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A Design Junction special includes: A report from the ICFF, an Interview with a Tool maker, a slice of Pye and a scotch egg recipe

2012 Tools for Everyday Life given UK debut >> pages 4-7

This newspaper’s job is to report on the activities that surround The Designers in Residence scheme at Northumbria University and as such much of this edition is devoted to the Tools for Everyday Life project to be shown at Design Junction 19-23 September. The brief, for

products being made >>pages 8-10 profiles of past Designers in Residence>> page 19

the 2nd part of the ongoing project, to explore both the design language of utilitarian products and the value of making skills is on page 3. At a time when there is much debate in the design world around the possibilities of domestic 3d printing and the democratisation of production, the ‘tools’ project might, at first glance, look like it is stubbornly dwelling on the role of the designer and his/her interest in traditional materials and processes and the

aesthetics of the workshop. The intention, however, is to go beyond the exploration of an industrially crafted ‘style’ in order to illustrate the premise that knowing how to make something leads to a clearer understanding of what the critic Stephen Bayley calls an object’s logic, beauty and meaning*. * Bayley, S. “Reasons for a Ruskin Renaissance” in the Collect 2011 Catalogue, Crafts Council Pages

Designers in Residence at DesignJunction

The latest products from both Designers in Residence and Northumbria University Design School staff will be showcased at this years Design Junction event. “Now in its second year, DesignJunction has cemented its reputation for showcasing the finest selection of international design brands. ...continues on page 2

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from page 1... Designjunction will feature more than 100 world-class international brands set against the industrial surrounds of a 1960’s Sorting Office. Here are some of the Design Junction press images of the space:

Who are the Designers in Residence and what is the “Tools” project? Following the launch of the “Tool for Daily Life” project at the ICFF, Core 77 interviewed Rickard Whittingham, The co-ordinator of Northumbria University’s Designers in Residence scheme. Core77: What is the Designers in Residence Scheme at Northumbria and how did it come about?

“Moving away from the traditional trade show environment, designjunction strikes the balance between creative and commercial, offering visitors a vibrant yet relaxed atmosphere to engage and connect with design. Three floors, across an impressive 120,000 sq ft. space, will be devoted to leading international brands, smaller cutting-edge labels, design shops, large-scale installations, temporary restaurants, bars and cafes, working flash factories, and live entertainment. Designjunction will transform the Sorting Office into the largest destination for design, culture and entertainment”.

DesignJunction is at The Sorting Office, 21-31 New Oxford Street, London WC1A 1BA The event runs from 19th until 23rd September 2012. The Designers in Residence have stand F3 on the first floor, Opening Times 19 September 3pm-9pm 20 September 10am-7pm 21 & 22 September 10am-6pm 23 September 10am-5pm 

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Rickard Whittingham (RW) The Designers in Residence scheme is a postgraduate platform that provides access to workspace, equipment and on-site mentoring for selected graduates of BA(hons) 3D Design at Northumbria University. Residents use the scheme to develop and grow their professional practice. It came about because of an identified need to support graduates, not with a prescribed academic curriculum of business start-up but with a system of support that responds to their individual ideas for commercial enterprise. It means the scheme can support furniture and product designers working across all sorts of contexts. The benefit to the resident in basic terms is access to facilities and advice to start their professional practice. The benefit to the 3D Design undergraduate students is having exciting professional work happening alongside their study. The benefit to the North East region (Northumbria University is based in Newcastle upon Tyne) is retaining the very best of its graduates many of whom stay in the city to continue their work. Core77: How is the “Tools for Daily Life” project incorporated into the Designers in Residence scheme? RW: The “Tool for Daily Life” brief was set to the network of practice that now surrounds the Residency as a way of illustrating the fact that residents after they have ‘flown the nest’ of the scheme stay connected to it. The intention of the brief was to show how staff and residents continue to support each other. The idea of investigating “tools” was seen as a way of exploring a common thread amongst this community of designers. That thread is the exploration of craftsmanship in

designed objects and the careful choosing of materials and processes for both functional and expressive goals. The intention of the brief set to this community of designers was to explore the potential beauty in functional tools. Core77: Tools are obviously made to be used, and some would say that much of their beauty comes from signs of such: dings, dents, patina, etc. all constitute the ‘character’ of the object. Do the designers consider this notion of history during the design process? RW: The ‘character’ of tools is at the forefront of all our minds and indeed exploring the connection between the operator and the tool was the thrust of [both] the “tools” brief[s] to date. ‘Use’ in all cases is the defining issue. References to traditional hand-tools and utilitarian objects are clear not in a postmodern ironic way but with a genuine appreciation of the benefits an object gains from the scars of use. Material choices are without exception informed by a concern for longevity. I think all the designers consider the notion of history in their work. None of us explore novelty for novelty’s sake and are very aware of that which has gone before. The intention is never one of retro styling but one of acknowledging details and forms that communicate longevity.

