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THIS ISSUE: Train for the Future / Learn Your ABC’s / Documenting Impairment / The Foreclosure Bomb

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ARIZONATOOLING.ORG JULY/AUGUST 2011

PrecisionNews TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS EDUCATION EVENTS DIRECTORY

U.S. Manufacturing:

LEADING THE RECOVERY Our industry leads the way forward manufacturing products for domestic use and export and the jobs it takes to produce them p.14

SPECIAL

RESET ISSUE!

PLUS THE 800-lb GORILLA:

Doing business with the customers who helped you grow p.12


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JULY/AUGUST 2011 VOLUME 1 • ISSUE 1

Contents 10 12 14

Features

Departments

SPECIAL ADVERTISING FEATURE

IS IT TIME FOR AN OIL CHANGE?

03 President’s Letter

From either contamination or oxidation, cutting oils eventually go south. Learn how higher quality oil and proper filtration can extend cutter life.

04 Power Up

MANAGING THE 800-LB GORILLA You know who these gorillas are – they’re the cornerstone customers that helped you grow, but also the customers that would jeopardize the survival of your company if they were to leave.

06 Policy Watch 08 Leading Edge 18 Flashpoints 20 Arizona Chapter Info

MANUFACTURING LEADS THE WAY

24 Wesites that Work

The manufacturing industry is the goose that lays golden eggs in the form of products for domestic use and export and the jobs it takes to produce them.

26 San Diego Chapter Info 28 North Texas Chapter Info

OUR MISSION:

“WE JOIN TOGETHER AS MEMBERS OF THE SW REGION PRECISION CUSTOM MANUFACTURING COMMUNITY TO ACHIEVE BUSINESS SUCCESS IN A GLOBAL ECONOMY THROUGH ADVOCACY, ADVICE, NETWORKING, INFORMATION, PROGRAMS AND SERVICES.”

The NTMA Southwest Regional Magazine Featuring Arizona, San Diego and North Texas EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR & EDITOR Chris Mignella

TM

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CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Michele Nash-Hoff, Omar Nashashibi, Brett Reynolds, Rob Tracy, Jeff Thredgold, Joseph Velez ADVISORY BOARD Chris Mignella, Lisa Ellard, Glenn VanNoy, Gail Houser EDITORIAL, ADVERTISING & ADDRESS CHANGES Chris Mignella Phone: 602.242.8826 • Fax: 480.970.8501 Email: ExecutiveDirector@arizonatooling.org

Precision News is published bi-monthly by the Arizona Tooling & Machining Association (ATMA). Opinions expressed are those of the authors or persons quoted and not necessarily those of the ATMA. While efforts to ensure accuracy are exercised, ATMA assumes no liability for the information contained in either editorial or advertising content. ATMA assumes no responsibility or liability for unsolicited manuscripts or artwork. Reproduction in whole or part without the expressed written consent from ATMA is prohibited. Precision News is the registered trade name of this publication. Copyright ©2011 by ATMA. All rights reserved.

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First Word PRESIDENT’S LETTER

