99 24 (€0.34/min). 24 bd Poissonnière (9th). M° Grands-Boulevards. Tel: 0 892 68 00 31 (€0.34/min). www.maxlinder.com

PARIS, CITY OF LIGHT For the end of year festivities, “Paris illuminates Paris”, the City commissions artists to create illuminations for more than 120 streets. The result is a captivating circuit: Milky Way, crystal rain, stream of garlands, vault of flames and other original creations decorate the night in a magical way. The Eiffel Tower sparkles at dusk throughout the year. In total, 296 sites (hotels, churches, statues, fountains, national buildings, etc.) and 33 Parisian bridges are illuminated at nightfall.

EVENT

Max Linder Panorama

35


• Palais-Royal (1st) • Madeleine (8th) • Opéra (9th) • Grands Boulevards (9th)

It’s not just the nearby Comédie-Française theatre that puts on a show – the stores in this district are entertainment enough! Admire boxes (of the musical and chocolate variety), exhibition rooms hung with silks or artful displays of goat skins, antique engravings, and much more. Rumour has it though that these elegant arcades were home to risqué goings-on, where scooters now fly by. And if the truth be told, many a man has been ruined by dancing girls from the Opera House.

PARIS

GLAMOROUS

Witness Paris in all its splendour of gold, marble and crystal. Admire the dome of the Opera House, the rue Royale and rue de la Paix, English tailors, tearooms, prestigious hotels, bellboys, the diamonds of Place Vendôme, and the gardens of the Palais-Royal.

And, of course, there are the grands boulevards, these broad avenues with buzzing music halls, cafe-theatres, and numerous shows with a cheeky edge. Like the big department stores, which illuminate the boulevard Haussmann, this is the centre of chic with a sprinkling of stardust. Everything seems much more refined under the stained-glass art nouveau cupolas! That’s what the Belle Époque was all about, and it’s alive and well in this part of Paris.


AI

ITÉ

Rambuteau

Châtelet Q

.D L’AUXERROIS M É G E L A IS

N

SER

RU

IE

ED ER IVO

LI

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

Passage Bourg-l’Abbé Passage Brady Passage du Caire Pas. Choiseul/Ste-Anne Galeries Colbert/Vivienne Passage du Grand-Cerf Passage Jouffroy Galerie de la Madeleine Passage des Panoramas Passage des Princes Passage Verdeau Galerie Véro-Dodat

Opéra (lines 3, 7, 8) • Madeleine (lines 8, 12, 14) • Palais-Royal (lines 1, 7) • Grands-Boulevards (lines 8, 9) • Pyramides (lines 7, 14) • Tuileries (line 1)

DON’T MISS Palais Garnier – Opéra national de Paris The Opera House was inaugurated under the Third Republic, following fifteen years of setbacks, including the nightmarish discovery by the architect Charles Garnier, of an underground expanse of water. This rather deep lake, the stage for executions during the Commune, was the inspiration for writer Gaston Leroux’s Phantom of the Opera. But let’s start with the main auditorium, with its ceiling painted by Chagall, its eight-ton crystal chandelier, and purple velvet seats set around an Italian-style stage, where operas and ballets are performed. The vestibules and main staircase going up to the auditorium are made of marble and filled with sculptures of harps and lyres leading the dance. Outside, Baroque and neo-Renaissance styles intertwine above a flight

of steps that are a popular place for people to meet up.

Place de l’Opéra (9th). M° Opéra. Tel: 892 89 90 90 (€0.34/min). Daily: 10am-4.30pm, except for matinees and exceptional events. €9 – RR: €5. Under 10s, Pass’Opera Jeunes, carte culture: free. www.operadeparis.fr

Place de la Madeleine The square surrounding the church also bears its name. Thoughts turn quickly to the little sponge cakes known as “madeleines”, which Marcel Proust made famous many years after having lived at no.9. The square seems to have been given over to gourmet pleasures since 1854 when a certain Ferdinand Hédiard opened a delicatessen store here, joined in 1886 by that of Auguste Fauchon and followed by chocolate, truffle and caviar houses…

DID YOU KNOW?

?

Fish, fed by the scene shifters, glide through the underground waters of the Opera House and bees, from two hives on the roof, collect their nectar in the nearby Tuileries gardens.

37

GLAMOROUS PARIS

DEN

OUR

S T-

ASB

FBG

DU

STR

DE

RUE

BD

S T- D

RUE

L

OPO

AST

SÉB

DE

ONO

LouvreRivoli ST-GERMAIN-

G

IS

EV IL LE R. D’ HA UT

R. DU FBG POISS ONNIÈ RE EIL

RU E MO NT OR GU

VRE LOU DU R.

AI D U LO UV RE

S T- H

2

E N IS

R IC

DE RUE

QU

RUE

2

BD

OT

HEL

IE U

IB E SCR RUE

RU LA E D PA E IX

E YA L ER O RU

M

RS

Q VO UAI LTA IR E

Palais Royal Musée du Louvre

ES ED S RU ALLE H

IVE

Les Halles

12 LOUVRE DES ANTIQUAIRES

JARDIN DU

CE

E

ER

ED EL ’UN

5

RTR

-G ST 250 m

DE

SE S T U I L E R I ECARROUSEL A . IN E S FR AN

S

R.

DU CH ÂT EA PORTE BD D U Bonne E BO D’ EA Nouvelle N O U V E L LN N E ST-DENIS PORTE BD U E S T- D E N IS ST-MARTIN B O ULEV Y ÉR UKIR A RD L S StrasbourgT- M A C BO R T IN DE A 3 St-Denis R. R. D’ Temple R Sentier . R É A U M U O R B IG TUR R DE Étienne Réaumur- . R É A U M U R . R Marcel Sébastopol IG O R. É T IE N 6 1 URB Arts et Métiers NE E T MAR R. D CEL Passages and galeries

TMA

BD

RU

AI

Bourse

JARDINS DU PALAIS ROYAL

DÉCORATIFS AI

9

MON

QU

Musée d’Orsay

RA

i

É L’O P

É

Pyramides PLACE DE R RU E D Tuileries U E OBÉLISQUE ST ER -H I VO LA CONCORDE ON LI OR É JARDIN DES MUSÉE TUILERIES DES ARTS

TRE

RUE

OR

R PET UE DE IT S S CHA MP

DE

ON

Concorde

QU

4

UE

ES T- H

. DU Q

Opéra U AT R E S E P T EMB R Quatre-Septembre E

N AV E

RU

10

Château d’Eau

A NT

ES

Madeleine

IE N S

Grands Boulevards

GE

RB E E B D D A D E L E IN LA M

8

PLACE DE L’OPÉRA R

ITA L

7

BD ONTM AR

MA

HE

OLYMPIA

ES BD D

RUE RICHER

11

DE

LES

Chaussée Richelieud’Antin DrouotM

BD

MA

Auber

TTE

R. DR OU

BD

E BD HA F AY U S S M GRANDS MAGASINS U E L A ANN R

R. DES MAT HUR INS


COVERED ARCADES At the beginning of the 19th century, Haussmann redesigned Paris. Built for the crowds thronging the cafe terraces and theatres along the boulevards, covered shopping arcades were a huge success with their boutiques of Chinese ornaments, curiosities and gifts, along with tea, chocolate and coffee houses. They were the meeting places for the elegantly dressed, a haven from wet weather. Then came the department stores. With the magic of electricity and pavements the passageways

Église de la Madeleine

became less fashionable, and some were demolished. Indulge yourself! These ‘human aquariums’, as the French writer Aragon described them, still offer an original shopping experience complete with wonderful wood panelling: discover the exciting creations of Passage Vivienne or Passage du Grand-Cerf; marble, art and knowledge await you in the Galeries Véro-Dodat and Colbert, while the prints, sepia photos and antique toys in passages Verdeau and Jouffroy contrast with the kitsch bazaar in the passage des Panoramas …

DID YOU KNOW?

?

To the right of the church, the Madeleine public toilets are free of charge and in the purest art nouveau style. The construction of the Madeleine church was fraught with drama. Scarcely had work begun in 1764, than it was stopped. Begun again in 1777, only to be interrupted by the French Revolution, before being restarted under Napoléon, who altered the plans to make the building a pantheon to the glory of his armies. The building was designated a place of worship again and the church was completed in 1842. With no bell tower or cross on the outside, it’s more like a Greek temple, with two monumental doors and a forest of Corinthian columns. From the top of the steps is a view worthy of Olympia: firstly the rue Royale, with its luxury goods and prestigious addresses, then the Obelisk at Concorde and beyond, looking in the same direction, yet another temple, the Palais Bourbon. 38

Place de la Madeleine (8th). M° Madeleine. Tel: 01 44 51 69 00. Daily: 9.30am-7pm.

Place Vendôme

Louis XIV had desired a grandiose setting to embody absolute power at the heart of Paris. And Napoléon was quick to replace the king’s statue, dismantled in 1792, with a bronze column made from 1,200 enemy canons. However, since the Second Empire, the square, an octagonal gem of classic urban design, has changed

its affinities. Politics have given way to luxury, and the great names in jewellery have made Place Vendôme and the adjoining rue de la Paix a continuous stream of diamonds, rubies and emeralds. Place des Victoires Before being given over to the cult of fashion and local fashion designers, this almost perfect circle was an important place for royal adoration. In order to curry favour with the king, the Marquis de la Feuillade designed the square to house a triumphant statue of the monarch. Louis was delighted but the courtier died in financial ruin.

DID YOU KNOW?

?

Behind Place des Victoires, the military successes of Louis XIII were celebrated in the basilica of Notre-Damedes-Victoires on the pretty Place des Petits-Pères.


DISCOVER Palais-Royal Richelieu started the saga by building his residence here; Louis XIV inherited it and gave it to his brother. Philippe d’Orléans and his son extended it. In 1780, the indebted Philippe Égalité opened up the area around the gardens to commerce: sixty buildings supported by arcades were built to house the stores. Prostitution, gambling and scandal took hold of the palace. And as the police were not authorised to operate there, it became a bastion for revolutionary unrest until 1793. The peaceful Palais-Royal now houses the Ministry of Culture and several institutions, some very chic boutiques, gourmet restaurants and a garden planted with four rows of lime trees. Although the striped Buren columns almost reignited the revolution here in 1986.

Place du Palais-Royal (1st). M° Palais-Royal – Musée-du-Louvre. www.monuments-nationaux.fr

1 place Colette (1st). M° Palais-Royal – Musée-du-Louvre. Res: 0 825 10 16 80. www.comedie-francaise.fr

Les Étoiles du Rex – Grand Rex Founded in 1932 on the Grands Boulevards, the Grand Rex, a listed building, is one of the largest cinemas in Europe with its 2,800 seats under a star-studded ceiling, its Mediterranean baroque decor and art deco facade. The 50-minutes audioguided and interactive show Les Étoiles du Rex reveals the behind-the scenes of cinema, from the shooting to the screening of a film: archive images, special effects room, sound effects room and projection room, etc. 1 bd Poissonnière (2nd). M° Bonne-Nouvelle. Visits in French, English, Italian, German, Spanish and Russian. Tel: 01 45 08 93 58. Wed to Sun and public hols: 10am-7pm. Daily during sch hols. €9.80 – RR under 12s: €8. www.legrandrex.com

Grévin +

Choco-Story Le musée gourmand du Chocolat The museum explores the 4,000 years of the history, making and secrets of this delicious product. Smooth creamy chocolate from Costa Rica, fruity from Peru or mild flavours from Vanuatu … tasting essential. 28 bd Bonne-Nouvelle (10th). M° Bonne-Nouvelle. Tel: 01 42 29 68 60. Daily: 10am-6pm. €9 – TR: €6/8. www.museeduchocolat.fr

Comédie-Française Here are two words that inspire respect: Comédie-Française. And you’re right here! This theatre is home to the prestigious French theatre group, the Comédiens-Français. And it’s here, on the corner of Palais-Royal, that the theatre’s permanent troupe, originating from the union of two troupes – Molière’s and that of the Hôtel de Bourgogne – in 1680, has performed the French repertory since the end of the 18th century. Candelabras and busts of great writers escort you to the padded doors of the red and gold auditorium. Shhh! 40

Each new arrival is elected by a panel of personalities. Then follows a sitting, a wax and resin moulding, make-up, costume and accessories. Since 1882, the waxworks museum has been producing and displaying wax figures of great historical figures and stars of sport, the arts, science and politics. 250 personalities! Michael Jackson, Jimi Hendrix, Einstein and Louis XIV all under the same roof! 10 bd Montmartre (9th). M° Grands-Boulevards. Tel: 01 47 70 85 05. Mon to Fri: 10am-6.30pm. Sat, Sun, sch and public hols: 10am-7pm. Last admission 1hr before closing time. €21. 6-14 yrs: €13. RR: €18/€10. www.grevin.com


1€

ee e f TP nc 2 - O tra 201 en /06/ ult il 30 ad unt an Valid

History, demonstration and tasting Open every day from 10 am to 6 pm. Last entrance at 5 pm Adults : 9€ • Students, over 65’s, groups : 8€ • Kids 6 to 12 years : 6€ (Free for children under 6) Metro: Bonne Nouvelle or Strasbourg Saint-Denis Bus: numbers 20, 39 or 48; bus stop Poissonnière – Bonne Nouvelle or Porte Saint-Denis Choco-Story - Le musée gourmand du Chocolat - 28, bd Bonne Nouvelle - 75010 Paris Tél. : 00 33 (0) 1 42 29 68 60 - info@museeduchocolat.fr - www.museeduchocolat.fr


Pinacothèque de Paris Located in a historic venue, the Pinacothèque de Paris seeks to bring the works of civilizations and brilliant artists such as Chaïm Soutine, Georges Rouault or Suzanne Valadon and Maurice Utrillo, rarely exhibited, in France to a much wider audience. 2,000 sq.m. are devoted to exhibitions, partly sourced from private collections. 28 place de la Madeleine (8th). M° Madeleine. Tel: 01 42 68 02 01. Daily: 10.30am-7.30pm. Wed: open until 9.30pm. Some public hols: 2pm-7.30pm. €10 – RR: €8. Under 12s: free. www.pinacotheque.com

Musée Maxim’s Maxim’s was chic and decadent in 1900. During the Belle Époque, courtesans lounged in the rooms above the restaurant, which have been recreated for this museum with objects from Pierre Cardin’s art nouveau collection. Discover suggestive paintings, Tiffany lamps, a table set for an intimate supper and a bed carved by Majorelle, evoking the rustle of petticoats of the famous beauty Otéro. 3 rue Royale (8th). M° Concorde. Tel: 01 42 65 30 47. Wed to Sun: 2-5.30pm. Public hols: closed. www.maxims-musee-artnouveau.com

The Fragonard perfume museums In a wonderful Napoléon III town house, the Musée du parfum, offers a fascinating journey tracing 3,000 years of the history and technique of perfume making. The Théâtre Musée des Capucines houses the finest objects of an important private collection of perfume. Finally, at the end of a visit, it is impossible to resist products offered at factory prices.

From 4 yrs: €10 – RR: €9 – Adults: €6 – RR: €5. www.musee-en-herbe.com

Paris Story ! + Take a multimedia museum where Victor Hugo brings the history of Paris to life; add an interactive model “Paris-Miniature” and “Paris expérience” with thematic videos screened on a revolutionary 3D screen: 2,000 years in the history of the capital for you to enjoy. 11 bis rue Scribe (9th). M° Opéra. Tel: 01 42 66 62 06. Daily, every hour (translation in 14 languages): 10am-6pm. €10. 6-18s: €6. www.paris-story.com

Bibliothèque nationale – site Richelieu The library has retained the departments of Manuscripts, Maps and Plans, Music, Prints and Photography, Theatrical Arts, and Money, Medals and Antiques. Reassuringly, this venerable institution, founded in the distant era of Charles V, and established on the Richelieu site since 1721, has also preserved the throne of Dagobert, the fan of Diane de Poitiers, etc. 5 rue Vivienne (2nd). M° Bourse. Tel: 01 53 79 49 49. • Temporary exhibitions (daily except Mon) paying in the Mansart gallery (photography). • Musée des Médailles et Antiques: daily: 1-5.45pm, Sat: 1-4.45pm, Sun: noon-6pm. Free. Closure of a part of the departments until 2014: contact for information. www.bnf.fr

Bourse de Paris – palais Brongniart

Musée du parfum. 9 rue Scribe (9th). M° Opéra. Tel: 01 47 42 04 56. Mon to Sat: 9am-6pm. Sun and public hols: 9am-5pm. Free guided tour. www.fragonard.com Théâtre Musée des Capucines. 39 bd des Capucines (2nd). M° Opéra. Tel: 01 42 60 37 14. Mon to Sat: 9am-6pm. Free guided tour.

Musée en Herbe For children! Exhibitions are fun and based on games and developing sensibility, curiosity, and creativity in children. 21 rue Hérold (1st). M° Les Halles. Tel: 01 40 67 97 66. Mon to Sun: 10am-7pm.

In 1987, after over 150 years of the clamour and shouting of stockbrokers, silence finally reigned under the cupola of the Palais Brongniart. The stock exchange was computerised and today the neoclassical temple encircled with columns opens its marble hall and nave, decorated with wood panelling and frescoes, to curious visitors. Around the famous trading floor, glass cubicles and a blackboard displaying stocks and shares recreate the atmosphere of the trading floor. Rue Vivienne (2nd). M° Bourse. Tel: 01 49 27 14 70.

42


FASHION AND SHOPPING

From interior decoration to accessories for pets, from hats to gardening kits, you will find everything you could wish. There are constantly new places and ways to buy – fair trade, artisanal, on Sunday, in the evening, with a personal coach, etc. The latest trends are boutique-art galleries, bookshop-tearooms, workshop-shops and flagship stores of brands which are flourishing from the Champs-Élysées to rue de Rivoli. Take advantage of duty-free You can benefit from duty free shopping if you are not a European citizen, are over 15 years-old, and have made your purchases (€175.01 minimum) within the last three months. To be reimbursed for the VAT (value added tax), ask for “Tax-free Shopping France” receipts in the tax-free tourist stores. Have them stamped at customs and return the pink stamped copies within the three months in the pre-stamped envelope that you received when you paid for your purchase(s).

Paris Shopping Book To discover Paris on a shopping spree, ask for the free guide Paris Shopping Book published by the Paris Convention and Visitors Bureau and visit www.shoppingbyparis.com

44

Department stores

Printemps Haussmann

Beneath their art nouveau glass roofs, the boulevard Haussmann and Left Bank department stores have a legendary reputation. Together with the department stores on rue de Rivoli and at the Madeleine, they are essential places for up-market shopping. N.B.: at Christmas time their windows are decorated with magical mises en scène. A great success with the kids!

64 bd Haussmann (9th). M° Havre-Caumartin. Tel: 01 42 82 50 00. Mon to Sat: 9.35am-8pm. Late opening Thurs: 9.35am-10pm. www.printemps.com

BHV 52-64 rue de Rivoli (4th). M° Hôtel-de-Ville. Tel: 01 42 74 90 00. Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri: 9.30am-7.30pm. Wed: 9.30am-9pm. Sat: 9.30am-8pm. www.bhv.fr

Galeries Lafayette 40 bd Haussmann (9th). M° Chaussée-d’Antin – La Fayette. Tel: 01 42 82 34 56. Mon, Tues, Wed, Fri: 9.30am-8pm. Thurs: 9.30am-9pm. Sat: 9.30am-8pm. www.galerieslafayette.com

Le Bon Marché Rive Gauche 24 rue de Sèvres (7th). M° Sèvres-Babylone. Tel: 01 44 39 80 00. Mon, Tues, Wed, Sat: 10am-8pm. Thurs, Fri: 10am-9pm. www.lebonmarche.com

Les Trois Quartiers 23 bd de la Madeleine (1st). M° Madeleine. Tel: 01 42 97 80 12. Mon to Sat: 10am-8pm.

Shopping galleries Fashion, beauty, DIY, well-being, sport, culture, high-tech ‘toys’ … not forgetting those gourmet interludes, and everything under one roof!

Bercy Village Cour Saint-Émilion (12th). See p.87.

Carrousel du Louvre 99 rue de Rivoli (1st). M° Palais-Royal – Musée-du-Louvre. Tel: 01 43 16 47 10. Daily: 10am-8pm. Restaurants: daily 8.30am-8pm. www.carrouseldulouvre.com

Forum des Halles 1-7 rue Pierre-Lescot (1st). M° Châtelet-les-Halles. Mon to Sat: 10am-8pm. Tel: 01 44 76 96 56. www.forumdeshalles.com See p.33.

Maine-Montparnasse Tour Maine-Montparnasse (14th). M° Montparnasse – Bienvenüe.

Shopping galleries Champs-Élysées Arcades du Lido, Berri, Claridge, Rond-Point des Champs-Élysées (8th). M° Franklin-D.-Roosevelt.


Madeva – Paris

Sguardo

12-14 rue du Havre (9th). M° Saint-Lazare.

18 rue Ferdinand-Duval (4th). M° Saint-Paul. Tel: 06 99 42 05 35. www.madeva.fr Limited series of women’s clothes from small Parisian workshops.

20 rue Danielle-Casanova (2nd). M° Pyramides. Tel: 01 47 03 43 72. www.sguardo-paris.com Costume jewellery by French designers, shoes, bags, etc.

Maison Caillau

Stock shops and brand outlets

On Sunday as well! For relaxing shopping, Paris has several areas (often pedestrianized) that are open on Sunday: the Marais, Montmartre, around the canal Saint-Martin or even at the Saint-Ouen flea market … If you’re looking for something at one of the big chain stores or themed boutiques, then the Champs-Élysées, the Carrousel du Louvre, Bercy Village or La Vallée Village are the places to go. N.B.: a certain number of shops are open on the five Sundays leading up to the end of year festive season.

Boutiques There is something for everyone amongst Paris’s 17,000 shops. Some shopping streets boast a large number: rues des Archives, des Francs-Bourgeois, du Commerce, des Gardes, etc.

1.2.3 www.1-2-3.fr Urban chic mixes with Parisian elegance. 12 shops in Paris.

Boutiques des aéroports de Paris – Buy Paris Duty free (Aelia) www.aeroportsdeparis.fr 80 duty-free shops at the airports of Roissy Charles-de-Gaulle and Orly.

124 rue du FaubourgSaint-Honoré (8th). M° Miromesnil. Tel: 01 43 59 06 86. Specialist in quality hair accessories.

L’Occitane Tel: 01 55 35 17 00. www.loccitane.com Skincare, body care, natural and authentic fragrances. 22 boutiques in Paris.

Paris France Products 82 rue Chardon-Lagache (16th). M° Exelmans. Tel: 01 46 47 67 32. www.souvenirsofparis.com Online sales of souvenirs of Paris and France.

Fashion and shopping

Passage du Havre

Ready-to-wear boutiques offer articles at discount prices or from previous collections with substantial reductions on the original price. In Paris, there are a large number in rue d’Alésia (14th). Good discounts are also to be found in the big brand factory shops around Paris.

Vallée Village (La) 3 cour de la Garonne. 77700 Serris. RER A Val-d’Europe. Tel: 01 60 42 35 00. Mon to Sun: 10am-7pm. www.lavalleevillage.com Stock clearance of major brands.

Paris-Mythique 43 rue des Cinq-Diamants (13th). Tel: 01 55 28 89 72. M° Corvisart. www.paris-mythique.fr Souvenirs of Paris.

Paris viaduc des Arts 1 to 129 av. Daumesnil (12th). See p.86.

Christmas à Paris

Laurence Bossion 10 rue Saint-Roch (1st). M° Tuileries, RER A Auber. Tel: 01 42 96 80 50. www.laurencebossion.com Bespoke hats and accessories.

WINTER AND SUMMER SALES These take place over a maximum of five weeks in January with “Soldes by Paris”, and in July, when shops sell off the previous season’s stock (clothes, footwear, accessories, etc.) with discounts of between 20 and 60% on the original price. Some stores open at midnight, others on Sundays. And on Saturday, everyone is out hunting for a bargain! Information: www.shoppingbyparis.com

EVENT

7 rue de Condé (6th). M° Odéon. Tel: 01 43 26 36 47. www.christmas-a-paris.com Christmas decorations and original souvenirs of Paris on sale all year.

45


• Montmartre (18th) • Pigalle (9th) • Saint-Georges (9th) • Trinité (9th) • Batignolles (17th)

PARIS

VILLAGE

Following in the footsteps of a horde of street entertainers, climb the picturesque “Butte” (little hill), crowned by the Sacré-Cœur – the second most-visited site in Paris. A leisurely stroll will enable you to enjoy the pleasures of this wonderful Parisian ‘village’. And going from one ‘village’ to another you can venture as far as the popular Batignolles area, a hidden gem, before wandering through the Saint-Georges theatre district and the little Place Gustave-Toudouze. Surrounded by bell towers, the day begins at the counter of a cafe with a café crème and crusty buttered baguette. One can browse idly, filling one’s shopping basket full of delicious treats in rue Lepic, rue des Martyrs, rue Caulaincourt … and also with fabrics in rue d’Orsel and the Saint-Pierre market, and why not guitars in rue de Douai and rue Victor-Massé. Lunch is at a bistro offering simple, hot dishes or crunchy salads. And given that the village is a bit of a ‘fashion victim’, there are designer boutiques and galleries to check out amid the charcuteries and dairy shops. In the evening, you can dress up, stay casual, dance the java, enjoy the nouba or a fiesta, or just go to the movies.


