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THIS ISSUE: Spirit and Resilience / Debt Committee Deadline / Useful Tax Tips / Tramp Oil Skimming

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The NTMA Southwest Regional Magazine Featuring Arizona, San Diego and North Texas

PrecisionNews

TM

TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS EDUCATION EVENTS DIRECTORY

Reawakened U.S. Manufacturing:

GETTING THE

JOB DONE

How leadership and hard work are bringing back manufacturing jobs and strengthening the backbone of our economy THE SPECIAL ‘GLOVES OFF’ ISSUE!

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SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2011 VOLUME 1 • ISSUE 2

Contents Features

Departments

SPECIAL ADVERTISING FEATURE

10 12 14

TO SKIM OR NOT TO SKIM?

03 President’s Letter

Have you ever looked in your sump and wondered where all that oil floating on top came from, and better yet, what in the world to do with it now?

04 Power Up

MANUFACTURING - AMERICA’S NATIONAL PASTIME?

06 Policy Watch 08 Shop Floor

Is manufacturing more American than baseball? Manufacturing is the backbone of our economy and the industry that will be the driving force to rebuilding our economy.

18 Drill Bits 20 Websites that Work 21 Arizona Chapter Info

ARE YOU THE LEADER? American manufacturing companies should be the leaders in their industry instead of following the “herd mentality.”

26 San Diego Chapter Info 28 North Texas Chapter Info

OUR MISSION:

“WE JOIN TOGETHER AS MEMBERS OF THE SW REGION PRECISION CUSTOM MANUFACTURING COMMUNITY TO ACHIEVE BUSINESS SUCCESS IN A GLOBAL ECONOMY THROUGH ADVOCACY, ADVICE, NETWORKING, INFORMATION, PROGRAMS AND SERVICES.”

The NTMA Southwest Regional Magazine Featuring Arizona, San Diego and North Texas EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR & EDITOR Chris Mignella

TM

PrecisionNews

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CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Bill Hammett, Michele Nash-Hoff, Omar Nashashibi, Brett Reynolds, Joel Strom, Brent Terhaar ADVISORY BOARD Chris Mignella, Lisa Ellard, Glenn VanNoy, Gail Houser EDITORIAL, ADVERTISING & ADDRESS CHANGES Chris Mignella Phone: 602.242.8826 • Fax: 480.970.8501 Email: ExecutiveDirector@arizonatooling.org

Precision News is published bi-monthly by the Arizona Tooling & Machining Association (ATMA). Opinions expressed are those of the authors or persons quoted and not necessarily those of the ATMA. While efforts to ensure accuracy are exercised, ATMA assumes no liability for the information contained in either editorial or advertising content. ATMA assumes no responsibility or liability for unsolicited manuscripts or artwork. Reproduction in whole or part without the expressed written consent from ATMA is prohibited. Precision News is the registered trade name of this publication. Copyright ©2011 by ATMA. All rights reserved.

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First Word PRESIDENT’S LETTER

GET RIGHT WITH ME

WHAT’S WRONG WITH THIS COUNTRY? Maybe it is a predetermined part of the aging process but as I approach 50 I can’t help but feel like our country is going to hell in the proverbial handbasket. There is not enough space here to list the issues, but you have only to pick up a newspaper or watch the political hamburger making on TV to feel a sense of dread about our direction. But as I join the ranks of my forefathers in yelling at kids to get off my lawn, it occurs to me that the question is not ‘What’s wrong with this country?’, it’s ‘What is right?’ WHAT IS RIGHT WITH THIS COUNTRY? As we observe the 10th anniversary of that game changing day in September, it occurs to me that our country has an incredible resilience that ultimately will allow us to get through whatever comes our way. Like all of you I can remember the unfolding of that day as though it were this morning, yet it is just as surreal today as it was as it happened. As I watched the inconceivable become reality before my eyes, I felt that my fledgling business was doomed. Yet, we are still here. Despite the tough years then and the arguably tougher ones we have inflicted on ourselves lately, our industry has survived. It appeared the fate of American manufacturing was written on the wall as I began my manufacturing career at the sprawling complex of 10000 people at GE’s Appliance Park in Louisville KY in the early 80’s. The Japanese were kicking our country’s manufacturing butts and shaming our backbone automotive industry with better and cheaper products. One of the five huge buildings was already shut down, dark and eerie. The larger appliances were being moved to Mexico and the union was vowing to hold their ground until the last man was gone. I read last month that GE is moving much of its appliance manufacturing back to Appliance Park, using technology and lean manufacturing to make it work. The along came China. Sure we adapted to turn the tide against Japan, but how could we possibly endure the tidal wave of a billion impoverished workers willing to do our jobs for a pittance? How many generations would it take for the economic equalization to reverse the flow of job loss? Not that many as it turns out. I am as amazed by the pace of reshoring of manufacturing as I am by the return to profitability of GM. This month my shop resumes shipments of a product family that devastated us when it was moved to Asia last year. Our country has a spirit and resilience that was born in our revolution and has seen us through every challenge from Pearl Harbor to 9/11. And it will continue to see us through. As disgusting as it is to watch our political process at work, we can take comfort in the fact that it still is better than any alternative, to paraphrase Winston Churchill. But recovery and reform will not happen automatically, it comes from the hard work and leadership of people like you and me. Participate. Speak out. Lead. Mark Weathers President, Arizona Tooling & Machining Association

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Power Up NEWS FROM THE NTMA

NTMA TO OFFER APPTIX BUSINESS SERVICES TO MEMBER COMPANIES CLEVELAND, OH – The National Tooling and Machining Association (NTMA) today announced a partnership with Apptix, a premier provider of hosted business communication services, to offer Apptix’s comprehensive suite of solutions including hosted Exchange email, SharePoint, mobility, and business collaboration to NTMA’s 2,000-plus association members.

said Aubrey Smoot, Apptix Vice President of Business Development. Our past performances have allowed us to partner with successful entities such as the National Tooling and Machining Association. We look forward to working hand in hand with the NTMA to provide the tools to help the association and its members succeed.”

The Apptix portfolio of hosted services will be made available to NTMA member companies of all sizes. Apptix services include communication platforms such as Exchange, Mobile Email and Secure Instant Messaging, collaboration tools including SharePoint, and Web Conferencing and infrastructural enhancements that include Virtual Private Server, Online Storage and Web Hosting. AD Sync, Domain Registration and Professional Services will also be offered to NTMA members.

Apptix has partnered with a number of industry organizations, with nearly 15 years of expertise in hosted services and award-winning customer support.

“As the national representative of the custom precision manufacturing industry in the United States, we must ensure that our members are provided with the advanced communications and collaboration capabilities to operate productively and efficiently,” said Rob Akers, Vice President and Chief Operating Officer at the National Tooling & Machining Association. “Many NTMA members are small businesses, privately owned and operated, and their IT resources are limited. Apptix provides tools to allow them to focus on what’s important – their customers – giving them the capabilities to achieve business success in a global economy.” “We have created an extensive suite of solutions for our key channel partners to address their most critical business communication and collaboration needs,”

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About Apptix Apptix (OSE: APP) is the premier provider of hosted business communication services for businesses of all sizes – from SOHO to enterprise – with particular expertise serving legal, financial, and health care firms. The extensive Apptix product portfolio includes integrated solutions (e.g. Unified Communications) and point solutions including Exchange, VoIP, SharePoint, Web Conferencing, and Secure IM with Presence. Services are delivered over a highly reliable network leveraging best-in-class technology, housed in SAS 70-compliant data centers, and backed by U.S.-based 24/7 support.

Learn more at: apptix.com, follow us on Twitter at: twitter.com/apptix, or contact Caitlin Andrews at caitlin.andrews@bgllp.com or 202.828.7637.

NTMA MISSION: “HELP MEMBERS OF THE U.S. PRECISION CUSTOM MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY ACHIEVE BUSINESS SUCCESS IN A GLOBAL ECONOMY THROUGH ADVOCACY, ADVICE, NETWORKING, INFORMATION, PROGRAMS AND SERVICES.”


ABOUT THE NTMA NTMA is the national association representing the precision custom manufacturing industry, which employs more than 440,000 skilled workers in the United States. Its mission is to help members of the U.S. precision custom manufacturing industry achieve business success in a global economy through advocacy, advice, networking, information, programs and services. Many NTMA members are privately owned small businesses, yet the industry

PHOENIX METAL TRADING, INC.

generates sales in excess of $40 billion a year NTMA’s nearly 1,600 member companies design and manufacture special tools, dies, jigs, fixtures, gages, special machines and precision-machined parts. Some firms specialize in experimental research and development work.

Industrial Scrap Specialists

ABOUT THE PMA PMA is the full-service trade association representing the $91-billion metalforming industry of North America. Its nearly 1,000 member companies include metal stampers, fabricators, spinners, slide formers and roll formers as well as suppliers of equipment, materials and services to the industry. Through advocacy, networking, statistics, the

OUR MISSION: Our mission at Phoenix Metal Trading is to provide the best service at a fair price and to continually improve our company to be a leader in our industry.

Educational Foundation, METALFORM tradeshows and MetalForming magazine, PMA helps lead innovative member companies toward superior competitiveness and profitability.

EPA and ADEQ Environmental Compliance We Purchase All Types of Scrap:

Together, PMA and NTMA formed the “One Voice” partnership to advocate for the interests of small and medium manufacturers throughout the U.S. Visit: metalworkingadvocate.org for additional information on NTMA and PMA.