ATTRACT AND TRAIN FOR THE FUTURE

I WOULD LIKE TO DEDICATE THIS LETTER to the subject of our upcoming ATMA Apprentice Program launch in August. Like any project, it has to have an acronym, ours is AzPMAP, for Arizona Precision Manufacturing Apprentice Program. This will be a 3-4 year federally registered apprenticeship offered throughout the state for machinists and eventually service techs and NDT/process technicians. This program was developed in partnership with the Az Commerce Authority, Maricopa County Workforce Development, Maricopa County Community Colleges, Department of Education and the ATMA. With the generous support of Modern industries, George Henninger has been assigned to take on the central coordinator role and will move into this position full time when he retires at the end of this year. Why are we doing this? Well, it should be obvious to everyone that lack of qualified workforce is one of our greatest problems. Even with high unemployment, finding skilled workers is my single biggest challenge in running my business. A big part of this problem is the reluctance of high potential young people to enter our field, partly due to the negative publicity around manufacturing trends. There are a lot of indicators that manufacturing in the USA is staging a major comeback, which will help our publicity issue but further strain our resources. So, to make a long story short, we feel that a formalized apprentice program that includes a marketing component will attract and train the caliber of candidates today’s precision machine shop needs. Some accurate information on the industry, combined with a clear career path, will go a long way towards influencing students, parents and counselors. Why apprenticeship? Our state has many positives in workforce development such as good community colleges, an active trade association, solid CTE programs and training funding. What we lack is a cohesive program to bring that all together. The apprentice program does that by providing a prescribed training regimen of schoolwork and on-thejob experience, resulting in qualified employees that emerge with a nationally recognized certificate and without a load of debt. The downside of such a program is the paperwork and reporting required. The AzPMAP program will provide a central coordinator to minimize the burden on the individual companies to make it practical for all of us. Some logistics: The program will market to students and other candidates at schools and job fairs. Applicants will be tested, interviewed and ranked and then matched with interested employers. Apprentices will begin full time work immediately, training after work at one of four community colleges. Apprentices will be paid $9/hr to start, progressing periodically up to $18/hr at the end of the 3-4 year program. Workforce development funds will pay for the first year of classroom training, apprentices pay after that. Employers must provide a ‘journeyperson’ level machinist to train up to two apprentices and coaching will be provided for the trainers. There will be a cost to employers to support the coordinator and marketing efforts, but it is far less than the cost of running your own program, or of having unfilled positions. The program will be offered statewide, and although it will not be limited to ATMA members, it will be cost neutral to become a member versus paying to participate without joining. I expect this program to become a good recruiting tool for the ATMA in addition to ensuring a pipeline of qualified workers for our critical industry. Mark Weathers President, Arizona Tooling & Machining Association

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Power Up NEWS FROM THE NTMA

WHITE HOUSE WORKER TRAINING INITIATIVES BUILD ON EFFORTS BY MANUFACTURERS TO EXPAND SKILLED WORKFORCE CLEVELAND, OH – The National Tooling and Machining Association (NTMA) and the Precision Metalforming Association (PMA) today saluted a White House initiative to expand U.S. manufacturing by recruiting and educating more skilled workers. The initiative mirrors ongoing efforts by NTMA, PMA and other manufacturing groups to develop more qualified workers for the metalforming, tooling and machining industries through two main avenues: actively recruiting new workers, and developing widely recognized credentials that signal their qualifications. Currently, there is an insufficient supply of skilled workers for U.S. manufacturing jobs despite the fact that jobs in the manufacturing sector pay an average of $22 per hour, compared to average service-sector job pay of $11 per hour. “It is essential to the future of our industry that we find creative ways to attract the attention of new workers,” said NTMA President Dave Tilstone. “That’s why NTMA sponsors activities like the National Robotics League, which draws students to technical careers by partnering student teams with local manufacturers to build complex machines designed to do battle and test ingenuity – all while building hightech skills. NTMA’s Chairman, Grady Cope, is involved in another worthy effort: the SkillsUSA National Leadership and Skills Conference. Over 5600 technical education students compete with one another using expertise they’ve developed in occupations like electronics, computeraided drafting, precision machining, and more. Events like these let students know that there may be more rewarding career opportunities available to them than an average service-industry job.”

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“Alongside creative recruitment efforts, the key to developing more skilled workers in the U.S. is the use of uniform, widely-recognized and industry-driven credentials to demonstrate competency in the specific industry skills needed by employers,” said PMA President Bill Gaskin. “PMA and NTMA have worked closely with the National Association of Manufacturers to devise a way to validate metalworking industry skills through the National Institute of Metalworking Skills (NIMS) machining and metalforming certifications. NIMS certifications offer a concrete path for students to acquire or increase specific skills, while in turn providing a set of credentials that signals employers that they’re able to perform to quality standards in a skilled machining or metalworking job. Both the worker and employer benefit as a result.”

Learn more at: ntma.org and pma.org

NTMA MISSION:

“HELP MEMBERS OF THE U.S. PRECISION CUSTOM MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY ACHIEVE BUSINESS SUCCESS IN A GLOBAL ECONOMY THROUGH ADVOCACY, ADVICE, NETWORKING, INFORMATION, PROGRAMS AND SERVICES.”