Core77 is an online magazine dedicated to the practice and produce of the field of industrial design. This interview in full can be found at: http://www. core77.com


The Brief

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2012 Tools for Everyday Life



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Trevor Duncan: CC41 Jugs 1&2

Although silversmiths were perhaps the original industrial designers, producing highly functional useful objects in beautiful materials, the industry has now mostly become confined to and concerned with the production of decorative or ceremonial objects. Inspired by a strongly held belief in the value of utility as the foundation for good design this project strives to bring back together the application of functional design with the industrial craft practice of the silversmith. Design of the CC41 JUGS 1&2 draws heavily on early C20 oil cans found in industrial workshops that had very little to do with anything other than function – a fixed volume of 1 quart, a balanced handle and a spout. Whilst these objects had little or no real intrinsic value their functional excellence now gives them a status and integrity that transcends being simply tools fit for purpose and makes them beautiful objects. To amplify the functional value of the design each jug is produced from 30oz of Britannia silver (purer and whiter than Stirling silver) and employs traditional manufacturing processes including hand forming, spinning, polishing and plating resulting in objects without obsolescence.

David Irwin: Rivet Lights.

The rivet lights are a family of three table lamps including Button, Cone and Pan. The forms of the lamps are derived from types of solid rivet – permanent mechanical fasteners consisting of a cylindrical shaft with a head on one end. The base cylinder made from Corian houses the battery and light source while the various formed heads in copper and polycarbonate act as diffusers to create a warm ambient light that can be adjusted via the dimmer switch to suit the chosen environment. The cordless lights allow for the freedom of use in a variety of locations or alternatively they can be powered directly via the mains, while placed on their accompanying charging base.

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Philip Luscombe: Cabinet Knobs and Handles

A range of tool-inspired cabinet hardware developed through an investigation into the decorative elements of utilitarian objects. Philip Luscombe’s fittings are influenced by David Pye’s idea’s about useless work being done on useful objects - that even when an object is supposed to be entirely ‘functional’, there is nearly always effort spent upon refining its appearance. The range of knobs is an opportunity to explore this balance between the useless and the useful, in search of a charming ‘utilitarian’ visual language that doesn’t, as it might be imagined, develop on its own.



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Ellen Thomas: Down-lighter

The project takes inspiration from Newcastle upon Tyne’s strong industrial heritage. The downlighter makes use of materials associated with shipbuilding, both the luxurious and the industrial. The light utilises the function of a pressed glass lens (used in the railway industry) in a domestic manner by focusing the light to create an unusual down-lighter.

Colin Wilson: Industrial Blocks - Desktop Empires Industrial Blocks are a series of wedges, v blocks, gauges and shims that facilitate the holding and securing work in an engineering machine shop, they exist to assist in manufacturing procedure. They are designed using simple minimal geometric forms and echo childhood quality’s; they are tactile objects that promote the act of playing with building blocks. Taking these items out of the context of the workshop environment gives the opportunity for play and adventure as the imagination is liberated......Build an Empire


Danny Duquemin-Sheil: Magnifying Glass Task Lamp

A device that facilitates fine craft work on a small scale, such as model making or collecting. Using miniature LEDs for illumination, and made by expert Yorkshire machinists, it is a marriage of modernist design elements with aesthetic nods to the familiar traditional magnifying glass. Materials: Brass, steel, glass, various hardware and electronic components.

Rickard Whittingham: Northern Tool Box

This project is an investigation of utilitarian design language and the beauty of what might be called ‘low-tech’ or ‘traditional’ tools. The intention is to apply this exploration to contemporary everyday functions and tasks. The idea is to imbue day-to-day products with the same simple elegance and grace as these efficient task driven products. Avoiding a nostalgic retreat from new technology, the development of products was to embrace digitally driven technology whilst making use of traditional woodworking processes. The result is a very simple newspaper rack that references a Carpenters toolbox. Made from black dyed solid Ash, it is constructed with dovetail joints. The turned wooden handle has a laser etched ‘knurl’ to notionally add grip but also give a very domestic object an engineered value.