R

DE LO RE TT E

E

N.-D. de Lorette

UA RT

DU

NK

ERQ

B AU

G EU

R. D E BE L

E

M RUE D ELAMARTINE E RU

RUE

LA

FOR

E FAY

RU E DU FG POISSON NIÈRE

E

R. DE RO CH EC HO

D A IN

IE R

ROD

E

R. ST-LAZAR E

RUE

ST TI AP

RS M

ROM

Trinité

ON

DA

SAINTE-TRINITÉ

HY

DE

C L IC

RUE D ES M A RTY

E-

St-Georges

TRU

RU E CON DOR DE L CET A TO RUE UR D 'A UVE RGN E M ILT

RUE

E LL

MAS

E

OR

NUE AV E

DE

LARIBOISIÈRE

H

UE

T

A NT

TA L

R. V IC T

Anvers

DE E G R. EU UB

MA

Poissonnière

TTE 250 m

DON’T MISS

Venice has its gondolas, Montmartre its steps – physically demanding but Romanesque in the extreme. Countless novels, legends and “fabulous destinies” are set in the Butte, such as the Bateau-Lavoir in Place ÉmileGoudeau, where Picasso painted the Demoiselles d’Avignon, and the cafe made famous by Amélie Poulain in rue Lepic. The grocery from the film is higher up on rue des Trois-Frères. And there’s even more climbing to do – but Montmartre’s well worth it! Walk up rue Tholozé, for example, for a film or a drink in the winter garden of a tiny cinema patronised by Buñuel and Cocteau. Pause at the top of the street under the

last remaining windmills, before continuing on up … Keep going! At the top is Sacré-Cœur, surrounded by a labyrinth of extraordinary little streets, and a vineyard, where the grape harvest is celebrated each year. There is also the flattering bust of Dalida in the square of the same name, breathtaking views over the rooftops of Paris, amazing crowds and hundreds of tranquil spots. From the square de la Turlure or the rue de la Chevalierde-la-Barre, the Sacré-Cœur is just as wonderful from the side, the back or the front! Basilique du Sacré-Cœur

In 1873, the National Assembly voted for the construction of a basilica devoted to the Sacred

Heart on the butte Montmartre. The site was chosen as much for its altitude (127 metres) as for its symbolism; it was sanctified long before with the martyrdom of Saint Denis and sullied by the violent acts of the Commune, in 1870. Pitfalls, controversies, underground quarries, and 83 buried pillars caused the work to extend over forty years. All these efforts were rewarded! From below, the RomanoByzantine contours take on the appearance of a whippedcream palace set on a hill of gardens and terraces: green and white outlined against swathes of azure. The view from the top of the steps, and especially from the top of the dome, is simply stunning. Parvis du Sacré-Cœur (18th). M° Anvers. Tel: 01 53 41 89 00. Basilica: 6am-11pm. www.sacre-coeur-montmartre.com

47

VILLAGE PARIS

ONN

I ER S

BARBÈS

IS S S P O

DE

UE

RU E DE CL IG NA

BOULEVARD R

R. P. ALB ERT D

AR

R. DE LA GOUTTE D'O

Abbesses (line 12) • Pigalle (lines 2, 12) • Barbès-Rochechouart (lines 2, 4) • Anvers (line 2) xxx • Place-de-Clichy (lines 2, 13) • Trinité (line 12) • Saint-Georges (line 12) • Blanche (line 2)

Butte Montmartre

HA

ON

i

Pigalle

TR

-B

R. S O FD E

UD HO R.

Y

NO

AN

R. R ON S

RÈ R E

CO UR T

T CO AIN UL

C PI LE E E NCH R. B LA

IS F

IA PL. Barbès Abbesses ST-PIERRE L E S R Rochechouart ÉLYSÉE R . D 'O T AR MONTMARTRE U HO HEC RO C LA CIGALE DE R. R. DU DELTA BD

R.

JE

G UR BO RS

TRO

GE

TE

ED ES

R. MYR

MA

PE

RU

ER ULL R. M R. A. DE L SA RT E

DE

S T-

ICH

E

DE

RUE

RU E L O D' AT HÈ NE S ND RE S

HE

RUE

NC R . B LA

ED E

AB R. D BE ES SS ES VÉ RO N

E

AIN NT

R. CH AP

R. DE LIÈGE

U

R. DU PE RR É

HY

RU

CL

FO

C L IC

R IN

E

E D E

RUE D'AMSTERDAM

TU

ROM

RU

E

DE R.

PLACE U A I A. MAX C AR . D E LA IS R. B ALL U

DE

E E D

DE

Liège

L IÈ G

Blanche

RUE

RU

RUE

Europe

E R. D

BD DO

RU

RU

Place de Clichy DE

EA

RE

Château Rouge

BD

IG N

IST

S

Y L IC H T DE C BIO E RU

BD

B AT DES

R. D E E MA J.

I

R.

ES OLL

MOULIN DE EG A R LA GALETTE R Funicula ire

TT

UR

RU

IC

P CAU IGA LD

E

LE P

FOU

NN

R.

RU

R. D L A R OE C HE

GA

U E LO

E RU

R AL V CA

ER

AV.

CI

R.

ER

A R A C V. HEL

M

N RO

CA

La Fourche

RCK

CIMETIÈRE DE MONTMARTRE

HY

AMA

IC

R. L

CL

TRE

LE

E

E MAIS

R.

R.J. D

AV .D


Place du Tertre Welcome to picture-postcard Montmartre, with its restaurant terraces and artists’ easels and portrait painters, who share 140 allotted spaces – 1 sq.m. for two artists working alternately. But the historic village square merits a little tour. The commune of Montmartre established its town hall at no.3, in 1790; no.19 is the headquarters of the Commune libre du Vieux Montmartre, which organises fun events and was founded in 1920. Another institution is the cafe Chez la mère Catherine where the word ‘bistro’ was said to have originated, in 1814. “Hurry” cried the occupying Russian soldiers,

eager to down a drink before rejoining their ranks. The waitresses thought they were simply asking for something to drink … Standing serenely at the centre of all this activity, the adjoining church of Saint-Pierre de Montmartre conceals the Roman vestiges of the Abbaye des Dames. Moulin-Rouge® Montmartre hill once bristled with windmills. They closed one after the other, while the Moulin de la Galette became a popular dance hall. In 1889, another opened with just the exterior decor of a windmill. Soon the French Cancan – black stockings, garters and petticoats – created an air of

euphoria and stardom for La Goulue and her fellow dancers. The first revues were staged and, in 1907, a certain Mistinguett began her music-hall career. After the war, a new generation of artists arrived, including Edith Piaf, Montant, Trenet and Aznavour... Every evening, glitz, feathers and sequins continue to weave their magic at the Moulin Rouge. 82 bd de Clichy (18th). M° Blanche.

DISCOVER

48

Pigalle

Espace Dalí +

From Place d’Anvers to Place de Clichy, night revellers, neon lights and illuminated signs ensure that, almost for as long as Paris has existed, this area never sleeps. In the Paris of yesteryear, wine, taxed at the entry to the city, was more expensive. So, Montmartre was the lively out-of-town place to go with its mix of lower classes, artists, young women and free thinkers. Later, the village was absorbed into the capital but the rowdiness continued. Piano-bars, night clubs, private clubs, concert halls, cafe-theatres, music halls, dinner shows, pubs, cabarets lasted for three seasons or over one hundred years. In the 1960s, Serge Gainsbourg sang ‘les petits gars de Liverpool’ causing a sensation at the Bus Palladium. Others followed. When the Paris of Jacques Dutronc ‘awakes’ at 5am, Place Blanche – at the end of turbulent rue Fontaine – often looks the worse for wear. But after a short rest, all is well again.

300 works by the major Catalan artist in a scenography alternating sound and light. Engravings, sculptures and surrealist furniture, including the famous Montres Molles, Alice in Wonderland, the Mae West lip sofa, The Space Elephant and an array of fantastic creatures, recreating the phantasmagorias of Salvador Dalí. On certain dates, workshops initiate children into the playful creativity of the great surrealist. 11 rue Poulbot (18th). M° Abbesses, Anvers. Tel: 01 42 64 40 10. Daily: 10am-6pm. July and Aug: 10am-8pm. Audioguides available for hire. €10 – RR: €7/€6. Under 8s: free. www.daliparis.com

Cimetière de Montmartre Lovers of Montmartre come to the cemetery to admire the outdoor art, catch a glimpse of the sun, watch the squirrels hopping between maple trees or to make the acquaintance of a string of poets, generals, thinkers, inventors and the Lady of the Camellias. Discover Vigny, Nijinsky or Guitry in a labyrinth of mossy rows and irregular stone steps. Cross the path of stray tomcats, a bust of Rodin, the bridge of Caulaincourt and finally, Alexandre Dumas, Zola, Degas and Dalida. Then, it’s off again to look for Poulbot, Truffaut and Feydeau. Up above the statues


and carved chapels, and the tombs of Stendhal and Berlioz, a brood of young sparrows chirp high in the chestnut trees. Eleven enchanting hectares.

12 rue Cortot (18th). M° Anvers, Lamarck-Caulaincourt. Tel: 01 49 25 89 39. Daily: 11am-6pm except Mon, 25 Dec and 1 Jan. €8 – RR: €6, under 12s: free. www.museedemontmartre.fr

Jardin sauvage Saint-Vincent

Musée de Montmartre In the 17th century, this folly was a country house belonging to the actor Rosimond, Molière’s successor. Much later, Auguste Renoir, Raoul Dufy, Francisque Poulbot, Suzanne Valadon and her son Maurice Utrillo had their studios here. Today, the house enables you to discover a chapter of history, complete with cabaret signs and dance posters. The Chat Noir, the Lapin Agile, the dances at the Moulin-Rouge and the Moulin de la Galette, and the Divan Japonais were the top spots. The cabaret singer Aristide Bruant also brought a crowd of night-revelling poets. La Goulue, Jane Avril, Nini Patte-en-l’air and other stage goddesses posed for Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Théophile Steinlen, Adolphe Willette and other artists.

GET A RIDE! Give the steps a miss with Promotrain. Children will be delighted, and parents too. For the price of a metro ticket, but without a commentary, the funicular will take you from the bottom to the top of Sacré-Cœur and the Montmartrobus makes the ascent from Place Pigalle to the 18th arrondissement city hall, in Place Jules-Joffrin. Promotrain + Les petits trains de Montmartre 131 rue de Clignancourt (18th). M° Simplon. Tel: 01 42 62 24 00. www.promotrain.fr

For a long time, this sloping parcel of land was overgrown with alders, foxgloves, brambles, ivy and wildlife. One day the city’s landscape gardeners decided to make it into a garden again. But impressed by the wild natural beauty of the site, spades and secateurs were put to one side. The decision was taken to preserve this fragile and poetic site as a place for observing the ecosystem and biodiversity, the trees, the charm of wild flowers, etc.

Musée Gustave-Moreau

14 rue de la Rochefoucauld (9th). M° Trinité. Tel: 01 48 74 38 50. Daily: 10am-5.15pm, except Tues, 1 Jan, 1 May and 25 Dec. €5 – RR: €3. Under 18s, 18-25 yrs EU and 1st Sun of the month: free. www.musee-moreau.fr

Place de Clichy In 1814, Marshal Moncey and his troops bravely defended the former “Place de la barrière de Clichy” against the invading Russians. Today, this lively and popular square at the crossroads of four arrondissements – reputed for its brasseries and cinemas – has regained its former calm after important renovation works that give more place to pedestrians. M° Place de Clichy.

50

PASS

At a time of world-stage museums, here is the exclusive domain of an artist, laid-out by himself, in his family home. At the end of his life, Gustave Moreau assembled precious memorabilia in a ‘little sentimental museum’ on the first floor. In 1895, he had two huge glazed workshops built on the upper floors, linked by a fine spiral staircase of wrought-iron steps. On the plum-pink walls there are some 5,000 wooden-framed drawings, and on the ceilings your eyes are drawn to admire Italian-style, symbolist and fauvist paintings …: a fantastical body of work.


A tree-lined path, a rectangular flower garden, a little mansion far from the buzz of the city: this is where the painter and sculptor Ary Scheffer lived from 1830 to 1858. Delacroix, George Sand, Chopin dropped in as neighbours; the whole of the intellectual and artistic world of Paris (Liszt, Rossini, Turgenev, Dickens, etc.) frequented his workshop-salon. Even today, as you go from room to room, Chopin will accompany you with his piano as you discover George Sand, and the paintings of Ary Scheffer and his contemporaries. 16 rue Chaptal (9th). M° Saint-Georges. Tel: 01 55 31 95 67. Daily: 10am-6pm, except Mon and public hols. Free permanent collections. www.vie-romantique.paris.fr

DID YOU KNOW?

?

Around 1820, neoclassical houses were built in and around rue Chaptal. Grecomania was all the rage, and the architecture was nicknamed “Nouvelle Athènes” (New Athens). Painters, writers, poets and actors were attracted to the area and soon the whole neighbourhood of Saint-Georges – the epicentre of artistic life – took on the new name. Musée de l’Érotisme

Eroticism is an art and it needed a showcase. Pigalle was the obvious home for these statuettes, amulets, saucy photos, satirical sketches, little tantric totems, painted, modelled, sculpted and engraved idols. Two rounded Buddhas form the entrance to this arousing but never shocking world, where 2,000 objects displayed over seven exhibition floors and from all over the world, explore popular, contemporary and sacred erotic art.

VILLAGE PARIS

Musée de la Vie romantique

Parc Clichy-Batignolles Martin-Luther-King This park – open but still being laid out – will be the biggest green area in the north-west of Paris. It will need 624 trees, 5,600 shrubs, 200 climbing plants, 51,000 perennial plants and aquatic plants, 47,000 bulbs, 8,400 sq.m. lawned areas, 25,000 sq.m. of gardens, 2,900 sq.m. of ornamental ponds, and 3,460 sq.m. of play areas for children and adolescents to embellish it. The park’s three themes will be sport, water and the seasons. 172 rue Cardinet (17th). M° Brochant.

Quartier des Batignolles Considered a quiet neighbourhood, with its market, church, garden and brand new Clichy-Batignolles park. Batignolles was annexed to Paris in 1860. At the time, this ancient hamlet between the city and fields, close to Montmartre, offered cheap living for artists. Impressionism took form here in a cafe frequented by Manet, Degas, Cézanne, Monet and Renoir. This was not just a centre for artists, and writers Zola, Verlaine, Max Jacob, Éluard and Simenon also lived here. And as you stroll down the rue des Dames and rue des Batignolles, something tells you that these windows, tables and welcoming cafe counters are still a refuge for tamed bohemians and a slower pace of life.

Square des Batignolles Its grotto, waterfall and a miniature lake, where black swans ruffle their feathers, make this English-style garden appear much larger than it is. Among the things to see are a Turkish hazel tree, swings, a sweets kiosk, a lemon tree, carp, a sequoia, a skate area, a sculpture in black stone from Volvic and table-tennis tables.

72 bd de Clichy (18th). M° Blanche. Tel: 01 42 58 28 73. Daily: 10-2am. €9. www.musee-erotisme.com

51


Place des Abbesses There are lifts for passengers at the deepest underground station in Paris – it is thirty metres below ground – but hale and hearty walkers are encouraged to climb the fresco-painted steps before emerging exhausted into the little square to catch their breath on one of the benches. In a glance, one takes in the art nouveau metro entrance by Hector Guimard, the merry-go-round, the cast-iron street lights and the Wallace fountain. In the adjoining Square Jéhan-Rictus, kids play at the foot of a wall in enamelled lava, where “I love you” is declared in 311 languages. Opposite, the church Saint-Jeanl’Évangéliste, nicknamed Notre-Dame-des-Briques (Our-Lady-of-Bricks) since 1904, mixes Byzantine and art nouveau influences. On both sides of rue des Abbesses, rue Durantin, and rue de la Vieuville, and rue Yvonne-le-Tac … trendy local boutiques rub shoulders with cafe terraces, where it is nice to do nothing more than watch the world go by.

under the circle of the mezzanine. This is also the place to come for shows and concerts in the auditorium, activity trails for children and, of course, for the 600 items in the Max Fourny collection, representing Naive art from the 1970s.

2 rue Ronsard (18th). M° Abbesses. Tel: 01 42 58 72 89. Daily: 10am-6pm, except 1 Jan, 1 May, 14 July, 15 Aug and 25 Dec. Aug: 12-noon to 6pm, except Sat and Sun. Temporary exhibitions: €7.50 – RR: €6. www.hallesaintpierre.org

DID YOU KNOW?

?

At number 21, Place du Tertre, the tourist office of Old Montmartre will tell you everything there is to know about the Butte, and offers a programme of guided visits and events.

21 place du Tertre (18th). M° Abbesses. Tel: 01 42 62 21 21. Daily 10am-7pm, except 1 May www.montmartre-guide.com

Avenue Junot and villa Léandre Still on the hillside of the Butte, but beyond the sculpture of the Passe-Muraille – in the square where its creator Marcel Aymé once lived – is the start of avenue Junot with its cubic art deco unfussy architecture, the beauty of pure forms, and harmony of volumes, as at no.15, the house built in 1926 for the dada poet Tristan Tzara. Further on, there is a new change of scene at Villa Léandre, where you can wander around in a fairytale setting between two rows of red and white brick Anglo-Norman pavilions with painted shutters, arbors and chocolate-box London-style gardens. Halle Saint-Pierre – musée d’Art brut, Art singulier et outsider Below the Sacré-Cœur, the Saint-Pierre fabric market is gaily-coloured and its neighbouring covered multicoloured market offers popular, naive and unusual art. Built in 1868 by a disciple of Baltard, this ancient covered market houses a cheerful cultural centre. Stop by for a snack or a coffee, amidst the canvasses and works exhibited by the gallery or to flick through the colourful art books in the bookshop, 52

Marché Barbès

On Saturday mornings under the overhead metro, the boulevard de la Chapelle is home to a colorful market, where Africans in boubous, dazed night-owls and Arabs in burnous rub shoulders with mothers and their young children looking for a watch, a headscarf or fruit and vegetables.

Wed: 7am-2.30pm. Sat: 7am-3pm.

Windmills of the past While the Moulin Rouge is only there for decoration, of the fifteen windmills that used to dot Montmartre, only two now remain – the Moulin de la Galette and the Moulin Radet. Their grinding stones ground grain, plaster of Paris and grapes from the Montmartre vineyard, of which a few slopes remain.


Gastronomy is king in Paris. Restaurants provide varied and refined menus to tempt the palate. And there are numerous delicatessens, caterers, bakers, wine merchants, butchers, confectioners, pastry cooks and grocers in every area of the city with delicious produce to take away. Choosing a restaurant For grande cuisine, there are the Michelin-starred top gastronomic restaurants or, more affordable, restaurants opened by chefs of French cuisine. Another trend is for table d’hôtes and canteen restaurants. Here one eats shoulder to shoulder with others, passing the salt and exchanging conversation over lunch, a wok or enormous open sandwiches. More typical, the brasseries – some of which are very chic –, bistros, and wine bars serve up regional, traditional and country cooking. They are alone worth a visit for their old-style decor and so Parisian blackboard, where menus and dishes of the day are chalked up.

Good food guide The Paris gourmand/Good food guide edited by the Paris Convention

and Visitors Bureau offers you a list of addresses classified by district and type of cooking. Ask for it at our offices!

Cosmopolitan restaurants and markets Around the rue des Rosiers, grocery stores and restaurants serve up kosher, European and oriental specialities. In the vicinity of the passage Brady, you will find India; China and the flavours of south-east Asia in the 13th and in Belleville; Japan in and around rue Sainte-Anne; tajines and couscous in Ménilmontant; South America on the montagne SainteGeneviève, and Africa and the West Indies in the Château-Rouge district.

Cooking and wine lessons Cookery workshops teach students the clever tricks of the trade of French chefs and the famous “savoir-faire” of our grandmothers. Savoury, sweet, basic or inventive, authentic, and exotic, private lessons or as a group: the choice is yours! And as a good dinner is always accompanied by a fine wine, there are courses in oenology to reveal the secrets of wine tasting. The science of wine is no longer just the preserve of a few experts. Selection of addresses at

MONTMARTRE WINE HARVEST The arrival of the latest vintages from the Butte’s vineyard has been celebrated since 1935, on the second weekend of October. Tastings, traditional parades, brass bands and street entertainment fill the village. www.fetedesvendangesdemontmartre.com

Gourmet capital

GOURMET CAPITAL

parisinfo.com, rubric “Practical Paris, learning in Paris, gastronomy courses” and in the brochures Paris se visite/Visiting Paris and Paris gourmand/Good food guide.

Fine food stores Here, you will find fresh, top-quality products, regional specialities and delicacies from all over the world. Selection of addresses on parisinfo.com, rubric “Restaurants & cafes” and in the Paris gourmand/ Good food guide.

Caterers These high-class establishments will give your soirées a festive touch with petits fours, foie gras and champagne. Culinary dishes, gateau and fine wines are chosen on the premises or ordered and then delivered. As an optional extra: waiters, wine waiter and even decoration at your home! Selection of addresses at parisinfo.com, rubric “Restaurants & cafes” and in the Paris gourmand/Good food guide.

Cheese or dessert? Both! Cheese sellers offer a large selection among the 400 varieties of French cheeses, accompanied by bread made in the traditional way or a crusty baguette. Confectionery, ice-cream and fine chocolate also have specialist shops. As for Parisian patisseries, they are famous for their deliciously tempting cakes and pastries to take away or enjoy at the shop, accompanied by a cup of tea or a hot chocolate.

53


• Musée d’Orsay (7th) • Saint-Germain-des-Prés (6th) • Luxembourg (6th) • Montparnasse (14th)

PARIS

ARTISTS’

Welcome to the Left Bank, the Babylon of beautiful things, where browsing through the pages of a fashion magazine or an art revue is an art in itself. This elegant world is sprinkled with chic and shock fashion designers, art galleries, antique galleries, literary cafes, and publishing houses with a whole string of prizes. Not surprising when you consider what the muses have given it – the Académie Française, the Théâtre de l’Odéon, the Beaux-Arts, the Musée d’Orsay, not to mention, Montparnasse which, during The Roaring Twenties, was a Mecca for artists from all over the world, before drawing them to Saint-Germain. So much to see! Everywhere, art spills over the threshold of museum-workshops and boutiques. There is the Centaure by César at the Carrefour de la Croix-Rouge, 17th-century wrought-iron balconies in rue de Buci and rue Saint-André-des-Arts, the Fontaine des Quatre Parties du monde, on avenue de l’Observatoire. And if the urban scene sets your head spinning, then go for greenery in the Luxembourg gardens, the parks of Montsouris, GeorgesBrassens and the Jardin Atlantique.


ARTISTS’ PARIS

i i

NOTREDAME

Odéon (lines 4, 10) • Assemblée-Nationale (line 12) • Sèvres-Babylone (lines 10, 12) • Montparnasse – Bienvenüe (lines 4, 6, 12, 13) • Saint-Germain-des-Prés (line 4)

DON’T MISS Musée d’Orsay +

PASS

There is no draught in this train station, just art and light! Inaugurated during the Exposition Universelle of 1900, the Orsay train station resembled “a fine arts palace” to the painter Édouard Detaille … which was what it was to become 86 years later. Unsuitable for modern trains, its deserted platforms finally closed in 1979. Plans to demolish it in 1970 were overturned just in time and it became a listed building. Its immense volumes were transformed into a museum whose canopy, nave, cupolas, pillars, iron girders and stucco decors draw unanimous praise. The huge clock in the glass roof of the central alley dominates a chronological layout over three main levels, focussing on the major artistic movements in Western art from 1848 to 1914: painting, sculpture, graphic

arts and art objects, as well as furniture, architecture and photography. The period was so productive, the collections so rich in wonderful works (and in –isms: expressionism, fauvism, etc.) that it seems impossible to cite one unique masterpiece.

1 rue de la Légion-d’Honneur (7th). M° Solférino. Tel: 01 40 49 48 14. Tues to Sun: 9.30am-6pm. Thurs: late opening until 9.45pm. €10 – RR and on late night opening (from 6pm): €7.50. Under 18s, 18-25 yrs EU and 1st Sun of the month: free. www.musee-orsay.fr

Saint-Germaindes-Prés The area is bound by the Seine, the Luxembourg gardens, the boulevard Saint-Michel and rue des Saints-Pères. Its name comes from the church, the first stones of which date back to 557. From the 1920s, the frenzied literary and art cliques gravitated towards the cafes of Saint-Germain. During the Liberation, existentialism took off, led by Camus and Sartre, while basement jazz shook the foundations with Sidney Bechet on the clarinet and the writer Boris Vian on the trumpet. Saint-Germain remains an oasis of ancient streets full of wonderful places for art, books and the latest must-have little items.

55


xxx CULT CAFES

The Café de Flore, the DeuxMagots and the Brasserie Lipp make up the golden triangle of the boulevard and Place Saint-Germain and were once the ‘headquarters’ of Sartre and Beauvoir, Éluard and Breton, Fargue and Faulkner, as well as an antechamber for politics and a second ‘office’ for publishers. What’s more, all three are listed as historical monuments

Jardin and musée du Luxembourg

Children love the Luxembourg gardens for their wooden horses, their model yachts to push along with a cane on the ornamental pond, for their refreshment kiosks, puppet theatre, ponies, etc. The wrought-iron chairs are perfect for a delightful nap below the Dames de France which form a circle of statues. What would Marie de Médicis think of the success of the palace and garden commissioned by her? At the time, the widow of Henri IV had sought to recapture a little of her native Florence. The Fontaine Médicis with all its niches and nymphs is all that remains of the Italianate grotto that she had built in 1630. The palace has become the seat for the Sénat (the upper house of the French 56

parliament). It oversees the running of the garden and the museum, which stages exhibitions on modern art and the Renaissance, of course, in memory of the Florentine queen. 19 rue de Vaugirard (6th). M° Odéon, RER Luxembourg. Tel: 01 40 13 62 00. Daily: 10am-8pm. Fri and Sat: open until 10pm. 25 Dec and 1 May: closed. www.museeduluxembourg.fr

DID YOU KNOW?

?

The Luxembourg may also be admired from the outside: the park’s railings showcase exhibitions of large-scale photographs to great effect.

Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain Under the auspices of a Cedar of Lebanon planted by Chateaubriand in the 19th century, the glass arch envisaged by Jean Nouvel has, since 1994, revived the artistic tradition of the area. The Theatrum Botanicum lies behind a glass screen, which extends the perspective of boulevard Raspail. This wild-looking garden surrounds the building, whose entrance is adorned with a wall of plants. Inside, a space of steel and glass provides the perfect showcase for contemporary creation.

Odéon Meet up in front of Danton! The statue stands firm amongst the wave of passers-by at the Carrefour de l’Odéon, some in a hurry, others sauntering along, traffic, cafe lights and snaking queues in front of cinemas keep this neighbourhood buzzing at all hours. The entrance to the Cour du Commerce Saint-André opens onto the crossroads. This cobbled pedestrian street houses the remains of the ancient city wall of Philippe-Auguste, and amidst the profusion of old-style shop and restaurant signs stands the Procope. Opened in 1688, it is perhaps the oldest cafe in Paris. It was the first to serve ice creams to its clients, who included Diderot, Rousseau and Voltaire. The Théâtre de l’Europe – Théâtre de l’Odéon until 1990 and temple from the Enlightenment period inaugurated in 1792 – is the stunning centre piece of Place de l’Odéon. Its programme of events represents an important part of European artistic heritage.

261 bd Raspail (14th). M° Raspail. Tel: 01 42 18 56 50. Daily: 11am-8pm, except Mon, 25 Dec and 1 Jan. Tues: late opening until 10pm. €8.50 – RR: €5.50. Under 10s: free. www.fondation.cartier.com

Fondation HenriCartier-Bresson The lens on the 20th century, Henri Cartier-Bresson photographed colonial Africa, the Spanish Civil War, the Liberation of Paris, the last hours of Gandhi, etc. His portraits captured Camus, Faulkner, Mauriac and a hundred other contemporary figures. In a workshop dating back to 1910, the Foundation displays the work of the photographer, as well as showing works by other artists. 2 impasse Lebouis (14th). M° Gaîté. Tel: 01 56 80 27 00. Tues to Sun: 1pm-6.30pm. Sat: 11am-6.45pm. Wed: late opening until 8.30pm. Closed Mon and between each exhibiton. €8.50 – RR: €5.50. www.henricartierbresson.org


ARTISTS’ PARIS

DISCOVER L’Adresse Musée de la Poste

PASS

Thexxx museum conserves and exhibits a rich historic, artistic, philatelic and scientific heritage featuring a wide range of objects including the first postal route maps, uniforms of postal workers, stamps, etc.