ABOUT THE NTMA NTMA is the national association representing the precision custom manufacturing industry, which employs more than 440,000 skilled workers in the United States. Its mission is to help members of the U.S. precision custom manufacturing industry achieve business success in a global economy through advocacy, advice, networking, information, programs and services. Many NTMA members are privately owned small businesses, yet the industry

PHOENIX METAL TRADING, INC.

generates sales in excess of $40 billion a year NTMA’s nearly 1,600 member companies design and manufacture special tools, dies, jigs, fixtures, gages, special machines and precision-machined parts. Some firms specialize in experimental research and development work.

Industrial Scrap Specialists

ABOUT THE PMA PMA is the full-service trade association representing the $91-billion metalforming industry of North America. Its nearly 1,000 member companies include metal stampers, fabricators, spinners, slide formers and roll formers as well as suppliers of equipment, materials and services to the industry. Through advocacy, networking, statistics, the

OUR MISSION: Our mission at Phoenix Metal Trading is to provide the best service at a fair price and to continually improve our company to be a leader in our industry.

Educational Foundation, METALFORM tradeshows and MetalForming magazine, PMA helps lead innovative member companies toward superior competitiveness and profitability.

EPA and ADEQ Environmental Compliance We Purchase All Types of Scrap:

Together, PMA and NTMA formed the “One Voice” partnership to advocate for the interests of small and medium manufacturers throughout the U.S. Visit: metalworkingadvocate.org for additional information on NTMA and PMA.

UPCOMING NTMA EVENTS NTMA/PMA PURCHASING FAIR Date: September 7, 2011

Copper Brass Aluminum Steel Stainless Steel

Titanium Plastic Cardboard Nickel and Cobalt Alloys

State of the Art Fleet and Plant Equipment Never a charge for pickup

Venue: Chicago O’Hare Hotel, Chicago, IL Visit: purchasingfair.com and intercontinental.com NTMA 2011 FALL CONFERENCE Date: October 13-16, 2011

602-257-4660 www.phxmtl.com

Venue: The Broadmoor, Colorado Springs, CO Visit: ntma.org and broadmoor.com

SCRAP METAL RECYCLING SINCE 1989 • ATMA MEMBER

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Policy Watch LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

Tax Reform Debates Begin by OMAR S. NASHASHIBI

AS OUR NATIONAL DEBT exceeds $14 trillion and the good faith and credit of the U.S. government is at risk, politicians are debating whether to cut spending, raise taxes, or both. Most Americans believe we need to cut our spending but one key question remains: can we pay our bills while accomplishing true tax reform? The last complete overhaul of the tax code came on President Reagan’s watch with the Tax Reform Act of 1986, which sought to simplify the code, broaden the base, and close so-called “loopholes”. Most in Washington agree that tax reform should be a part of any serious conversations to restructure our budget crisis. However, political skeptics do not believe Congress is willing to tackle comprehensive tax reform prior to the Presidential elections. President Obama is pushing for restructuring the code and many Republicans are proposing to, at a minimum, reduce the corporate tax rate to 25%. Regardless of whether tax reform is completed this year (unlikely), in 2012, or after, conversations in Washington are beginning today. Manufacturers have a seat at the table in shaping how they are taxed for many years to come and need to educate their government on their businesses. The National Tooling and Machining Association and other business groups are already making their case to members of Congress and the Administration on how best to generate revenue for the government without injuring employers and employees. First, it is best to understand how manufacturers are organized as companies, the vast majority of which are small businesses. Roughly, 72% of

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small businesses are pass-through entities such as Subchapter S Corporations or limited partnerships (LLC, LLP). The debate over business and individual tax rates may dominate the headlines, but the real lobbying fight will occur behind closed doors over which “loopholes” we must eliminate to increase revenues. We should keep in mind that one man’s loophole, is another man’s tax credit and both C Corporations and S Corporations benefit from tax deductions and incentives. Take for example some credits and deductions, that critics have called “corporate tax loopholes” which directly benefit manufacturers: R&D Tax Credit, Bonus Depreciation, Section 179 Expensing, Section 199 Domestic Production Deduction. As a business, which would you be willing to give up for a lower tax rate? Would you give them all up for a 25% business tax rate? Some want to take them all away and maintain a higher rate which is why it is important to evaluate these credits in the context of their impact on the effective tax rate your company pays. So as the debate begins behind the scenes on tax reform, what is the pulse of the American public and their politicians? Roughly 230 Republican House members, joined by 41 senators, signed a pledge opposing efforts to close corporate tax “loopholes” unless they're matched dollarfor-dollar by cuts in the tax rate – a position decried by Democrats. Meanwhile, a recent Gallup poll found that 37% of Americans favored both raising taxes and cutting spending to reduce the deficit and 20% said they favored “only” spending cuts and 28% said they supported “mostly” spending cuts.