Tatsuya Akita: ‘Chronovora’

Inspiration was drawn from the hourglass with the intention to develop an awareness of ‘time’ whilst using daily tools. From a functional perspective engaging the shape ensures a good grasp for grinding pepper and practical method of dispensing salt. The process of making the vessels is done by glass blowing on a glass lathe commonly used for making scientific glassware.

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Products in the making

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1. Cabinet Knobs being turned 2. Northern Tool box: knurl and dye samples 3. Magnifying Glass task light: models for testing. 

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4. Industrial Blocks 5. Submariner table lamp and its rollers 6. Magnifying glass task light: various tools


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2 1. CC41 Jugs: handles being soldered 2. Chronovora: quality control of glass

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3. CC41 Jugs: nice fingers

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4. Downlighters: turning walnut

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1. Rivet lamps being spun 2. Industrial Blocks being checked 4. Downlighter: Tools at rest

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3. Northern Tool Box: A laser etched knurl test


A Slice of Pye ‘Originality’ — Paragraph 14, Chapter 16, Blue Book ‘[I]t has long been understood that striving for [originality] as an end in itself is the mark of an inferior artist. The personal style of a good artist is never something that has been deliberately cultivated and forced but something that has appeared unsought as inevitably as the personal style of a man’s handwriting. But since all artists of note are seen to have a distinct personal style, no artist can hope to make a reputation in a competitive society unless he too can show a distinctive style which easily differentiates his work from that of other artists and draws attention to it. Therefore artists of little capability or uncertain vocation will take great care to make their work look ‘different’, whereas those with any certainty in them will know that their work can not help but look different from that of other people any more than their signatures can. It is worth reflecting that the fact of the unmistakable individuality of each man’s signature is one foundation of modern commerce everywhere. To establish the individuality of it one need not write it vertically up the page in letters two inches high. And yet there are only twenty six letters, and everyone else uses them too.’ Pye, David. (1978) The Nature and Aesthetics of Design. London: The Herbert Press

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The Pre & Post Sketch During the development of the products for the ‘A Tool for Everyday Life’ project there have been discussions amongst the designers about all manner of design issues, ranging from frustration with the brief through to skills, processes, timescales, costs and the point of any of it. In short, the usual discourse that surrounds the design and production of made things. The vehicle for this exchange is often a drawing. Once a designer gets past the self consciousness of showing a rough idea quickly drawn or even physically drawing in front of others he/she often finds it can be the only way of expediently resolving, confirming or raising an important issue. One thing that was talked about a lot by the designers of the Tools for Everyday Life was the idea of the genuine pre-sketch (‘pre’ in the sense it was done before it’s content was resolved) versus the postsketch done after the object has been designed but passed off as a preliminary musing. Monographs, blogs and promotional websites often include a designer’s drawings to help illustrate the background and inspiration to a project. Many of these are ‘postsketches’. The content of such ‘after the fact material’ is useful as a process summary and may well impress a client paying for the privilege of the designer’s time but also helps aid the myths that surround the creative process. The myth of a lone genius being struck by a moment of inspiration, jotting down an idea almost fully formed is ably reinforced with a nice annotated post sketch. The ‘post-sketch’ edits out the angst of hours spent mulling over what might be discarded. And to be honest the true design process illustrated in quickly drawn ‘roughs’ never intended to be shown anywhere might not be that attractive. The randomness of a pre sketch, with no audience for it imagined, can often contain a shopping list, profanity or unrelated musing whereas the self conscious post sketch is a bit of communication looking to either tell a palatable story of design development or in some cases add value to something where the designer worries there is none. The inclusion of pre sketches here is to simply let the viewer in or at least have a peek at some of the stuff that happened before issues were resolved. There may be some faked ‘pre’ sketches, (some attempts to rationalize a process) that have snuck in to this selection. It’s not always easy to tell the “pre” from the “post”. Thanks to Neil Conley for instigating the sketch debate.

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Some ‘Tools’ already in the project collection

A selection of the 2011 products

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3 1. Neil Conley: The Batchstick

...is primarily a tool for sealing letters...

2. Trevor Duncan: Pencil Works

... a celebration of the most ubiqitous every day tool...

3. David Irwin: Modelling tools for Swann Morton

... a tribute to the relentless commitment to quality of the British manufacturer Swann Morton...