Jardin Atlantique To keep to the high ground and take in the wide open spaces, the Montparnasse “traveller” can climb up to the Jardin Atlantique – a garden on top of the train station. Yes, a roof garden! An amazing feat with an undulating wave-like floor surface, evergreen pines, the bassin des Miroitements, a fountain from the island of Hesperides, tennis courts and fantastic ocean-inspired kids play areas. M° Montparnasse – Bienvenüe (15th). Access by lifts or steps.

34 bd de Vaugirard (15th). M° Montparnasse – Bienvenüe. Tel: 01 42 79 24 24. Daily: 10am-6pm, except Sun and public hols. €5 – RR: €3.50. Under 26s: free. www.ladressemuseedelaposte.fr

École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts Only the select few study at the Beaux-Arts, but guided tours are available on reservation. Visit the 19th century at the Loges, Palais des Études, etc. and the Hôtel de Chimay for a spectrum of the 17th and 18th centuries. After whetting your appetite, visit the Chapelle des Louanges. Its replicas of works by Michelangelo are housed beneath the oldest dome in Paris, in the remains of the Couvent des PetitsAugustins, built at the beginning of the 17th century for Queen Margot. Institut de France The Académie Française, founded by Richelieu in 1635, rather overshadows the smaller Académies – Belles-Lettres, Sciences, Beaux-Arts, Architecture, Sciences Morales and Politiques, as well as the Mazarine library. But each has its members immortals’ seated around the famous cupola. The Instituted promotes cultural heritage.

Tour Montparnasse + Its 59 floors of steel and smoked glass provoked cries of indignation when it was constructed in 1973. Since then, the tower has become a familiar landmark, visible from all over Paris. Visitors have an exceptional 360° view from a height of 210 metres of all of Paris and its surroundings within a circumference of 40 km.

33 av. du Maine (15th). M° Montparnasse – Bienvenüe. Tel: 01 45 38 52 56. Summer: 9.30am-11.30pm. Winter: 9.30am-10.30pm. Fri, Sat, pre-public holiday: 11pm. €10 – RR: €7/€4.20. Under 7s: free. www.tourmontparnasse56.com

Musée des Lettres et Manuscrits The museum has renounced its status as “the best kept secret in Paris” and moved into a Haussmanian town house on boulevard Saint-Germain for all to see. It is entirely devoted to the preservation of important historical letters and manuscripts. 222 bd Saint-Germain (7th). M° Rue-du-Bac. Tel: 01 40 51 02 25. Daily: 10am-7pm, except Mon. Thurs open until 9.30pm. €7 – RR: €5. Under 12s: free. www.museedeslettres.fr

23 quai Conti (6th). M° Odéon. Tel: 01 44 41 44 41. Visits by appointment. www.institut-de-france.fr

Musée Eugène-Delacroix

PASS

Follow in Delacroix’s footsteps and cross the tiny picturesque Place Fürstenberg open the door of this “decidedly charming” home, in the painter’s words. 57


The portrait of Jenny Le Guillou, the faithful governess, is displayed beside the Madeleine dans le désert, which Baudelaire marvelled at. From the lounge to the workshop opening onto the garden, there are other paintings and travel albums. 6 rue de Fürstenberg (6th). M° Saint-Germain-des-Prés. Tel: 01 44 41 86 50. Daily: 9.30am-5pm. Tues, 1 Jan, 1 May and 25 Dec: closed. €5/7. Under 18s, 18-25 yrs EU, 1st Sun of the month and 14 July: free. www.musee-delacroix.fr

Musée Bourdelle At the beginning of the 20th century, artists’ studios filled Montparnasse. Today, that of Émile-Antoine Bourdelle numbers 500 sculpted works in marble, plaster and bronze, along with canvases and watercolours. The Centaure mourant stands in the great hall. The exhibition continues in the studios and then in rooms. It continues in a winter garden of ivy and acacias where, declared the sculptor, ‘spring laughs, summer burns and time dreams’. 18 rue Antoine-Bourdelle (15th). M° Montparnasse – Bienvenüe. Tel: 01 49 54 73 73. Daily: 10am-6pm, except Mon and public hols. Permanent collections: free. www.bourdelle.paris.fr

23 allée de la 2e DB. Jardin Atlantique – covering the Gare Montparnasse (15th). M° Montparnasse – Bienvenüe. Tel: 01 40 64 39 44. Daily, except Mon and public hols: 10am-6pm. Permanent collections: free. www.ml-leclerc-moulin.paris.fr

Cimetière du Montparnasse Since 1824, the cemetery in the south of Paris has been a green campo santo of artists and men and women of letters: Bartholdi, Baudelaire, César, Duras, Ionesco, Maupassant, Sartre and Beauvoir, Zadkine. Gainsbourg, the Lilas ticket-puncher, collects metro tickets (in reference to the song he wrote). Brancusi placed a cubist Kiss and Niki de Saint Phalle a cat in mosaic to brighten the grave of a friend. But those who enjoy something really original will find it at the grave of Monsieur and Madame Charles Pigeon!

DID YOU KNOW?

M° Rue-du-Bac.

Parc Montsouris

Église Saint-Sulpice The church has the dimensions and majesty of a cathedral. Its construction began in the 17th century on the site of a previous building dating back to the 13th century and lasted over 135 years, due to a lack of funds, giving it treasures from each period: a choir decorated with statues by Bouchardon, a Vierge à l’Enfant and two fonts in the shape of shells sculpted by Pigalle, the Chapelle des Saints-Anges whose frescoes, filled the last years of Delacroix’ life. Place Saint-Sulpice (6th). M° Saint-Sulpice. Tel: 01 46 33 21 78. Daily: 7.30am-7.30pm.

Mémorial du maréchal Leclerc de Hautecloque et de la Libération de Paris – Musée Jean Moulin Focus on the action of two emblematic figures of WWII: one a leader of the free French units, the other a French resistance leader. A wall of images from audiovisual archives plunges the visitor into ‘occupied Paris’, ‘insurgent Paris’, and finally ‘liberated Paris’. 58

?

The graffiti and little messages covering the walls at no.5 bis rue de Verneuil (7th) are a reminder that the singer-songwriter Serge Gainsbourg once lived in this private town house, now a mythical place for admirers.

Like the Buttes-Chaumont, this landscaped garden of the Second Empire takes its inspiration from the parks of London. The grotto, artificial mounds and valleys are so convincing that even the crested tit and the serin are duped. On the island, they nest close to turtles from Florida, male mallard ducks and their female companions. Around the lake, there are rolling lawns, play areas, a ginkgo biloba and 1,399 other trees, and even a weather station. 14th. RER B Cité-Universitaire.

Musée Zadkine The museum houses the home and workshops where Ossip Zadkine (1890-1967), the French sculptor of Russian origin and a major figure of the École de Paris, lived and worked from 1928 to 1967. 100 bis rue d’Assas (6th). M° Notre-Dame-desChamps. Tel: 01 55 42 77 20. Daily: 10am-6pm, except Mon and public hols. Permanent collections: free (except during temporary exhibition periods). www.zadkine.paris.fr


Musée de la Monnaie

A brief tram ride will take you from the Cité Universitaire to Georges-Brassens park for further bucolic adventures amongst the beehives, “Pinot Noir” grapes, and honeysuckle and jasmine in the scented garden; playful adventures too with table tennis, merry-go-round, ponies and climbing; intellectual adventures can be found at the book market, each weekend, under the covered Halle aux Chevaux of the former Vaugirard abattoir.

In this 18th-century mansion, 2,000 coins, 450 medals and tokens as well as tools, paintings, engravings, stained-glass windows and sculptures recount the history of France since the Renaissance.

ARTISTS’ PARIS

Parc Georges-Brassens

PASS

Hôtel de la Monnaie. 11 quai Conti (6th). M° Pont-Neuf. Tel: 01 40 46 55 35. Closed for renovation until 2012. www.monnaiedeparis.fr

Observatoire de Paris

Rue des Morillons (15th). M° Convention.

“Your majesty’s glory depends on it”, scientists assured Louis XIV when they pleaded for an astronomical observatory. Eight years later, in 1672, the building was completed according to the plans of architect Claude Perrault, brother of the story writer. There are guided visits of the Moon, the phases of Venus and some Sunspots by appointment.

Place Denfert-Rochereau and Catacombes

77 av. Denfert-Rochereau (14th). M° Denfert-Rochereau. Tel: 01 40 51 22 21. 2hr guided visits by an astronomer. Res. necessary. www.grandpublic.obspm.fr

At the intersection of a constellation of avenues, the bronze lion by Bartholdi faces West so as not to offend the Prussian enemy, defeated at Belfort in 1870. Around the perimeter stand the two unpopular tax pavilions that punctuated the wall encircling Paris until the 19th century. Denfert is also the entrance to the “Land of the Dead” or catacombs – the underground tunnels used as the ossuary of the cemetery of the Innocents in 1785. A wall of skulls and a rotunda of tibias isn’t for sensitive souls, so you might prefer to get away to the area in and around rue Daguerre with its attractive small shops and eateries.

Chapelle Notre-Damede-la-Médaille-Miraculeuse In 1830, the Virgin ordered Catherine Labouré, a novice at the Couvent des Filles-de-la-Charité-deSaint-Vincent-de-Paul, to have a medal minted that would protect its bearers. The first miracles were indicated when cholera ravaged Paris. The medal’s favours spread across the world, Catherine was canonized and pilgrims flocked to the chapel. 140 rue du Bac (7th). M° Sèvres-Babylone. www.chapellenotredamedelamedaille miraculeuse.com

Musée Curie – Institut du radium

Catacombes de Paris 1 av. du Colonel-Henri-Rol-Tanguy (14th). M° Denfert-Rochereau. Tel: 01 43 22 47 63. Tues to Sun: 10am-5pm. Closed Mon, Easter Sun and Whit Sun. €8. RR: €4, €6. www.catacombes.paris.fr

It was here that Marie Curie, her daughter and son-in-law, Irène and Frédéric Joliot-Curie, carried out their research after the death of Pierre Curie in 1906. The laboratory, now a museum, retraces an episode in the history of the sciences inextricably linked to this family with five Nobel prizes. 1 rue Pierre-et-Marie-Curie (5th). RER Luxembourg. Tel: 01 56 24 55 33. Closed until end 2011. www.curie.fr/musee

59


ARTISTIC CREATION

You’ll find artistic design everywhere in Paris. Not just in museums but in haute couture, design, jewellery, objects and works of art – all very much in the present. The capital of fashion is a breeding ground for young stylists. This avant-garde current runs through the area in and around Place des Victoires, Palais-Royal, and in the Marais. Discover contemporary creation at one of the seasonal fashion events (the Biennale de Paris, the festivals d’Automne et Émergences, the FIAC, the Mois de la photographie, etc.). But also in galleries, specialist markets, museums of course, art foundations (la Maison rouge, les fondations EDF-Electra, Cartier, etc.), cultural centres: Swedish (rue Payenne) or Swiss (rue des Francs-Bourgeois), the institutes: du Monde Arabe (Place Mohammed-V), Goethe (avenue d’Iéna), Finnish (rue des Écoles) or Mexican (rue Vieille-du-Temple) and more. On a smaller scale, there are workshops, and alternative scenes like Artists in Residence as well as authorised squats, like the Point éphémère (quai de Valmy), the squat 59 Rivoli-Électrons libres (rue de Rivoli) or La Générale (rue du Général-Lassalle). 60

Artists studios It is possible to see artists other than in museums and art galleries. You can visit them in their workplace and some even open up their studios on a permanent basis; others just open from time to time, notably during the “Journées Portes Ouvertes”, organized by associations of artists. Don’t miss them: they take place in the summer, sometimes in quite unusual places.

Anvers aux Abbesses (9th) 3rd w/e in November. Tel: 08 77 04 45 10. www.anversauxabbesses.fr

Ateliers de Belleville (20th) In May. Tel: 01 77 12 63 13. www.ateliers-artistes-belleville.org

Ateliers de Ménilmontant (20th) In September/October. Tel: 01 43 66 54 87. www.ateliersdemenilmontant.org

Ateliers des Frigos (13th) In May. www.les-frigos.com

Père-Lachaise (20th) In November. Tel: 06 11 20 77 06. www.apla.fr

Markets/specialist shops These markets and shops are full of beautiful things! Discover the expertise of designers – watercolourists, ceramicists, creators of original jewellery and textiles,

designers, engravers, painters, photographers, visual artists, sculptors … – and give in to temptation!

Galerie Elsa Vanier 7 rue du Pré-aux-Clercs (7th). M° Rue-du-Bac. Tel: 01 47 03 45 00. www.elsa-vanier.fr Jewellery of jewellers and goldand silverware designers.

L’Île aux Images 51 rue Saint-Louis-en-l’Île (4th). M° Pont-Marie. Tel: 01 56 24 15 22. www.lileauximages.com Purchase-sale of collectors’ photographs and lithographs.

Marché de la création Paris Bastille Bd Richard-Lenoir (11th). M° Bastille. Sat: 10am-7pm. www.artistesparisbastille.fr 200 artists (water-colourists, etc.) present and sell their works.

Talents – Ateliers d’art de France 1 bis rue Scribe (9th). Tel: 01 40 17 98 38. www.ateliersdart.com This boutique showcases modern creativity with unique pieces and limited sereis by more than 100 French creative artists.


N.B.: contemporary art is also becoming popular on the heights of Belleville and around the Parc des Buttes-Chaumont.

Graff Art 27 rue Paul-Bert. 93400 Saint-Ouen. Tel: 01 40 10 15 86. Fri to Mon: 10am-6pm and by appointment from Tues to Thurs. www.graffart.fr First permanent Graffiti gallery.

Blandin Nicolas Tel: 01 45 08 52 83. Personalized accompaniment and advice on buying art at auction rooms, from major galleries, and from Parisian antique dealers and flea markets.

Artistic creation

Take your time to examine that highly-coveted object, discuss it with the gallery owner and if a sale is agreed you will receive a certificate of authenticity. Prestigious galleries of art objects and antiques (fine paintings, jewellery, furniture, etc.) have, since the 1850s, occupied the area near the Drouot auction rooms (9th), the surrounding covered arcades and the neighbourhood of the Bourse (2nd). Also very up-market are the numerous galleries in SaintGermain-des-Prés. Contemporary design reigns at Bastille, around the Centre Pompidou and in the Marais, rues Saint-Claude, de Turenne and Vieille-du-Temple. Every two months or so, each gallery renews its exhibition of objects for sale: photos, paintings and installations. A new generation of gallery owners has moved into the former industrial districts of the 13th arrondissement, rues Chevaleret, Duchefdelaville, Louise-Weiss.

PARIS, CAPITAL OF CREATION Each year, this operation brings together some thirty professional trade fairs for fashion, design, art professions and house and home. Over 400,000 sq.m. of exhibition space play host to professionals from 115 countries: 17,500 designers and manufacturers, of which 50% foreigners, and 700,000 buyers including 350,000 foreign buyers. Get the Guide des 100 adresses incontournables (100 top addresses guide). Also available to download from the website, it suggests a design trail across the capital to discover designers, museums, art galleries, fashion designers, cafes, bookshops, etc. Information: www.pariscapitaledelacreation.com

Outdoor art and street art The streets, squares and gardens of Paris are home to thousands of works of art. There are well-known ones like the Buren columns at the Palais-Royal or the Stravinsky fountain on the esplanade at the Centre Pompidou. Others are more unobtrusive, as were the 135 Arago medallions, by Jan Dibbets, before the success of the Da Vinci Code. The medallions are set into the pavement on the old Paris Meridian line. On the sidelines of official commissions, ‘clandestine’ art expression – frescoes, graffiti, stencils, ceramics, etc. – occupy public areas. The more or less incognito artists of these works sometimes become so notorious that … they end up receiving public commissions. Belleville’s art works can be found in Belleville along with the phantom silhouettes

of Jérôme Ménager. As for the ‘love graffiti’ of the tagger André and the mysterious mosaic Space Invaders, just look around and you will see them more or less all over!

Green design Being environmentally conscious and responsible is a growing trend today. Design takes this into account and raises consumer awareness. Brands are therefore offering hand-made products, using renewable materials (bamboo, organic cotton, naural linen, etc.) in conditions that respect the environment. See specialist retail outlets.

NUIT BLANCHE (SLEEPLESS NIGHT) Every first Saturday in October, from 7pm to dawn, this event organized by the City of Paris, provides free access to contemporary design sites that are sometimes quite surprising, in several neighbourhoods of Paris. It is a great success! Interactive works, concerts of images, live shows: these aesthetic explorations with their festive air are becoming ever more popular. Programme on www.paris.fr

EVENT

Art galleries

61


The area around the Eiffel Tower is on a fitting scale to the tower itself. On a clear night, its beam sweeps through the sky in a radius covering 80 kilometres. The spectacle is awesome and one feels so small in this grandiose area with its massive buildings and vast green spaces! Just opposite, for example, are the gems of the 1937 Exposition Universelle: seventy-one artists decorated the Palais de Chaillot and a quartet of architects designed the Palais de Tokyo and its white colonnade. On show in the latter is the acclaimed fresco La Fée Électricité by Dufy and the monumental La Danse triptychs by Matisse. For La Porte de l’Enfer, see the Musée Rodin.

PARIS

MONUMENTAL

• Tour Eiffel (7th) • Champ-de-Mars (15th) • Invalides (7th) • Trocadéro (16th)

And what spectacular perspectives! One stretching from the Esplanade des Invalides to beyond Pont Alexandre III. Another between the equestrian statues of the two marshals, Foch in Place du Trocadéro and Joffre in the Champ-de-Mars, in front of the École Militaire. Did you know that this institution trained a young Corsican, who was ‘an excellent sailor’, and who was none other than Napoléon Bonaparte? Today, his imperial remains lie beneath the golden dome of the Invalides.


MONUMENTAL PARIS Invalides (lines 8, 13) • École-Militaire (line 8) • Trocadéro (lines 6, 9) • Iéna (line 9) • La-Tour-Maubourg (line 8) • Bir-Hakeim (line 6) • Varenne (line 13) • Rue-du-Bac (line 12)

DON’T MISS Champ de Mars and the Eiffel Tower

The vast park laid out below the famous tower has nothing warlike about it, and even boasts a Wall of Peace! Its name, borrowed from the god of war, relates to its early history as an exercise area for the young cadets of the military school. Later, as the centre point of the Expositions universelles, it was chosen as the site of the biggest attraction of 1889, the Eiffel Tower. Stop to gaze up at all of its 324 metres! The tower was saved from demolition after twenty years because of its scientific utility. A few more figures: 10,100 tons, 2,500,000 rivets, 1,665 steps, two years of relentless work for

the 50 engineers and 132 workers directed by Gustave Eiffel, and approximately 230 million visitors since its construction. The tower is a special landmark symbolizing Paris and France throughout the world and it sparkles every evening until 1am (in winter) or 2am (in summer). Champ-de-Mars (7th). M° Bir-Hakeim. Tel: 08 92 70 12 39 (€0.337/min). From 1 Jan to 16 June and from 29 Aug to 31 Dec: 9.30am-11pm. From 17 June to 28 Aug: 9am to 12-midnight. Lifts: €8.20 – RR: €4.10/€6.60. Stairs: €4.70 – RR: €3.20/€3.70. Summit by lift: €13.40 – RR: €9.30/€11.80. Under 4s: free. www.tour-eiffel.fr

Trocadéro The elevated ‘Troca’ has a privileged viewpoint of the Eiffel Tower on the opposite bank of

the Seine. Between the curved wings of the vast Palais de Chaillot – emblem of the 1930s – are gently sloping terraces and gardens, bordered by century-old Caucasian wingnut and hazel trees, and dotted with gilded bronze statues. Skaters and rollerbladers weave alongside the fountains beneath the gaze of Apollo and Hercules, sculpted on the pediment of the pavilions.

?

DID YOU KNOW? In 2011, prolongation of ‘L’épopée Tour Eiffel’ the exhibition celebrating the 120th anniversary of the Eiffel Tower.

63


Invalides

In 1671, Louis XIV decided to build ‘a royal hostel that would be large and spacious enough to house all officers, crippled, old and retired alike’. The “pensioners” began arriving in 1674. The Église Saint-Louis – or “Soldiers Church” – and the Église du Dôme (transformed into a military pantheon) were built afterwards. This magnificent ensemble, with its wonderful green lawn, today houses canons, the Musée de l’Armée, the Musée de l’Ordre de la Libération and the Musée des Plans et Reliefs. The Musée de l’Armée houses the tomb of Napoléon, the department of arms and ancient armoury and that of the two world wars and the Historial Charles de Gaulle. As for the modern department (17th-19th centuries), it has reopened following restoration work. Hôtel national des Invalides 129 rue de Grenelle (7th). M° La-Tour-Maubourg, Invalides. Tel: 0 810 11 33 99 (price of a local call). 7.30am-7pm. Musée de l’Ordre de la Libération PASS 51 bis bd de La-Tour-Maubourg (7th). M° La-Tour-Maubourg, Invalides. Tel: 01 47 05 04 10. 1 Apr to 30 Sept: Mon to Fri, 10am-6pm. Sun and public hols, 10am-6.30pm. 1 Oct to 31 Mar: Mon to Fri, 10am-5pm. Sun and some public hols, 10am-5.30pm. Sat and 1st Mon of the month (except from July to Sept): closed. €9 – RR: €7. Under 18s, 18-25 yrs EU: free. www.ordredelaliberation.fr

64

Musée des Plans-Reliefs PASS 129 rue de Grenelle (7th). M° La-Tour-Maubourg, Invalides. Tel: 01 45 51 95 05. 1 Oct to 31 Mar: 10am-5pm. 1 Apr to 30 Sept: 10am-6pm. 1st Mon of the month, 1 Jan, 1 May, 1 Nov and 25 Dec: closed. €8.50 – RR: €6.50. Under 26s: free. www.museedesplansreliefs. culture.fr

DID YOU KNOW?

?

Under the famous dome, redecorated with 12kg of gold in 1989, the remains of the emperor lie in five successive coffins set into a block of red quartzite from Finland!

Musée de l’Armée Tomb of Napoléon I PASS Hôtel national des Invalides. 129 rue de Grenelle (7th). M° La-Tour-Maubourg, Invalides. Tel: 0 810 11 33 99 (price of a local call). 1 Apr to 30 Sept: 10am-6pm. 1 Oct to 31 Mar: 10am-5pm. 1 Jan, 1 May, 1 Nov, 25 Dec and 1st Mon of the month (except from July to Sept): closed. €9 – RR: €7. Under 18s, 18-25 yrs EU: free. www.invalides.org

Musée national Rodin PASS

Auguste Rodin took up residence here in 1908, surrounded by a park teeming with brambles and rabbits. The museum opened in 1919, two years after his death. Sculptures in marble, bronze, and terracotta alternate with drawings by the master, works by Camille

Claudel (his muse), paintings by his friends Carrières, Monet, Van Gogh and others. In the garden, roses and statues have replaced the rabbits, but the charm remains unique. Hôtel Biron 79 rue de Varenne (7th). M° Varenne. Tel: 01 44 18 61 10. Daily: 10am-5.45pm. Mon, 1 Jan, 1 May, 25 Dec: closed. €10/€6 – RR: €5. Park only: €1. 18-25 yrs EU: contact for information. www.musee-rodin.fr

Musée du quai Branly

PASS

A few steps from the Eiffel Tower and perched on piles, in a richly-planted two-hectare garden featuring a plant wall, the Musée du quai Branly showcases the arts and civilizations of Africa, Asia, Oceania and the Americas. Visitors will enjoy discovering aboriginal shields and Shamanic costumes, and discover the crossroads where civilizations and cultures meet. There is also a panoramic and gastronomic restaurant or the pleasant cafe overlooking the garden. 37 quai Branly (7th). M° Alma – Marceau. Tel: 01 56 61 70 00. Tues, Wed, Sun: 11am-7pm. Thurs, Fri, Sat: 11am-9pm. €8.50 – RR: €6. Under 18s, 18-25 yrs EU, 1st Sun of month: free. www.quaibranly.fr


DISCOVER Musée national des Arts asiatiques Guimet PASS Wonderfully renovated with modern design, it is the biggest museum in Europe devoted entirely to Asian art. From Buddhas from Afghanistan to Zen monks from Japan, Indian fabric, Samourai weapons, treasures from Angkor, and refined art from China, the museum’s collections are outstanding and a wonderful way to get to the heart of Asian culture.

13 av. du Président-Wilson (16th). M° Iéna. Tel: 01 47 23 54 01. Tues to Sun: Midday to midnight. 1 Jan, 1 May and 25 Dec: closed. €6 – RR: €4.50. Under 18s, disabled: free. www.palaisdetokyo.com

Musée d’Art moderne de la Ville de Paris

6 place d’Iéna (16th). M° Iéna. Tel: 01 56 52 53 00. Daily: 10am-6pm, except Tues. €7.50 – RR: €5.50. Under 18s, 18-25 yrs EU: free. www.guimet.fr

Palais de Tokyo, contemporary creation The spacious dimensions brightened with acid tones are a showcase for emerging contemporary art. From midday to midnight, experimental, irreverent, international, and often interactive exhibitions and events brighten the line-up. The shop disguised as a petrol station from the suburbs of Stockholm is stocked with amusing objects in limited series; under the luminous pink and green saucers of the restaurant, one can enjoy peas with mint and clementines en gratin.

JUST AROUND THE CORNER The museum’s Panthéon Bouddhique displays pieces brought back from Japan in 1876 by Émile Guimet, an industrialist from Lyon, a fervent admirer of the culture of the Far East and founder of the museum that bears his name. 19 av. d’Iéna (16th). M° Iéna. Tel: 01 40 73 88 00. Daily: 9.45am-5.45pm. Closed Tues. Free.

66

It shows the pure tones of the fauvists, the deconstructed shapes of the cubists and Les Disques by Fernand Léger. It features all the trends in non-figurative art, from the École de Paris, Modigliani, Soutine, and Giacometti’s search for the absolute to photos by Brassaï. It also covers the 1950s and the following decades with New Realism, Arte Povera, Support/Surface, Fluxus, and more. It honours great contemporary figures, such as Boltanski, Bourgeois, and Buren, and supports the most outstanding trends in new design. The City’s museum of modern art illuminates the east wing of the Palais de Tokyo! 11 av. du Président-Wilson (16th). M° Iéna. Tel: 01 53 67 40 00. Daily: 10am-6pm, except Mon and some public hols. Thurs: late opening until 10pm. Permanent collections free. www.mam.paris.fr

Musée de l’Homme Even its name will change! Currently closed for renovation work, the Musée de l’Homme will reopen in 2012 as a brand new wonderful museum of mankind. On the programme: a great journey through time from man’s appearance – 150,000 years ago – to the present day, in a totally new laid out museum. Palais de Chaillot. 17 place du Trocadéro (16th). M° Trocadéro. www.mnhn.fr


PASS

Discover more than 1,000 extraordinary objects retracing 300 years of maritime history: models of ships and machines, figureheads, paintings, sailors’ souvenirs, weapons, navigation instruments, etc.