UPCOMING NTMA EVENTS NTMA 2011 FALL CONFERENCE Date: October 13-16, 2011

Copper Brass Aluminum Steel Stainless Steel

Titanium Plastic Cardboard Nickel and Cobalt Alloys

State of the Art Fleet and Plant Equipment Never a charge for pickup

Venue: The Broadmoor, Colorado Springs, CO Visit: ntma.org and broadmoor.com MANUFACTURING 2012 Date: March 8-11, 2012

602-257-4660 www.phxmtl.com

Venue: Hyatt Regency Grand Cypress, Orlando, FL Visit: ntma.org and manufacturing2012.com

SCRAP METAL RECYCLING SINCE 1989 • ATMA MEMBER

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Policy Watch LEGISLATE

WITH A NEW DEBT COMMITTEE COMES A NEW DEADLINE by OMAR S. NASHASHIBI

IF THERE IS ONE THING Congress has taught us each of the past 10 years, is that they can’t turn in their homework on time. They have now extended the debt ceiling 11 times since 2002, extended the R&D Tax Credit 14 times (often after it expires), failed to extend the Workforce Investment Act every year since 2003, and recently caused a partial shutdown at the Federal Aviation Administration because of more missed deadlines. In high school or college, many of us procrastinated then crammed to finish our homework the night before it was due. However, at stake was only your grade, not the livelihoods of millions of people, and not to mention the global economy. In August, Congress granted itself another extension to complete its work on the debt ceiling, except now it promises to finish its assignment on time by November 23, 2011. To make sure it meets this deadline, Congress imposed a number of repercussions if it didn’t hit its target, but unfortunately, it may be U.S. manufacturers who feel the pain more than members of Congress. As part of the agreement to prevent the federal government from defaulting on its obligations, Congress created a 12person “super” committee made up of six Senators and six Representatives split evenly among the parties. This super congressional committee, which some are calling the “Divine Dozen”, has full authority to look at government spending and even revenue (meaning taxes, user

06

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fees, and other federal government collections). This unprecedented committee may now have control over the tax rates, deductions, and credits that impact every manufacturer in the country. Normally, such a combination should make manufacturers throughout the country worry; however, we do have a few of our champions on the Committee who could help support manufacturing in America. Congressmen Dave Camp (R-MI) who chairs the Ways and Means Committee (think tax, trade, and health care) and Fred Upton (R-MI), chairman of Energy and Commerce Committee (oil/gas, cap and trade, etc.) are two of the three House Republicans on the Super Committee. Both have solid histories of supporting manufacturing in America, especially Chairman Camp, the top tax writer in the House of Representatives. The NTMA is working with Chairmen Camp, Upton and other leaders on Capitol Hill to make sure the voices of manufacturers are heard. Very few in Washington question the power this new Committee has over every American. Before ever holding their first meeting, its members faced pressure from all sides, including those calling for revenue raisers to reduce our debt. While Republicans insist any tax increases are off the table, Democrats themselves are standing firm that they will not accept only spending cuts as they did in August. Some are targeting tax deductions and credits claimed by millions of businesses,

september/october 2011

including manufacturers. The Section 199 Domestic Productions Activities Deduction amounts to a 3% effective tax rate reduction for all manufacturers who take advantage of this provision. Clearly on the target list is the use of Last-InFirst-Out for inventory accounting, which roughly 40% of small manufacturers use. The Administration estimates that eliminating LIFO for businesses will increase revenues by $70 billion over ten years, making it an attractive target that has a significant impact on manufacturers. Will the “Divine Dozen” scramble for revenue raisers and increase taxes on manufacturers? If this new Congressional Committee is going to take on tax policy, they should not do so in a vacuum but rather through comprehensive tax reform. Manufacturers cannot continue to operate in an environment of instability due to politics as usual in Washington. Business owners have to make important decisions about purchasing and expensing capital equipment or investing in R&D and employees, but continue to struggle because they do not know for certain Congress will do its job and extend or make permanent these tax provisions before they expire (again). While Congress has vested the full faith and credit of the United States into 12 members of Congress appointed to a “super committee”, manufacturers need greater assurance they can make the tough decisions without balancing the budget on the back of small businesses. Today, only 17% of Americans approve of the job this Congress is doing – by far a failing grade. However, if Congress misses this next deadline or cuts too little and taxes too much, it will be this Congress that failed the American people by not doing its job.

Omar Nashashibi is a founding partner at The Franklin Partnership, LLP, a bipartisan government relations firm retained by the National Tooling and Machining Association in Washington, D.C. Learn more at: franklinpartnership.com


PrecisionNews // SHOWCASE

BANK OF AMERICA – A COMMITMENT TO SMALL BUSINESS Bank of America understands the vital role of small businesses in the U.S. economy. We’re helping small businesses succeed through a wide range of efforts, all aimed at building deeper relationships and growing this crucial segment of the economy. Improving efficiency with accessibility: • Nearly two million small business customers use our Online Banking services, ranked No. 1 among major banks • We offer Mobile Banking2, plus online payroll, invoicing, direct payments and wire transfers • Customers have access to approximately 5,800 U.S. banking centers and roughly 18,000 ATMs. • Our Small Business Online Community provides free advice to more than 65,000 members

Lending responsibly to small businesses: • In the first quarter of 2011, we loaned more than $2.9 billion to small businesses, following more than $18 billion in lending to small businesses in 2010, a $1.5 billion increase year-over-year • We are an active participant in SBA lending programs. We were the No. 1 lender in the 504 program in 2010, originating more than $530 million in new first- and second-trust deed loans with long-term, fixed-rate financing.

Unlocking more capital in creative ways: • We are the leading bank supporting Community Development Financial Institutions, providing more than $200 million to finance small businesses that can’t qualify for traditional loans • Our 2010-11 grant program for CDFIs – aimed at unlocking $100 million in low-cost capital for small businesses – has allowed CDFIs in 29 states to access $53 million in government lending capital • To date, we have purchased $63 million in loans, allowing loan originators to extend more credit to small businesses

Going beyond loans to provide support and new solutions: • We are now offering a suite of small business charge cards that give businesses more choice and control over their payment and expense management needs. As a result, Bank of America has been named the best credit card company for small business owners by Card Hub!

Contact Sophia Koo, your local Small Business Banker for any needs on your business. Call: 480.458.1021 or email: sophia.koo@bankofamerica.com

ATMA PRECISION

maui-wowi luau exhibits & hors d’oeuvres courtesy of the atma associate members

Save the date: October 26th from 4:00-7:30pm at The Phoenix Airport Hilton

win $1000 & other exciting prizes! (must be present to win)

Live Hula Entertainment! FREE EVENT * FREE APPETIZERS * FREE CHANCES TO WIN

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Shop Floor INFORMATION FOR ACTION

NINE TIPS FOR CHARITABLE TAXPAYERS IF YOU MAKE A DONATION TO A CHARITY THIS YEAR, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO TAKE A DEDUCTION FOR IT ON YOUR 2011 TAX RETURN. HERE ARE THE TOP NINE THINGS THE IRS WANTS EVERY TAXPAYER TO KNOW BEFORE DEDUCTING CHARITABLE DONATIONS. source IRS

Make sure the organization qualifies > Charitable contributions must be made to qualified organizations to be deductible. You can ask any organization whether it is a qualified organization or check IRS Publication 78, Cumulative List of Organizations. It is available at www.IRS.gov. You must itemize > Charitable contributions are deductible only if you itemize deductions using Form 1040, Schedule A. What you can deduct > You generally can deduct your cash contributions and the fair market value of most property you donate to a qualified organization. Special rules apply to several types of donated property, including clothing or household items, cars and boats. When you receive something in return > If your contribution entitles you to receive merchandise, goods, or services in return – such as admission to a charity banquet or sporting event – you can deduct only the amount that exceeds the fair market value of the benefit received. Record keeping > Keep good records of any contribution you make, regardless of the amount. For any cash contribution, you must maintain a record of the contribution, such as a cancelled check, bank or credit card statement, payroll deduction record or a written statement from the charity containing the date and amount of the contribution and the name of the organization. Pledges and payments > Only contributions actually made during the tax year are deductible. For example, if you pledged $500 in September but paid the charity only $200 by Dec. 31, you can only deduct $200. Donations made near the end of the year > Include credit card charges and payments by check in the year you give them to the charity, even though you may not pay the credit card bill or have your bank account debited until the next year. Large donations > For any contribution of $250 or more, you need more than a bank record. You must have a written acknowledgment from the organization. It must include the amount of cash and say whether the organization provided any goods or services in exchange for the gift. If you donated property, the acknowledgment must include a description of the items and a good faith estimate of its value. For items valued at $500 or more you must complete a Form 8283, Noncash Charitable Contributions, and attach the form to your return. If you claim a deduction for a contribution of noncash property worth more than $5,000, you generally must obtain an appraisal and complete Section B of Form 8283 with your return. Tax Exemption Revoked > Approximately 275,000 organizations automatically lost their tax-exempt status recently because they did not file required annual reports for three consecutive years, as required by law. Donations made prior to an organization’s automatic revocation remain tax-deductible. Going forward, however, organizations that are on the autorevocation list that do not receive reinstatement are no longer eligible to receive tax-deductible contributions.

For the list of organizations whose tax-exempt status was revoked, visit www.IRS.gov. For general information see IRS Publication 526, Charitable Contributions, and for information on determining value, refer to Publication 561, Determining the Value of Donated Property. These publications are available at www.IRS.gov or by calling 800-TAX-FORM (800-829-3676).

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Shop Floor INFORMATION FOR ACTION

accomplished can be another make or break point in creating and maintaining a high performing board. The facilitation process of the meetings and of the board members themselves is the most important component of that engagement.

BUILD A BOARD THAT WILL HELP YOU BUILD YOUR BUSINESS by JOEL STROM

TO SAY THAT TODAY’S persistently uncertain business environment is a challenge for manufacturers is definitely an understatement. Meeting those challenges and profitably growing their businesses requires that companies utilize every possible advantage and tool available to them. One such tool that too many companies have not considered is an advisory board. And for the companies that have formed an advisory board, many are not getting anywhere near the potential benefit they could. Advisory boards are NOT governance boards. If utilized as they should, their sole purpose is to provide strategic guidance and advice to management. Unlike most shareholder or governance boards, the purpose of an advisory board is to create significant returns on the investment made in the board and provide quantifiable strategic value to the company. There is a 4 step process to consider when creating a new advisory board or in restructuring an existing board that will ensure that your board will be highly functioning and that it will be producing great returns on your board investment. Design the Board Like anything you build, it all starts with the design. Designing a highly functioning board begins with a strong understanding and definition of what strategic objectives the board will be expected to help the company accomplish. Without this understanding, it is impossible to select

the right members for the board, to set expectations for the board, or to create metrics for board performance that will ensure strategic value. The outcome of the board design should be a board charter that sets and defines the board objectives, member requirements, and measures of board success. Build the Board Once the board charter has been completed and the member profiles have been developed, the board can be built. The process of finding and vetting the potential members of the board must be done as objectively as possible. Choices here can make or break the effectiveness of the board as well as its ultimate strategic value. If prospective members do not have the knowledge and experience as defined in the charter and are not the “right fit” for the company and its culture it will be nearly impossible for them to contribute in a meaningful way and to add value. Experience shows that there is no such thing as a bad board or a bad board member. There are simply t he wrong board members on the wrong boards for the wrong reasons. Friends, relatives, and other nice people may be fun to have dinner or play golf with but are not necessarily the right people for your board. Leverage the Board Once the board has been created, in order to help meet the stated strategic objectives of the company the members of the board need to become truly engaged. How this engagement is

Facilitation should include: • Sufficient preparation for each meeting including the creation of a solid meeting agenda. • Creating collaborative meetings that provide the board members with encouragement to participate by leveraging rather than managing the meeting. Going beyond simple yes/no answers from the members. • Bringing others from your team into the board meetings; not to report but to participate. • Reaching out to your board members for their insight outside of the board meetings. Evaluate the Board Assessing the ongoing effectiveness and strategic value of the board is a critical step in ensuring that the board continues to function as intended and that it continues to deliver strategic value. This evaluation helps the company determine when and if the board structure needs to be changed over time. Creating a great board and then maintaining its effectiveness over a long period of time requires attention and work. However done correctly it can provide a manufacturer with one more competitive edge; the power of 4 or 5 experienced executives dedicated to helping you succeed.