4. Tatsuya Akita: Tape Dispenser

...made from spun copper, cast concrete and steel...

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5. Colin Wilson: The Tradesmens’ Wedges

...wrought from Brass, Phospher Bronze and Gunmetal...

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Interview with a tool maker: Joel Moskowitz founder of Tools for Working Wood and Gramercy Tools Having admired images of the Gramercy Tools Kings County hammer from afar we visited Tools for Working Wood and met the company’s founder.

The Kings County Hammer is a great example of a product designed for use that is a joy to look at too. Machined from tool steel, the hammers are differentially hardened and then given decorative Victorian inspired file work and an octagonal crosssection hickory handle. The Gramercy Tools range of products have their home at Brooklyn’s Tools for Working Wood. We asked the founder of the company some questions. Name: Joel Moskowitz Lives: New York City Education: The Cooper Union (Mechanical Engineering) Career: Before TFWW, I was a programmer. What do you do? I own the company. Once upon a time TFWW was a one man band and I did everything. As we got bigger I have shed tasks. These days I personally do less and less design but I manage the design process. As we have grown we are codifying the way we design stuff. We have meetings every two weeks and phases in the design process that we try to follow. Right now we are doing preliminary investigation on about a dozen ideas to see which will go to the next steps as we focus on the new tools for the fall. As we narrow the field I will be involved less and less in the process. I currently also do all the product management for outsourced products, write the website copy, and do the photography. I design and write all the software the business and website uses. How did you go from being a programmer to founding TFWW/Gramercy Tools? I have always been interested in tools and woodworking and the history of tools. So back in 1996 I when I needed to create a sample website to showcase my company’s website design abilities, the sample site we did was www.antiquetools. com. We then added ecommerce a year later. Then I decided as a tiny consulting company we could not compete in the computer services business - and I

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thought the techno-bubble might burst - so I thought about selling tools full time. I began doing that in 2001. Deep down I wanted to make my own line of tools, so we took that on as soon as we could. Now Gramercy Tools and BT&C (Brooklyn Trade and Craft) form a huge percentage of our total sales and we are continuing to grow at a good pace. Being in NYC and wanting to manufacture in the US and Europe, we realized we needed to be at the high end of tools, which considering my own appreciation of high end tools made sense. How would you describe the “Gramercy Tools” line of products? And how has your interest in woodworking/tool history informed their design? Gramercy Tools are tools that we design and either make or source (USA). With a few exceptions, these tools are sold exclusively through us. We consider these products our flagships. All of them reflect some new feature or more usually a reintroduction of an old feature that has been lost to time. Our interest in history informs the design of our tools in many ways. For example, late 18th century dovetails saws are small and light, with a higher hang in the handle than mid 19th century saws. We were curious why this is the case. Until we built a prototype we didn’t understand how much easier it is to control a light saw than a heavier saw that influences the cut. The higher hang handle also makes the saw easier to control. The ergonomics of the tools are designed to help the user move their hands in the correct fashion for accurate cuts. But if that’s the case, why did the dovetail saw get heavier with a lower hang handle as the 19th century moved on? Further research showed that the term “dovetail saw” was applied to any short backsaw, most of which were used for cutting trim on construction sites, not dovetailing. That is why if you bought a “dovetail” saw by the 20th century it was heavy to stand up to jobsite abuse, deep in the cut for versatility, and filed crosscut for cutting trim (not rip as dovetail saws should be). We just rolled back the clock. Since we hand-file our saws, and do tons of hand operations in manufacture, it is easier in many cases to get that feeling of an 18th or 19th century

design than if we dumbed it down to make the tools by machines. Our etch on the blades is a real acid etch - not a laser - so we get the same line quality as the great saw etches of the nineteenth century did. The reason for sticking with a classic look is that part of the reason many people are attracted to woodwork: it’s a link to the past - something you don’t get using high tech tools, or streamlined tools made of plastic. How have you managed to assemble a like minded team of people to design and develop and manufacture these tools? We advertised on Craigslist. I interviewed a lot of people, looking for competence, smarts, and generally interesting, curious folks you want to work with. As it turned out, many are art school graduates. Our designer, Timothy Corbett, has a background in sculpture and a real passion for tools and a feel for 19th century design and history. He also is a fine craftsman in his own right and set the bar pretty high for the very talented and dextrous people who actually make the tools. Can you tell of any further plans for tool development? Not really - we are instituting a formal design process and we are still in phase one for a lot of products. Founded in 1999 Tools for Working Wood is located in the Bush Terminal Market, a giant warehouse facility built in 1907 to service the Brooklyn docks. Now also known as Industry City it is home to lots of warehouses and a fair number of woodworking shops. www. toolsforworkingwood.com Tools for Working Wood 32 33rd Street 5th floor Brooklyn, NY 11232 Hours 10- 5 Monday to Friday