Palais Galliera – musée de la Mode de la Ville de Paris

MONUMENTAL PARIS

Musée national de la Marine

PASS

In the course of temporary exhibitions showcasing a part of its invaluable and fragile collections – 90,000 costumes and accessories from the 18th-century to today – the museum offers an insight into past and contemporary fashion. 10 av. Pierre-Ier-de-Serbie (16th). M° Iéna. Tel: 01 56 52 86 00. Closed for renovation until spring 2012. www.galliera.paris.fr

Les égouts de Paris Palais de Chaillot. 17 place du Trocadéro (16th). M° Trocadéro. Tel: 01 53 65 69 53 (info and res). Mon, Wed, Thurs, Fri: 11am-6pm. Sat, Sun: 11am-7pm. Tues, 1 Jan, 1 May, 25 Dec: closed. €9/€7 – RR: €7/€5 (audioguide included). 18-25 yrs EU: free. www.musee-marine.fr

Musée Maillol – Fondation Dina-Vierny Dina Vierny was the muse and friend of the painter and sculptor Aristide Maillol. The foundation and the museum reveal the work of the artist and offer a panorama of 20th-century art through his collection and that of Dina: B for Bonnard, D for Duchamp, K for Kandinsky … S for seductive! Fondation Dina-Vierny. 61 rue de Grenelle (7th). M° Rue-du-Bac. Tel: 01 42 22 59 58. 10.30am-7pm, except Tues and public hols. €11 – RR: €9/€7. Under 16s: free. www.museemaillol.com

PASS

Underground Paris, what an adventure! 2,400 km of pipes; some 31,600 manhole covers for easy access; 500 sewer workers responsible for the upkeep … and 1 underground visit to find out everything there is to know about the water cycle. Opposite 93, quai d’Orsay (7th). M° Alma – Marceau. Tel: 01 53 68 27 81. Daily except Thurs, Fri and 2 weeks mid-Jan.1 May to 30 Sept: 11am-5pm. 1 Oct to 30 Apr: 11am-4pm. €4.30 – RR: €3.50. Under 6s: free. www.paris.fr

Cité de l’architecture et du patrimoine PASS Housed in a wing of the Palais de Chaillot, this cité – open to all – devotes its 23,000 sq.m. to the urban environment. The museum’s galleries present architectural moulds, medieval and Renaissance wall paintings and an architectural panorama from 1850 to the present day.

Aquarium de Paris – Cinéaqua 43 tanks, more than 10,000 fish and invertebrates, 25 sharks, a touch pool to stroke the fish, 2 cinema auditoriums and interactive animations for a fun-packed family day out! Plus: the opportunity to have a delicious snack in the traditional Japanese restaurant with a view of a 600,000-litre aquarium! Jardins du Trocadéro. 5 av. Albert-de-Mun (16th). M° Trocadéro. Tel: 01 40 69 23 23. Daily: 10am-7pm, except 14 July. €19.50. 3-12 yrs: €12.50. Under 3s: free. www.cineaqua.com

Palais de Chaillot. 1 place du Trocadéro (16th). M° Trocadéro. RER C Champ-de-Mars – Tour-Eiffel. Tel: 01 58 51 52 00. Mon, Wed, Fri, Sat, Sun: 11am-7pm. Thurs: 11am-9pm. Closed Tues, 1 Jan, 1 May and 25 Dec. €8 – RR: €5. Under 18s, 18-25 yrs EU, 1st Sun of the month: free. www.citechaillot.fr

67


CULTURE AND MUSEUMS

If you’d like an idea of what there is to do … then how about exploring 6,500 years of history, 173 museums, 171 churches and temples, 31 monuments, 3 opera houses and more? The top ten classics To brush up on the classic sights, start with the top ten: 13,650,000 people visited Notre-Dame in 2009. Behind this star site, the 9 most-visited museums and monuments are the Sacré-Cœur, the Louvre, the Eiffel Tower, the Centre Pompidou, the Cité des Sciences et de l’Industrie de la Villette, the Musée d’Orsay, the Chapelle Notre-Dame de la Médaille miraculeuse, the Arc de Triomphe and the Musée du quai-Branly.

National museums Their missions are: an acquisitions policy to enrich the national collections, the reception of the general public and the organisation of temporary exhibitions. There are 15 in Paris: the Musées Eugène-Delacroix, Ennery, Hébert (closed), Jean-Jacques-Henner, Louvre, Gustave-Moreau, Moyen Âge – thermes et hôtel de Cluny, Orangerie, Orsay, Picasso (closed for work until 2012), Rodin, Galeries Nationales du Grand Palais, Palais de la Porte-Dorée – tropical aquarium, and the arts asiatiquesGuimet.

68

Museums, good to know They open at 10am, close at 5pm or 6pm, and sometimes open late one evening each week. Most are closed on Monday or Tuesday, and on some public holidays. For guided visits, contact museums for information.

Free The permanent collections of national museums and monuments are free for young Europeans aged 18 to 25 as well for currently employed French teachers. The places concerned are indicated in this guide. Admission is free on the first Sunday of each month in the national museums. And free all the time for under 18s, art history students, journalists and teachers (www.rmn.fr).

On presentation of proof of status, reductions or free admission will be given to young people aged under 18, or under 26, students, disabled people, unemployed people, teachers, etc. Contact each site for details.

Paris Museum Pass + This pass gives you free and unlimited access without having to queue to over 60 museums and monuments in Paris and the Paris region (except temporary exhibitions). Three different passes (2, 4 or 6 consecutive days for €35, €50 or €65) are on sale at the Paris Convention and Visitors Bureau, on parisinfo.com and at participating sites (www.parismuseumpass.fr). The places included in the pass are indicated in this guide by the pictogram PASS

CITY OF PARIS MUSEUMS Art, history, literature … the City of Paris presents the second most important collections after those of the State! 14 sites and museums belong to the Paris City Council: the Musées d’Art Moderne, Bourdelle, Carnavalet – histoire de Paris, Cernuschi – arts de l’Asie, Cognacq-Jay, Galliera – musée de la Mode, Vie Romantique, Zadkine, the house of Balzac, the Catacombes, the Crypte Archéologique du parvis de Notre-Dame, the Mémorial du Maréchal Leclerc de Hauteclocque et de la Libération de Paris – the Musée Jean-Moulin, the Petit Palais – musée des Beaux-Arts and the house of Victor Hugo. N.B.: admission to these sites is free for everyone, except for temporary exhibitions, the Catacombes, the Crypte de Notre-Dame, the Musée des Égouts and Galliera (closed for work until 2012). www.paris.fr


• Auteuil (16th) • Bois de Boulogne (16th) • Porte Maillot (16th) • Passy, La Muette (16th)

This elegant district grew from two small villages – Passy and Auteuil. Fine houses line the quiet avenues, concerts are regularly given by the Radio France Philharmonic Orchestra, horse riders trot along the sandy pathways, the hamlets are shrouded in foliage, and birds chirp above the tennis courts.

PARIS

CHIC

In the past, people came here to enjoy the thermal springs and pleasures of the countryside away from Paris. Boileau, La Fontaine, Molière, Racine and Ninon de Lenclos were regular visitors to the Auberge du Mouton Blanc, rue d’Auteuil. Formerly the parade ground for carriages and fine clothes, people now come to the Bois on Sunday to enjoy the open air, jog, or row on the lake. Several mansion houses were built here, along with some rather crazy-looking villas. Today, the district makes for surprising architectural tours. Looking for Guimard, one comes across the Studio Building by Sauvage, rue d’Agar, and the sandstone building by the Perret brothers, rue Franklin. Visiting Le Corbusier, square du DocteurBlanche, one discovers the nearby light and cubic Cité Mallet-Stevens, built in the 1920s … Chic, simple, and peaceful.


CHIC PARIS Porte-Maillot (line 1) • Porte-Dauphine (line 2) • La Muette (line 9) • Passy (line 6) • Porte-d’Auteuil (line 10) • Alma – Marceau (line 9)

DON’T MISS Bois de Boulogne

A part of the forest that once surrounded ancient Paris, the Bois (Wood), a place of debauchery in the 18th century, became a fashionable promenade in the Belle Époque period thanks to the wide lane linking it to Paris, the creation of lakes and little rivers, the Pré-Catelan in 1855, along with racecourses in 1857 and 1873. A green 845 hectare ‘lung’, whose paths are a favourite place for joggers, horses and cyclists; the great waterfall attracts photographers, while rowing boat fans enjoy the lake, and children have fun in the play areas.

Hippodrome d’Auteuil and Hippodrome de Longchamp

?

DID YOU KNOW?

Since 1860, the Jardin d’Acclimatation has been a paradise for children with its Enchanted River, little train, fairground rides, farm and vegetable garden, museum, puppet theatre, and workshops (cooking, calligraphy, magic, etc.) for children aged 3 to 10. There is something for parents too with chocolate, perfume, and dance workshops. Bois de Boulogne (16th). M° Les Sablons. Tel: 01 40 67 90 82. Oct to Mar: 10am-6pm. Apr to Sept: 10am-7pm. Park: €2.90 – RR: €1.45. Train (return trip): €2.70. Park + train: €5.60 – RR: €4.15. Under 3s: free. www.jardindacclimatation.fr

Do you have a preference for steeplechases or flat racing? The former take place on the eastern side of the Bois de Boulogne, at the 33-hectare Auteuil racecourse, with 18 hectares of track, hedges and steeplechase. For cheering on the jockeys and thoroughbreds in flat racing, the 57-hectare Longchamp racecourse in the western part of the Bois is the place to go. You don’t have to be a betting fan to enjoy a day out here! Around the track and stands, you have the choice of panoramic restaurants, brasseries, picnic areas, free children’s play areas, ponies and behind-the-scenes visits.

16th. M° Porte-Maillot.

71


Musée Marmottan-Monet A former hunting lodge devoted to several passions. From the Middle Ages, there are illuminated manuscripts, while under the Third Republic, the art historian Paul Marmottan reconstituted the grandeur of the First Empire with a bronze and mahogany bed belonging to Napoléon, a backgammon table and pieces of Sèvres biscuit porcelain. Also over a hundred Impressionist paintings by Degas, Manet, Berthe Morisot, Pissarro, Renoir, Sisley and especially Monet. The Nymphéas (Water Lilies) are here, as well as the Cathédrale de Rouen, and the Pont Japonais. 2 rue Louis-Boilly (16th). M° La Muette. Tel: 01 44 96 50 33. Thurs: open until 8pm. Tues to Sun: 10am-6pm. Mon, 1 Jan, 1 May and 25 Dec:

DID YOU KNOW?

?

In 1874, Monet exhibited Une chose faite au Havre (something done at Le Havre), which he did not know how to name. ‘Put Impression’, he said. Thething known as Impression, Soleil levant (Sunrise) gave its name to the movement that revolutionized painting at the end of the 19th century – Impressionism. closed. €10 – RR: €5. Under 8s: free. www.marmottan.com

Parc de Bagatelle City of Paris Botanical Garden

The result of a bet wagered between Marie-Antoinette and the Comte d’Artois, this AngloChinese bagatelle nestling in the Bois de Boulogne was created in just 64 days! The garden

has a renowned rose garden, peacocks, little bridges, water lilies, pagoda, waterfalls, a restaurant, classical concerts, and temporary exhibitions. Bois de Boulogne (16th). M° Porte-Maillot. Tel: 08 26 30 20 30 (€0.34/min). Contact for opening times.

Musée Dapper Since 1986, ancestral and contemporary African arts have been showcased here with exhibitions, shows, meetings, and a cinema club. With time, the scope of the collections has been extended to include the culture of the Caribbean and the diasporas of sub-Saharan Africa. 35 bis rue Paul-Valéry (16th). M° Victor-Hugo. Tel: 01 45 00 91 75. Daily: 11am7pm, except Tues. €6 – RR: €4. Under 26s, and last Wed of the month: free. www.dapper.com.fr

DISCOVER Stade Roland-Garros and Musée de la Fédération Française de Tennis

2 av. Gordon-Bennett (16th). M° Porte-d’Auteuil. Tel: 01 47 43 48 48. Wed, Fri, Sat, and Sun: 10am-6pm. €7.50. Under 18s: €4. www.fft.fr/site-tenniseum/

Borg, Connors, McEnroe, Noah … What tennis champion has not played on the centre court or no.1 court? The stadium was built in 1928 to create a venue worthy of defending the Davis Cup (won on American soil). Since then, Roland-Garros has staged the International Tennis Championships each year welcoming 500 players and 400,000 spectators! The tennis museum offers permanent and thematic exhibitions. Also, discover the changing rooms, press centre, famous centre court, and memorable anecdotes on a guided tour (French/English).

Jardin des serres d’Auteuil City of Paris Botanical Garden

This garden is a world of surprises: classic and regular, then winding and hilly in the English style; Japanese here, Mediterranean there, rich in art – with its Dalou fountain and Rodin mascarons –, and in botany – with its 230 varieties of trees and flowers. And so exotic too, in the tropics of the 19th-century hothouses! Palm trees, birds in an aviary, banana trees, hibiscus, carps and passionflowers thrive in the turquoise reflections of the metal framework. 16th. M° Porte-d’Auteuil. Tel: 39 75.

72


The foundation which houses the work of the Swiss-born, French-naturalized architect, designer and painter, occupies the Jeanneret and La Roche maisons (houses), built in 1924. The latter is open to visitors and applies the “five points of modern architecture” defined by Le Corbusier: free-standing pillars, roof garden, free facade, an open plan, and long windows. White dominates, light floods in, and the configuration is astonishing. 8-10 square du Dr-Blanche (16th). M° Jasmin. Tel: 01 42 88 41 53. Maison La Roche : Tel: 01 42 88 75 72. Mon: 1.30-6pm. Tues, Wed, Thurs: 10am-6pm. Fri, Sat: 10am-5pm. www.fondationlecorbusier.asso.fr

Fondation Pierre-Bergé – Yves-Saint-Laurent

CHIC PARIS

Fondation Le Corbusier

of the secrets of crystal glass are unveiled. Finally, Au-delà de la Transparence, presents the facets of a prolific knowledge with masterpieces. 11 place des États-Unis (16th). M° Kléber, Iéna. Tel: 0 820 32 22 22 (€0.79/min). Mon to Sat: 10am-6.30pm, except Tues, Sun and public hols. €5 – RR: €3.50. Under 18s: free. Reservation recommended. www.baccarat.fr

Musée du Vin Former wine cellars in rue des Eaux are a delightful place to find out more about the history of wine, wine regions, and utensils. Oenology courses and tasting sessions are also offered as an option. Rue des Eaux. 5 square Charles-Dickens (16th). M° Passy. Tel: 01 45 25 63 26. Tues to Sun: 10am-6pm. Admission + a glass of wine (under 18s: fruit juice) + audioguide: €11.90 – RR: €9.90. Under 14s: free. www.museeduvinparis.com

Maison de Balzac Who made iconic fashion items of the three-quarter coat and the trouser suit, square shoulders, puffed sleeves, the spencer, gypsy blouses, etc. The legendary designer Yves Saint Laurent, of course! From his first collection in 1962 to his final farewells in 2002, this successful designer has become a legend.

On the run from his creditors, Balzac took refuge in the village of Passy in 1840. He spent seven years of intensely productive writing in the garden level of the house, rented in the name of M. de Breugnol. The writer corrected La Comédie humaine here, and wrote La Cousine Bette, etc.

5 av. Marceau (16th). M° Alma – Marceau. Tel: 01 44 31 64 00. Mon to Fri: 9.30am-1pm and 2.30-6pm, except public hols. €5 – RR: €3. www.fondation-pb-ysl.net

47 rue Raynouard (16th). M° Passy. Tel: 01 55 74 41 80. Daily: 10am-6pm, except Mon and public hols. Permanent collections: free (except during temporary exhibition times). www.balzac.paris.fr

Musée Baccarat The magic of this mansion founded in 1764 and transformed into a crystal palace by the designer Philippe Starck, operates on three levels. Everything begins with monumental rooms and candelabras Folie des Grandeurs. Next is Alchimie, where some

GUIMARD FACADES The Castel Béranger was completed in 1898, in rue La Fontaine. Given the nickname “Castel dérangé” (crazy castle), this apartment block is representative of Hector Guimard’s artistic style. He became the prominent exponent of the art nouveau style. See his work in the 16th arrondissement at numbers 14, 17, 19 and 21 rue La Fontaine, numbers 8, 10, 40, 60 rue Agar, Hôtel Guimard, 120 and 122 avenue Mozart, etc.

Le Parc des Princes – Discover the behind-the-scenes of PSG Take a one-hour guided tour behind the scenes of Paris’s prestigious football club. Visit the VIP area, changing rooms and trophy area of this legendary stadium. 24 rue du Commandant-Guilbaud (16th). M° Porte-de-Saint-Cloud. Tel: 32 75 (€0.34/min). Wed, Fri, Sat: €10 – RR: €5. www.leparcdesprinces.fr and www.psg.fr

Rue de Passy A good place to browse for a fashionable new wardrobe. For something to eat, stop off at Place de Passy, with its covered market leading on to rue de l’Annonciation and the church past delicatessens, greengrocers …

73


SURROUNDING AREA

Hauts de Seine

Thousands of wonderful moments await you in the Hauts-de-Seine area. Within easy reach of Paris by metro or bus, you will discover famous people and fall in love with havens of greenery and their inhabitants … you’ll be amazed at what there is!

1

Sèvres – Cité de la céramique

PASS

Unique in Europe, the porcelain factory has been conserving and passing on its expertise since the 18th century. Its collections include works from all countries and all periods. 2 place de la Manufacture. 92310 Sèvres. M° Pont-de-Sèvres. Tel: 01 46 29 22 00. Factory visit by appointment. €4.50 – RR: €3. Under 25s and 1st Sun of the month: free. www.sevresciteceramique.fr 2

Paris

2

5

3 1

6

4

10 km

4 Château de Sceaux, musée d’Île-de-France, Parc de Sceaux

Jean-Baptiste Colbert, a minister of Louis XIV, commissioned the greatest artists of the time to make his residence fit for a king. Since 1937, the chateau has housed the Musée de l’Île-de-France. RER B Parc-de-Sceaux. Museum: Tel: 01 41 87 29 50. Daily, except Tues. €3 – RR: €1.50. Park: free. www.domaine-de-sceaux.fr

Musée du château de Malmaison

PASS 5

Acquired in 1799 by Joséphine Bonaparte, the Château de Malmaison became the residence of the future emperor and his wife and the seat of the French government.

Maison des Jardies

This former wine-grower’s house was transformed in the 18th century into a country house and was home to Balzac in 1838, who was fleeing his creditors, then to Léon Gambetta in 1878, who came here to relax. 14 av. Gambetta. 92310 Sèvres. Tel: 01 45 34 61 22. Contact for opening times. €5 – RR: €3.50. 18-25 yrs EU: free. www.monuments-nationaux.fr 6

Av. du Château. 92500 Rueil-Malmaison. RER A La Défense – Grande-Arche, then bus 258. Tel: 01 41 29 05 55. Daily except Tues. Contact for opening times. €6. Under 18 to 25 yrs: €4.50. 18-25 yrs EU: free. www.chateau-malmaison.fr 3

Domaine national de Saint-Cloud

On this estate there is no chateau but 460 hectares of greenery for walking and cycling, a pedagogical farm for children and also a museum retracing the history. M° Boulogne – Pont-de-Saint-Cloud. Tel: 01 41 12 02 90. Daily. Contact for opening times and admission prices. 18-25 yrs EU: free. www.saint-cloud.monuments-nationaux.fr La ferme du Piqueur :

74

Albert Kahn, museum and gardens

The banker Albert Kahn laid-out wonderful gardens and built up an exceptional collection of 183,000 metres of film footage and 72,000 autochromes created between 1909 and 1931. 10-14 rue du Port. 92100 Boulogne-Billancourt. M° Boulogne – Pont-de-Saint-Cloud. Tel: 01 55 19 28 00. Daily except Mon. Contact for opening times. €3 – RR: €1.50. Under 12s and 1st Sun of the month: free. www.albert-kahn.fr

CONTACT Comité départemental du tourisme des Hauts-de-Seine 8 place de La Défense. 92974 Paris-La-Défense Cedex. Tel: 01 46 93 92 92. contact@tourisme92.com www.tourisme92.com


Paris’s reputation as the capital of luxury is carried high by perfumers, jewellers, designers of haute couture, antique dealers and the large auction houses like Drouot, Christie’s and Sotheby’s. Not forgetting the artisans, who create luxury goods – gold- and silversmiths, trunk and suitcase makers, leather craftsmen, saddlers or artists in glassmaking and more. Some stars Idyllic decor, impeccable service, illustrious guests … upscale hotels are not lacking in Paris! Twenty of them have been rated five-star since the new classifications in the rules and regulations of the hotel industry

FASHION SHOWS In January and July, Paris stages dozens of haute couture fashion shows that present the springsummer and autumn-winter collections. It is not easy to get a seat next to the ‘happy few’ alongside the catwalks. However, the fashion shows organized by Galeries Lafayette each Friday, at 3pm, are free and open to everyone. www.galerieslafayette.com And for even more information on shopping and top fashion designers, visit parisinfo.com, rubric “Shopping and Fashion”.

came into effect, and three of them are rated four-star Luxe. Discrete and efficient, the concierges satisfy (almost) all the wishes of their guests. The price of a suite may leave you dreaming but everyone can enjoy palace life with a light snack or a drink. More information on parisinfo.com

Chic districts To get a close look at Baccarat, Cartier, Chanel, Christofle, Daum, Dior, Guerlain, Hermès, Lacroix, Lalique, Saint Laurent or even Vuitton, go along to the ChampsÉlysées, avenue Montaigne, SaintGermain-des-Prés, the prestigious Place Vendôme and the equally famous rue de la Paix.

Jewellery Boucheron 26 place Vendôme (1st). Tel: 01 42 61 58 16.

Cartier 154 av. des Champs-Élysées (8th). Tel: 01 40 74 01 27.

Chaumet 12 place Vendôme (1st). Tel: 01 44 77 24 00.

Mauboussin 66 av. des Champs-Élysées (8th). Tel: 01 42 56 03 42.

A taste for luxury

A TASTE FOR LUXURY

Antiques Village St-Paul (4th) M° Saint-Paul. Tel: 01 48 87 00 65. www.village-saint-paul.com

Village suisse 78 av. de Suffren – 54 av. de la Motte-Picquet (15th). M° La Motte-Picquet – Grenelle. Daily except Tues and Wed. www.levillagesuisseparis.com

Well-being Club Med Gym www.clubmedgym.com 22 sport halls in Paris.

Ergotonic Tel: 06 62 89 43 75. www.ergotonic.net Massages by appointment at your hotel.

Le cercle 12 rue du FaubourgSaint-Honoré (8th). Tel: 01 42 68 29 79. http://lecercle-by-regineferrere.com Upscale spa.

Spa Occitane 47 rue de Sèvres (6th). M° Sèvres-Babylone. Tel: 01 42 22 88 62. www.loccitane.fr Skin care, traditional massages, etc.

Van Cleef & Arpels 3 rue de la Paix (2nd). Tel: 01 53 45 35 60.

75


• Concorde (8th) • Champs-Élysées (8th) • Tuileries (1st) • Louvre (1st)

PARIS

MYTHICAL

There is no escaping the fascination of this legendary district, starting of course, with the smile of Mona Lisa and the hieroglyphs at the Place de la Concorde. Then, at the Louvre, there is The Wedding Feast at Cana, The Winged Victory of Samothrace, discovered on the banks of the Aegean Sea and The Lacemaker by Vermeer. There’s the Cour Carrée, the Grande Galerie, and the 175-metre colonnade – a brief history tour that continues up to the gates of the Élysée Palace. And beyond, the voluted columns of the Grand and Petit Palais, the Seine from the railings of the Tuileries gardens, town houses in avenue Gabriel, fashion designers in avenue Montaigne, a few Picassos at the Orangerie. Visitors will fall under the spell of the silky bedroom of Jeanne Lanvin at the Decorative Arts museum and the palace of the courtesan Païva, a few steps from the rond point des Champs-Élysées. At the top of the avenue, the futuristic vessel-like Drugstore is quite impressive too. The 1918 and Liberation parades, the cycles of the Tour de France, the tanks of the 14 July, the celebrations following the 1998 Football World Cup all contribute to the making of a myth!


MYTHICAL PARIS

R.

i MUSÉE DU JEU DE PAUME

i

Charles-de-Gaulle – Étoile (lines 1, 2, 6) • Champs-Élysées – Clemenceau (lines 1, 13) • Concorde (lines 1, 8, 12) • Tuileries (line 1) • Palais-Royal - Musée-du-Louvre (lines 1, 7)

DON’T MISS Arc de Triomphe and the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier PASS

At the tip of the Champs-Élysées, directly in line with the Arc du Carrousel and the Arche de la Défense, is Napoléon’s triumphant antique arch. Commissioned in 1806 to celebrate the victories of the Great Army, it was completed in 1836. Its huge proportions – 50 metres high and 45 wide – are decorated with fine sculpture by Cortot and Étex, along with Rude’s famous Marseillaise. The arch became a national symbol. A flame is rekindled each evening at 6.30pm and the inscription ‘Here lies a French soldier, who died for his country’ is written on the tomb of an unknown soldier laid to rest here in 1921.

Place du Général-de-Gaulle (8th). M° Charles-de-Gaulle – Étoile. Tel: 01 55 37 73 77. Daily. From 1 Apr to 30 Sept: 10am-11pm. From 1 Oct-31 Mar: 10am-10.30pm. Open after the parades on 8 May, 14 Jul and 11 Nov. 1 Jan, 1 May and 25 Dec: closed. €9.50 – RR: €6. Under 18s, 18-25 yrs EU, 1st Sun of the month (Nov to end Mar): free. www.monuments-nationaux.fr

DID YOU KNOW?

Champs-Élysées

Between Concorde and Étoile, is the emblematic section of a perspective that extends from the Louvre Pyramid to La Défense. The first steps of this “glorious way”, an obligatory passage for patriotic parades, were however modest. Lined with undergrowth, the avenue reached the current site of Place de l’Étoile in 1724. A fashionable place to walk, the gardens were devastated at the fall of the Empire. They regained their splendour around 1840: candelabras, fountains, creamy pavilions, landscaping with flowers and copses date from this period of balls and theatres. It was one hundred years later that rapid development occurred when

? ?

From the roof dominating place de l’Étoile, twelve avenues radiate outwards, some with the names of victories (Friedland, Iéna, Wagram) and generals of the Empire (Carnot, Hoche, Kléber, Marceau). When the sun sets under the Arch directly in line with the Champs, it really is a spectacular sight!