Joel Strom is a Growth Management consultant working out of Phoenix. He has been helping manufacturers thrive and grow for 30 years. To learn more about his consulting and advisory board practices visit www.Joelstrom.com or you can reach him at 602.276.3033 or by email at joel@joelstrom.com.

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Tech Talk

//COLUMN //

SPECIAL ADVERTISING FEATURE

VOLUME 4 OF ©

THE OIL BARON BULLETIN

TO SKIM OR NOT TO SKIM? by BRETT “THE COOLANT GUY” REYNOLDS, CMFS

Have you ever taken a look at your sump and wonder where all that

BLASER SWISSLUBE

oil floating on top came from, and better yet, what in the world do I do with it now? Well listen up my friends because were going to school!

MILESTONES

Tramp oil, (as we call it in the industry) is a real problem for metalworking fluids in general; it doesn’t improve the cutting action of the metalworking fluid and it tends to be a readily available food supply for anaerobic bacteria. Anaerobic bacteria don’t require oxygen to live, but they still require a food source. Waylubes/Hydrualic oils as well as the raw materials found in metalworking fluids are potential food sources for these anaerobic bacteria, these anaerobes excrete hydrogen sulfide gas (H2S) a by product of metabolizing the sulfur found in most waylubes and hydraulic oils. This creates the wonderful aroma of the famous Monday morning stink that we are all so fond of. If we choose to ignore this potential problem and not remove (Skim) this tramp oil on a weekly if not daily basis, then eventually it will become part of the coolant and then we have a real problem on our hands, as now this food source is readily available throughout the emulsion itself. Older and even new machines being manufactured today use Waylubes/Hydraulic oils for lubricating the box ways, linear guides and spindle bearings. Unless the lubricating system is sealed, this oil will eventually to find its way into the coolant sump. Metalworking fluid manufacturers formulate their coolants to reject out these larger oil agglomerate’s to the top of the emulsion. This foreign oil is to be removed by means of skimming or coolant coalescing equipment. This is done by design; as tramp oil leads to coolant deterioration/contamination and eventual disposal. By implementing simple measures of using coolant skimmers and filtration equipment, on a regular basis, a metalworking fluids sump life can be greatly prolonged, thus reducing overall fluid cost.

1936 Foundation of the Company by

Willy Blaser 1974 Peter Blaser expands with the Coolants

and configuration of a distribution network in Europe and Overseas 1981 Foundation of Blaser Swisslube Inc. in

Goshen, NY, the first subsidiary with own production plant 1993 Foundation of Blaser Swisslube

Czech Republic 1995 Foundation of Blaser Swisslube Germany 1996 Foundation of Blaser Swisslube Japan 1999 Foundation of Blaser Swisslube France 2001 Foundation of Blaser Swisslube Brazil,

China and India 2002 Foundation of Blaser Swisslube Singapore 2006 Foundation of Blaser Swisslube Turkey

and Korea 2010 Foundation of Blaser Swisslube Taiwan.

Today, the Coolants have been produced in Hasle-Rüegsau, in USA, in China and in India

So the answer to the question of, to skim or not to skim is, skim that sump son! Stay tuned for more useful coolant tips, from The Coolant Guy!

Brett Reynolds, “The Coolant Guy” works for Blaser Swisslube Inc. If you would like more useful information regarding metalworking fluids, or would like to find out more information about Blaser metalworking fluid products, please contact Brett at 801.722.4095 or via email at b.reynolds@blaser.com. The Oil Baron Bulletin is not affiliated with Blaser Swisslube Inc. or its subsidiaries.

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Feature Story // PrecisionNews

Manufacturing – America’s National Pastime? STORY BY BRENT TERHAAR

........................................................................................................................................ WHAT’S MORE AMERICAN THAN BASEBALL? Hot dogs or apple pie? How about manufacturing? Manufacturing certainly belongs in this category. Manufacturing is what built this country, the backbone of our economy, and the industry that will be the driving force to rebuilding our economy. While there’s no question that baseball is our country’s “national pastime,” I’d argue that manufacturing should be our country’s “national industry.” With the baseball pennant races in full swing, I can’t help but think of the correlation between top performing baseball teams and top performing manufacturers. Here are some things our “national industry” can learn from our “national pastime.” THE FARM SYSTEM Branch Rickey, the storied general manager of the St. Louis Cardinals and Brooklyn Dodgers, recognized the challenges of finding and affording young talent coming through the ranks for his team. Rather than paying a premium and fighting other teams for the best talent, he tried something new. He responded by creating a team-owned farm system to develop players specifically for his organization. This resulted in a lasting pipeline of talented players for his teams and unparalleled success. This new idea ultimately changed the landscape of how Major League teams build their organizations, and it continues to be the primary pipeline for developing the next generation of Major League players. The same is true in manufacturing. Companies are struggling to find talented craftsmen to join their shops. There is a lack of skilled labor entering the workplace. Companies that are most successful in developing young talent aren’t waiting for those people to apply. They are being proactive by raising awareness at the high school, technical school, and college ranks to attract and recruit talented employees. They are going back to their own farm system concept – building up their intern and apprentice programs and generating the talent pool within their organization. Having this internal farm system helps these successful manufacturing companies control their own destiny to ensure they are building the next generation of employees. THE UTILITY PLAYER Every team has that one player that can do just about everything. They play outfield one day, first base the next, and pinch run

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when they need some speed on the bases. These players are affectionately referred to as utility players. The utility player isn’t typically the highest paid player or the most famous. However, ask any team manager, and they will repeatedly sing their praises and talk about how valuable these utility players are. Why is that? A utility player can take on a number of different roles and be productive. This gives the manager flexibility when tough situations arise. Teams’ need this flexibility when there is an injury or a unique game situation. There’s no question that having a strong utility player is an essential piece of a successful baseball team’s puzzle. The same is true in manufacturing. Organizations that build operations based on flexibility are the ones that can react quickly to the ever-changing business environment. Having work centers that are quick-change and multi-functional allows business owners to deploy resources to take advantage of new opportunities. The same is true for employees. Building a team that is open to change and willing to wear a number of hats typically results in a more productive and energetic workforce. Manufacturing companies that build this flexibility and culture into their organizations are better positioned for short-term and long-term success. THE POWER OF STATISTICS Baseball enthusiasts love their statistics. Runs batted in (RBI), homeruns, earned run average (ERA) – you name the statistic, and it’s tracked in baseball. We use historical statistics to compare players today against those 100 years ago. We use statistics to determine who will be the MVP or Cy Young award winners. Do these long-lived historical statistics provide the best baseline for these comparisons? Billy Beane, the General Manager of the Oakland A’s, didn’t think so. He saw a flaw in traditional statistics used to measure and compare talented players in the league. So what did he do? He took the same activity and changed the way he looked at the information. He used objective information and modeled that information in a different format. Instead of RBI, fast ball velocity, and batting average, he put more emphasis on slugging percentage, walks allowed, and on-base percentages. The result was an atypical combination of players that made up the Oakland A’s roster. On paper, these teams didn’t stand up to most in the league.


ORGANIZATIONS THAT BUILD OPERATIONS BASED ON FLEXIBILITY ARE THE ONES THAT CAN REACT QUICKLY TO THE EVERThink of BUSINESS your lastENVIRONMENT. busy month CHANGING

and your last slow month. How much did they vary?