“A decline in tool use would seem to betoken a shift in our relationship to our own stuff; more passive and more dependant” Matthew B. Crawford (Shopclass as Soulcraft :An Inquiry into the Value of Work

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Tools for Everyday Life win prize in NYC Designers in Residence pick up the ICFF Editors award for best Products/ Accessories 2012 The collective work of 3D Staff and Designers in Residence to design ‘Tools for Everyday Life secured the award for best products on show at the ICFF (International Contemporary Furniture Fair) in New York City. Previous winners of this award include Jasper Morrison, Magis, Normann Copenhagen. The award, healthy sales, the making of new friends and the support of the British European Design Group (BEDG) made for a great week at the ICFF’s Jacob K. Javits Convention Center on 11th Avenue at 38th Street. Having missed out on the Designers in Residence debut at the ICFF in 2011 due to a freak skiing injury, designer of the Industrial Blocks and the Tradesmen’s Wedges , Colin Wilson was “over the moon” at the interest in the collection in 2012. Current Designer in Residence Neil Conley produced a limited addition scented promotional poster for the ICFF this year. Neil’s illustrations also graced promotional beer mats produced for the event. The beer mats which will also be used at future trade fairs have two functions: firstly they act as reminders for visitors that there is a Designers in Residence web site (www. designersinresidence.org is printed on the reverse side of the mat) and secondly they provide a topic for, the sometimes, awkward first lines of chat with more reserved visitors to the stand. For example: Designer in Residence: “Hello. Would you like a ‘Designers in Residence’ beer mat with an illustration by Neil Conley on it?” Visitor. “Yes please”. The ice is broken and business can start. The beer mat has done one of its jobs.

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New Designers Awards Designer in Residence Neil Conley designed this year’s New Designers awards.

Over 3500 newly graduated designers from all design disciplines came together at the Business Design Centre in July for the 27th edition of New Designers, the UK’s most important graduate exhibition. This year the graduate show had two awards evenings where outstanding individuals were singled out by sponsors /judges and then presented with an awards package designed by Neil. In Neil’s own words the awards package is “a balance of two underlying themes; the notion of consistency and quality of message, and the celebration of design during London’s Olympic year”. Paying homage to Otl Aicher’s visual communication of the Olympic Games in Munich 1972, the awards balance the function of being a tangible reward with subtle reference to both industrial and hand skills. Materials were selected to reflect the disciplines that are represented at New Designers. Bespoke ceramic bolt; Ceramic & Glass. Leather strap; Fashion & Textiles. Wooden body; Traditional Furniture Design & Architecture. Fusion of contemporary and traditional practice; Interior/Spatial Design. Bespoke brass bolt; Industrial Design, Engineering & Transportation Design. User engagement with trophy; Interaction design. Medallion form; Precious Metalwork & Jewellery. Documentation and overall composition; Visual Communication & Applied Arts.

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Current Designers in Residence

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1. DDQ Design

2. Neil Conley

3. Ellen Thomas

4. Tatsuya Akita

DDQ Design, established 2011 by Danny Duquemin-Sheil, is based in Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK. Danny is a product designer from Nottingham, currently enrolled on the ‘Designers in Residence’ startup support scheme at Northumbria University. An appreciation for precision craftsmanship, industrial heritage, and all things technological results in products that fulfil an honest function, while employing minimalist principles and considered detail. “Pragmatic design with integrity”.

Neil is the producer of two and three dimensional pieces that place a heavy emphasis on narrative. Aiming to re-inject relevance to this level of storytelling through innovation and environmental awareness, Conley’s pieces often reflect a bleak and ominous view of the world around us. “Throughout my education I was always obsessed with the natural environment – so inevitably, as both a designer and illustrator, the work I have produced has often placed a heavy emphasis on this. I have also been heavily influenced by artists such as Stanley Donwood - whose sinister interpretations of the world around us have always driven me to create a similar level of storytelling and emotion through my pieces. ”

Ellen is a British freelance furniture, product and interior accessories designer based in Newcastle producing designs for manufacture, licence and commissions. She is concerned that attitudes towards products and furniture today are too disposable.Her focus is to create beautiful contemporary designs with added value encouraging the user to form an attachment with her work. She makes and designs lots of things and is not defined by one process material or craft. Her work brings a contemporary twist to iconic products and furniture. “I make things that want to be loved be used and to have a life of their own like the objects that inspire them”.