77


affluence spread to the west of the capital. The avenue was then adorned with prestigious palaces, cafes and restaurant terraces and cinemas – joined today by ready-to-wear fashion stores and high-tech showrooms. Everything can be found on the “Champs”: films, dresses, lunch, cotton and compresses, racing cars, yoghurts and fresh vegetables, books, CDs, perfume … from morning to midnight, sometimes 24 hours a day, often 7 days a week. Musée du Louvre

+

PASS

The biggest museum in Paris, and home of the Mona Lisa, The Raft of the Medusa, and Venus de Milo was, first and foremost, the jewel in the crown of the kings, emperors and republics of France. From the sombre late-12th century fortress to Peï’s glass pyramid, inaugurated in 1989, many have reigned here and practically everyone has left their mark – Renaissance, Classic, First and Second Empire, contemporary … The Louvre, a museum since 1793, houses collections of Western art from the Middle Ages to 1848, and collections of ancient oriental, Egyptian, Greek, Etruscan and Roman civilizations which preceded and influenced them, graphic arts and Islamic arts. Main entrance via the pyramid (1st). M° Palais-Royal – Musée-du-Louvre. Tel: 01 40 20 50 50. Daily: 9am-6pm, except Tues, 1 Jan, 1 May and 25 Dec. Wed and Fri: open until 10pm.

78

€10. Under 18s, 18-25 yrs EU, under 26s (Fri late opening, except exhibitions Hall Napoléon) and 1st Sun of the month: free. Exhibitions Hall Napoléon: €11. Combined ticket: €14. Multimedia guide (commentary of works according to profile of visitor): €2/€4/€6. www.ticketlouvre.fr www.louvre.fr

DID YOU KNOW?

?

Uncovered by archaeological excavations in 1985, the foundations of the donjon and the moat of the castle, built at the gateway to the city, under the reign of Philippe Auguste (1180 to 1223), can be visited in the medieval part of the museum. Place de la Concorde

Work began on Place Louis XV in 1755. It broke with the tradition of enclosed royal squares, to open up the perspective to the Tuileries gardens. The fine mansion houses – the Hôtel de la Marine and the Hôtel Crillon underlined the axis of the statue of the monarch – were demolished after thirty years. Place de la Revolution is where Louis XVI, Marie-Antoinette, Danton and Robespierre were guillotined. However, Place de la Concorde spells reconciliation. Louis-Philippe sought a monument that would cool revolutionary and royalist passions, which he found in the 3,300-year-old Obelisk, a gift from the pasha of Egypt. Erected in 1836, its 23 metres and 230 tons of pink granite took four years to travel from Luxor! Two fountains, embellished with

HOTEL Guests who have stayed at the Crillon, a luxury palace hotel designed to pamper a select clientele, include the Emperor Hiro-Hito, King George V of England and Theodore Roosevelt. In 1778, the treaty in which France recognized the independence of the United States was signed here, and 1919 saw the creation of the League of Nations, the older brother of the United Nations.

golden mermaids and fish, enliven the grey, green and golden decor of the square. Jardin des Tuileries Statues populate the terraces, the lawns and flowerbeds laid out in the French style, the copses and the areas around the ornamental ponds: an academic Spartacus on a marble pedestal and the contemporary Welcoming Hands, by Louise Bourgeois, plus classical allegories and Tinguely’s tricolor. The green Maillol bronzes emerge from the labyrinth of hedges that connect the Tuileries to the Louvre. At the other end, in a direct line with the great axis, the garden opens out spectacularly onto Concorde. Lush greenery, games, refreshment chalets, and farniente lie between the two.

1st. M° Concorde.


MYTHICAL PARIS

DISCOVER Grand Palais This impressive stone building, crowned with a splendid metallic-framed glass roof, was constructed for the Exposition Universelle in 1900. Architecturally daring in its time, the Grand Palais hosts diverse events under the great nave and four exhibitions per year in the Galeries nationals. It also houses the Palais de la Découverte. Entrance to Galeries nationales du Grand Palais : avenue du Général-Eisenhower (8th). Entrance to nave: avenue Pdt-Winston-Churchill (8th). M° Champs-Élysées – Clemenceau. Tel: 01 44 13 17 17. Opening times and rates vary. www.grandpalais.fr

Petit Palais – musée des BeauxArts de la Ville de Paris Like its ‘Grand’ neighbour, the Petit (little) Palais is an example of the eclectic splendour of the Exposition of 1900. The building alternates white and coloured marble, moulding and garlands, painted ceilings, mosaic flooring and opal stained-glass windows around an interior garden. The city’s Fine Arts museum since 1902, the Petit Palais displays collections of painting, sculpture and art objects from antiquity to 1918. Amongst other marvels, visitors will admire Greek amphora, orthodox icons, Gothic ivories, Italian Madonnas, paintings by Rubens, Saxe porcelain and blown-crystal glass vases.

Musée de l’Orangerie

Built in 1852, the Orangery of the Tuileries soon lost its fruit trees to become a storehouse, and a room for examinations and dog competitions. Its destiny became clearer when Monet chose it to house the complete cycle of the Nymphéas (Water Lilies) on which he worked from 1914. Since its renovation, the panels of a landscape of water lilies, weeping willows, reflections of trees and clouds – 2 metres high, almost 100 long – have regained their beauty and meaning in daylight. This exceptional venue also does justice to the collection of art dealer Paul Guillaume of whom it was said ‘the paintings and statues whispered in his ear’. And ‘his’ Renoir, Cézanne, Rousseau, Modigliani, Marie Laurencin, Matisse, Derain, Picasso, Soutine and Utrillo paintings definitely reveal a certain flair. Jardin des Tuileries (1st). M° Concorde. Tel: 01 44 77 80 07. Daily: 9am-6pm, except Tues, 1 May and 25 Dec. €7.50 – RR: €5.50. + €2 for temporary exhibitions. Under 18s, 18-25 yrs EU, 1st Sun of the month: free. www.musee-orangerie.fr

DID YOU KNOW?

??

For 30 years, Monet placed his easel opposite his water garden to capture the changes in nature: the Nymphéas cycle numbers some 300 paintings! Studio Harcourt Paris

Av. Pdt-Winston-Churchill (8th). M° Champs-Élysées – Clemenceau. Tel: 01 53 43 40 00. Daily: 10am-6pm, except Mon and public hols. Thurs: open until 8pm during temporary exhibitions. Permanent exhibitions free. www.petitpalais.paris.fr

PASS

Established in 1934, the studio soon became a place not to be missed for Paris’s in-crowd. Famous writers, painters, singers, sportsmen and actors such as Marlene Dietrich, Salvador Dalí, Brigitte Bardot, Zinédine Zidane and John Galliano all came here to be photographed. 10 rue Jean-Goujon (8th). M° Champs-Élysées – Clemenceau. Tel: 01 42 56 67 67. Visit with commentary. www.studio-harcourt.eu

79


Musée Jacquemart-André

Nélie Jacquemart was commissioned to paint the portrait of Édouard André, the heir of a banking family. They were to remain inseparable and devoted their fortune to the collection exhibited in their mansion, built in 1875. The magnificent reception rooms, winter garden and private apartments are decorated with Louis XV and Louis XVI furniture, paintings by Boucher, Chardin and Fragonard and treasures of the Italian Renaissance. The smoking room is English with Hoppner, Lawrence and Reynolds. The Flemish and Dutch masters of the 17th century, led by Rembrandt, are displayed in the library.

Musée des Arts décoratifs

PASS

A stroll through the nave and galleries is a wonderful experience. The setting is all whiteness and airy spaces with calligraphy quotations in red on the walls. The riches of the Medieval and Renaissance periods embellish the residence and testify to its grandeur. From Henri IV to Louis XVI, it is pure magnificence. Ebony and rosewood, classical ideals, useful objects and philosophy all contribute to the rich pomp of the salons. Bourgeois splendour triumphs in the 19th century. Then come the sinuous curves of art nouveau, the geometry of art deco, and the industrial logic and functionalism of the 1950s, before plastic and anti-conformism give way to individualism and the desire for natural comfort. The trend for the 21st century is predicted to be … low-key.

158 bd Haussmann (8th). M° Miromesnil. Tel: 01 45 62 11 59. Daily: 10am-6pm. €10 – RR: €8.50. Under 7s: free. www.musee-jacquemart-andre.com

Palais-Bourbon The Palais Bourbon, which has housed the Assemblée Nationale (the lower house of the French parliament), was built in 1726 for Louise-Françoise, daughter of Louis XIV and Madame de Montespan, the widow of the Duc de Bourbon.

33 quai d’Orsay (7th). M° Assemblée-Nationale. Proof of identity essential. Admission and visit by appointment by post 2 to 3 months in advance. Free. www.assemblee-nationale.fr

Les Arts décoratifs This institute pursues the objectives it was given at the outset, ‘to promote what is both beautiful and useful’ and groups together the Musée Nissim-de-Camondo and the Musées des Arts décoratifs, de la Publicité, de la Mode et du Textile. 107 rue de Rivoli (1st). M° Palais-Royal – Musée-du-Louvre. Tel: 01 44 55 57 50. Tues to Sun: 11am-6pm. Thurs: open until 9pm. €9 – €7.50. Under 18s, 18-25 yrs EU: free. www.lesartsdecoratifs.fr

80

Musée de la Publicité

PASS

The collection of posters (some of which date from the 18th century), and press, film, and radio advertisements showcase advertising in all its forms, including a retrospective of Chinese posters, a tribute to the pioneers of the advertisement, displays of logos, the power of images from Man Ray to Jean-Paul Goude, the epic story of the ‘Nantais’ biscuit and a Senegalese soldier on a box of cocoa. These works cannot be on permanent display due to their fragile nature and are thus presented in temporary exhibitions only. However the multimedia library is open to everyone. Musée de la Mode et du Textile

PASS

Silks, embroidery, printed fabrics, lace, tapestry – 31,000 pieces in total – present the history of textiles from the 14th century onwards. Fashion is showcased with a collection of outfits and accessories from the 17th century to creations by Balmain, Chanel, Courrèges, Dior, Lanvin, Lacroix, Poiret, Saint Laurent, etc. These works cannot be on permanent display due to their fragile nature and so appear in temporary exhibitions only. Musée Nissim-de-Camondo

PASS

In the first decade of the twentieth century, the banker Moïse de Camondo, a passionate collector of 18th-century decorative arts, had a magnificent mansion built on the edge of Parc Monceau, inspired


MYTHICAL PARIS

by the Petit Trianon at Versailles but equipped with all modern comforts. In his wood-panelled apartments, he artfully displayed his collection. From the blue salon to porcelain collections, he takes us from Versailles to the table of Catherine II of Russia. In 1936, the mansion became a museum. A wonderful opportunity to visit an exceptionally refined family residence.

Av. Franklin-D.-Roosevelt (8th). M° Champs-Élysées – Clemenceau. Tel: 01 56 43 20 21. Tues to Sat: 9.30am-6pm. Sun and some public hols: 10am-7pm. Mon and some public holidays: closed. €7 – RR: €4.50. Planetarium: €3.50 supplement. Under 6s: free. www.palais-decouverte.fr

63 rue de Monceau (8th). M° Villiers. Tel: 01 53 89 06 50. Wed to Sun: 10am-5.30pm. Closed Mon and Tues. €7 – €5. 18-25 yrs EU: free. www.lesartsdecoratifs.fr

Chapelle expiatoire

PASS

Guillotined in 1793, Louis XVI and Marie-Antoinette were hastily buried in the Madeleine cemetery, on the actual site of square Louis XVI. During the Restoration, their remains were exhumed and transferred to the Basilique de Saint-Denis. Louis XVIII erected a funerary chapel, completed in 1826, on the site of their first tomb. Laid out as a Greek cross, it is decorated inside with angels, fleurs-de-lis, an altar in white marble, and a sculpture of Marie-Antoinette soutenue par la Religion, by Cortot.

Musée Cernuschi Philanthropic financier and aesthete traveller, Henri Cernuschi (1821-1896) bequeathed the works of art he had collected on his long travels together with his mansion, at the edge of Parc Monceau to the City. Rooted in the art and archaeology of ancient China, from the Neolithic period to the 13th century, the museum gives centre stage to a huge bronze Buddha. Around this sage meditating opposite a bay window inundated with light, are jade necklaces, ceramics, a Barbare Occidental with a long terra cotta nose and much more. 7 av. Velasquez (8th). M° Villiers. Tel: 01 53 96 21 50. Daily: 10am-6pm, except Mon and public hols. Permanent collections free. www.cernuschi.paris.fr

Parc Monceau

29 rue Pasquier (8th). M° Saint-Lazare. Tel: 01 44 32 18 00. Thurs, Fri, Sat: 1-5pm. And some public hols. €5 – RR: €3.50. Under 18s, 18-25 yrs EU and 1st Sun of the month (from Nov to Mar): free. www.monuments-nationaux.fr

Palais de la Découverte – Universcience How does a light bulb light up? Do animals speak? What is out there in space? To answer these questions, Scientists carry out spectacular experiments on four themes (the Earth and the Universe, matter and energy, mathematics, and living things), which provide the focus for the permanent and temporary exhibitions. And the planetarium is an invitation to travel through the universe.

This 18th-century Anglo-Chinese ‘folly’ was one of the first irregular gardens designed like a cabinet of outdoor curiosities. Amongst the lawns and play areas, there remain some extravagances: the mock antique ruins surrounding the ornamental pond, a little bridge, a grotto, rocks and even an Egyptian tomb covered with moss! The last folly of note was the capture of a wolf, in 1972. 8th. M° Monceau.

81


VISITING THE CAPITAL

Hundreds of ways of visiting Paris … There is the traditional way of seeing Paris: visiting the city’s top sites and getting around on foot and other modes of transport whether public or private. But there are also less-well known or offbeat itineraries and sites to discover, literally hundreds of ways of getting around and seeing the city in a new light. Do you dream of following in the footsteps of impressionist or contemporary painters? Discovering street art, funerary art or sacred art? Touring India, the West Indies or China without taking a plane? Would you like to know everything about the fauna, flora and statuary of parks and gardens? Go on an art nouveau or art deco architectural walking tour? Historical, literary, cinematographic, gastronomic, and other themed walks? All types of tours are possible! Visits that are guided, thematic, on the water (see p.16), by bike, on foot, by electric scooter, on rollerblades, even in the air: here are some ideas for discovering another side of Paris.

82

Cultural visits The professions of guide and interpreter guide are regulated in France by the law of 13 July 1992. Only holders of a professional card are authorized to give guided tours of exhibitions and inside museums and monuments. Having the services of a lecturer guide or of an interpreter guide, if you prefer to communicate in your language, is a guarantee of quality and expertise. Guides will also take you on walking, cycling tours … and elaborate tours according to your wishes. Whether for a group or an individual, do not hesitate to call on the professionals below, all members of the tourist office and listed on parisinfo.com, and request the brochure Paris se visite/Visiting Paris (full of ideas for different ways of visiting Paris) at our information centres. More information on these professionals from the Fédération Nationale des Guides Interprètes et Conférenciers (FNGIC): www.fngic.fr

Other visits There is more to visit in Paris than the Louvre Museum and the Eiffel Tower! Whether it is your first visit to the capital or not, you will also enjoy discovering other aspects of the city … visiting the behindthe-scenes of theatres, meeting Parisians, trendy shopping, taking part in a treasure hunt … there is something for everyone!

Where to get information? Find information about guided tours in Paris and its surroundings in the brochure Paris se visite/Visiting Paris available at our information centres and on parisinfo.com, rubric “Trips and Tours/Guided tours”.

Heritage walks For those who prefer to explore the city by themselves, the Paris City Council has devised thematic itineraries to download from its website: Paris and its faubourgs, On the trail of the Middle Ages, and Stained-glass windows are a few of the themes offered. www.paris.fr

ROLLERBLADING TRIPS AROUND PARIS Every week, free skating trips are organized in the capital. The rando-rollers on Sunday is for families and beginners and starts from Place de la Bastille at 2.30pm (www.rollers-coquillages.org). The Friday evening tour is more energetic and is for experienced skaters. Unless the weather is rainy, it starts at 10pm from Place Raoul-Dautry, below the Tour Montparnasse, and returns around 1am in the morning (www.pari-roller.com).


• Viaduc des Arts (12th) • Place d’Italie (13th) • Bercy (12th), Tolbiac (13th) • Bois de Vincennes (12th)

The tramway is back in service. The Diderot University is open to students on the site of the former Grands Moulins flour mills. Docks en Seine – La Cité de la mode et du design (centre for fashion and design) occupies the site of the former bonded warehouses. A shopping centre now flourishes on the paving stones of abandoned covered markets, and pagodas dot 1970s tower blocks. You won’t believe your eyes!

PARIS

UNDISCOVERED

The south-east of Paris is undergoing a renaissance. The disused former railway line has been landscaped, and benches and skater ramps installed. The futuristic portico of the Ministry of Finance straddles the quay and is reflected in the water. Artistic creation and rehearsals take place at the Frigos, the former Paris-Ivry refrigerator station.

Flowering palisades, workers’ housing blocks standing shoulder to shoulder with skyscrapers, organic vegetable gardens on the waste ground of warehouses that back on to smoked-glass offices. And to go from one side of the Seine to the other, there are lush green tunnels, bridges of spindle-shaped steel, and an undulating footbridge between the four book-shaped towers of France’s national library – the Bibliothèque Nationale de France – and the contemporary cinema … Since the time of the medieval tanners on the banks of the River Bièvre, nothing has been lost, everything has metamorphosed!


H

UNDISCOVERED PARIS

ReuillyDiderot

Quai de la Rapée

Jussieu

Gare de Lyon

i Gare d’Austerlitz

Montgallet

Place Monge

Censier Daubenton

Bercy

St-Marcel

Quai de la Gare

PALAIS OMNISPORT DE PARIS-BERCY

H

Gobelins CampoFormio

Chevaleret

Cour St-Émilion

Nationale Bibliothèque Fr. Mitterrand

Place d’Italie

Place-d’Italie (lines 5, 6 ,7) • Gobelins (line 7) • Gare-de-Lyon (lines 1, 14) • Cour-Saint-Émilion (line 14) • Bercy (lines 6, 14)

DON’T MISS Docks en Seine – Cité de la mode et du design Designed by the architects Jakob+MacFarlane, Docks en Seine (ex-Magasins généraux) seeks to familiarize the public with all types of fashion, beauty and design. The site includes concept stores, exhibition spaces and the French fashion institute. The 2,500 sq. metre terrace, accessible to the public, offers an exceptional view over the river. On the corner of the pont Charles-de-Gaulle. 34 quai-d’Austerlitz (13th). M° Quai-de-la-Gare. Opening end 2011. www.paris-docks-en-seine.fr

Bois de Vincennes 995 hectares of trees, lakes, islands and grass! This royal hunting ground, now Paris’s largest green space, is crisscrossed with 32 km of car-free roads, some 20 km of

cycle paths and a similar number of bridle paths. And what’s more, the wood also has a zoo (closed until 2014 for renovation work), a race track, an ornithological reserve, a theatre, a Buddhist temple, and more.

Don’t miss the Dahlia garden, the Valley of Flowers, etc.

Esplanade du château (12th). M° Château-de-Vincennes. Tel: 01 43 43 92 95. €3. www.paris.fr 12th. M° Porte-Dorée.

Château de Vincennes PASS

Parc Floral de Paris City of Paris botanical garden

In summertime, jazz and classical music concerts fill the air of the park, with its little vales, water features, patios, pine wood, cedars and beeches. In the orchard, the Jardin Insolite cultivates exotic species and vegetables from the past, while the hothouses of the Butterfly garden are mostly home to cocoons and chrysalises.

The Capetian kings established their hunting manor in the surrounding forest in the 12th century. Two centuries went by, Charles V had a keep built here along with ramparts and a Holy Chapel. In the 17th century, Louis XIII grew up here and Louis XIV stayed here. Half fortified castle, half classic palace, it is a wonderful ensemble! Av. de Paris. Vincennes. M° Château-de-Vincennes. Tel: 01 48 08 31 20.

85


1 Apr to 30 Sept: 10am-6.15pm. 1 Oct to 31 Mar: 10am-5.15pm. Daily, except 1 Jan, 1 May and 25 Dec. €8 – RR: €5. Under 18s, 18-25 yrs EU and 1st Sun of the month (Nov to Mar): free. www.monuments-nationaux.fr

ARTS AND CRAFTS Over 50 craft workers and designers have their ateliers under the vaults of the Viaduc des Arts. Wood, leather, copper, bark, thread, gouache, marble, moss, straw, clay, paper, pigments, and glass … are transformed before your eyes. 1 to 129, av. Daumesnil (12th). M° Ledru-Rollin – Gare-de-Lyon. Tel: 01 44 75 80 66. www.viaducdesarts.fr

DID YOU KNOW?

?

A 5-hectare working organic farm, the Ferme de Paris allows young city-dwellers to explore country life through the seasons with its meadow, stables and farmyard. Route du Pesage (12th). www.paris.fr

Viaduc des Arts and promenade plantée

The walk begins in mid-air, on avenue Daumesnil. A staircase leads up to the viaduct of a former

railway line. Brick mansions eventually give way to the former residence of the Merovingian kings, now the Jardin de Reuilly, with its half-moonshaped lawn. A footbridge, a tunnel, and that just about sums up this stretch of greenery that was once Paris’s circular railway line. In total, 4.5 km of pure delight.

Bibliothèque nationale de France – site François-Mitterrand Once upon a time, there were four towers in the shape of open books, dominating the Seine on a wooden square and set around a garden. Since 1996, they have been the repository for books while the Haut-de jardin and Rezde- jardin levels devote their reading rooms – red carpet, steel and natural wood – to all fields of knowledge, printed material as well as multimedia and many fine exhibitions. Quai François-Mauriac (13th). M° BibliothèqueFrançois-Mitterrand. Tel: 01 53 79 49 49 (res, tours). Tues to Sat: 10am-7pm. Sun: 1-7pm. Closed on public hols and two weeks in Sept. Bibliothèque d’études: €3.50 (accessible from aged 16). Temporary exhibitions: €7/€5. www.bnf.fr

12th. M° Bastille.

DISCOVER La Butte-aux-Cailles

This churchless village, which witnessed popular uprisings in 1871, owes its name to a certain Monsieur Caille, who planted vines here around 1540. Although the libertarian spirit has disappeared with time, good humour remains among the little houses with flowers, and the small, cobbled alleyways such as the rues de l’Espérance, des Cinq-Diamants, and de la Butteaux-Cailles. Discover its small and co-op run cafes with walls tattooed with poetic Miss.Tic stencils. 86

Palais de la Porte-Dorée – aquarium tropical PASS Built in the strict and grand art deco style for the Exposition Coloniale of 1931, the former museum of the Colonies retains its Aquarium (renovated in 1985). The educational trail takes the visitor from primitive to electric fish, and from the waters of Asia to the aquatic fauna of Africa and South America. 293 av. Daumesnil (12th). M° Porte-Dorée. Tel: 01 53 59 58 60. Tues to Fri: 10am-5.15pm. Sat and Sun: 10am-7pm. Closed Mon and some public hols. €4.50/€6.50 – RR: €3/€5. www.aquarium-portedoree.fr


UNDISCOVERED PARIS

Palais de la Porte-Dorée – Cité nationale de l’histoire de l’immigration

CHINATOWN IN PARIS

This cultural centre traces two centuries of immigration in France. The permanent exhibition ‘Repères’ evokes departure, frontiers, the living environment, exclusion, work, and the mutual enrichment of cultures. 293 av. Daumesnil (12th). M° Porte-Dorée. Tel: 01 53 59 58 60. Tues to Fri: 10am-5.30pm. Sat and Sun: 10am-7pm. Closed Mon and some public hols. €3/€5 – RR: €2/€3.50. Under 26s and 1st Sun of the month: free. www.histoire-immigration.fr

La Cinémathèque française – musée du Cinéma PASS Optical instruments, cameras, magic lanterns, legendary costumes, posters, documents from film shoots and cult objects all make up the collection of this museum. Film buffs will find the greatest names in cinema including Charlie Chaplin, Fritz Lang, Buñuel and Alfred Hitchcock. 51 rue de Bercy (12th). M° Bercy. Tel: 01 71 19 33 33. Mon to Sat: 12-noon to 7pm. Sun: 10am-8pm. Tues, 1 Jan, 1 May, 3 weeks in Aug, 25 Dec: closed. €5 – RR: €4. Under 18s: €2.50. www.cinematheque.fr

Bercy Village Like the neighbouring Bercy Park, the village is reserved for pedestrians. Themed restaurants, cinema, shops for good wine and good living, Zen culture for the mind and body occupy these former 19th-century wine storehouses with their pointed roofs and stonework.

Neon lights flash in Chinese ideograms. Even Uncle Sam’s fast food restaurant has a pagoda roof! Below the tower blocks on the Olympiades paved area, you’ll find guavas, silk tunics, Tonkinese soups and karaoke DVDs in the shopping arcades. And here, New Year is celebrated a good month after 1 January! Since the 1970s, dragon dances, kites, gongs and flowers have been parading in the triangle of avenue d’Ivry, avenue de Choisy and boulevard Massena, which form the heart of this Asian quarter in the 13th arrondissement.

Musée national du sport The museum showcases some 100,000 objects related to sport: the poster for the first Football World Cup in 1930, the gloves and dressing gown of Marcel Cerdan, an 18th-century plate with an illustration of royal tennis, medals from the Albertville Olympic Games (1992), a racket of Yannick Noah (1983), etc. 93 av. de France (13th). M° BibliothèqueFrançois-Mitterrand. Tel: 01 45 83 15 80. Tues to Fri: 10am-6pm. Sat, 1st Sun of the month and public hols: 2pm-6pm. Mon, 25 Dec and 1 Jan: closed. €4 – RR: €2. Under 18s, 1st Sun of the month: free. www.museedusport.fr

Manufacture nationale des Gobelins, de Beauvais et de la Savonnerie Cour Saint-Émilion (12th). M° Cour-Saint-Émilion. Tel: 0 825 166 075 (€0.15/min). Daily: 11am-9pm. Restaurants: 11am to 1.30 or 2.30 in the morning. www.bercyvillage.com

DID YOU KNOW?

?

This village is 6,500-years-old! In 1990, the building site for the renovation of the storehouses and the creation of the park unearthed three oak flat-bottomed sailing boats and thousands of artefacts from the Neolithic period.

Around 1440, Jean Gobelin, a “scarlet dyer” came to live on the banks of the River Bièvre. Later in 1667, Colbert grouped together tapestry, ebony, gold and silversmith workshops to form the Manufacture Royale des Meubles de la Couronne. At the rate of 1 sq.m. of tapestry per year and using the high warp technique, tapestry-making goes on with respect for this traditional art. 42 av. des Gobelins (13th). M° Gobelins. Tel: 01 44 08 53 49. Visit accompanied by a speaker. Tues, Wed and Thurs: 1pm, 3pm, except public hols and Aug. €9 – RR: €7. 4-12 yrs: €4 (except for exhibitions). www.mobiliernational.culture.gouv.fr

87


SURROUNDING AREA

Val-de-Marne Paris

There are plenty of ideas for places to go in the Val-de-Marne area. Its proximity to Paris means you can easily spend a day exploring museums and losing all sense of time in wonderful gardens …

3 2 1 6

45

10 km

1

Roseraie du Val de Marne

The garden devised by rose-lover Jules Gravereaux and landscaped by Édouard André in 1899 boasts 3,177 varieties of old roses. A work of art.