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As interest groups from all sides and industries begin to dig in on tax reform, manufacturers must identify which approaches best strengthen their global competitiveness. The status quo is no longer sustainable; federal tax revenue as a share of GDP is at its lowest levels since the 1950s while our spending has skyrocketed. One thing is clear, the American voter will not stand for another year when General Electric earns $10.3 billion in profits and pays no income tax. Many of the United States’ competitors use their tax structure to incentivize manufacturing, it is time the U.S. did the same but we cannot balance our budget on the back of manufacturers and small business owners. While tax reform will not occur overnight, a serious conversation must begin today – on the shop floor and on the floors of Congress.

Omar Nashashibi is a founding partner at The Franklin Partnership, LLP, a bipartisan government relations firm retained by the National Tooling and Machining Association in Washington, D.C. Learn more at: franklinpartnership.com


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Detecting, Documenting Employee Impairment by SCF ARIZONA

ARIZONA LAWMAKERS earlier this year passed a law that provides protection to employers that may wish to terminate workers who are under the influence of medical marijuana by spelling out what to look for in determining if an employee is impaired.

which employers, workplace supervisors or managers have to make. The bill defining impairment can help.

The need to define impairment arose because of language in Arizona’s voterapproved medical marijuana law that protects workers, who are registered users, from being terminated if they test positive. At the same time, the law is clear that workers may not use or possess the medical pot at their place of employment.

Fox said the indications of impairment are physical and behavioral. Below are some symptoms of marijuana impairment:

To ensure your workers are not impaired at work, employers can use the guidelines presented in HR 2541, said SCF Arizona Legal Compliance and Risk Manager Bobbie Fox. The bill defines impairment as: “symptoms that a prospective employee or employee while working, may be under the influence of drugs or alcohol that may decrease or lessen the employee’s performance of the duties of their job position.” The bill covers any controlled substance, including prescription medications. Impairment from use of medical marijuana is difficult to detect. “The problem with marijuana is that unlike alcohol, there is no measureable standard for impairment,” Cox explained. “Impairment has to be proven in order [for the employee] to be disciplined.” Making the determination of whether a worker is impaired is a “judgment call,”

Fox stressed that Arizona employers need to know their rights in detecting and documenting impaired employees.

Red, bloodshot eyes An odor of marijuana (a musky, earthy, sometimes skunk-like scent) Difficulty or sluggishness in coordination, speech, movement or dexterity Unusually increased hunger or thirst Irrational or unusual behavior Negligence or carelessness in operating equipment Difficulty in performing production and manufacturing processes

Fox said an employer documenting impairment of an employee should gather observational evidence and, if possible, seek out a witness who can confirm the findings. If the employer can document impairment at the workplace, then the offending employee can be punished according to the company’s human resource policies. However, Fox warned that the company needs to make sure its rules on drugs and alcohol in the workplace, as well as on reasons for termination, need to be described clearly in personnel policies so the company’s workers understand them.

SCF Arizona is the leading provider of Arizona workers’ compensation insurance. Founded in 1925, SCF has nearly 35,000 policyholders and covers more than 50 percent of all businesses working in Arizona. Learn more at: scfaz.com

Disregard for safety Involvement in an accident that results in serious damage to equipment The law permits employers acting in “good faith” to document their workers’ behaviors if impairment is suspected. The bill defines “good faith” as: Observed conduct, behavior or appearance Information reported by a person believed to be reliable, including witness reports of possession or use Drug paraphernalia at work Written, electronic or verbal statements Lawful video surveillance

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Leading Edge PERSPECTIVES AND OPINION