The actual results were quite different than what everyone expected. Beane created this band of atypical players that turned You’ve already invested significant time and money to develop your out to be extremely successful, despite the A’s ranking of being costing system – the last thing you want to do is abandon it. Don’t do one of the lowest salaried teams. This philosophy of being that! There is critical information you can gather from your current innovative and looking at information in a different way, which system. The key is figuring out how to use this information. was coined sabermetrics, has proven successful and been adopted by other successful organizations in baseball. Progressive manufacturing companies are simplifying their systems and eliminating the intricacies and uncertainties of job costing. It is The same is true in manufacturing. Successful companies are important to understand that this elimination of detail doesn’t becoming more innovative in how they analyze information. translate to a reduced focus on cost. Just the opposite – these The lack of timeliness, reliability, and economic pressures are companies put a high degree of focus on understanding their cost requiring companies to look at information in a different light. structure. The difference is that the focus is on a macro (i.e., entity Traditional models used to measure and manage profitability, wide) basis versus a micro (i.e., job by job) basis. such as job costing or standard costing, can result in misleading information. Companies are replacing these traditional A typical misconception many businesses have is how they view what measurements with simpler and more reliable models for their competitors are doing. Don’t assume that the low price your measuring profitability. This new view of profitability is resulting competitors are charging results in lost profits. Companies that manage in a new thought process for many manufacturers which is their profitability in different ways can be extremely profitable by resulting in increased profitability. capturing sales at levels others view as non-profitable.  THE PENNANT RACE Focus on understanding what drives profitability in your shop. I love watching the pennant race in late summer and early fall. Although you’re delivering a finished machined product, what you’re Every game is make-it or break-it at this time of year. Teams are really selling, and what your customers are buying, is your expertise volleying back and forth for the lead in their division hoping to and production capabilities. Companies that truly understand and make the playoffs. When you look at the teams that are in the hunt manage their machining capabilities and capacity have a competitive for the pennant, what do they all have in common? Longevity. advantage in the marketplace. Their focus is on managing, executing, The baseball season is a marathon – 162 games. Most teams in and pricing based on throughput, not job by job cost. They still evaluate the race survived their mid-season slumps and stayed healthy job performance, but it isn’t on a cost basis, it is on a production basis. throughout the year. Those that can weather the storm the longest and stay relevant when they need to be are rewarded The results of changing this focus can be significant. Typically, with the opportunity to continue their season in the playoffs. companies that change the way they evaluate their business bring simplicity and clarity to their operations. Functional teams (production, The same is true in manufacturing. When the economy starts to sales, finance, etc.) understand the information better and work slump, companies that survive are the ones that can weather the together to drive toward the same goals. There becomes a shift in storm. Companies that are highly leveraged, inflexible, and unwilling people’s focus. Instead of spending time refining their job cost system, to make the difficult decisions in a timely manner are more management spends time figuring out how to operate more efficiently vulnerable to fail. Companies that manage their financial results to drive sales and production through the plant. Most importantly, it and are balanced in the type of work and industries they serve are leads to increased profitability and organizational direction that better prepared to survive and be successful for the long-term. ultimately result in increased enterprise value. The correlation between successful baseball teams and successful Changing the way an organization operates and manages information manufacturing companies runs deep. As we watch our favorite is no easy endeavor Past practices, especially those that have been teams fight to make the playoffs, keep in mind what made these consistently followed in successful companies, make it challenging to teams successful, and think about how you can incorporate move away from. Not every organization has the ability to make this those same principles into your manufacturing organization. shift in philosophy. However, those that do will have a competitive advantage in the marketplace. Brent Terhaar is a Principal in the Manufacturing and Distribution group of LarsonAllen. Brent can be reached at 888.529.2648 or Dave Hopkins and Brent Terhaar are Principals in the Manufacturing and bterhaar@larsonallen.com.

Distribution group of LarsonAllen. They can be reached at 800.525.2826 or dhopkins@larsonallen.com; bterhaar@larsonallen.com. To learn more about Learn more at: larsonallen.com LarsonAllen, visit our website at www.larsonallen.com.

GREA AT INNOV INN ATTIONS BEGIN WITH SIMPLE IDEAS. We help our manufacturing clients innovate, change, and grow. Contact David H Hopkins opk at 800-525-2826 opkins or dhopkins@larsonallen.com.

Improving profitability | Accelerating growth Reducing risk | Planning for succession

Noticeably ly Dif Different. fffe erent. september/october 2011

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Feature Story // PrecisionNews

A new worksheet calculator is teaching managers of American manufacturers that want to be leaders in bringing manufacturing back to the United States.

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When I succumbed to peer pressure as a teenager and asked my mother if I could do something that “everyone else was doing,” her refrain would be “don’t be a sheep and follow the crowd; be a leader.” The management of American manufacturing companies should have followed my mother’s advice of being a leader in their industry instead of following the “herd mentality” of outsourcing their manufacturing offshore to China to the detriment of the overall American manufacturing industry and the United States’ position as the world’s pre-eminent country. A new report by the Boston Consulting Group, Made in America, Again - Why Manufacturing Will Return to the U.S., reveals that “China’s overwhelming manufacturing cost advantage over the U.S. is shrinking fast.” The authors, Harold L. Sirkin, Michael Zinser and Douglas Hohner, conclude that within five years, “rising Chinese wages, higher U.S. productivity, a weaker dollar, and other factors will virtually close the cost gap between the U.S. and China for many goods consumed in North America.”

ARE YOU THE LEADER? STORY BY MICHELE NASH-HOFF

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Feature Story // PrecisionNews

Their report substantiates the Total Cost of Ownership worksheet calculator that Harry Moser, founder of the Reshoring Initiative, has developed and is teaching to managers of American manufacturers that want to be leaders in bringing manufacturing back to the United States. The Boston Consulting Group makes the same recommendation as Moser: conduct a rigorous, part-by-part, product-by-product analysis to fully account for total costs rather than just factory wages. In doing so, they may discover that manufacturing in the U.S. is a more attractive option, especially for products sold in the U.S. market. For products with high labor content that are destined for mainly Asian markets, manufacturing in China will remain the best choice because of economies of scale or technology. They key idea is to recognize that China is no longer the default option to lower costs and increase profitability. What is the basis for authors’ conclusion that manufacturing will return to the United States? They say the key reasons for the shift are the following: • Wage and benefits have increased 15 to 20 percent per year at the average Chinese factory, which will slash China’s low-cost advantage over the U.S. from 55 percent today down to 39 percent by 2015, when adjusted for the higher productivity of U.S. workers. • When the Total Cost of Ownership factors such as transportation, duties, supply chain risks, cost of inventory, and other costs are calculated, the cost savings of manufacturing in China rather than some U.S. states will become minimal within five years.

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• “Automation and other measures to improve productivity in China won’t be enough to preserve the country’s cost advantage. Indeed, they will undercut the primary attraction of outsourcing to China - access to low-cost labor.” • Demand of goods in Asia will increase rapidly due to rising income level so multinational companies are likely to devote more of their capacity in China to serving the Asian market and bring some production back to the U.S. to service the North American market. • “Manufacturing of some goods will shift from China to nations with lower labor costs, such as Vietnam, Indonesia, and Mexico.” However, this will be limited by the supply of skilled workers, inadequate infrastructure, supply networks, as well as by political and intellectual property risks, corruption, and the risk to personal safety in those countries. The BCG report presents an interesting perspective on the decline and forecast renaissance of American manufacturing. They acknowledge the effect of Japan and the “Asian Tigers of Korea and Taiwan had on the shrinking of the American manufacturing industry, in which the U.S. share of the world’s manufacturing dropped from the high of around 40 percent in the early 1950s down to less than 20 percent today.” However, they point out that “U.S. industry and the economy responded with surprising flexibility to reemerge more competitive and productive than ever” by the late 1990s.


THE PRICE OF LABOR IS INCREASING SO RAPIDLY THAT MANUFACTURERS ARE AUTOMATING THEIR PLANTS IN CHINA TO REDUCE THE LABOR CONTENT. They opine that the “U.S. manufacturing sector is today in the midst of a similar process of readjustment in response to perhaps its greatest competitive threat ever - the rise of China.” As proof, they state that the “output of manufacturing is almost two and a half times its 1972 level in constant dollars, even though employment has dropped by 33 percent ... the value of U.S. manufacturing has increased by one-third, to $1.65 trillion, from 1997 to 2008 - before the onset of the recession - thanks to the strongest productivity growth in the industrial world.” The authors conclude that within five years, “the total cost of production for many products will be only about 10 to 15 percent less in Chinese coastal cities than in some parts of the U.S. where factories are likely to be built,” such as South Carolina, Alabama, and Tennessee. When you add in the other factors of Total Cost of Ownership, the cost gap will be minimal. Although some production is moving to Chinese cities in interior provinces to reduce costs, these regions lack the abundance of skilled workers, supply networks, and efficient transportation infrastructure of the coastal cities. “As a result, they expect companies to begin building more capacity in the U.S. to supply North America.” A few of their examples are: • NCR moved production of its ATM’s to a plant in Columbus, Georgia, that will employ 870 people by 2014. • The Coleman Company is moving production of its 16-quart wheeled plastic cooler from China to Wichita, Kansas. • Sleek Audio has moved production of its high-end headphones from Chinese suppliers to its plant in Manatee County, Florida. • Peerless Industries will consolidate all manufacturing of audiovisual mounting systems in Illinois, moving work from China in order to achieve cost efficiencies, shorter lead times, and local control over manufacturing processes.

manufacturer Foxconn International, which employs 920,000 people in China alone, doubled wages” after a string of worker suicides. They assert that rising Chinese productivity will be insufficient to offset these wages increases because output will increase at only half the pace of the rise in wages. Even though Chinese wages will still be much lower in 2015, labor content is only part of the cost of making a part so the savings could shrink to as low as 10 percent when other costs are included. The price of labor is increasing so rapidly that manufacturers are automating their plants in China to reduce the labor content, but as the labor content is reduced, it reduces the advantage of keeping manufacturing in China for the low labor rates. Another factor is the increasing cost of land in China for building factories. For example, industrial land costs average $10.22 per square foot, but ranges up to $21 per square foot in Shenzhen. In contrast, industrial land in Alabama ranges from $1.86 to $7.3 per square foot and $1.30 to $4.65 in Tennessee and North Carolina. Other low-cost nations won’t be able to absorb all of the high labor content manufacturing moving from China because China has the highest proportion of able-bodied adults in the workforce (84 percent), and 28 percent of those workers are employed by industry. The estimated 215 million industrial workers in China are 58 percent more than the industrial workforce of all of Southeast Asia and India combined. The authors predict that “instead of pulling out of China, most multinational companies will orient more of their production to serve China and the rest of a growing Asia ... The shifting cost structure between China and the U.S. will present more manufacturing and sourcing options.”

These examples corroborate what I’ve been seeing and wrote about in my book and subsequent blog articles about companies in the San Diego region. For example, at a TechAmerica Operations Roundtable event last April, Luke Faulstick, COO of DJO Global said that they have brought back the manufacturing of their cold therapy unit from China, their printed circuit boards to a supplier in South Dakota, their textile manufacturing to North Carolina, and their screw machined parts to Texas. He recommended that any company on the “lean” journey should rethink their outsourcing offshore.

U.S. manufacturers should undertake a thorough analysis of their global supply networks, factoring in worker productivity, transit costs, time-to-market considerations, logistical risks, energy costs, as well as other hidden costs of sourcing offshore.

The BCG report goes into quite a bit of detail about the factors that are starting to dramatically shift the manufacturing cost equation in favor of the U.S. A key factor is that China’s average wages have become more volatile. In 2010, “the giant contract

Michele Nash-Hoff is the President ElectroFab Sales and the author of Can American Manufacturing be Saved? Why We Should and How We Can, available at www.savingusmanufacturing.com or www.amazon.com

The question is: Are you going to be one of the leaders in bringing manufacturing back to the U.S. or are you going to follow the “herd mentality” by continuing to outsource manufacturing in China?