4

Exploradôme

A museum for exploring the sciences, multimedia and sustainable development and where it is prohibited … not to touch! You can start a tornado, stick your shadow to the wall, etc. 18 av. Henri-Barbusse. 94400 Vitry-sur-Seine. M° Villejuif – Louis-Aragon, then bus 172. Tel: 01 43 91 16 20. Contact for opening times. €6 – RR: €4.50. www.exploradome.com

Rue Albert-Watel. 94240 L’Haÿ-les-Roses. M° Porte-d’Italie, then bus 184. Tel: 01 43 99 82 80 (local council parks and gardens department). 6 May to 18 Sept 2011: 10am-8pm. €3 – RR: €1.50. Under 5s: free. Guided visits: contact for information. www.roseraieduvaldemarne.com

Musée Fragonard de l’École Vétérinaire de Maisons-Alfort 2

Situated in the park of the prestigious École Nationale Vétérinaire de Maisons-Alfort, this cabinet of curiosities presents a unique collection devoted to pet animals: skeletons, moulds, natural anomalies (cyclops, mermaids …) and the famous Écorchés of Honoré Fragonard (1732-1799). 7 av. du Général-de-Gaulle. 94700 Maisons-Alfort. M° École-Vétérinaire-de-Maisons-Alfort. Tel: 01 43 96 71 72. Wed, Thurs: 2-6pm. W/e: 1-6pm. €7 with audioguide – RR: €5. Under 18s, 18-25 yrs EU: free. http://musee.vet-alfort.fr/ 3

MAC/VAL

This amazing museum of contemporary art boasts a rich collection of works that presents the art scene in France from the 1950s to the present. It is also a vibrant arts venue with a cinema, a documentation centre, a bookshop and art workshops. Place de la Libération. 94400 Vitry-sur-Seine. M° Porte-de-Choisy, then bus 183. Tel: 01 43 91 64 20. Daily: 12-noon to 7pm, except Mon, 1 Jan, 1 May and 25 Dec. €5 – RR: €2.50. Under 26s, students, 1st Sun of the month: free. www.macval.fr 6

Marché international de Rungis

The leading fresh-food market in the world, Rungis can be visited on the second Friday of each month, departing from the Place Denfert-Rochereau (Paris), at 5am in the morning. 1 rue de la Tour. BP 316. 94152 Rungis Cedex. Tel: 0 892 700 119. €75 (entrance fee and coach). www.visiterungis.com

The Marne river bends

There is nothing like a trip along the river for discovering the exceptional natural beauty of the Marne riverbanks. The guinguette (open-air cafes with dancing) – synonymous with local popular culture and merriment, and Sundays at the water’s edge during the belle époque – combine well with water sports activities for nature enthusiasts. 88

5

CONTACT Comité départemental du tourisme du Val-de-Marne 16 rue Joséphine-de-Beauharnais. 94500 Champigny-sur-Marne. Tel: 01 55 09 16 20. cdt94@tourisme-valdemarne.com www.tourisme-valdemarne.com


OUTDOOR CITY LIFE

More than 450 parks and gardens, 2,199 hectares of municipal parks open to the public, 3,700 trees planted each year, over 300 kilometres of cycling paths (600 between now and 2014), an ever larger number of pedestrian areas – all that for relaxation and farniente! In Paris, nature and culture make a delightful mix. One can enjoy listening to openair concerts in the parks and admire art in the garden: fountains, sculptures, statues from all periods abound. Become more acquainted with the French, and English gardening styles, botanical, picturesque, and Anglo-Chinese gardens, and the so called Haussmanian, or contemporary, parks. Then there is the surprising richness and diversity of Paris’s fauna and flora to discover!

Public gardens, parks and woods

VÉLIB’

From the small public gardens that dot each neighbourhood to the huge woods of Boulogne and Vincennes, one is never far from an area of greenery in Paris. Closed in the event of bad weather, parks have different opening hours which also vary according to the time of year. Some lawns are prohibited to the public, and intruders are whistled off the grass by park personnel! Choose your park: modern at André-Citroën, Bercy and Clichy-Batignolles (see p.49), romantic at Bagatelle (see p.72), Monceau (see p.81) and Montsouris (see p.58), the lively parc de la Villette (see p.93) and Parc Floral de Paris (see p.85), etc. Other parks and gardens to discover: Jardins d’Éole – champions of ecology –, Luxembourg and Acclimatation, with their play areas for children (see p.56 and 71), Atlantique on the roof of the Montparnasse train station (see p.57), the busy

A fleet of 20,600 self-service bicycles, provided by the Paris City Council, offers Parisians and tourists all the pleasure of free wheeling around the city. 30 towns and villages on the outskirts of the capital are also served by 300 stations. www.velib.paris.fr les Halles (see p.33) or the tranquillity of Palais-Royal (see p.40), the Jardin des Plantes and its little zoo (see p.23), the hothouses at Auteuil (see p.72), Trocadéro with its fountains, etc.

Pedestrianized areas These traffic-free areas are great favourites with pedestrians. The main pedestrian thoroughfares are rues Daguerre (14th), de Lappe (9th), de Levis (17th), Mouffetard (5th), Montorgueil (2nd) and cour Saint-Émilion (12th). Some areas are also closed to traffic on Sunday and public holidays (as part of the

PARIS AIR-BALLOON In addition to initiating passengers into the joys of flying in an aerostat (according to weather conditions), the balloon is also an air-quality indicator. An information space has been set up below the balloon to explain the impact each of us has on the quality of the air. M° Javel, Balard. Flights daily: 9am until 30 min before closure of park. €12/10 – RR: €10/€9/€6/€5. Under 3s: free. Exhibition: free. www.ballondeparis.com

90


4-6 rue Louis-Armand (15th). M° Balard. Tel: 01 40 60 10 00. Mon to Thurs: 9am-11pm. Fri: 9am-midnight. Sat: 8am-midnight. Sun: 8am-11pm. Cash desks close at 9pm. €20/€25. 3 to 11 yrs: €12. Under 3s: not allowed. www.aquaboulevard.fr Leisure pool with water slides, saunas, Jacuzzis … for children and adults.

Aquarium tropical (palais de la Porte-Dorée) 293 av. Daumesnil (12th). M° Porte-Dorée. Tel: 01 53 59 58 60. Daily: 10am-5.15pm, except Mon. €4.50 – RR: €3. 18-25 yrs EU: free. www.aquarium-portedoree.fr See p.86.

Jardin d’Acclimatation Bois de Boulogne (16th). M° Les Sablons. Tel: 01 40 67 90 82. Apr to Sept: 10am-6pm. Oct to Mar: 10am-7pm. Park: €2.90, train: €2.70 (return). RR: 50%. Under 3s: free. www.jardindacclimatation.fr See p.71.

Outdoor city life

Theme parks Aquaboulevard de Paris

PARIS TREASURE HUNT Every summer, this treasure hunt offers a discovery tour of the cultural and historical heritage of Paris for Parisians and visitors, in a team or as a family. The 2011 edition is accessible to people with physical disabilities and is expected to draw 20,000 participants. It will take place on Saturday 12 July, in the 3rd, 6th, 9th, 11th, 12th, 13th, 18th, 19th and 20th arrondissements and in Saint-Ouen. Differents itineraries, one of which will be in English. Information: www.paris.fr

Ménagerie du Jardin des plantes

Évasion verte

57 rue Cuvier (5th). M° Jussieu, Gare-d’Austerlitz. Tel: 01 40 79 37 94. Daily: 9am-6pm. Sun and public hols: 9am-6.30pm. €8. 4-13 yrs: €6. Under 4s: free. www.mnhn.fr See p.23.

Tel: 06 12 80 06 75. M° Boulogne – Pont-de-Saint-Cloud. €24 – RR: €14/€18. Acrobatic trails throught the treetops at the Domaine national de Saint-Cloud. www.evasion-verte.fr

On the outskirts of Paris

Aquarium Sea Life Centre commercial international Val-d’Europe. 14 cours du Danube/Les Terrasses. 77700 Serris. RER A Val-d’Europe. Tel: 01 60 42 33 66. Daily: 10am-5.30pm. €16. Under 12s: €12. Under 3s: free. www.sealife.fr Discover the richness of marine life and the importance of protecting it.

Disneyland Paris + See p.110.

Parc Astérix + 60128 Plailly. Tel: 0 826 30 10 40 (€0,15/min). June, July, Aug: daily. Apr, May, Sept, Oct, Nov, Dec: contact for information. €40 – 3 to 11 yrs: €30. Under 3s: free. www.parcasterix.fr Sample life with the Gaulls: test the effects of the magic potion, teach the very youngest how to repel Roman chariots, etc.

Parc zoologique de Thoiry 78770 Thoiry. Tel: 01 34 87 53 76. Opening times and dates variable: contact for information. www.thoiry.net

PARIS RESPIRE (PARIS ‘BREATHES’) The riverside expressways are closed to motor vehicles on Sunday and public holidays, from 9am to 5pm. Cyclists, walkers and skaters have 10 different areas of Paris all to themselves, as well as the right bank of the Seine – voie G.-Pompidou, from the entrance to the tunnel at the Tuileries (1st) to the Charles-de-Gaulle bridge (12th) – and the left bank – from the entrance quai A.-France (7th) to the exit quai Branly (7th). Information: www.paris.fr

EVENT

initiative “Paris respire” – Paris breathes –, cf. box), neighbourhoods of the Sentier (2nd), Mouffetard (5th), Luxembourg (6th), la Roquette (11th), Montmartre (18th), rues des Martyrs (9th) and Poteau (18th).

91


• Canal Saint-Martin (10th) • La Villette (19th) • Buttes-Chaumont (19th) • Belleville (20th)

PARIS

COSMOPOLITAN

Taking flight from the end of rue des Envierges, on the high terrace of Belleville Park, above Maison de l’Air, you fly over four-storey Chinese restaurants, city gardens and a schoolboy’s huge blackboard on which Ben has written that we shouldn’t trust in words. Next stop, the Canal Saint-Martin, where a blue barge passes through a green lock – it’s a lengthy process. On the Ourcq, a rowing boat races a kayak, and a graffiti-covered van overtakes them on the quay. Call in at the CENTQUATRE, rue d’Aubervilliers, for a novel cultural adventure. Next stop, a 3,000 sq.m. bamboo plantation, surrounded with lawned areas – you are in la Villette Park. Zigzagging your way through the Jardin des Voltiges then the Jardin des Dunes and Vents, you’ll find pedal-driven windmills, weather vanes, kites … before you reach an enormous ball that reflects the clouds – the Géode! A spatial odyssey on a giant screen – it definitely gives you an appetite. Choose your menu: mafé in Place Sainte-Marthe and a Technicolor film? A slam session, soup and kebabs at “Ménilmuche”? Curry, capoiera dances and ragga hip hop performances? Chilli with bird’s beak pepper and a theatre bar? Tagine and a pop-electro concerto and more.


Porte de la Villette ILE

RU E

IE R S

U

EA

R.

NO

ÉE

G VA N L’É

IM

NA

DE

CR

OR

R

DE

Corentin Cariou CINAXE L’ O

ZÉNITH

CH

AR

Marx-Dormoy

ENE

R.

CQ

R.

FL

AN

DR

E

R. D ’A U

BER

UR

E

BO

UL

EV

AR

BD

AV .D

RU E DE CL IG NA NC

R. O RD

BD BARBÈS

RC

V IL L

OU RT

NE Hoche L IV E AR M N LO A D ET Crimée R JEA LA LE AV. R. RIQ UET L MarcadetE I E IS I D N V Poissonniers L’ O U A I O PORTE Riquet DE QDE T H SACRÉPorte DE PANTIN I A Château Rouge CŒUR È S de Pantin QU TE E R U LE PRÉT A LE IR NJ JEA VIL LO TI T La Chapelle ST-GERVAIS AV. Ourcq RU E PE LA A DE L BarbèsIN E Rochechouart BD DE LA CHAPELLE SS D R È S Laumière BA AI IN JAU AN AN QU UX A RT LARIBOISIÈRE Stalingrad PL. DE AV. J E R. R. M R CHOU EA E H ÉR IN C M LO H D ’A N. D . MA N E RO A. CARR EL STALINGRAD R. IP E . G UI BD D ERS R D HE S SÉ R IQ BL Bolivart RU GARE UE A Danube A Louis V. NC Jaurès RI S ER DU NORD Blanc EC ÏA UZA Botzaris MO R Gare R. DE ÉT A Château N A RI S du Nord Pré St-Gervais BO T Z Landon R. BOIS GARE E ButtesDES ETT Cadet RUE FAY DE L’EST Chaumont A L Pl. des Colonel L I E R. F E IL L SS RUE Fabien V A R Fêtes LEV A RT R . DPoissonnière BE L E PA R . DE Gare RAD IS de l’Est Jourdain R. RICHE R Pyrénées Télégraphe ST-LOUIS Château RUE R. M A

DEN

ES

TA

BET

RU

ES

LL

BE

AI

QU

G R. RA D NG E E LA AU X

G

RG

UR

OU

BO

ASB

FA U

STR

DU

DE

PELLEPORT

St-Fargeau

R.

RUE

S

LE

PARC DE BELLEVILLE

PY

IL

BD

ÉE

EV RG OU Belleville UB LE FA M P DU TE BELLEVILLE R. DU

AV. G AM

E

ES

AP

MM

JE

S A IN T-

DE

EC HO UA RT

CH

POIS SON NIÈR E

IM

DE

LL

R. DU FAUB OUR G

CR

E

DE

RU

R.

BE

A NT

ES AP MM Y JE LM D E E VA D Q.

GE

H

DE

Q.

MA

d’Eau

BD

DE

Bonne Nouvelle

i

BD

Grands Boulevards

AV. SIMO N B O

RO

P

IS

D

i

500 m

Belleville (lines 2, 11) • Pyrénées (line 11) • Buttes-Chaumont (line 7 bis) • Botzaris (line 7 bis) • Porte-de-la-Villette (line 7) • Porte-de-Pantin (line 5) • Jaurès (lines 2, 5, 7 bis)

DON’T MISS Le CENTQUATRE City of Paris artistic establishment

and huge abattoirs were built on the site. In 1974, their closure led in the 1980s to its reconversion into a cultural centre, symbolic of the renewal of the East of Paris.

211 av. Jean-Jaurès (19th). M° Porte-de-la-Villette. Tel: 01 40 03 75 75. www.villette.com Grande Halle :

Parc de la Villette

On the site of the former Municipal Funeral Service, the CENTQUATRE enables the public to formulate a new perception of the visual arts, music, dance, theatre, video, fashion, design, cinema or literature. 104 rue d’Aubervilliers or 5 rue Curial (19th). M° Crimée, Stalingrad. Tel: 01 53 35 50 00. Daily, except Mon: 11am-8pm. Sun: 11am-7pm. www.104.fr

La Villette In the 19th century, the commune of La Villette was an industrial centre. In 1867, a cattle market

Cité des sciences et de l’industrie – La Villette PASS

The park’s wide lawns crossed by the Canal de l’Ourcq and dotted with red pavilions are a popular place to play ball, read or enjoy the sounds of live percussion … In fine weather, people gather to picnic and enjoy open-air concerts and films. Scattered around the four corners of the perimeter: the Grande Halle, the former Bourse aux Cuirs now the Théâtre Paris- Villette, the Zénith concert hall, an equestrian centre, the big top of the Cabaret Sauvage, a dragon slide, and more.

Behind its steel and glass exterior, this futuristic giant, surrounded by water offers a multitude of activities that make science and technology fun and accessible. Conferences, aquarium, 3-D cinema, Cités des Enfants, des Métiers, de la Santé, exhibitions, media library, planetarium, workshops … It is difficult to fit everything in at one go! 30 av. Corentin-Cariou (19th). M° Porte-de-la-Villette. Tel: 01 40 05 80 00. Individual reservations: 0 892 69 70 72 (€0.34/min). Group reservations: 01 40 05 12 12.

93

COSMOPOLITAN PARIS

ON NE T

DE

BD

Simplon R. OR DE NE

ER

CH AM PI

R.

RUE


Tues to Sat: 10am-6pm. Sun: 10am-7pm. 1 Jan, 1 May and 25 Dec: closed. Explora exhibitions: €8 – RR: €6. Under 6s: free. Supplement Planetarium: €3. Under 3s: not allowed. www.cite-sciences.fr

The Cité des enfants It offers two exhibitions (2-7 yrs and 5-12 yrs) in the form of interactive learning activities: building a house, playing with water … a fully-renovated centre. Even parents will love it!

2-12 yrs: €8 – RR: €6.

Three spectacular satellite sites The Argonaute, a former naval submarine; the Cinaxe with a mobile projection room that simulates a high-speed flight; the sparkling silver Géode, a 36-diameter stainless steel ball with a 1,000 sq.m. hemispheric screen that makes for thrilling cinema. The Argonaute Tues to Sat: 10am-6pm. Sun: 10am-7pm. €3. From 3 yrs. The Cinaxe From 4 yrs. Tues to Sun: film shows lasting approx. 15 min from 11am-5pm. Sch hols and some Mon: 11am-6pm. €5.40 – RR: €4.80.

94

The Géode 26 av. Corentin-Cariou (19th). M° Porte-de-la-Villette. Tel: 0 892 68 45 40 (€0.34/min). €10.50 – RR: €9. Under 3s: not allowed. www.lageode.fr

Cité de la musique – Musée de la musique PASS Situated in the south of the Parc de la Villette, the Cité de la musique provides the widest access to musical culture for all, with concerts, a museum, educational activities and publications for adults and children. The museum showcases a collection of more than 4,000 instruments from the 17th-century to the present. 221 av. Jean-Jaurès (19th). M° Porte-de-Pantin. Tel: 01 44 84 44 84. Tues to Sat: 12-noon-6pm. Sun: 10am-6pm. €8 – RR: contact for information. Under 26s: free. www.citedelamusique.fr

Belleville

In the beginning there were the sources, hence the names of the streets rue de la Mare (pond), rue des Rigoles (rivulets), and wine fresh from the vines, called piquette (cheap local wine). In 1730, the Grand-Rue of the village (rues de Belleville and du Faubourg-du-Temple) were paved. Carousing took place under shady trees. From cheap eating houses to popular dance halls, every carnival was rounded off with an extravagant parade down the Courtille. In the 19th century, people of modest means flooded

into the factories: misery and workers movements went hand-in-hand. The Armenians arrived in 1918, Greeks in 1920, German Jews in 1933, Spaniards in 1939 … In “Babelville”, the whole world mixes, except perhaps the blackbird and song thrush nesting in the heights of the park. Canal Saint-Martin

Extending over 4.5 km, of which two are underground, it has linked the Port de l’Arsenal to the La Villette canal basin since 1825. Its course across working class areas, punctuated with locks, swing bridges, Venice-style footbridges, and lined with chestnut trees and squares, inspired Georges Simenon, Léo Malet and Marcel Carné in the film Hôtel du Nord. Yes! It was from the little iron bridge at the Grange-aux-Belles–Vinaigriers crossroads – reconstructed in the studio – that Arletty famously quipped to Louis Jouvet ‘Atmosphère…’. Not surprising, serenading by the water and supper under the stars have become an institution here, as have brunches, delightful retro bistros and colourful eateries on both sides of the canal banks.

DID YOU KNOW?

?

From Port de l’Arsenal, as well as from Port de Solférino (below the Orsay museum) to Parc de la Villette, or the other way round, cruises with a commentary will take you on a peaceful voyage through the 4th, 10th, 11th and 19th arrondissements (see p.16).


COSMOPOLITAN PARIS

DISCOVER Bassin de la Villette and canal de l’Ourcq Until the industrial decline of La Villette, after the Second World War, wood, coal, fodder, and sugar passed in transit along its long quaysides. Today, they are the location for attractive cinemas, pétanque players, cosy cafes to warm up in, benches in the fresh air looking on to the lapping water, fishermen, barge-theatres, a water sports centre in a reconverted 19th-century warehouse, etc. In the background you’ll hear the cries of gulls and the referee’s whistle.

Ménilmontant Of all the Belleville hamlets this one is the most famous, with its rough wine and guingette dance halls that played host to Piaf, Chevalier, Trenet and others. The old songs can still be heard in its winding streets mixed with contemporary melodies: informal bars, groovy apéros, gypsy jazz or philosophical debates at the cafe, colourful bazaars and tropical stalls, trompe-l’œil and artistic graffiti at the bend in rue des Cascades or on rue de l’Ermitage, rickety small houses and the red citadels of the affordable housing built in the 1920s. Quartier Jourdain Also known as Haut-Belleville, the area around the Église Saint-Jean-Baptiste, built in the Gothic style in 1859, and a patisserie that’s almost as old, in rue du Jourdain, offers typical Parisian dishes and quiet walks past hidden courtyards and artists’ workshops opening onto flower gardens.

30-metres-high, crowned with the fanciful little temple of Sibyls. From here, there are sweeping views across the horizon or down to the balletic black swans and moorhens below. 19th. M° Pyrénées, Buttes-Chaumont.

Église Saint-Serge This former Lutheran temple was bought at auction in 1924, on Saint Serge Day, to welcome faithful Russian orthodox worshippers, whose numbers had become too large in rue Daru. Behind the gate, visitors admire its red vermillion walls, filigree wooden staircase and icons. 93 rue de Crimée (19th). M° Crimée. Tel: 01 42 01 96 10.

Quartier de la Mouzaïa

It is a working-class housing estate built between the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century! Running down the side of the hill are some twenty pedestrianized little streets, with delightful ‘villas’ laid out in a star shape from rue de Mouzaïa and rue Michel-Hidalgo. Red brick dominates but each of the houses has its own character – a pink facade here, yellow tiles there, shutters with heart-shaped cut-outs, tidy yards and wild gardens. Le Plateau – centre d’art contemporain

Parc des Buttes-Chaumont In 1860, the buttes (little hills) of the mont chauve were still quarried for gypsum and blasted in the open air. Seven years later, on the orders of Napoléon III, the steepest and most picturesque of the landscaped parks was inaugurated. In the interval, titanic work was carried out using dynamite to terrace and reshape the landscape, creating waterfalls, a lake, a grotto with fake stalactites, and an island of rocks

Immaculate walls display contemporary art for the public with exhibitions and an experimental space that presents the works of artists in residence in Paris. 50 metres away at 22, cours du 7e-Art, the Antenne organises contemporary creation-related educational events. Place Hannah-Arendt. Corner of rue des Alouettes and the rue de Carducci (19th). M° Buttes-Chaumont. Tel: 01 76 21 13 41. Wed to Fri: 2pm-7pm. Sat, Sun: 12-noon-8pm. Free (except events). www.fracidf-leplateau.com

95


SURROUNDING AREA

Seine-Saint-Denis

Just north-east of Paris the Seine-SaintDenis area possesses many treasures. There is something for all tastes: sporting adventures, relaxing shopping, a full programme of artistic events, great outings with the family. Take your pick!

12

5

34

Paris 10 km

1 Basilique cathédrale de Saint-Denis PASS

The basilica is a cradle of gothic architecture. A royal abbey in the Middle Ages, it became the official burial place for Merovingian aristocrats, then Carolingian and Capetian kings. From its illustrious past, the basilica retains a unique ensemble of recumbent statues and more than 70 sculpted tombs, including those of Clovis, François I, Catherine de Médicis … 1 rue de la Légion-d’Honneur. 93200 Saint-Denis. M° Basilique-Saint-Denis. Tel: 01 48 09 83 54. Opening times: contact for information. 7 € – RR: €4.50. Under 18s, 18-25 yrs EU: free. www.monuments-nationaux.fr

2

Stade de France

The stadium boasts 6 hectares of roofing, 45 km of terraces and 9,000 sq.m. of turf, and hosts a round of sporting events, concerts and shows. A visit and museum trail recount all these great moments, the behind-the-scenes and public areas.

93216 Saint-Denis-la-Plaine. M° Saint-Denis – Porte-de-Paris. Tel: 0 892 700 900 (€0.34/min). 10am-6pm. Tours daily, except during events: 10am-6pm. Access gate G. Contact for times. €12 – RR: €8. Under 6s: free. www.stadefrance.com

3

Puces de Paris-Saint-Ouen

This flea market brings together more than 1,500 second-hand and antique dealers on some 16 markets and little streets, and attracts several million visitors each year for its inimitable atmosphere and the quality of its old furniture, gilded wood, glassware and other unusual objects for bargain hunters! M° Porte-de-Clignancourt, Garibaldi. Tel: 01 40 12 32 58. Sat: 9am-6pm. Sun: 10am-6pm. Mon: 11am-5pm. www.parispuces.com. See p.99. 4

Musée Pierre Cardin

Referred to as an “architect of clothing”, a “pioneer” and a “fashion reference”, Pierre Cardin gives us here a selection of the most original and representative creations of his career. 33 bd Victor-Hugo. 93400 Saint-Ouen. M° Mairie-de-Saint-Ouen. Tel: 01 49 21 08 20. Wed, Sat and Sun: 2-5pm. 5

Musée de l’Air et de l’Espace

PASS

150 planes bring the history of aviation alive for you, from the epic adventures of Louis Blériot, or Saint-Exupéry to the high-tech Mirage and Ariane rockets. Climb aboard a Boeing 747 or Concorde. Enjoy a visit with the family to the new Planète Pilote exhibition area where children can learn all about flying and space. Aéroport de Paris – Le Bourget. 93350 Le Bourget. RER B Le Bourget. Tel: 01 49 92 70 00. Contact for opening times. Free (except exhibitions). www.museedelair.org

CONTACT Comité départemental du tourisme de la Seine-Saint-Denis 140 av. Jean-Lolive. 93695 Pantin Cedex. Tel: 01 49 15 98 98. info@tourisme93.com – www.tourisme93.com

96


PARIS CONVENTION AND VISITORS BUREAU

PARIS We make it easy

EVENTS, LEISURE, MUSEUMS, HOTELS, RESTAURANTS, SHOPPING, TOURS: ALL PARIS IS ON PARISINFO.COM Photos: Getty Images, Intermusées, A. Dupont, Lido.


MEETING THE PARISIANS

You might know the capital. But what do you know about daily life here? To enjoy all those little unexpected pleasures, there is nothing better than local neighbourhood life in markets, cafes, local buses or the tramway … Share in the leisure activities of Parisians, their favourite places and their moments of relaxation with friends or family and even get to learn some French. Markets In addition to permanent, often covered markets, there are many marchés (markets) that set up their stalls several mornings per week, especially towards the end of the week, in every local neighbourhood. People shop here for the fresh and varied range of produce, and the lively and friendly atmosphere. You can ask the fishmonger for advice, taste samples of goodies that will make you want to fill your shopping basket and much more. Some have a speciality: organic at the Raspail and des Batignolles markets and in rue Saint-Charles, exotic products at Aligre, Barbès and Belleville. Flowers, and stamps (rond-point des Champs-Élysées), rare and second-hand books (parc Georges-Brassens, see p.59). Not forgetting the flea markets! More information at parisinfo.com, rubric “Practical Paris”.