Top 14 Things to Know When Advising a Client on Walking Away from a Residential Property AN EXCERPT FROM THE MAY, 2011 PRESENTATION TO THE ARIZONA SOCIETY OF CPA’S, “DR. STRATEGIC DEFAULT: OR HOW I STOPPED WORRYING AND LEARNED TO LOVE THE FORECLOSURE BOMB”. by JOSEPH VELEZ

DON’T LOOK NOW, but just when you thought things couldn’t get worse, home prices have resumed their steady glide downward, doing their own version of the limbo dance (insert jingle: how low can you go...). The usual suspects of real estate data gathering - Core Logic, CaseShiller and RealtyTrac - tell us that we should soon see home values in the valley dip below the previous record low from back in May, 2009. Clearly, the current patchwork system of weak government and lender sponsored programs to address the existing, or more accurately stated, the continuing mortgage crisis, is not working. What follows is a very brief outline of answers to the most common questions likely to be posed clients when they are considering walking away from their home. It Seemed Like a Good Idea at the Time 1. Clients with Timeshares: There are generally two types of timeshares. In the first type, an owner holds a time share interest through a points based account system. In the second type, the owner holds an interest in a specific property. “Points based” timeshares are the problematic ones because when one forecloses on such a property, the owner will face liability as well as whatever other breach consequences existed in the financing contract with the timeshare company. In contrast, “property based” timeshares follow the same general rules as if you were foreclosing on real property,

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namely that when a timeshare is foreclosed via trust sale, the lender (or timeshare association) cannot seek a deficiency against the former owner. All’s Well that Ends Well 2. Foreclosure often prevents a bank from pursuing a homeowner for a deficiency liability. Here’s a simple but very accurate way to assess your client’s situation. Because almost all residential foreclosures in Arizona are done through a deed of trust sale (it’s no exaggeration to say that 99.99% of all foreclosures in Arizona are done by a trustee sale), then the lender will never have a claim against the former owner for deficiency - even if the loan was refinanced, such as a non-purchase money loan. This protection applies even if the homeowner is an investor. However, there is one catch - the home must be either a single family home, condo or duplex, on 2.5 acres or less and, it must have been dwelled in. To Be Forewarned is to Be Forearmed 3. If you maintain a bank account with the same lender that has your mortgage, you may be at risk to having your bank account offset prior to the foreclosure. What most don’t realize is that when you open a savings or checking account, buried deep within the terms and conditions form which you signed is that you agree to allow the bank to offset debts owed to it. And it’s riskier if your money is in a credit union. The safest approach is to assume

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that your money is not safe and open up a new account elsewhere. Enjoy the Ride 4. Stay in home until the foreclosure auction (enjoy the ride). As has been widely reported, it can take a lender anywhere from 7 months to 12 months to foreclose on a home. The benefit is obvious - the homeowner gets to live rent/ mortgage free for the better part of a year. “I’ll Be Back” 5. HELOCs (home equity credit lines) do pose a deficiency liability problem. As is most often the case, HELOC’s are originated after the home was purchased, and when this is the case, the HELOC lender does have the right to pursue the former owner for a deficiency. Resist the Parting Shot 6. Don’t strip or waste property: Sometimes when homeowners damage or ruin the house in frustration. Investor owners who do this might simply want to minimize losses by stripping valuable fixtures and improvements like spas, A/C units, etc. This is called “waste”. Lenders can sue homeowners for waste if such actions lower the value of the home. As a general rule, if taking the item from the home requires the use of tools, then it will probably be considered a fixture and thus it would not be permissible to remove the item, even if the homeowner paid for it and installed it.


............................................................................................................................................ .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Accident Waiting to Happen 7. Short sales could lead to liability. Not all lenders will offer to completely relieve the seller/homeowner of the responsibility of paying off the balance of the loan simply because they have agreed to allow the property to be sold. In some cases the lien holder could request that homeowner sign a promissory note to pay back some or all of the difference. Or the lender could include troubling language in the short sale approval such as stating that the lender reserves its right to pursue a deficiency. This open ended provision affords a strong argument to an aggressive lender that since the Arizona anti-deficiency statutes grant protections only in foreclosures, such protections are not available to a seller in a short sale. Oh What a Tangled Web We Weave When First We Practice to Deceive 8. Don’t misrepresent financial information when pursuing a short sale or loan modification. Mortgage fraud is the intentional misstatement, misrepresentation, or omission by an applicant or other interested party, relied on by the lender or underwriter to provide funding to a mortgage loan. The temptation, and thus the danger, is in deliberately providing inaccurate information to the lender, or deliberately omitting material information, such as asset information. There are serious civil as well as criminal laws that may be implicated. Know Where you Stand 9. You should prepare to minimize credit harm. Whether you choose to short sell or foreclose, your credit score will tumble significantly. My office always recommends that a client acquaint themselves with how to rehabilitate their credit well before they actually start the foreclosure or short sale process since there are numerous pre-emptive tactics they can take that will help cushion the credit blow. A Fresh Start 10. Bankruptcy should be considered if problems are more than just an