Tatsuya Akita was born in Osaka, Japan in 1987 and graduated in Three Dimensional Design at Northumbria University in 2011. He designs products which are honest in terms of the materials and processes employed. He loves to investigate various scales of manufacture with a view to learning their limitations whilst exploiting them constructively. Material selection also plays a major role and each project brings with it new things to explore and research.

www.ddqdesign.co.uk

www.neilconley.co.uk

www.epthomas.com

www.at-studio.net

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Past Residents Over the past 10 years the Designers in Residence scheme has supported over thirty designers in setting up their professional practice. Profiled here are a selection of past residents.

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1. David Irwin

2. James UK

3. Deadgood

4. Reeves Design

www.davidirwin.co

www.jamesuk.co.uk

www.deadgoodltd.co.uk

www.reevesd.com

Designer in Residence 2007-10 David Irwin is an Industrial Design Studio focused on material exploration and driven by a desire to assign purpose to both traditional and contemporary manufacturing processes. The goal with all Irwin’s work is to combine a strong concept with fundamental usefulness resulting in simple, innovative and refined solutions which aid our daily lives. As a practice David Irwin works for leading manufacturers and design led companies such as Habitat, Deadgood and Gardiner Richardson and operates predominately within the spectrum of contemporary furniture, product and lighting design.

Designers in Residence 2005–7 James UK is an award winning contemporary British furniture brand primarily supplying the contract market with unique, high end, design led furniture and interior products. “Our products are made in the UK using specialist manufacturers who combine traditional woodwork and upholstery techniques with modern technology. Using British suppliers and manufacturers allows us to offer customers total flexibility in their choice of fabrics and finishes and peace of mind that materials are responsibly sourced and products are built to last”

Designer in Residence 2003-5 Deadgood is the award winning partnership of Elliot Brook and Dan Ziglam. Designers and entreprenuers they both create lighting and interior products and commission work from some of the UK’s most talented young designers. Based in studios in Newcastle and London Deadgood sell direct from their website and via retailers around the globe. “Our vision is to develop a leading British design brand that produces the very best furniture and interior products. We offer an excellence in design, an uncompromising commitment to quality and an outstanding level of customer service and on top of this we apply our unique sense of passion, fun and enjoyment into everything we do.”

Designer in Residence 2003–4 The idea of experimenting and pushing production techniques is very much a part of Reeves Design. Whilst John’s Reeves signature collection is the Louis range distributed via Heals in the UK, his studio and workshops in Vietnam supply North America via ABC Carpet and Home and Henry Hall Design. “Living in a world that seems to be focused more and more on “the moment”, I believe designing with a respect and reverence for what has gone before keeps us mindful of where we’ve come from and what we really need. Ensuring that design evolves not only through materials and production processes but also under the direction of culture.”

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Tool Search and Recipe R T X H S H N E Q X W V Z C D S I Z V H U P U V E I O N N R

I I A M R C U F D O D F X M S C L G K N S F F I W X J Q E S

I O R V E N H T H C O D I B G R D B G V A A E I R O G K Z L

R P V V P E N P U J S P W N S E F X G F V R R P G G R Q P T

M E L L I R M K S U N G L K E W V C H I S E L W K A R M M D

Q G M P L W P B F W O O A X Q D A P L L K B B B M I O T P K

T B B M L I R Y M U V B T E N R G X U F B P R E O S S D M M

I R R B A D R Y I A K L I C Y I K Q F N S Y N X U X K Y A F

R M A V C H W D C V O O W P H V U T C P C O G Q P A W N X F

N B D Y L R Y V G R X A O E Q E B J M Q Z H E L M W C V Y B

AXE BRADAWL CHISEL DRILL ENGRAVER FILE GOUGE HAMMER INTERNAL CALLIPERS JIG KNIFE LATHE MITRE BOX NOTCHER OILSTONE PUNCH QUARTERSQUARE RASP SCREWDRIVER TAPE MEASURE UPHOLSTERY HAMMER VERNIER GAUGE WIRE CUTTERS WRENCH X-CUT SAW ZONE MARKER