98

Covered markets Alésia

Les Enfants rouges

Rue de la Glacière et de la Santé (14th). M° Glacière. Wed: 7am-2.30pm. Sat: 7am-3pm.

39 rue de Bretagne (3rd). M° Filles-du-Calvaire. Tues to Sat: 8.30am-1pm, 4pm-7.30pm (until 8pm Fri and Sat). Sun: 8.30am-2pm.

Barbès

Monge

Bd de la Chapelle (18th). M° Barbès-Rochechouart. Wed: 7am-2.30pm. Sat: 7am-3pm. See p.52.

Place Monge (5th). M° Place-Monge. Wed and Fri: 7am-2.30pm. Sun: 7am-3pm.

Saint-Germain

Bastille

4-8 rue Lobineau (6th). M° Mabillon. Tues to Fri: 8.30am-1pm and 4pm-8pm. Sat: 8.30am-1.30pm and 3.30pm-8pm. Sun: 8am-1.30pm.

Bd Richard-Lenoir (11th). Between rue Amelot and rue Saint-Sabin. M° Bastille. Thurs: 7am-2.30pm. Sun: 7am-3pm.

Batignolles 96 bis rue Lemercier (17th). M° Brochant. Tues to Fri: 8.30am-1pm and 3.30pm-8pm. Sat: 8.30am-8pm. Sun: 8.30am-2pm.

Ternes 8 bis rue Lebon (17th). M° Ternes. Tues to Sat: 8am-1pm and 4pm-7.30pm. Sun: 8am-1pm.

Flower markets Île de la Cité Place Louis-Lépine (4th). M° Cité. Tlj : 8h à 19h30.

RESPECT THE ENVIRONMENT, LIKE THE PARISIANS Sorting household rubbish, cleanliness of roads, keeping an eye on air quality, developing non-polluting public transport, the City Council’s sustainable development week … in Paris, the protection of the environment is the responsibility of everyone. Visitors are also invited to contribute to this initiative: wherever you are staying, avoid wasting water and energy; use preferably public transport to get around; whenever possible, sort your rubbish, etc. Information: www.paris.fr


East side of the church (8th). M° Madeleine. Daily: 8am-7.30pm, except Sun.

Place des Ternes On the central reservation (17th). M° Ternes. Wed to Sun: 8am-7.30pm.

Animal markets Place Louis-Lépine (4th)

Meeting the Parisians

Place de la Madeleine

PARIS WITH THE PARISIANS If you are already familiar with the classic sights in Paris and are curious about Parisian-style living, then we suggest that you go along and meet Parisians in their local neighbourhoods to share a few pleasant moments with them, their leisure time and their favourite addresses. All this information can be found on parisinfo.com, in the report “Paris with the Parisians” in the section “Trips & Tours”. You can also go along and discover a range of professions, from the most traditional to the most innovatory. Artisans will be happy to share their enthusiasm for their art with you, during a visit. Details on parisinfo.com, in the report “the Parisians at work” in the section “Trips & Tours”.

M° Cité. Sun: 8am-7pm. M° Pont-Neuf. Daily: 10am-7pm.

• Office de Tourisme de Saint-Ouen : Tel: 01 40 11 77 36. www.st-ouen-tourisme.com See p.96.

Flea markets

Vanves

The puces (flea markets) at the portes (gateways) to Paris are a paradise for those who like to hunt around for antiques, the curious, vintage fans and those who enjoy hunting for a bargain. At Saint-Ouen, more than 1,500 exhibitors on some fifteen or so markets offer a large choice of clothes, unusual objects and highquality antiques. Montreuil is top for knick-knacks, second-hand bikes, small items of furniture and secondhand clothes. The marché de Vanves is essentially a secondhand market and overflows with old toys, paintings and advertising objects and more.

Porte de Vanves, Porte Didot. Av. Georges-Lafenestre (W/e: 7am-3-5pm). Av. Marc-Sangnier (14th) (W/e: 7am-1pm). http://pucesdevanves.typepad.com/

Porte de Montreuil Av. de la Porte-de-Montreuil (20th). M° Porte-de-Montreuil. Sat to Mon: 7am-7.30pm. www.paris.fr

Porte de Saint-Ouen Av. de la Porte-de-Clignancourt (18th). M° Porte-de-Clignancourt. Sat: 9am-6pm. Sun: 10am-6pm. Mon: 11am-5pm. • Association des Puces de Paris Saint-Ouen : Tel: 01 40 12 32 58. www.parispuces.com

Galerie Cristo 33-41 rue Paul-Bert. 93400 Saint-Ouen. Tel: 01 40 11 05 16. www.galeriecristo.com Antique Chinese furniture and objects at the heart of the Saint-Ouen flea market.

Do you speak French?

which will help make this language (reputed to be difficult) easier. Some schools will even help you to arrange your language stay. More information on parisinfo.com, rubric “Practical Paris”.

Smile, you’re being filmed! Take advantage of a free ride on a magic carpet to crack jokes at Parisians. It all lasts 3 minutes and is filmed in a studio. If you want to, you can take the DVD (€29.90 ) away with you to add to your holiday souvenirs.

Paris Magic Souvenirs 4 bd de Clichy (18th). Tel: 09 53 37 96 17. Daily: 11am-11pm. ParisMagicSouvenirs@yahoo.fr

Would you like to improve your French and learn more about French culture? Contact language schools

OUTDOOR CINEMA FESTIVAL Every summer, a giant screen is set up on the grass of the Triangle in the Parc de la Villette for a season of free films shown in their original version. At nightfall, people enjoy getting together to picnic on the grass before the start of the film. The 2011 edition runs from 19 July to 21 August. Theme: “the street in films” with a panorama of films from all over the world. Information: www.villette.com

EVENT

Quai de la Mégisserie (1st)

99


• République (10th) • Bastille (11th) • Oberkampf (11th) • Père-Lachaise (20th)

Mix accordion, a musette waltz and the oompahpah-pahs of the Firemen’s Ball. Take a tightrope walker in midair from under the cupola of the Cirque d’Hiver. Throw in a sandwich and liqueurs from a pre-war cafe on rue de la Main-d’Or, some shiny souvenirs of oldtime trades – boiler makers, scrap-metal merchants, and matchstick sellers – and that’s the first third.

PARIS

PEOPLE’S

Next, take a parade of demonstrators marching and chanting from the column at the Bastille to the statue with its Phrygian bonnet at République. Incorporate several revolutions, powder and canons. Finally, the last third: spice with a pinch of Brazil, lemon, cane sugar, Cap Vert, salsa and tapas, one after the other. Sprinkle with showrooms and fashionable spots, soup stores, Wi-Fi, fruit juice, and make-up. Season with plush sofas, silver dance floors, moleskin wall seats and the soft lighting of inner-rooms and glean some glam rock, jungle, disco remix, high-spirited DJs, and alternative labels. Do not shake – the cocktail is self-activating!


CH AR LO R. DE TURENNE T

R. R DU AR UE TE CH DE MP IV S LE ES RU E

IR

L IN ROL RU LED

E VI E

LENO ARD

Alexandre Dumas

ON

STE

NE

GU

RE

AR

Rue des Boulets

AU

LT AI

PE

VO

CH

ILIP

UE

NE

DE

ON HAR

PH

AV E N

D

BD R IC H

VA R

E

DE L'BASSIN ARSEN AL

UL E

UE

NE

Gambetta

RB

N TO I

BO

N AV E

STE-MARGUERITE

S T- A

OA

CIMETIÈRE DU PÈRE LACHAISE

ANT ONT

RU

IL M

FBG

DE C

Charonne B D

NNE

B

HE

Ledru Rollin

DU

CH A R O

OT

RUE

E DE

GAM AV.

FR

RU

F A ID

N

i

RUE

R.

HE

IV RI

TE

PhilippeAuguste

ON

LA

Voltaire

É EL

DE

RU

BD

E

Q

T UE

Bastille

IN E

E

Sully-Morland

RU

RO

PL. LÉON BLUM

E R U L E N O IR D

NTO

O IS

A ED

E IN

HAR

ST -A

BréguetSabin

E

R

PLACE DES VOSGES

RU

S

RE

T

R IC

RGE

É BR

E GU

AU

E

TA I

RT

T- M

RU

BOU

R C H A IS

St-Paul

CS

R

E RU

VE

IN

AN

DU UE

MIN

RT

SA

Chemin Vert

E CH

CH

SS

A ETT

MÉN

E

FR

RU

T

S

Père Lachaise E NV

I EM

DA

R

SE

R

UR

DE

UMA B D B EA

E

TIE

NE

S

EN

I RO

BI

IE

IQ U E

LA

RB

LYCÉE VOLTAIRE

DE

RM

Rue St-Maur

NDIE R

PA

RE

UBL

BD

RÉP

DE

SO

LA

A V.

CO RI MÉ L IE IR FO E N O L LA DE A R D H RIC

DE

Ménilmontant

PF

R.

RUE

KAM

S AM A R. DE

R.

LOT

BR

ÎLE ST-LOUIS

LT AI

PICASSO

SE

INE

BD

DE

RU

DE

Q ÔT UAI EL D DE E VIL L

VO

UE

R OBE

Filles CIRQUE MB -A D’HIVER du ST E E R U S T IE N Calvaire RU A P St-Ambroise SÉB M S TU TE St-Sébastien- Richard ED BD URU -D Froissart E VO Lenoir L IL L MUSÉE

R . F. M R IV O IR O N L I

L’ H

BD

AV E N

Parmentier

LE

HÔTEL DE ROHAN

RUE

AG

PLE

R.

ET

Oberkampf ME R. A

CARREAU DU TEMPLE

R

République TEM

UMU

Arts et Métiers

Temple

DU

RÉA

O

BD

RUE

B IG

250 m

Gambetta (lines 3, 3 bis) • Filles-du-Calvaire (line 8) • Rue-Saint-Maur (line 3) • Voltaire (line 9) • Parmentier (line 3)

DON’T MISS Place de la Bastille

In the 14th century, an eighttowered fortress was built here to defend the royal city. However, the city quickly expanded and the Bastille lost its military role. It became a prison, the cells of which symbolised the arbitrary nature of royal power. Six hundred rioters, mostly from the Faubourg Saint-Antoine, stormed it on 14 July 1789, and at the cost of one hundred deaths, they set free … six prisoners. The fortress was demolished soon afterwards, and the legend built. In the centre of the square, the Colonne de Juillet, crowned by a winged figure of Liberty, commemorates the revolutionary days of 1830 that also set alight this rebellious neighbourhood.

Opéra Bastille Opéra national de Paris Inaugurated in Place Bastille on 14 July 1989, it has brought ballets and orchestras to the industrial East, to form the Opéra national de Paris in tandem with the Palais Garnier. This imposing building by Carlos Ott has a modern elegance about it: state-of-the-art acoustics and technology, integrated decor and costume workshops, etc. Performances or guided visits provide the perfect opportunity to marvel at the blue granite, pear wood from China, and 2,700 black velvet seats in the great auditorium, the Monde by Niki de Saint Phalle and Jean Tinguely at the bottom of the central staircase.

Place de la Bastille (12th). M° Bastille. Tel: 0 892 89 90 90 (€0.34/min). www.operadeparis.fr

Place de la République The square’s huge dimensions were drawn up in 1854, at the convergence of the new Haussmanian boulevards. Its creation severed the boulevard du Temple from its most lively section, nicknamed the “boulevard of crime” in reference to the melodramas played out in its many theatres. Among the allegories of Liberty, Equality and Fraternity, a nine and a half metre-high bronze Marianne was erected at the centre of the square. Draped with a classical toga and leaning on the Tables of Law, she brandishes an olive branch and will get a new makeover between now and 2013 for the delight of passers-by.

101

PEOPLE’S PARIS

R. UR DE T RUE


Cimetière du Père-Lachaise This huge ‘city of the dead’ owes its name to Père de La Chaise, the confessor of Louis XIV, who lived on this hill. Opened in 1804, the cemetery retained the little pathways, undulating topography, lime trees and chestnut trees of the former Jesuit domain. But that did not entice Parisian families to bury their dead in this disreputable area. It took the transfer of Héloïse and Abélard, and Molière and La Fontaine in 1817 to reverse the trend. From then onwards, a fashionable craze was to transform it into a mossy hillside museum of funerary art.

Countesses, black cats, Gothic chapels and famous people – Apollinaire, Chopin, Colette, Éluard, Kardec (the father of Spiritism), Jim Morrison, Musset, Piaf, Proust, Oscar Wilde … weave a thousand tales that will capture your imagination and set you dreaming.

DID YOU KNOW?

?

In May 1871, at the end of Bloody Week, the Communard rebels from working class areas, entrenched in the cemetery, launched their last offensive on Versaillais. The 147 survivors were shot onsite and thrown into a ditch. Around the Federalists wall, several monuments – built with stones from the original walls – pay tribute to the victims of Nazi concentration camps.

16 rue du Repos (20th). M° Père-Lachaise. Daily, except public hols.

DISCOVER Areas for fashion and streets for partying Around Bastille

In rue de Charonne and rue Keller, the shop windows of fashion designers vie with each other in colour: orange, turquoise blue, candy pink... the neighbourhood is also a favourite of neo-punk Lolitas, fans of vintage, mangas and tattooing. At the end of the day, bars ring the bell for “happy hour”. Towards rue de la Roquette, there is a concentrated cocktail of Latino apéro bars, pulsing restaurants, lounge cafes and euphoric dance floors.

A few steps away from République

The bustling crossroads of rue Oberkampf and rue Saint-Maur, as well as rue Jean-Pierre-Timbaud, teem with big crowded bistros and bars with live music and with dancing. In this little area, you’ll find music and everything you could want to nibble, sip, whistle and mix right through the night.

102

Pavillon de l’Arsenal Paris information, documentation and exhibition centre for urban design and architecture

The permanent exhibition ‘Paris, Visite Guidée’ (Paris, a guided tour), is a multimedia, bilingual display that’s also suitable for children. Images, landmarks, interactive terminals, and a giant model present the capital from the origins of the city to projects for the future. The decor on the first floor changes … three times a year! Under the aegis of architectural experts, the centre adapts completely to the theme exhibited. And as it is always a fine show, visitors enjoy prolonging their visit in the red cocoons of the video lounge, in the bookshop. 21 bd Sully-Morland (4th). M° Sully-Morland, Bastille. Tel: 01 42 76 33 97. Tues to Sat: 10.30am-6.30pm. Sun: 11am-7pm. Admission free. www.pavillon-arsenal.com


FAUBOURG SAINT-ANTOINE This has been a traditional area for woodworking crafts since the 15th century! Furniture shops are still scattered along rue du Faubourg Saint-Antoine. In and around a maze of poetic names – the Étoile-d’Or and Bel-Air courtyards, the alleyways of Cheval-Blanc and Bonne-Graine – lacquerers, gilders and upholsterers carry on traditional savoir faire. Some of the workshops are now occupied by new professions under the old shop signs.

Bibliothèque de l’Arsenal Ah, beautifully bound books! Precious volumes, medieval manuscripts and prints of the Marquis de Paulmy were placed in François I’s former Arsenal in 1757, which was rebuilt by Sully. The collection became richer as the years went by. Declared a public collection in 1797, it became part of the Bibliothèque nationale in 1934. Exhibitions are the ideal opportunity to discover its treasures and ancient wood panelling. 1 rue de Sully (4th). M° Sully-Morland. Tel: 01 53 79 49 49. Temporary exhibitions.

Marché d’Aligre

museum presents a practice as old as mankind. Sacred, diabolic, and refined, the history of smoking is recounted through short briar pipes, rustic snuff boxes, Chinese opium pipes, and posters by Mucha. 7 rue Pache (11th). M° Voltaire. Tel: 01 46 59 05 51. Daily: 12.30-7pm, except Sun, Mon, 1 May, 1st week of Jan and 1st three weeks of Aug, 25 Dec. €5 – RR: €3. www.museedufumeur.net

La Maison rouge – fondation Antoine-de-Galbert Contemporary art collector Antoine de Galbert set up the headquarters of his foundation in a former factory. He named it maison (house) so people would feel at home. It offers three major monographic or thematic exhibitions each year, complemented with talks, a bookshop and a restaurant. 10 bd de la Bastille (12th). M° Bastille, Gare-de-Lyon. Tel: 01 40 01 08 81. Wed to Sun: 11am-7pm. Thurs: open until 9pm. 1 Jan, 1 May, 25 Dec: closed. €7 – RR: €5. Under 13s: free. www.lamaisonrouge.org

Espace Hattori – Franco-Japanese cultural centre At this crossroads of tradition and current trends, people come here to see, discover and try out a whole host of experiences such as calligraphy, a tea ceremony, furoshiki, hatha yoga, etc. 8-10 passage Turquetil (11th). M° Nation. Tel: 01 43 48 83 64. Mon to Sat: 12-noon-6pm. Closed Sun and public hols. www.ccfj-paris.org

La Maison des Métallos Already in the 18th century, the market supplied the Faubourg Saint-Antoine with vegetables and pork products. From Tuesday to Sunday, it is one of the most lively and mouth-watering markets. The covered Beauveau market boasts regional products like tomatoes from Provence, beef from the Limousin, goats’ cheese from the Charolais, and much more. The surrounding outdoor market offers shellfish and seafood, exotic products, second-hand goods, light-hearted songs, and fruit and flowers at unbeatable prices at the end of the morning. Between rue du Faubourg-Saint-Antoine and rue de Charenton (12th). Daily, except Mon: 7am-2pm.

Musée du Fumeur From the cigars of the Maya gods to peace pipes, from Dutch smoking dens to oriental hookas, the smoking 104

City of Paris cultural establishment

Firstly a factory, then a place for the manufacture of wind-instruments, the Maison des Métallos has been converted into a place for professional and amateur performance and the exchange of expertise. 94 rue Jean-Pierre-Timbaud (11th). M° Couronnes. Tel: 01 48 05 88 27. €14 – RR: €10, €8, €5. www.maisondesmetallos.org

Pavillon de l’Ermitage The only Regency-style Parisian folly, built by the Duchess of Orléans, the daughter of Louis XIV. 148 rue de Bagnolet (20th). M° Porte-de-Bagnolet. Tel: 01 40 24 15 95. Fri and Sat: 2-5pm. From 18 Dec 2011 to 1 Mar 2012: closed. www.pavillondelermitage.com


With 150 theatres, 3 opera houses, 120 show and concert halls, some thirty cafe-theatres, and the conservatories and venues of associations, Paris has a highly-charged agenda of shows and concerts, etc. All year round, artists from all over the world come to perform on legendary, intimist, alternative, permanent or improvised stages. There is something for everyone. Revues and musicals, ballets, operas, one-man comedy shows, contemporary theatre and more. The music is also eclectic. International stars, rising stars or amateurs fill the stadiums, auditoriums … or tiny back-rooms of local bars, for classical or contemporary concerts. Young people also have their own programme. Circus, magic and puppet shows, theatre and stories for children can be found everywhere, especially during the school holidays.

Show and theatre venues, and circuses Batofar Opposite 11 quai François-Mauriac (13th). M° Bibliothèque-F.- Mitterrand. Tel: 01 53 60 17 00. www.batofar.org

Bercy 8 bd de Bercy (12th). M° Bercy. Tel: 0 892 390 100 (€0.34/min). www.bercy.fr

Cirque national Alexis Gruss Pelouse de Saint-Cloud – Bois de Boulogne (16th). M° Porte-de-Saint-Cloud. Tel: 01 45 01 71 26. www.alexis-gruss.com

Cirque d’Hiver Bouglione 110 rue Amelot (11th). M° Filles-du-Calvaire. Tel: 01 47 00 28 81. www.cirquedhiver.com

Cité de la musique 221 av. Jean-Jaurès (19th). M° Porte-de-Pantin. Tel: 01 44 84 44 84. www.cite-musique.fr See p.94.

Folies Bergère

Olympia 28 bd des Capucines (9th). M° Opéra, Madeleine. Tel: 0 892 68 33 68 (€0.34/min). www.olympiahall.com

Opéra Bastille – Opéra national de Paris Place de la Bastille (12th). M° Bastille. Tel: 0 892 89 90 90 (€0.34/min). www.operadeparis.fr See p.101.

Palais Garnier – Opéra national de Paris Place de l’Opéra (9th). M° Opéra. Tel: 0 892 89 90 90 (€0.337/min). www.operadeparis.fr See p.37.

Salle Pleyel 252 rue du FaubourgSaint-Honoré (8th). M° Ternes. Tel: 01 42 56 13 13. www.sallepleyel.fr

Théâtre Mogador 25 rue de Mogador (9th). M° Havre-Caumartin. Tel: 0 820 88 87 86 (€0.12/min). www.mogador.net

32 rue Richer (9th). M° Cadet. Tel: 01 44 79 98 60. www.foliesbergere.com

Théâtre national de Chaillot

Gaîté Lyrique (La)

Théâtre de la Ville

3 bis rue Papin (3rd). M° Réaumur-Sébastopol. www.gaite-lyrique.net

Music and shows

MUSIC AND SHOWS

1 place du Trocadéro (16th). Tel: 01 53 65 30 00. www.theatre-chaillot.fr 2 place du Châtelet (4th). M° Châtelet-les-Halles. Tel: 01 42 74 22 77. www.theatredelaville-paris.com

105


Zenith

Zèbre de Belleville (Le)

211 av. Jean-Jaurès (19th). M° Porte-de-Pantin. www.zenith-paris.com

63 bd de Belleville (11th). M° Belleville. Tel: 01 43 55 55 55. www.lezebre.com

Cabarets Crazy Horse Paris (Le) + 12 av. George-V (8th). M° Alma – Marceau, George-V. Rés. : 01 47 23 32 32. www.lecrazyhorseparis.com

Lido de Paris (Le) + 116 bis av. des Champs-Élysées (8th). M° George-V. Tel: 01 40 76 56 10. www.lido.fr

Jazz Caveau de la Huchette (Le) 5 rue de la Huchette (5th). M° Saint-Michel. Tel: 01 43 26 65 05. www.caveaudelahuchette.fr

China (Le) 50 rue de Charenton (12th). M° Ledru-Rollin. www.lechina.eu

Duc des Lombards (Le) Moulin Rouge (Le)® + 82 bd de Clichy (18th). M° Blanche. Tel: 01 53 09 82 82. www.moulinrouge.com See p.48.

Paradis Latin (Le) 28 rue du Cardinal-Lemoine (5th). M° Cardinal-Lemoine. Tel: 01 43 25 28 28. www.paradislatin.com

Pau Brasil 32 rue de Tilsitt (17th). M° Charles-de-Gaulle – Étoile. Tel: 01 53 57 77 66. www.paubrasil.fr

42 rue des Lombards (1st). M° Châtelet. Tel: 01 42 33 22 88. www.ducdeslombards.com

Melody Blues (Le) Quai de Bercy (12th). M° Bercy. Tel: 01 56 95 03 15. www.melodyblues.com

New Morning (Le) 7-9 rue des Petites-Écuries (10th). M° Château-d’Eau. Tel: 01 45 23 51 41. www.newmorning.com

FÊTE DE LA MUSIQUE, 21 JUNE

EVENT

Since 1982, the beginning of summer has been celebrated with music until late into the night. Professional and amateur musicians take to the streets, squares, gardens, churches, bars and clubs, etc. of Paris to give free concerts. The press and Internet publishes a comprehensive programme: classical, rock, jazz, French songs, soul, etc. There are always huge concerts and itinerant musicians at Bastille, République and Place Denfert-Rochereau.

106

Petit Journal Montparnasse (Le) 13 rue du Cdt-Mouchotte (14th). M° Montparnasse-Bienvenüe. Tel: 01 43 21 56 70. www.petitjournalmontparnasse.com

Petit Journal Saint-Michel (Le) 71 bd Saint-Michel (5th). M° Cluny-la-Sorbonne. Tel: 01 43 26 28 59.

Sunset/Sunside (Le) 60 rue des Lombards (1st). M° Châtelet. Tel: 01 40 26 46 60. www.sunset-sunside.com

Programme and tickets Programmes of events are given in the general and cultural press, and by the Pariscope and the L’Officiel des spectacles. Tickets can be purchased at ticket desks at the venue on the day of the show, or, preferably, in advance. Tickets may also be purchased from specialist agencies, kiosks (Madeleine, Montparnasse or Ternes) or from the Fnac and Virgin stores, or the agency Cultival. It is often possible to obtain reducedpriced tickets. The Bastille opera house offers standing places at €5!

Cultival 33 rue Le Peletier (9th). M° Le Peletier, Richelieu-Drouot. Tel: 0 825 05 44 05 (€0.15/min). www.cultival.fr


95 93 78

92

ÎLE-DE-FRANCE

SIGHTSEEING IN

91

Paris

94

77

• Seine-et-Marne (77) • Yvelines (78) • Essonne (91) • Hauts-de-Seine (92) • Seine-Saint-Denis (93) • Val-de-Marne (94) • Val-d’Oise (95)

Tempted by an excursion? Then leave Paris behind for a moment to visit the surrounding Île-de-France region. With nine royal towns, the Île-de-France is a land of chateaux – a tapestry of brick and slate titles, interlacing of stucco, intricate hedging and elaborate garden water features. Whether historic or artistic, these trips are always a delight for the eyes. In the 19th century, steam trains offered painters luminous landscapes on the outskirts of Paris. Follow them! Renoir set up his easel at Chatou, Van Gogh at Auvers-sur-Oise, and other no less-famous painters passed through Barbizon on the banks of the Marne. It is still a place for art. Events and festivals, music, dance and theatre attract an ever larger public. And the region has something for everyone with theme parks and entertainment all year round.


SIGHTSEEING IN ÎLE-DE-FRANCE

DON’T MISS Château de Versailles

PASS

This symbol of the absolute power and glory of Louis XIV was nothing more than a “modest hunting lodge” built for Louis XIII, until Louis XIV had it renovated in 1661 by his architect Le Vau. Still not sufficiently grand, the Sun King commissioned further extensions and embellishments, notably the Grand Appartement du Roi, and the fabulous Hall of Mirrors. The Queen’s Bedroom can be seen just as Marie-Antoinette left it in 1789. Visitors can also discover her ‘private estate’ – a haven of intimacy and simplicity compared to the baroque splendours of the chateau – and which includes

the Théâtre and Hameau de la Reine (a mock farm), the Petit Trianon, the dairy, an English garden, and more. The inventory of the chateau’s treasures is innumerable, and extends to the French-style gardens designed by Le Nôtre and the Grand Trianon built for Madame de Maintenon. RP 834. 78000 Versailles. Tel: 01 30 83 78 00. Daily except Mon, 1 Jan, 1 May, 25 Dec and official ceremonies. 1 Apr to 1 Nov: 9am-6.30pm. 2 Nov to 31 Mar: 9am-5.30pm. €15 – RR: €13 (including access to temporary exhibitions). Under 18s, 18-25 yrs EU: free. Marie-Antoinette’s Estate and Châteaux de Trianon: €10 – RR: €6 (from 4pm). Pass: Chateau and park and gardens: €18 in high and low seasons. €25 during the Grandes Eaux Musicales or Jardins Musicaux days in high season. www.chateauversailles.fr

DID YOU KNOW?