underwater home. I can’t tell you how many times clients come in to discuss their options when they are deciding between keeping or letting go of their home, only to discover that the home isn’t the problem, but just the symptom of greater problem - namely, too much other debt. But first let’s debunk a myth: If you did want your home, you can keep it if you file a Chapter 7 bankruptcy. And creditors are becoming much more aggressive in their collection efforts against borrowers and the number of these suits filed nationwide by debt collectors are exploding. If your client owes a creditor, credit card company, vendor, etc., sooner or later, the matter will probably escalate to a lawsuit and then a judgment. For the most part, these judgments, as well as wage garnishments, can be extinguished through a bankruptcy. The Gift that Keeps on Giving 11. Stay in home after the foreclosure. A common practice in Arizona is for the new owner of foreclosed home to offer the former owner cash to vacate the premises. This practice, generally referred to as “cash for keys” or “relocation reimbursement”, is basically a polite term for “get out of my house and don’t damage it”, and can often net cash to the former homeowner anywhere from $1500 to $3000. Lay Your Cards Out on the Table 12. If you’re a landlord and you’re planning to strategically default, you may still rent the home. However, upon notice of trustee sale, you must disclose this fact to the tenant. See Arizona Revised Statute sect. 33-1331. Days Are Numbered 13. Rights of tenants after a foreclosure: Federal law protects tenants after a foreclosure. Currently, tenants cannot be evicted immediately after a foreclosure, but instead may be able to live out the full term of their lease. If the new owner of the home does not intend to utilize the home as a primary residence (such as when a bank takes the property back, or if an investor buys the property), then the

tenant must be given the option of staying in the property for the full remaining term of the lease. If however, the new owner intends to use the property as a primary residence, then the new owner must give the tenant 90 days to vacate. Last But Not Least 14. Pay HOA’s and Assessments, Pay insurance, but Do Not Property Taxes. HOA’s: The homeowner must pay the HOA fees and assessments until the home is actually sold at the foreclosure. Homeowners Insurance: Yes, you must continue to pay this. Our firm recommends that upon deciding to foreclose or short-sell, you immediately contact your insurance carrier and request that they bill you directly. Keep in mind that this insurance coverage does more than simply cover the home - it also protects you against certain liabilities. Homes are magnets for accidents, liabilities, not to mention they’re full of personal property too. Property taxes: Property taxes are “liens on the property”, which means that whoever later buys the home must bring current the “arrear” property taxes. So the advice to a homeowner who is strategically defaulting is, not to pay the property taxes.

Joseph Velez is an attorney in Scottsdale, Arizona. He is also a member of the ASCPA and serves on the CPA’s in Industry and Financial Planning Committees. He practices in the areas of real estate/business law, bankruptcy and employment law. Much of his practice focuses on advising and counseling clients on residential transactional and debt management matters. He may be reached via email at jvelezesq@me.com or 480.710.5079.

DISCLAIMER: This information is intended for informational purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice. Seek competent legal counsel for advice on any legal matter.

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Tech Talk

//COLUMN //

SPECIAL ADVERTISING FEATURE

VOLUME 3 OF ©

THE OIL BARON BULLETIN

IS IT TIME FOR AN OIL CHANGE? by BRETT “THE COOLANT GUY” REYNOLDS, CMFS

In my travels as a metalworking fluids specialist, I’ve come

BLASER SWISSLUBE

across many companies, Swiss Screw and job shops alike, that when asked how long they been using their current cutting oil respond, “Forever; besides oil never goes bad.” If that was only the case! Neat straight oils (cutting oils) do eventually go bad, as nothing lasts forever. The main influences that kill cutting oils and lead to eventual disposal are as follows.