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Drill Bits

//OPINION //

CUTTING TO THE ISSUES

GROWTH OF HEALTH CARE COSTS UNDERMINES EFFORTS TO IMPROVE ACCESS TO HEALTH INSURANCE by BILL HAMMETT

American employers are spending more than ever for their workers’ health insurance, according to a new study from the federal Agency for Health Research and Quality. The agency’s researchers found that average premiums were $4,940 for one person last year -- more than double the price employers paid in 1996. Unfortunately, health costs are expected to go up even further. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services project that total health spending will increase more than 80 percent through the end of this decade. That upward cost trend could put health insurance beyond the reach of an ever-growing number of Americans. Fortunately, there’s a way to reduce health care costs and extend insurance coverage to more people -- by expanding access to highdeductible health plans linked to Health Savings Accounts (HSAs). High-deductible health plans carry low monthly premiums, which make them very affordable. With an HSA, individuals can set aside up to $3,050 per year in pre-tax dollars -- or $6,150 for families -- to pay for routine medical expenses. Once a consumer reaches his policy’s annual deductible, insurance generally covers any additional medical expenses. Funds left in the account at the end of the year remain the individual's property for future use. And plans cover preventive services without a deductible. These plans provide protection against the costs of a major medical problem. They also make people more cost-conscious health care consumers. Participants have an incentive to avoid paying for unnecessary services because they keep the money they don’t spend. It should come as no surprise, then, that high-deductible plans generate significant cost savings compared to traditional plans -as high as 20 percent the first year, and three to five percent, on

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average, in the ensuing years, according to a study by the American Academy of Actuaries. Overall costs associated with high-deductible plans have gone down even as insurance premiums for traditional plans have risen. Importantly, consumers with high-deductible plans aren’t just misers, skirting necessary medical care to save a few dollars. In fact, the Actuaries’ study found that patients with high-deductible policies are more likely to take advantage of preventive services. Lawmakers have taken notice of the benefits of high-deductible plans and HSAs. Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) is advancing a bill that would enhance these offerings by giving consumers more control over how they can spend their HSA dollars and by expanding the insurance choices available to them. Rep. Erik Paulsen (R-Minn.) has introduced a similar measure in the House. The evidence is clear: High-deductible insurance plans combined with Health Savings Accounts are an extremely effective way to both curb rising health costs and ensure that more Americans have access to quality care. Even better, they don’t require billions in new federal expenditures. They should be at the center of our nation's efforts to expand health insurance coverage.

Bill Hammett is a Past-President of the San Diego Association of Health Underwriters and specializes in Employee Benefits for Champion Risk & Insurance Services in San Diego, CA. He can be reached at whammett@championrisk.net


• Machining Excellence since 1997 • ISO 9001 + AS9100B Certified • Experienced senior machinists • Experts in stainless, aluminum, plastics and exotics • 8A Certified, Viet Nam Vet, Minority Owned Small Business • Eager to provide you with quality performance and quick responses

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• Machining Excellence since 1997 • ISO 9001 + AS9100B Certified • Experienced senior machinists • Experts in stainless, aluminum, plastics and exotics • 8A Certified, Viet Nam Vet, Minority Owned Small Business • Eager to provide you with quality performance and quick responses

Contact Nichols at 480-804-0593 www.nicholsprecision.com

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WEBSITES THAT WORK FOR YOU Arizona Chapter Website arizonatooling.org

ATMA PRECISION 2011 ATMA BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Arizona Dept. of Commerce-Job Training Grant Application azcommerce.com/workforce Arizona Department of Education azed.gov

President MARK WEATHERS Excaliber Precision Machining

Arizona Manufacturers Council azchamber.com/amc

Vice President DANTE FIERROS Nichols Precision

Arizona MEP arizonamep.org

Executive Director CHRIS MIGNELLA

Arizona State University Mechanical & Manufacturing Engineering Technology poly.asu.edu/technology/mmet/ City of Phoenix – Community & Economic Development Program phoenix.gov/ECONDEV/index.html

Secretary DAVID LAIR Dynamic Machine & Fabricating Trustee JOHN LEWIS Lewis Aerospace

EVIT (East Valley Institute of Technology) evit.com GateWay Community College gatewaycc.edu

BOARD MEMBERS

Greater Phoenix Chamber of Commerce phoenixchamber.com Human Resources, Safety & Environmental topics of interest (Also see link on the NTMA website: www.ntma.org) blr.com Maricopa Skill Center maricopaskillcenter.com

Bob Marusiak Micro-Tronics, Inc. John Raycraft Arizona Precision Industrial Jeremy Lutringer Unique Machine & Tool Gary Watkins MarZee

Maricopa Community Colleges maricopa.edu Maricopa Workforce Connection maricopaworkforceconnection.com

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Mesa Community College mc.maricopa.edu

Arizona Tooling & Machining Association A Chapter of the National Tooling & Machining Association

Mesa High School mpsaz.org National Institute for Metalworking Standards nims-skills.org National Tooling & Machining Association ntma.org

P.O. Box 3518 Scottsdale, AZ 85271 Office: 602.242.8826 Fax: 480.970.8501 ExecutiveDirector@arizonatooling.org

One Voice Advocacy metalworkingadvocate.org SCF Arizona scfaz.com

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U.S. Department of Labor dol.gov

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THE RIGHT TOOLS. THE RIGHT TEAM. THE RIGHT TIME.

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PrecisionNews // ARIZONA TOOLING & MACHINING ASSOCIATION

MEMBER LISTINGS REGULAR MEMBERS Hein Tran

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Micropulse West

602-438-9770

ATMA EVENTS IN SEPT/OCT Safety Meeting (Fire Prevention) Date and Time: September 14, 11:30-1:00 Venue: Foresight Technologies, 1301 W. Geneva, Tempe Board of Directors Meeting Date and Time: September 20, 11:30-1:00 Venue: Micro-Tronics, 2905 S. Potter, Tempe, 85282 GENERAL DINNER MEETING Date and Time: September 28, 5:00-8:00 pm Venue: Phoenix Airport Hilton, 2435 S. 47th Street, Phoenix Board of Directors Meeting Date and Time: November 18, 11:30-1:00 Venue: Micro-Tronics, 2905 S. Potter, Tempe, 85282 MAUI WOWI TRADE SHOW Date and Time: September 28, 4:00-7:30 pm Venue: Phoenix Airport Hilton, 2435 S. 47th Street, Phoenix $1000 cash prize!

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UPCOMING ATMA EVENTS!

MAY MAYSafety Meeting (General Safety Standards) 11:30 5/11 Phoenix Heat Treat,Safety 2450Standards) W. Mohave, Phoenix 5/11 at Safety Meeting (General 11:30

ATMA_0202_FINAL_Layout 1 6/18/11 7:04 AM Page 23

MARK YOUR CALENDAR WITH THESE

at Phoenix Heat Treat, 2450 W. Mohave, Phoenix

5/12MAY Combined Membership, Marketing & Program 5/12 Combined Membership, &Technologies, Program 5/11 Safety Meeting (General Safety Standards) 11:30 Meeting 11:30-1:00 atMarketing Foresight Meeting at Foresight Technologies, at Phoenix Heat Treat, 2450 W. Mohave, Phoenix 1301 W. 11:30-1:00 Geneva, Tempe

UPCOMING ATMA EVENTS! 5/17

PrecisionNews // ARIZONA TOOLING & MACHINING ASSOCIATION

W. Geneva, Tempe Marketing & Program 5/121301 Combined Membership, ofDirectors Directors Meeting 11:30-1:00 Meeting 11:30-1:00 at Foresight Technologies, 5/17 Board Board of Meeting 11:30-1:00 at at 231301 W. Geneva, ATMA_0202_FINAL_Layout 1 6/18/11 7:04 AM PageMicro-Tronics, 2905 S. Potter, Tempe, 85282 Tempe Micro-Tronics, 2905 S. Potter, Tempe, 85282 MAY BoardDinner of Directors Meeting 11:30-1:00atatPhoenix 5/17 MARK YOUR CALENDAR WITH THESE 5/25 General Dinner Meeting 5:00-8:00pm at Phoenix 5/25 General Meeting 5:00-8:00pm 5/11 Safety Meeting (General Safety Standards) 11:30 2905S.S.47th Potter, Tempe, 85282 Micro-Tronics, Airport Hilton, Street, Phoenix Hilton,2435 2435 S. 47th Street, Phoenix 245023 W. Mohave, Phoenix Airport 1 Phoenix 6/18/11 Heat 7:04 Treat, AM Page ATMA_0202_FINAL_Layout at 5/25 General Dinner Meeting 5:00-8:00pm at Phoenix JUNE Airport Hilton, 2435 S. 47th Street, Phoenix 5/12 Combined Membership, Marketing & Program JUNE Meeting 11:30-1:00 at Foresight Technologies, 6/08 Safety Meeting (General Safety Standards) 11:30 6/08JUNE Safety Meeting Standards) 11:30 1301 W. Geneva, Tempe at Leavitt Group,(General 919 N. 1stSafety St., Phoenix Safety Meeting (General Safety 11:30 6/08 Leavitt Group, 919 N. 1st Standards) St., Phoenix 5/17 Board of Directors Meeting 11:30-1:00 at 6/09 at Combined Membership, Marketing & Program at Leavitt Group, 919 N. 1st St., Phoenix Micro-Tronics, 2905 S. Potter, Tempe, 85282 A 2 Z Metalworker 602.412.7696 MAY 6/096/09 Combined Membership, Marketing & Program Meeting 11:30-1:00 at Foresight Technologies, Combined Membership, Marketing & Program MARK YOUR CALENDAR WITH THESE 5/25 General Dinner Meeting 5:00-8:00pm at Phoenix 1301 W. Geneva, Tempe Meeting 11:30-1:00 Foresight Technologies, 5/11 Safety Meeting (General Safety Standards) 11:30 Adams Machinery 480.968.3711 Meeting 11:30-1:00 atatForesight Technologies, Hilton,2450 2435W. S. 47th Street, Phoenix W. Geneva, Tempe 11:30-1:00 at at PhoenixAirport Heat Treat, Mohave, Phoenix 1301 Geneva, Meeting Tempe 6/21 1301 Board ofW. Directors Arizona CNC Equipment 480.615.6353 JUNE Micro-Tronics, 2905Meeting S. Potter, Tempe, 85282 MARK YOUR CALENDAR WITH THESE Board ofDirectors Directors 11:30-1:00 at at 5/12 Combined Membership, Marketing & Program 6/216/21 Board of Meeting 11:30-1:00 ATS Industrial 602.276.7707 2905 S. Potter, Tempe, at 85282 Micro-Tronics, 6/0811:30-1:00 Safety Meeting (General Safety Standards) 11:30 6/29 Micro-Tronics, General Dinner Meeting Phoenix Meeting at Foresight Technologies, 2905 S.5:00-8:00pm Potter, Tempe, 85282 at Leavitt Group, 919 N. 1st St., Phoenix Bank of America 1301 W. Geneva, Tempe 602.523.2044 6/29Airport General Dinner Meeting 5:00-8:00pm at Phoenix Hilton, 2435 S. 47th Street, Phoenix Jeff Anderson 6/29 General Dinner Meeting 5:00-8:00pm Airport Hilton, 2435 S. 47th Street, Phoenixat Phoenix 6/09 Combined Membership, Marketing & Program Barry Metals 602.484.7186 5/17 Board of Directors Meeting 11:30-1:00 at 9878 W. Camelback, Glendale, AZ Street, 85305Phoenix Airport Hilton, 2435 S. 47th Meeting 11:30-1:00 MAY at Foresight Technologies, Micro-Tronics, 2905 S. Potter, Tempe, 85282 ChemResearch Co., Inc. 1301 W. 602.253.4175 Geneva, Tempe

MEMBER LISTINGS UPCOMING ASSOCIATE MEMBERS ATMA EVENTS!