?

A visit to Versailles is more than just a visit to the chateau … Special events and shows are also on the agenda: Grandes Eaux Musicales, Grandes Eaux Nocturnes, Fêtes de Versailles at the Neptune fountain, Versailles Off … Not forgetting the Bartabas Equestrian Show Academy! Fontainebleau and Barbizon PASS

Fond of hunting here, the kings of France built a manor house, which was embellished by thirty-four successive kings, to become the grandiose Château de Fontainebleau in the midst of a huge forest. Between the Cour du Cheval Blanc and the Jardin de Diane, one goes from Renaissance rooms to the apartment of Napoléon I, from state apartments to the Chinese museum of the Empress Eugénie. From 1830 to 109


1875 the more modest hamlet of Barbizon, on the edge of the forest, attracted a colony of landscape painters, later known as the Barbizon School. The Auberge du Père Ganne, where they stayed, is now a museum and displays memorabilia relating to Corot, Millet, Renoir, Sisley, etc.

DID YOU KNOW?

?

In the Oise, less than one hour from Paris, the Chantilly estate with its chateau, Musée Condé, park, gardens, grand stables, etc. is open to the public and is one of the jewels of French heritage.

Domaine de Chantilly PASS Tel: 03 44 27 31 80. Daily, except Tues. www.domainedechantilly.com

Disneyland Paris + Office de tourisme du Pays de Fontainebleau. Tel: 01 60 74 99 99. www.fontainebleau-tourisme.com Office du tourisme de Barbizon. Tel: 01 60 66 41 87. www.barbizon-tourisme.fr

DID YOU KNOW?

?

Every Sunday and public holiday, from April to October, a direct train operates between Paris-Gare du Nord and Auvers-sur-Oise. Château d’Auvers-sur-Oise

At the heart of Auvers-sur-Oise, the multimedia tour at the Château d’Auvers ‘Voyage au temps des Impressionnistes’ takes you on the trail of the great impressionist painters, who marked the history of this village: Daubigny, Pissarro, Cézanne, Monet, Van Gogh. Rue de Léry. 95430 Auvers-sur-Oise/CergyPontoise. Tel: 01 34 48 48 48. Tues to Sun. • 1 Apr to 30 Sept: 10.30am-6pm. • 1 Oct to 31 Mar: 10.30am4.30pm. €13. 6-18 yrs: €8.90. Under 6s: free. www.chateau-auvers.fr

110

Château de Vaux-le-Vicomte

It’s a fact – children are not the only ones to enjoy parades, shows, stores, themed restaurants, magical hotels, and giant attractions and rides. Travelling through the five different imaginary countries of the park, there are many surprises in store: the buccaneers in Adventureland, the chateau of Sleeping Beauty in Fantasyland, Nemo’s submarine, the 36-metre high Space Mountain, a 13-floor plummeting drop in the Tower of Terror … At the Walt Disney Studios park you’ll meet your favourite stars and will even be able to get into their skin. 77777 Marne-la-Vallée. RER A Marne-la-Vallée – Chessy. Tel: 0 825 30 60 30 (€0.15/min). Ticket prices subject to modification. • 1 day/1 park: €57; 3-11 yrs: €51. • 1 day/2 parks: €69; 3-11 yrs: €62. www.disneylandparis.com

Three geniuses of the 17th century – the architect Le Vau, the painter and sculptor Le Brun and the landscape gardener Le Nôtre – combined their talents so well to create this site that Louis XIV subsequently commissioned them to work on the Château de Versailles. The view of the dome, the painted decors and hangings in the Salon des Muses, the borders in the French-style garden, its ornamental ponds and fountains are spellbinding. And the candlelit visit – well, that goes without saying! 77950 Maincy. Tel: 01 64 14 41 90. Daily: from 19 Mar to 13 Nov (closed 22 June). €16 – RR: €13. Under 6s: free. Shuttle service from Paris and Melun. www.vaux-le-vicomte.com

For half-day sightseeing-trips outside Paris – in the Hauts de- Seine, the Val-de-Marne or Seine-Saint-Denis départements – see p.74, p.88 and p.96.


SIGHTSEEING IN ÎLE-DE-FRANCE

DISCOVER Villa Savoye

Château de Champs-sur-Marne

PASS

This villa revolutionized the traditional conception of a house. White and smooth on a green lawn, it applies the main principles of Le Corbusier: free-standing pillars, roof garden, free facade, and long windows. 82 rue de Villiers. 78300 Poissy. Tel: 01 39 65 01 06. Daily except Mon, 1 May, 1 Nov, 11 Nov, 25 Dec to 1 Jan. From 1 Mar to 30 Apr, from 1 Sept to 31 Oct: 10am-5pm. From 2 May to 31 Aug: 10am-6pm. From 2 Nov to 28 Feb: 10am-1pm and 2-5pm. €7 – RR: €4.50. Under 18s, 18-25 yrs EU: free. www.monuments-nationaux.fr

Domaine de Chamarande Invited each year to the (17th century) chateau and its 98-hectare landscaped park, contemporary creation is revealed in all its forms, with exhibitions, dance, music and more. 38 rue du Commandant-Maurice-Arnoux. 91730 Chamarande. Tel: 01 60 82 52 01. Free. www.chamarande.essonne.fr

Medieval city of Provins Visitors come here to admire the ramparts of the medieval city, the former capital of the counts of Champagne and a market town, which is today a Unesco world heritage site. One goes away dazzled by the falconry and cavalry demonstrations and by the fantastic battles between knights. Office de Tourisme de Provins. Tel: 01 64 60 26 26. www.provins.net

Château de Maisons

PASS

A listed monument since 1914, this chateau, built by the architect François Mansart between 1632 and 1646, is a model of the French style of architecture: magnificent facades, elegant proportions, high chimneys, etc. In 1777, the Comte d’Artois – brother of Louis XVI – became the owner of the estate and had work carried out there until he ran out of money. After the Revolution, the chateau was sold and bought many times before being purchased by the State in 1905 to save it from demolition.

PASS

Many films are regularly shot here: Ridicule by Patrice Leconte (1995), Marie-Antoinette by Sofia Coppola (2005) … The chateau is also famous for other reasons: it is an example of classic architecture and remains a comfortable residence: rocaille decor, fine furniture, as well as, painted wooden panelling by Christophe Huet – the painter of animals admired by the marquise de Pompadour. The French-style formal gardens are wonderful. Domaine national de Champs-sur-Marne. 31 rue de Paris. 77420 Champs-sur-Marne. Tel: 01 60 05 24 43. Chateau closed for restoration in 2011. Free admission to park. www.monuments-nationaux.fr

Château de Rambouillet

PASS

Situated in the middle of a wonderful estate of woodland, water features, islands and gardens, the Château de Rambouillet was originally a royal residence, before attracting several French presidents who organized hunting parties here or summer holidays. François I, who loved to hunt died here, Louis XIII, like Louis XV and Louis XVI (and many others …) commissioned major work here. For example, the Queen’s Dairy – under Louis XVI for Marie-Antoinette – or the Bergerie Nationale, the Ermitage or the Shell Cottage. 78120 Rambouillet. Tel: 01 34 83 00 25. From 1 Apr to 30 Sept: 9.50am-12-noon and 1.50-6pm. From 1 Oct to 31 Mar: 9.50am-12-noon and 1.50-5pm. Daily, except Tues, 1 Jan, 1 May, 1 and 11 Nov, and 25 Dec. Closed during presidential stays. €7/€4.50. Gives admission to the chateau, the Laiterie de la Reine and the Chaumière aux Coquillages. Under 18s, 18-25 yrs EU, and 1st Sun of the month (Nov to May): free. www.monuments-nationaux.fr

2 av. Carnot. 78600 Maisons-Laffitte. Tel: 01 39 62 01 49. From 15 May to 14 Sept: 10am-12.30pm and 2-6pm. From 15 Sept to 14 May: 10am-12.30pm and 2-5pm. Daily, except 1 Jan, 1 May, 1 and 11 Nov and 25 Dec. €7 – RR: €4.50. Under 18s, 18-25 yrs EU and 1st Sun of the month (Nov to May): free. www.monuments-nationaux.fr

111


INDEX Each monument, theme or place is listed alphabetically.

A

B

Abbaye royale du Val-de-Grâce .................................24

Baccarat (musée) ....................................................73

Air et de l’Espace (musée de l’) ................................96

Balzac (maison de) ..................................................73

Aligre (marché d’) .................................................. 104

Barbès (marché) ......................................................52

Along the water ....................................................16

Barbizon ................................................................ 109

Animal markets ....................................................99

Bars .......................................................................34

Antiques ................................................................75

Bassin de la Villette .................................................95

Aquaboulevard de Paris ............................................91

Bastille ................................................................. 102

Aquarium de Paris – Cinéaqua ..................................67

Beaubourg ...............................................................30

Aquarium Sea Life ....................................................91

Beaux-arts (École nationale supérieure des) .............57

Arc de triomphe .......................................................77

Belleville .................................................................94

Architecture and Heritage ....................................25

Bercy Village ...........................................................87

Architecture et du patrimoine (cité de l’) ...................67

Bibliothèque de l’Arsenal ....................................... 104

Archives nationales (centre historique des) – Musée de l’histoire de France ................................33

Bibliothèque nationale – site François-Mitterrand .....86

Arènes de Lutèce .....................................................24

Bois de Boulogne .....................................................71

Argonaute (The) .......................................................94

Bois de Vincennes ....................................................85

Armée (musée de l’) .................................................64

Booksellers .............................................................13

Arsenal (port de l’) ...................................................14

Bourdelle (musée) ...................................................58

Art et d’histoire du judaïsme (musée d’) ....................32

Bourse de Paris (palais Brongniart) ...........................42

Art galleries ..........................................................61

Boutiques ..............................................................45

Art moderne de la Ville de Paris (musée d’) ...............66

Bridges of Paris .......................................................13

Artistic creation ....................................................60

Butte-aux-Cailles (la) ..............................................86

Artists studios ......................................................60

Butte Montmartre ....................................................47

Bibliothèque nationale – site Richelieu ....................42

Arts asiatiques – Guimet (musée national des) .........66 Arts décoratifs (Les) ................................................80 Arts et Métiers (musée des) .....................................31

C Cabarets .............................................................. 106 Cafes .....................................................................56 Canal de l’Ourcq ......................................................95

112


Cognacq-Jay (musée) ..............................................33

Carnavalet – histoire de Paris (musée) .....................31

Comédie-Française ..................................................40

Cardin (musée Pierre) ..............................................96

Conciergerie ............................................................20

Cartier-Bresson (fondation Henri-) ............................56

Cooking lessons ...................................................53

Cartier pour l’Art contemporain (fondation) ...............56

Covered arcades ...................................................38

Catacombes ............................................................59

Covered markets ..................................................98

Caterers ................................................................53

Cruises ..................................................................16

CENTQUATRE (Le) .....................................................93

Culture and Museums ..........................................68

Cernuschi (musée) ...................................................81

Curie (musée) – Institut du radium ...........................59

INDEX

Canal Saint-Martin ..................................................94

Champ-de-Mars ......................................................63 Champs-Élysées ......................................................77

D

Chapelle expiatoire ..................................................81

Dapper (musée) .......................................................72

Château d’Auvers-sur-Oise ..................................... 110

Delacroix (musée Eugène-) ......................................57

Château de Champs-sur-Marne .............................. 111

Department stores ................................................44

Château de Maisons ............................................... 111

Dinner-cruises ......................................................16

Château de Malmaison (musée du) ...........................74

Disabled people ......................................................7

Château de Rambouillet ......................................... 111

Discos ....................................................................34

Château de Sceaux, musée d’Île-de-France ...............74

Disneyland Paris ............................................. 91 - 110

Château de Vaux-le-Vicomte .................................. 110

Domaine de Chamarande ........................................ 111

Château de Versailles ............................................ 109

Domaine de Chantilly ............................................. 110

Château de Vincennes ..............................................85

Domaine national de Saint-Cloud .............................74

Châtelet (théâtre du) ...............................................31

Duty-Free ..............................................................44

Chinatown ...............................................................87 Choco-Story – Le musée gourmand du Chocolat .......40

E

Cimetière de Montmartre .........................................48

Égouts de Paris (musée des) ....................................67

Cimetière du Montparnasse ......................................58

Eiffel Tower .............................................................63

Cimetière du Père-Lachaise ................................... 102

Environment (respect the) ...................................98

Cinaxe (The) ............................................................94

Érotisme (musée de l’) .............................................51

Cinema ........................................................... 35 - 99

Espace Dalí .............................................................48

Cinémathèque française – musée du Cinéma ............87

Espace Hattori (Franco-Japanese cultural centre) ... 104

Circuses .............................................................. 105

European Heritage Days .......................................26

Cité de la mode et du design – Docks en Seine ..........85

Évasion verte ...........................................................91

Cité de la musique ...................................................94

Events programme ...................................... 35 - 106

Cité des enfants ......................................................94

Exploradôme ...........................................................88

Cité des sciences et de l’industrie – La Villette .........93 Cité médiévale de Provins ...................................... 111 Cité nationale de l’histoire de l’immigration ..............87

113


F Fashion and shopping ...........................................44 Fashion shows ......................................................75 Fauna and flora ........................................................14 Fines food stores ..................................................53 Flea markets .................................................. 96 - 99 Flower markets ....................................................98 Fontainebleau ........................................................ 109 Fragonard (Perfume museums) .................................42 Fragonard – École Vétérinaire de Maisons-Alfort (musée) .......................................88

Histoire naturelle (Muséum national d’) ....................23 Historic streets .....................................................26 Homme (musée de l’) ...............................................66 Hôtel de Ville ...........................................................30 Hugo (maison de Victor) ...........................................29

I Île-de-France .................................. 74 - 88 - 96 -108 Île de la Cité ............................................................19 Île Saint-Louis .........................................................19 Infomobi ..................................................................7

Free admission in museums ................................68

Institut de France ....................................................57

Fumeur (musée du) ................................................ 104

Institut du monde arabe ...........................................22 Invalides (hôtel des) ................................................64

G Gainsbourg (Maison de Serge) ..................................58

J

Gardens .................................................................90

Jacquemart-André (musée) ......................................80

Gay discos and bars ..............................................34

Jardin Atlantique .....................................................57

Géode (The) .............................................................94

Jardin d’Acclimatation ...................................... 71 - 91

Gobelins, de Beauvais et de la Savonnerie (manufacture nationale des) ....................................87

Jardin des Halles .....................................................33

Good food guide ....................................................53

Jardin des serres d’Auteuil .......................................72

Gourmet capital ....................................................53

Jardin des Tuileries ..................................................78

Grand Palais ............................................................79

Jardin du Luxembourg ..............................................56

Grand Rex (Le) – Étoiles du Rex (Les) ........................40

Jardin sauvage Saint-Vincent ...................................50

Green design .........................................................61

Jardin Tino-Rossi .....................................................14

Grévin .....................................................................40

Jazz ..................................................................... 106

Guimard (facades) ...................................................73

Jewellery ..............................................................75

Jardin des plantes ...................................................23

Jourdain (quartier) ...................................................95

H

Junot (avenue) .........................................................52

Halle Saint-Pierre – musée d’Art brut, Art singulier et outsider ...........................................52

K

Halles (Forum des) ...................................................33

Kahn (Albert-), museum and gardens ........................74

Harcourt Paris (Studio) .............................................79 Hauts-de-Seine area ............................................74 Herbe (musée en) ....................................................42 Heritage walks .....................................................82 Hippodrome d’Auteuil ...............................................71 Hippodrome de Longchamp ......................................71

114

L L’Adresse Musée de la Poste .....................................57 La Villette ...............................................................93 Language schools ....................................................99


Moreau (musée Gustave-) ........................................50

Le Corbusier (fondation) ...........................................73

Moulin de la Galette ................................................52

Léandre (villa) .........................................................52

Moulin Radet ...........................................................52

Lettres et Manuscrits (musée des) ...........................57

Moulin-Rouge® .......................................................48

Libération (musée de l’Ordre de la) ...........................64

Mouzaïa (quartier de la) ...........................................95

Louvre (musée du) ...................................................78 Lunch-cruises .......................................................16

Moyen Âge – Thermes et hôtel de Cluny (musée du) ....................................22

Luxury ...................................................................75

Museums (national and City of Paris) .................68

Luxembourg (musée du) ...........................................56

Music ................................................................... 105

INDEX

La Villette ...............................................................93

Musique (fête de la) ............................................ 106

M MAC/VAL .................................................................88 Madeleine (église de la) ...........................................38

Musique (musée de la) .............................................94

N

Magie (musée de la Curiosité et de la) ......................33

Night transport ......................................................34

Maillol (musée) – Fondation Dina-Vierny ..............................................67

Nissim-de-Camondo (musée) ...................................80

Maison des Jardies ..................................................74

Notre-Dame de Paris ...............................................19

Maison des Métallos (La) ....................................... 104

Nuit Blanche .........................................................61

Maison Rouge – Fondation Antoine de Galbert .................................. 104

Nuit des musées (Museum Night) .......................26

Marché international de Rungis ................................88

O

Markets ...........................................................53- 98 Markets/specialist shops ....................................60 Marine (musée national de la) ..................................67 Marmottan-Monet (musée) ......................................72 Marne River bends ...................................................88 Maxim’s (musée) .....................................................42 Médaille-Miraculeuse (chapelle Notre-Dame-de-la-) ................................................59 Meeting the Parisians ..........................................98 Mémorial du maréchal Leclerc de Hautecloque et de la Libération de Paris – musée Jean Moulin ......58

Noctilien .................................................................34

Observatoire de Paris ...............................................59 Odéon .....................................................................56 Opéra Bastille – Opéra national de Paris ................. 101 Orangerie (musée de l’) ............................................79 Orsay (musée d’) ......................................................55 Outdoor art ............................................................61 Outdoor cinema festival........................................99 Outdoor city life ....................................................90 Outlets ..................................................................45

Ménagerie du Jardin des plantes ....................... 23 - 91

P

Ménilmontant ..........................................................95

Palais Bourbon (Assemblée nationale) ..................... 80

Metro ..................................................... 25 - 34 - 120

Palais de la Découverte – Universcience ...................81

Mode et du Textile (musée de la) ..............................80

Palais de la Porte-Dorée – Aquarium tropical ..... 86 - 91

Monnaie (musée de la) .............................................59

Palais de Tokyo – site de création contemporaine ................................66

Montmartre (musée de) ...........................................50 Montmartre wine harvest ....................................53

115


Palais Galliera – musée de la Mode de la Ville de Paris ...................................................67

Petit Palais (musée des Beaux-arts de la Ville de Paris) ..................................................79

Palais Garnier – Opéra national de Paris ...................37

Picasso (musée) ......................................................30

Palais-Royal ............................................................40

Pigalle ....................................................................48

Panthéon .................................................................20

Pinacothèque de Paris .............................................42

Panthéon bouddhique ..............................................66

Place de Clichy ........................................................50

Parc Astérix .............................................................91

Place de la Bastille ................................................ 101

Parc Clichy-Batignolles – Martin-Luther-King ...........51

Place de la Concorde ...............................................78

Parc de Bagatelle ....................................................72

Place de la Contrescarpe .........................................24

Parc de la Villette ....................................................93

Place de la Madeleine ..............................................37

Parc de Sceaux ........................................................74

Place de la République .......................................... 101

Parc des Buttes-Chaumont ......................................95

Place Denfert-Rochereau .........................................59

Parc des Princes – Discover the behind-the-scenes of PSG ..................................73

Place des Abbesses .................................................52

Parc Floral de Paris ..................................................85

Place des Vosges .....................................................29

Parc Georges-Brassens ............................................59

Place du Châtelet ....................................................31

Parc Monceau ..........................................................81

Place du Tertre ........................................................48

Parc Montsouris ......................................................58

Place Vendôme ........................................................38

Parc zoologique de Thoiry .........................................91

Places of workship ...............................................26

Paris air-ballon .....................................................90

Plans-Reliefs (musée des) .......................................64

Paris, Capital of Creation .....................................61

Plateau – centre d’art contemporain (le) ...................95

Paris, City of lights ...............................................35

Pompidou (Centre) ...................................................29

Paris Convention and Visitors Bureau ..............5 - 7

Poupée (musée de la) ...............................................33

Paris illumine Paris ..............................................35

Private mansions (hôtels particuliers) ...............25

Paris Museum Pass ..............................................68

Promenade plantée ..................................................86

Paris-Plages (Paris Beaches) ..............................17

Promotrain ..............................................................50

Paris respire (Paris ‘Breathes’) ............................91

Publicité (musée de la) ............................................80

Paris Shopping Book ............................................44

Puces de Paris-Saint-Ouen ............................... 96 - 99

Paris Story ! ............................................................42

Pyramide du Louvre .................................................78

Place des Victoires ..................................................38

Paris treasure hunt ..............................................91 Paris with the Parisians .......................................99 Parisian nights ......................................................34 Parisnightlife.fr ....................................................35 Parks .....................................................................90

Q Quai Branly (musée du) ............................................64 Quartier des Batignolles ..........................................51 Quartier latin ...........................................................20

Pavillon de l’Arsenal .............................................. 102 Pavillon de l’Ermitage ............................................ 104 Pedestrianized areas ............................................90 Péniche de l’eau ......................................................14 Péniche du Cercle de la Mer .....................................14

116

R Racecourses ............................................................71 République ............................................................ 102


Sully (hôtel de) ........................................................31

Rodin (musée national) ............................................64

Swimming pool (Joséphine-Baker) ...........................13

Roland-Garros (stade) – Tennis (musée de la Fédération Française de) ..................................72

Syndicat d’initiative de Montmartre .....................7 - 52

Rollerblading tours ..............................................82

T

Roseraie du Val de Marne .........................................88 Rue de Passy ...........................................................73 Rue Mouffetard .......................................................24

S

INDEX

Restaurants ..........................................................53

Taxi .........................................................................34 Theatres .............................................................. 105 Theme parks .........................................................91 Tickets ................................................................ 106 Tomb of Napoléon I ..................................................64

Sacré-Cœur (basilique du) ........................................47

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier ...................................77

Saint-Antoine (faubourg) ........................................ 104

Tour Jean-sans-Peur ................................................32

Saint-Denis (basilique cathédrale) ...........................96

Tour Montparnasse ..................................................57

Saint-Eustache (église) ............................................32

Tour Saint-Jacques ..................................................33

Saint-Germain-des-Prés ..........................................55

Tourisme & Handicap ..............................................7

Saint-Laurent (Fondation Pierre-Bergé – Yves-) ........73

Train stations ........................................................25

Saint-Serge (église) .................................................95

Trips with commentary ........................................16

Saint-Sulpice (église) ..............................................58

Trocadéro ................................................................63

Sainte-Chapelle .......................................................20 Sainte-Geneviève .....................................................24 Sales .....................................................................45 Seine-Saint-Denis area ........................................96 Sèvres – Cité de la céramique ..................................74 Shoah (mémorial de la) ............................................32 Shopping ................................................. 32 - 44 - 45 Shopping streets ..................................................32 Shows .................................................................. 105

V Val-de-Marne area ................................................88 Vélib’ .....................................................................90 Viaduc des Arts ........................................................86 Vie romantique (musée de la) ...................................51 Villa Savoye ........................................................... 111 Vin (musée du) ........................................................73 Visits .....................................................................82

Shows and theatre venues ................................. 105 Shuttle boat ..........................................................17 Sport (musée national du) ........................................87 Squares ......................................................... 26 - 90 Square du Vert-Galant .............................................14 Square des Batignolles ............................................51 Stade de France .......................................................96 Stocks and outlets ...............................................45 Street art ...............................................................61 Street furniture ....................................................26

W Well-being ............................................................75 Welcome ............................................................5 - 7 Wine lessons ........................................................53 Woods ..................................................... 71 - 85 - 90

Z Zadkine (musée) ......................................................58

Sunday shopping ..................................................45

117


PARIS CONVENTION AND VISITORS BUREAU

25, rue des Pyramides, 75001 Paris – France. www.parisinfo.com

Publication Director P. Roll – Publication Manager S. Petit – Editor C. Jean-Louis – English Translation D. Lindsay-Mc Geown, Lexcelera. Contributors to this guide: E. Filliot (CDT du Val-de-Marne), M. Fournier (PCVB), O. Gangnard and A. Epeche (Mairie de Paris), M. Périvier (CDT de Seine-Saint-Denis), J. M. Grégoire (PCVB), A. Jacquemart (CDT des Hauts-de-Seine) and I. Vignaud (PCVB). Advertising System Media – Design Publicis Consultants Verbe – Photo (cover) J. Albarracín – Author V. Vidalou, PCVB – Production L. Augereau – Maps AFDEC – Photogravure Asto – Printed by Casterman. Photos PCVB: M. Bertrand, R. Casal, F. Charaffi, B. Desprez (Organization: Gad Weil / La Fonderie / Agence VU); A. Dupont, J. H3D, F. Jousselin, L. Lammerhuber, J. Lebar, D. Lefeuvre, D. Lefranc, A. Potignon, S. Querbes, S. Rivoal, J. Serur Yedid, A. Terrier. Musée de la Marine – Grande galerie les modèles historiques: Arnaud Fux, Muséum d’histoire naturelle, Pavillon de l’Arsenal, Musée du Louvre: S. Cardinale, Musée de la Poste. CDT Hauts-de-Seine: Musée du château de Malmaison – F. Watbled. CDT Val-de-Marne: La Roseraie. CDT Seine-Saint-Denis: Stade de France® – Macary, Zublena and Regembal, Costantini – Architects, ADAGP – Paris – 2010 – Photo: F. Aguilhon. CRT Île-de-France: Grandes eaux musicales de Versailles: C. Milet ; Fontainebleau: CDT77 – J. P. Chasseau; Disney / DR; Visite aux chandelles – Château de Vaux le Vicomte: J. Vallé. Paris City Council: J. Blachas, E. Boucher, C. Boyer, G. Bruneel, R. Casal, A. Clément, H. Garat, S. Krauss, Laurent, D. Lefeuvre, E. Lefeuvre, M. Lemonnier, R. Mesnildrey, A. Moreau, J.-M. Paz, F. Perrot, C. Pignol, W. Ripka, S. Robichon, B. Ruggeri, T. Sanson, C. Thiebault, M. Verhille. Please note: the PCVB may in no way be held responsible for any possible errors or omissions in this guidebook. Some changes may occur during the year. The PCVB remains at your disposal for any additional information or clarifications. This guidebook lists tourism professionals who were members of the Paris Convention and Visitors Bureau on 7 January 2011. June 2011

118


PARIS foR you! Walking guide for discovering Paris

(2011/2012)

Walking guide for discovering Paris

PARIS foR you!

2011/2012

Paris For You 2011/2012  

Um guia para descobrir Paris bairro a bairro: 13 passeios mostram os pontos turísticos - Torre Eiffel, Notre Dame, Louvre, Champs-Elysees, M...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you