MILESTONES

Contamination: Over time waylubes, bar feed/hydraulic oils, water and sub-micron metal fines contaminate the straight oil. The fines through proper filtration can be removed, but the cross contamination from the waylube and bar feed oil cannot. With proper filtration, you can greatly prolong the life of the cutting oil. Oxidation: Oxidation is a form of chemical degradation. Oxidation of the additives and the oil occurs when heat is generated by the cutting forces generated at the spindle, and by the heat put back into the oil by the pumps. This in turn creates hydrocarbon molecules in the oil which then react with oxygen to form, you guessed it, water (H2O). Antioxidant additive packages eventually deplete out; which in turn leads to your once nice clean cutting oil turning the nasty turbid brown and in some cases black color. As you can see, neat oils eventually all go south. The higher the quality of the oil the longer it takes, also this process can be lengthened by keeping direct water contamination out of the oil as much as possible, and by implementing good filtration down to at least 1 micron in size.

1936 Foundation of the Company by

Willy Blaser 1974 Peter Blaser expands with the Coolants

and configuration of a distribution network in Europe and Overseas 1981 Foundation of Blaser Swisslube Inc. in

Goshen, NY, the first subsidiary with own production plant 1993 Foundation of Blaser Swisslube

Czech Republic 1995 Foundation of Blaser Swisslube Germany 1996 Foundation of Blaser Swisslube Japan 1999 Foundation of Blaser Swisslube France 2001 Foundation of Blaser Swisslube Brazil,

China and India 2002 Foundation of Blaser Swisslube Singapore 2006 Foundation of Blaser Swisslube Turkey

and Korea 2010 Foundation of Blaser Swisslube Taiwan.

Today, the Coolants have been produced in Hasle-Rüegsau, in USA, in China and in India

This process can take a year or more to happen, but it will happen. When you compare tool life studies of new oil against old contaminated oil, the difference in cutter life can be up to 15-20%. So ask yourself, is it time for an oil change? Stay tuned for more useful coolant tips, from The Coolant Guy!

Brett Reynolds, “The Coolant Guy” works for Blaser Swisslube Inc. If you would like more useful information regarding metalworking fluids, or would like to find out more information about Blaser metalworking fluid products, please contact Brett at 801.722.4095 or via E-mail at b.reynolds@blaser.com. The Oil Baron Bulletin is not affiliated with Blaser Swisslube Inc. or its subsidiaries.

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Feature Story // PrecisionNews

MANAGING THE 800-LB GORILLA STORY BY ROB TRACY

AS A PRECISION MACHINE SHOP, chances are you’re doing business with an 800-lb gorilla customer or two. You know who these gorillas are – they’re the cornerstone customers that helped you grow, but also the customers that would jeopardize the survival of your company if they were to leave. You love them because they pay the bills and keep your business going, but they’re also a demanding and brutish bunch. Those big customers have power, and they’re not afraid to use it. They’ll dangle the promise of volume and riches while simultaneously making demands that shave margins that are already razor-thin. For most precision machine shops, playing with this type of customer is a fact of life, but the stakes are high. If you play your cards right, big customers can be a vital part of growing the value of your company. But if played poorly, relationships with big customers can be a value killer. The Value Triangle The Value Triangle is a simple model to show the three key drivers of value: financial performance, markets and customers, and the quality of the infrastructure. In order to grow the value of the business, we need to expand one or more of these dimensions. Through their sheer size, 800-lb gorilla customers can dramatically change the shape of a company’s value triangle.

On each corner of the value triangle, 800-lb gorillas can create a paradox. They simultaneously enhance and detract enterprise value: 1. Financial Performance Enhances Value 800-lb gorillas buy in high volumes which creates substantial revenue. The loss of this volume would significantly damage financial performance. Detracts Value The 800-lb gorilla is always shopping for the lowest price and squeezing margins. 2. Markets & Customers Enhances Value Many 800-lb gorillas are “A-list” customers. Doing business with A-list customers credentializes your business.