Welcome

Linda Daly Richard Short

TO OUR NEWEST SPONSOR:

UPCOMING National Bank of Arizona ATMA EVENTS! UPCOMING

Greg Whelan John Anderson Isaac Bunney

ATMA EVENTS!

Howie Basuk Steve Blok

5/11 Safety Meeting ph: (General Safety Standards) 11:30 623.872.2546

5/25 General 5:00-8:00pm at Phoenix MAY 6/21Dinner BoardMeeting of 623.931.5009 Directors Meeting 11:30-1:00 at 2450 W. Mohave, Phoenix Consolidated Resources at Phoenix Heat Treat, Jeff.Anderson@nbarizona.com Airport Hilton, 2435 (General S. 47th Phoenix Micro-Tronics, 2905 Street, S. Potter, Tempe, 85282 5/11 Safety Meeting Safety Standards) 11:30Marketing & Program Creative Promotions 480.839.9511 5/12 Combined Membership, www.nbarizona.com at Phoenix Treat, 24505:00-8:00pm W. Mohave, Phoenix 6/29 GeneralHeat Dinner Meeting at Phoenix JUNE Meeting 11:30-1:00 at Foresight Technologies, D D i - Solidworks 602.241.0900 AirportMembership, Hilton, 2435 Marketing S. 47th Street, Phoenix 5/12 Combined & Program

Kerry Vance Cindy Stewart Lou Gallo

6/08 Safety Meeting (General Safety 1301Standards) W. Geneva,11:30 Tempe

MANY THANK MANY THANKS

Meeting 11:30-1:00 at Foresight Technologies, D&R Machinery at Leavitt 480.775.6462 Group, 919 N. 1st St., Phoenix 5/17 Board of Directors Meeting 11:30-1:00 at 1301 W. Geneva, Tempe EMJ Metals 602.272.0461 6/09 Combined Membership, Marketing & Program Micro-Tronics, 2905 S. Potter, Tempe, 85282 5/17 Board of Directors Meeting 11:30-1:00 at Meeting 11:30-1:00 at Foresight Technologies, Gartman Technical Services, Inc. 602.788.8121 5/25 Meeting 5:00-8:00pm at Phoenix Micro-Tronics, 2905 S.General Potter, Dinner Tempe, 85282 1301 W. Geneva, Tempe Airport Hilton, 2435 S. 47th Street, Phoenix HUB International5/25 General Dinner 602.749.4190 Meeting 5:00-8:00pm at Phoenix 6/21 Board of Directors Meeting 2435 S.11:30-1:00 47th Street,atPhoenix JUNE Industrial Metal Supply Airport Hilton, 602.454.1500

Randy Flores Steve Warner

Many Thanks TO TO OUR OUR 2011 2011ATMA ATMA TO OUR 2011 ATMA VALUED SPONSORS: VALUED SPONSORS! VALUED SPONSORS Micro-Tronics, 2905 S. Potter, Tempe, 85282 6/08 Safety Meeting (General Safety Standards) 11:30

Mickey Gartman Jackie Bergman David Cohen

MANY THAN

TO OUR 2011 AT MANY THANKS VALUED SPONSO

JUNE Klontech Industrial Sales Dinner Meeting 480.948.1871 6/29 General 5:00-8:00pm at Phoenix at Leavitt Group, 919 N. 1st St., Phoenix 6/08 Safety Meeting (General Safety Standards) 2435 S. 47th Street, Phoenix 11:30 L.A. Specialties AirportatHilton, 602.269.7612 Leavitt Group, 919Combined N. 1st St., Phoenix 6/09 Membership, Marketing & Program LarsonAllen, LLP 6/09 Combined Membership, 480.615.2300 Marketing & Program Meeting 11:30-1:00 at Foresight Technologies, Meeting 11:30-1:00 at1301 Foresight Technologies, W. Geneva, Tempe Leavitt Group 602.264.0566 1301 W. Geneva, Tempe 6/21 Board of Directors Meeting 11:30-1:00 at Magnum Precision Machines 602.431.8300 6/21 Board of Directors Meeting 11:30-1:002905 at S. Potter, Tempe, 85282 Micro-Tronics, Makino, Inc. 602.228.0347 Micro-Tronics, 2905 S. Potter, Tempe, 85282

Tim Kloenne Barry Armstrong

TO OUR 2011 ATMA VALUED SPONSORS!

Doug Berg Bob Von Fleckinger Jeff Trimble David Gundersen

6/29 General Dinner Meeting 5:00-8:00pm at Phoenix

Glen Zachman

6/29 General Dinner Meeting 5:00-8:00pm at Phoenix Moore Tool & Equipment 602.455.8904 Airport Hilton, 2435 S. 47th Street, Phoenix Airport Hilton, 2435 S. 47th Street, Phoenix North-South Machinery 602.466.2556

Pete Hushek

Phoenix Heat Treating

602.258.7751

Steve Montgomery

Phoenix Metal Trading

602.257.4660

Arlene Helt

Ryerson-Phoenix

602.455.3386

Ron Swartzbaugh

S&S Machinery

602.714.0116

Jane Rousculp

Samuel Aerospace Metals

602.721.0176

Frank Encinas

Semiray

602.275.1917

Russ Kurzawski

Star Metal Fluids LLC

602.256.2092

Lisa Barnes

TDS/HDS Marketing

602.635.6404

David Senkfor

Top Gun Consulting

602.510.5998

John Drain

Tornquist Machinery Co.

602.470.0334

George Compton

Total Print Solutions

623.241.7300

Greg Burke

TW Metals

602.864.0014

Doug Pratt

Ulbrich Stainless Steel & Spec.

203.234.3464

Joseph Velez

Law Office of Velez

480.710.5079

Daniel Franks

Wells Fargo Bank

602.522.7805

Thomas Moore

MANY THANKS TO OUR 2011 ATMA VALUED SPONSORS!

MANY THANKS MANY THANKS TO OURTO 2011 ATMA OUR 2011 ATMA VALUEDVALUED SPONSORS! SPONSORS!

arizonatooling.org / 23

Welcome TO OUR NEWEST MEMBERS: Top Gun Consulting

Ulbrich Stainless Steel

David Senkfor 9695 E. Voltaire Drive Scottsdale, AZ 85260

Doug Pratt 57 Dodge Avenue North Haven, CT 06473

ph: 602.510.5998 fx: 480.240.9312 david@topgunconsulting.net www.topgunconsulting.net

ph: 203.234.3464 dpratt@ulbrich.com www.ulbrich.com

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september/october 2011


MARK YOUR CALENDAR WITH THESE

UPCOMINGConsolidated Resources, ATMA EVENTS! " ! %  !

manufacturing estates MAY 5/11 Safety Meeting (General Safety Standards) 11:30 at Phoenix Heat Treat, 2450 W. Mohave, Phoenix

& "" 5/12 Combined Membership, Marketing & Program &  Meeting 11:30-1:00 at Foresight Technologies, 1301 W. Geneva, Tempe & ! !

5/17 Board of Directors Meeting & 11:30-1:00 at  Micro-Tronics, 2905 S. Potter, Tempe, 85282

& 

5/25 General Dinner Meeting 5:00-8:00pm at Phoenix & !" Airport Hilton, 2435 S. 47th Street, Phoenix

&   %

JUNE 6/08 Safety Meeting (General Safety Standards) 11:30 at Leavitt Group, 919 N. 1st St., Phoenix

Providing precision machining and fabricating of diverse parts and assemblies Serving the Aerospace/Aircraft, Military, Oil Tool and Commercial Industries

&  Our Quality System is AS9100 B Compliant &  &  Equipment ! Capacities range  up  to HS-4R   HAAS    4-Axis Horizontal Milling Center @ 150â€? x 66â€? x 48â€? and &  Ikegai VTL CNC Lathe @ Ă˜ 55â€? Diameter &  Centerless Grinding Capacities ranges from & !

!  !"! Ă˜1/8â€? up to Ă˜1-1/2â€? in Lengths up to 14’ long and &  " Ă˜1-1/2â€? to Ă˜ 3â€? RD With Weight Maximum of 50#

 

Dynamic Machine and Fabrication Corp. and Dynamic Centerless # Grinding % 3845 E. Winslow Ave., Phoenix, AZ 85040

6/09 Combined Membership, Marketing & Program Meeting 11:30-1:00 at Foresight Technologies, 1301 W. Geneva, Tempe

(602) 437-0339 !  "

6/21 Board of Directors Meeting 11:30-1:00 at www.BenefitWines.com/atma Micro-Tronics, 2905 S. Potter, Tempe, 85282 Benefit wines support the National Robotics League 6/29 General Dinner Meeting 5:00-8:00pm at Phoenix and the Brock Babb Scholarship Fund. Call Kerry Airport Hilton, 2435 S. 47th Street, Phoenix

Inc.



(602) 437-8947   fax !" !!# 

www.