V O A C A E C R A X D D I U B R R Y A G L D P G F G A G F J

G V W G N V H N E N T P W B Y E X K C X A I A N C Z B Q Z L

F I L E R A P L Z T H C G F T X M A V L T A J F Z E L L S J

A E J N E R U G P Y S P O P F A X E T M H L R U U M Y J K G

E N D Y T G R V S A X L I X V Z R H P A E W B M Y G R D F C

T Q P X N N T A D K A O O V O N U L K H C H I L E Q R B X T

E K P P I E W W J B G A B H I T Q M X U X U U B Z N F N G A

E R A U Q S R E T R A U Q E P S R O A L U D M T C U A L H W

T G U I O H G X I J D Z R Z R U J Q H G B A H C L R X C N Q

A A N I P S C R Y W A G H L J T G M I G S L R F U N Z P J C

G J P S Z U E J I U A Y X G B K I G O A N X W Y D K K W Z N

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U R J S M J T S G I B N Y I B P I R Y Z E G W M Y Q A Q O U

X K A A N E C E R R J I F W P F C A Z K P S F R B Z T L Q J

M W H V E D A W T A R E A G N K L J X W I R E C U T T E R S

H B U X L M Z S S I L R H P K B J T F V I N S C N E Z F K P

V T A Q B S G G U Z C Z P J D V R A R Q K N M U P E I N K I

E G U O G S V H Y R F Y F X J X B U Q F E T P G E W N H X C

E N O T S L I O E A E R Y Q G J W C M F S B J S K L A N K R

If you know how to make something you understand everything about it. You appreciate its logic its beauty and its meaning. And its value. And you can pass on these pleasures and benefits. Stephen Bayley. “Reasons for a Ruskin Renaissance”

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P G A E T M R J L U E H F K N G R M Z N B I E P Z R L Y A Z

W Y N H M D M P E C V B N G V G Q T B Y R Z R I K U C D S C

Tim Sheil’s Thurgarton Scotch Eggs 6 good quality sausages 3oz black pudding 1 tsp mixed herbs 1 tsp curry powder Salt and lots of freshly ground black pepper 7 eggs A little plain flour A splash of milk Breadcrumbs (from the crustiest loaf you can find) Sunflower oil to deep fry

“The real challenge and craft skill with a Scotch egg is making sure the sausage meat is cooked while the yolk is still runny in the centre” 1. Split the sausage skins and put the meat into a bowl along with the black pudding, the mixed herbs, curry powder and salt and pepper. Mix well with hands adding a little cold water if the mixture is too stiff. 2. Put 6 of the eggs into a pan in which they fit in a single layer. Add enough cold water to cover the eggs by an inch and cover with a lid then place the pan over a high heat. 3. Once the water comes to a boil, remove the pan from the heat and allow it to stand for 3 minutes. In the meantime, fill a bowl with ice and cold water and after the 3 minutes, transfer the eggs to the iced water. Leave to cool for 10–15 minutes. 4. When the eggs are cool enough to handle, carefully peel off the shells and discard. 5. Now divide the sausage meat mixture into 6 balls and flatten each portion between two sheets of cling film into a circle, then remove the top layer of cling film. Place an egg in the centre of each sausage meat circle. Wrap the sausage meat around the egg, by bringing all of the edges together and twist the top of the cling film. Press the edges to seal but don’t press too hard. Place in the fridge for 20 minutes. 6. In the meantime, put some plain flour into a small bowl and season it with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Beat the remaining egg in a second small bowl and stir in the milk. Put the breadcrumbs into a third bowl. Roll each coated egg in the flour, gently tapping off any excess, and dip it in the beaten egg. Finally, roll it in the breadcrumbs, making sure that all sides are coated adding more curry powder for an extra kick! Place the eggs in the fridge for 15 minutes. 7. Deep-fry the eggs two at a time for about 5-6 minutes turning constantly. 8. Stand in a warm oven for about 15 minutes on a sheet of kitchen paper to drain off the surplus oil. Eat hot for maximum crunch factor!

Northern Tool #3  

This time The Northern Tool was forced on/ distributed to, the visitors of Design Junction during the London Design Festival 2012. Again it...

Northern Tool #3  

This time The Northern Tool was forced on/ distributed to, the visitors of Design Junction during the London Design Festival 2012. Again it...

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