623.931.5009

% ! " 

dynamic-machine  %.com

    $    $$$ ! " 

MANY THANKS TO OUR 2011 ATMA VALUED SPONSORS!

arizonatooling.org / 23

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Arizona State University Mechanical & Manufacturing Engineering Technology www.poly.asu.edu/technology/mmet/ City of Phoenix â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Community & Economic Development Program www.phoenix.gov/ECONDEV/index.html Âł:H )HDU  12 0DW HU L DO  ´

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AS9100 Certified by DNV Mark Weathers, Owner 8737 NORTH 77TH DRIVE â&#x20AC;˘ PEORIA, ARIZONA 85345 P) 623.878.6800 â&#x20AC;˘ F) 623.878.0633 â&#x20AC;˘ C) 602.363.7929 mark@excalpm.com â&#x20AC;˘ www.excalpm.com

www.gatewaycc.edu

Greater Phoenix Chamber of Commerce www.phoenixchamber.com Human Resources, Safety & Environmental topics of interest (Also see a link on the NTMA website, www.ntma.org) www.blr.com Maricopa Skill Center www.maricopaskillcenter.com Maricopa Community Colleges www.maricopa.edu Maricopa Workforce Connection www.maricopaworkforceconnection.com Mesa Community College www.mc.maricopa.edu Mesa High School www.mpsaz.org WATER-JET CUTTING Providing...Tighter Tolerances / Minimal Machining

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â&#x20AC;˘ 47 â&#x20AC;˘ -XO\$XJ

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HEAT TREATING ALUMINUM DIP BRAZING VACUUM BRAZING ...at the largest facility of its kind in Northern California. We are proven innovators in this highly technical industry. Our experienced metallurgists have accomplished the near-impossible for many satisfied clients. Because of our high standards of quality, service and just plain hard work, we encourage you to contact us for your next heat-treating or brazing project. We are committed to your success.

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www.thermo-fusion.com ATMA_0202_FINAL_Layout 1 6/18/11 7:05 AM Page 27 ESTABLISHED 1973

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SAN DIEGO CHAPTER

NTMA PRECISION 2011 BOARD OF DIRECTORS President MELINDA COLDWELL Cornerstone Machining, Inc. Vice President TONY MARTINDALE Martindale Manufacturing Recruitment Director Mike Brown Computer Integrated Machining Past President PETER NEVILLE B&H Tool Education Director HEATHER RUSSELL K-Tech Machine

BOARD MEMBERS Education Board Member John Riego de Dios Construction Tech Academy Board Member Glenn Van Noy Champion Risk Insurance Board Member Mark Selway Selway Machine

MEMBER LISTINGS REGULAR MEMBERS Todd C. Lawson

Academy Machine Products

760.439.0109

Jodi Deane

Advanced Maching and Tooling

858.486.9050

Dennis Cope

Alphatec Spine

760.494.6774

Sean Tillett

Alphatec Spine

760.494.6894

Peter Neville

B&H Tool Company Inc.

800.272.8878

Lyle Anderson

C&H Machine and EDM Services

760.746.6459

Dudley Westlake

Compucraft Industries, Inc.

619.448.0787

Michael J. Brown

Computer Integrated Mach., Inc.

619.596.9246

Melinda Coldwell

Cornerstone Machining, Inc.

760.727.5228

Erich Wilms

Diversified Tool & Die

760.598.9100

Donovan Weber

Forecast 3D

760.929.9380

Andrew Allen

Henry Machine, Inc.

760.744.8482

Nhan Vo Young

Henry Machine, Inc.

760.744.8482

David Tuza

I-Source Technical Services, Inc.

949.453.1500

Dora E. Tuza

I-Source Technical Services, Inc.

949.453.1500

Jim Piel

J I Machine Company, Inc.

858.695.1787

Heather Russell

K-Tech Machine, Inc.

760.471.9262

Stuart Russell

K-Tech Machine, Inc.

760.471.9262

Cliff Manzke

Manzke Machine, Inc.

760.504.6875

Russell Wells Sr.

MarLee Manufacturing, Inc.

909.390.3222

Tony Martindale

Martindale Manufacturing Co.

760.744.3078

Mark Rottele

Roettele Industries

909.606.8252

Scott Cormony

Waterjet West, Inc.

760.471.2600

FOUNDING PARTNERS Glenn Van Noy

Champion Risk and Insurance Services

760.419.1393

Dave Stanton

Digital Dimensions, Inc.

858.279.2557

Board Member Dave Stanton Digital Dimensions

Jeff Schwen

East County Internet Marketing

619.315.5604

Gail Houser

National Tooling & Machining Assoc.

602.758.6912

Board Member Jeff Schwen East County Internet Marketing

Mark Selway

Selway Machine Tool Company

888.735.9290

Chapter Executive Suzanne Coleman

“To form an alliance within the San Diego region of the local machining and tool industry and to foster mutual success through education, technology, opportunity sharing and act as one voice with the government and the community.” NTMA - San Diego Chapter 348 Saratoga Glen Escondido, CA 92025 Phone: 760.419.1393 ntmasandiegochapter.org

26

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PrecisionNews

arizonatooling.org

september/october 2011

SAN DIEGO-NTMA UPCOMING EVENTS San Diego - An Evening with Brian Bilbray Date and Time: September 27, 5:30pm Venue: Kearny High School (Tooling Academy), San Diego - NTMA Board Meeting Date and Time: October 6, 11:30am Venue: Bruno’s Restaurant in San Marcos San Diego - NTMA Signature Event Date and Time: October 18, 5:30pm Venue: Seau’s in Mission Valley San Diego - Apprenticeship Program by Alphatec Spine Date and Time: November 19, 5:30pm Venue: Alphatec Spine in Carlsbad


...................................................................... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..

Perfect Fit THE RIGHT PERSON, THE RIGHT JOB

MEETING THE GROWING NEEDS OF INDUSTRY

THE ALPHATEC SPINE APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM (ASAP) IN THE OVERALL ECONOMY it’s tough to find a job. Conversely in the machining industry it’s getting harder and harder to find skilled workers. Apprenticeship programs that support the machining and manufacturing industry have nearly disappeared altogether. Organizations such as the NTMA seek to bring them back and support education as a core value in the mission statement of both the national and local associations. One local San Diego business decided to take matters into their own hands. Sean Tillett, Supervisor, Production Training and Apprenticeship Coordinator at Alphatec Spine searched for some type of support to launch an apprenticeship program for some time to no avail. His search brought him into contact with the California Division of Apprentice Standards (DAS) (http://www.dir.ca.gov/das/das.html). Eventually the DAS connected Sean with the District of Grossmont Adult School. Grossmont had funding for such a program available. The funding is enough to cover Alphatec Spine’s program for a minimum of five years. Thus, the birth of The Alphatec Spine Apprenticeship Program, known as ASAP. The program is state-certified, overseen by DAS San Diego field office and Grossmont Adult School as their Local Education Authority. As of mid July this program is just in its infancy stages. Once Alphatec Spine knew they would be able to launch the program Alphatec Spine had to find students. With funding in place to take three lucky students on for the next three years, Alphatec Spine had to be strategic about finding the right pupils. Their first move, they joined the local NTMA of course! The San Diego NTMA was able to put them in contact with local high schools, colleges, and educators to get the word out. They had a specific criteria and process that all applicants had to adhere to. The final three, according to Tillett, “were real stand outs and we are very pleased with our choices”. It’s a good thing, because Alphatec Spine is housing the classroom and training. Alphatec Spine’s staff will be working with these apprentices for the next three years. “It’s a big commitment, but we believe in the program.”

Accuwright Industries, Inc. is a full service Metal Spray facility utilizing State of Art Robotics and Controls for precision Flame Spray applications. Featuring Plasma Flame Spray, Twin Wire Arc Spray, Combustion Powder/ Wire Spray, and HVOF (High Velocity Oxygen Fuel) Spray. With Quality programs and certifications such as ISO 9001-2008 and FAA Repair Certificates we can meet the growing changes of your industry. Recently combined with our Metallizing capabilities, we now have the Cold Gas-Dynamic Spray (Low Pressure Cold Spray) available for specialized services.

Refurbish worn or damaged shafts/spindles? • Don’t throw away those worn shafts/spindles • Think green and repair • Surface restoration for worn or damaged shafts/spindles • Similar and Hard surfacing repair for longer life Over/under sized machined parts? • Don’t weld • Don’t throw away • Let us rebuild material on incorrectly machined parts • Coatings to match part material • Coatings to provide harder materials • Increase longevity Can’t quote that new job? Never heard of Flame Spray? • It is called Metallizing, Thermal Spray, Plasma Spray, HVOF Spray, Arc Spray, Combustion Spray, Cold Spray • We can do it • Material engineering • Quick turn around times And the Benefits? • Fast turn time • Engineering services • Friendly Service • Knowledgeable Staff • Pick-up/Delivery Valley wide • Consulting/Specification selection • In-house testing procedures

Alphatec Spine is a medical device company that designs, develops, manufactures and markets products for the surgical treatment of spine disorders, primarily focused on the aging spine. For more information contact: Sean Tillett, Supervisor Production Training Apprenticeship Coordinator Direct: 760.494.6894 Email: STillett@alphatecspine.com Website: www.alphatecspine.com

Accurate Thermal Spray Technologies Accuwright Industries, Inc. Contact: David Wright 480.892.9595 (toll free 877.247.9108) www.accuwright.com

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President’s Letter

NORTH TEXAS CHAPTER

NTMA - NORTH TEXAS CHAPTER

A CLIMATE FOR CHANGE

NTMA PRECISION 2011 BOARD OF DIRECTORS

AS THE FALL SEASON APPROACHES, we are thankful in North Texas to get past the record breaking summer heat. Although economic times are uncertain, our membership has remained steady and our member companies are maintaining consistent workflow. The North Texas Chapter continues to service our members through active participation with local colleges such as Richland College to offer continuing education classes for member companies, curriculum advice for our future workforce and scholarships for prospective employees. The need for trained personnel is always a challenge in our industry and we strive to assist our educational partners with training and supplying the next generation of machinists. With the political climate unsure, we maintain a close relationship with those who understand the needs of our industry and can be an advocate for manufacturing in our state and in Washington. In March, Manda Machine Company hosted a press conference for Texas Governer Rick Perry to speak about the outlook for small businesses in Texas and the impact of regulations in manufacturing. In August, Congressman Pete Sessions spoke again for our general meeting at Applegate EDM to provide us with a legislative update from Washington and discuss the implications of the debt crisis. The North Texas Chapter is not all business, however. In July, we had a great time at the Ballpark in Arlington with food, drinks and a Ranger baseball game. Also, our Annual Golf Tournament in September is always a well-attended event and a great chance to spend some casual time with friends and fellow members. We hope to see many of our members attend the Fall Conference at The Broadmoor in Colorado Springs, CO on October 13-16, 2011 and we look forward to networking and learning from fellow manufacturers from around the country. Todd Ellard President, NTMA - North Texas Chapter

President TODD ELLARD Manda Machine Company Vice President JEFF SPENCER Clay Precision Treasurer BARRON SMITH R.W. Smith Company Chapter Executive LISA ELLARD Trustee WAYNE APPLEGATE Applegate EDM

BOARD MEMBERS Mike Berdan BE Technologies Frank Burch Southern Machine Works Bill Walter Ellison Technologies Micah Embrey CNC Precision/Shamrock-Bolt Don Halsey Halsey Manufacturing Ray Jones MWI, Inc. Pat McCurley Midlothian Insurance Karla Chandler Education Liason

“The Power of Connections”

NTMA PRECISION

STAR CHAPTER AWARD 2010 For more information on how you can become a member, please contact us at: ntc.ntma@gmail.com

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NTMA - North Texas Chapter ntc.ntma@gmail.com phone: 214.536.4970 P.O. Box 541236 Dallas, TX 75354-1236 ntmanorthtexas.org


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NTMA

PRECISION NEWS READERS ARE KEY DECISION MAKERS THAT YOU AS AN ADVERTISER WANT TO REACH. OUR READERS WANT AN EDGE IN A CONSTANTLY EVOLVING INDUSTRY AND THEY FIND IT IN PRECISION NEWS!

Let your ad be a call to action! Contact Precision News today for more details at: ExecutiveDirector@arizonatooling.org

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STAR CHAPTER AWARD 2010

Specialty Metals Leadership. Supply Chain Innovation.

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1140 E. Washington St., Suite 205, Phoenix, AZ 85034 602-864-0014 â&#x20AC;˘ 800-203-8000 twmetals.com

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PrecisionNews // NTMA -NORTH TEXAS CHAPTER

MEMBER LISTINGS REGULAR MEMBERS

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS

Vincente Chan

Aeroweld Technologies, Inc.

972.247.1189

Larry Ellison

AJR Metalworks, Inc.

214.352.3766

Wade Whistler

A.C.T. Precision Sheet Metal, Inc.

214.678.9114

Tommy Thompson

Bodic Industries

972.840.1015

Wayne Applegate

Applegate EDM, Inc.

972.488.8997

Lewis Lance

Bodycote Heat Treat

817.265.5878

Steve Ingersoll

Bailey Tool & Manufacturing

972.974.8892

Rick Blair

Brook Anco Corporation

585.475.9570

Michael Berdan

BE-Technologies, Ltd.

972.242.1853

Craig van Hamersveld

Campat Machine Tool, Inc.

972.424.4095

Christi Cameron

Cameron Machine Shop, Inc.

972.235.8876

Claudia Pautz

Castle Metals

972.339.5000 516.536.8200

Jeff R. Spencer

Clay Precision, Ltd.

903.891.9022

Chris Simms

Champion Cutting Tool

Gary Embrey

CNC Precision Manufacturing, Inc.

972.241.3931

Fraser Marshall

Ellison Technologies

972.812.5500

Joseph Lodor

Commerce Grinding Company, Inc. 214.651.1977

Frank Vance

Frank J Vance

972.255.3925

Robert McNamara

Davis Machine & Manufacturing

817.261.7362

Norm Williamson

H & O Die Supply, Inc.

214.630.6660

Charles Gilbert

DNS Tool Cutter Grinding, LLC

972.241.5271

Mike Johns

Haas Factory Outlet

972.231.2802

David Ellis

Ellis Tool & Machine, Inc.

903.546.6540

Greg Kinney

Hartwig, Inc. -- Texas

972.790.8200

Rudy D. Kobus

Expert Tool & Machine, Inc.

972.241.5353

Matt Curtis

Hillary Machinery, Inc.

972.578.1515

Monte Titus

F& R Machine & Repair, Inc.

214.631.4946

Rod Zimmerman

Iscar Metals, Inc.

817.258.3200

Gary Fore

Fore Machine Company, Inc.

817.834.6251

Randy Joyce

Joyce Engraving Company, Inc.

214.638.1262

Larry Borowski

Greenslade and Company, Inc.

817.870.8888

Curtis Dahmen

Kaeser Compressors, Inc.

972.245.9611

David L. Hodgdon

H. H. Mercer, Inc.

972.289.1911

Mark S. Holly

Machinists Tools & Supplies

214.631.9390

Don Halsey, Jr.

Halsey Engineering & Mfg., Inc.

940.566.3306

Leland McDowell

McDowell Machinery & Supply Co. 214.353.0410

Keith Hutchinson

Lancaster Machine Shop

972.227.2868

Pat McCurley

Midlothian Insurance Agency

972.723.5171

Sammy Maddox

Maddox Metal Works, Inc.

214.333.2311

Ray Jones

MWI Inc. / Southwest Division

972.247.3083

Todd Ellard

Manda Machine Company, Inc.

214.352.5946

Mike Chadick

North Texas Precision Instrument

817.589.0011

Rodie Woodard

Maximum Industries, Inc.

972.501.9990

Reed Hunt

Reed Hunt Services, Inc.

817.261.4432

Woodrow W. Thompson

Metal Detail, Inc.

214.330.7757

Bob Severance

Severance Brothers

972.660.7000

Allen Meyer

Meyer Enterprises

972.353.9791

Alan VanHoozer

Top Tooling of Dallas, Inc.

972.278.8300

Eddie Steiner, Jr.

O E M Industries, Inc.

214.330.7271

Jake Bailey

Tower Extrusions Fabrication

940.564.5681

Morris Padgett

Padgett Machine Tools, Inc.

254.865.9772

Glenn Wise

Wise Machinery, LLC

817.905.9473

Troy Paulus

Paulus Precision Machine, Inc.

940.566.5600

Joe Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Dell

Plano Machine & Instrument, Inc.

940.665.2814

Matt Harrell

Quickturn Technology, Inc.

469.643.5010

Barron Smith

R. W. Smith Company, Inc.

214.748.1699

Dion Casto

Rapid Tooling, Inc.

972.633.8872

Frank Burch

Southern Machine Works

580.255.6525

John Anselmi

Sunbelt Plastics Inc.

972.335.4100

Marshall B. Taylor

T & K Machine, Inc.

903.785.5574

Many Thanks TO OUR 2011 NTMA-NORTH TEXAS SPONSORS:

NTMA-NORTH TEXAS MEETINGS&EVENTS Thanks to our 2011 General Meeting hosts: January 2011- Manda Machine Company February 2011- Ellison Technologies March 2011- Larson Allen LLP, Lunch & Learn April 2011- Midlothian Insurance Agency May 19, 2011- General Meeting, Commerce Grinding, Inc. July 27, 2011- Night at the Ballpark Ranger Baseball Game August 25, 2011- General Meeting, Applegate EDM Upcoming Events: September 22, 2011- Golf Tournament at Indian Creek October 20, 2011- General Meeting, DFW Movers November 17, 2011- General Meeting, Plano Machine

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BILLOR M AC HINE TOOL SERVICE


/FOR COST, QUALITY, Consolidated Resources, Inc. FLEXIBILITY, AND Industrial Recycling Specialists DELIVERY, CHOOSE LEWIS AEROSPACE / • Aluminum • and Nickel CATIA, Pro Engineer 2000i, SmartCam meet • Stainless your engineering and CNC programming Steel needs • Copper Production control through JobBOSS, tracking all • Brass jobs from the quoting process thru shipping • Titanium Full service machine shop includes CNC turning, • Aerospace Alloys CNC milling, and CNC Swiss turning

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Consolidated Resources Inc. 4849 West 1401 W. Victory Lane I Phoenix, AZ Missouri 85027 USA Glendale, AZ 85301 Phone: 623.581.0764 I Toll Free: 877.254.2024 Office: 623.931.5009 OPEN EVERY DAY, EVERY WEEKEND, Fax: 623.581.6505 Fax: 623.931.5852 MEETING YOUR DEADLINE kerry@consolidatedresources.com NEEDS www.LewisAerospace.com www.consolidatedresources.com

AS 9100, ISO 9000, and ITAR Certified

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Call Kerry 623.931.5009

september/october 2011

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ATMA_0202_FINAL_Layout 1 6/18/11 7:07 AM Page 32

32 /

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• Machining Excellence since 1997 • ISO 9001 + AS9100B Certified • Experienced senior machinists • Experts in stainless,Served: aluminum, Industries plastics and exotics • Automotive • Aerospace • 8A Certified, Viet•Nam Vet, • Medical Firearms Minority Owned Small Business • Dept of Defense • Electronics • Eager to provide you with quality performance quick responses 2440 Cades Way,and Vista, California 92081 phone: 760.727.5228 fax: 760.727.0799

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For All Your Grinding Needs!

We have the largest centerless grinder in the state!

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Sun Grinding, formerly known as BK Grinding, has been in the Phoenix fabrication industry for over 14 years. We are the leading surface grinding shop in Arizona. Family owned and operated. info@sungrindingusa.com / 522 E. Buckeye Rd. Phoenix, AZ. 85004

september/october 2011

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* Standard product configuration, peak performance. Š 2011 Makino



Th en Th ew M th e M a a a fle t he kin kino o Di xibi lp y PS PS lit sc o Se Ser u y ov ie de yo r er s liv ies u th ne co VMC er e ed m th .A ne es e to w tr r u el w pr ta i i ab th ly im ke od le s uc o p tio n th po tand res w si n ar ve er st e m d , an ve os fe sp a da td ee tu rtic rd em d, re al at le an pre s a ap m cis nd di . ak n s i in g on pe o. j ob cs co an s m d /p . s.

Precision News September October 2011  

Precision Magazine, the trade magazine from the Arizona Tooling and Machining Association. Featuring articles on manufacturing in Arizona, N...

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