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Detracts Value Relationships with 800-lb gorillas often develop into a significant customer concentration, which increases risk. 3. Infrastructure Enhances Value 800-lb gorillas often demand world-class performance from their suppliers, which forces the supplier to improve their capabilities and infrastructure. Detracts Value 800-lb gorillas often demand infrastructure that adds costs but adds minimal value.

As simple as it may sound, the key to working with 800-lb gorillas is to leverage the value enhancers while minimizing the value detractors. This is a classic case in which the concept is easy, but putting it into practice is very difficult. Two common traits our most successful job shop clients have in dealing with these customers are: 1) A clear understanding of the financial engine of their company, and 2) An increased level of operational agility. Financial Engine The accounting profession has done a disservice to many manufacturers over the years by advocating standard cost systems. Many of these cost accounting systems are based on concepts that were developed in the 1930’s and 40’s, when labor costs were 70% of the total cost of the product. Manufacturing has changed considerably since that time, but costing methods haven’t. Unfortunately, costing methods that many manufacturers use can lead to bad business decisions. One of the most common effects of the traditional costing methods is to underprice the most complicated and sophisticated products, while overpricing the simple products. Rather than focusing on standard costs and individual product profitability, we encourage our clients to evaluate the profitability of a family of products using a technique called value-added analysis. Value-added emphasizes the direct costs of manufacturing a product while focusing on available capacity available. Value-added analysis gives a much clearer picture of how pricing decisions will affect financial performance.


800-LB GORILLA CUSTOMERS ARE A PARADOX. YOU LOVE THEM AND YOU HATE THEM. THEY CAN ENHANCE VALUE OR THEYof CAN DESTROY IT. Think your last busy month

and your last slow month. How much did they vary? and demands 800-lb gorillas are aggressive in their negotiations for cost reductions, and the costing clarity provided by valueadded analysis can give you the business insights that you need You’ve already invested significant time and money to develop your to enter the negotiation fully armed. costing system – the last thing you want to do is abandon it. Don’t do that! There is Agility critical information you can gather from your current Operational system. The key out how to usegorillas this information. When it comesistofiguring operations, 800-lb are very demanding. They know what they want, and they want it now. It may be a Progressive manufacturing companies aredemands simplifying shipment that they need to expedite, fortheir costsystems and eliminating the intricacies and uncertainties of job costing. It is reductions, a schedule that needs to change, a product spec important to understand that this elimination of detail doesn’t that needs to be revised, or a new requirement in the quality translate to a reduced focus800-lb on cost. Just the – these certification. In the end, gorillas areopposite not terribly concerned companies put a high degree of focus on understanding their about the impact of their demands on your business. Thecost structure. difference is that focus is on a macro (i.e., entity customerThe is always right. Justthe ask them. wide) basis versus a micro (i.e., job by job) basis. In order to serve these customers effectively, your organization Amust typical businesses have how they viewto what bemisconception agile. Webstermany defines agility as theis“ready ability their competitors are doing. Don’t assume that the low price your move with quick easy grace” – this is an apt description of the competitors are must charging in lost Companies thatsell manage capability that be results built into yourprofits. organization. If you to their profitability in different ways can be extremely profitable by 800-lb gorillas, you need to respond to their demands. It’s only a capturing levels others matter ofsales howat gracefully youview do it.as non-profitable.  Focus profitability in your shop. Thereon areunderstanding many actionswhat youdrives can take to increase agility, including Although you’re delivering a finished machined product, what you’re the application of Lean principles, but it starts with making agility really selling, and what your customers are buying, is your expertise a priority to the leadership team. We see many leadership teams and capabilities. Companies truly understand thatproduction are so singularly focused on the that piece cost (See the and manage their machining capabilities and capacity have a competitive Financial Engine section above) that they make decisions advantage in the marketplace. Their focus is on managing, executing, resulting in the organization becoming less agile. A leadership and pricing based on throughput, not job by job cost. They evaluate team that does not put agility as a top priority will tendstill to make job performance, but it isn’t on a cost basis, it is on a production basis. decisions that are more appropriate for a mass production shop rather than a high-mix, low-volume job shop. The results of changing this focus can be significant. Typically, companies that change the way they evaluate their business bring Conclusion simplicity and to their Functional 800-lb gorilla clarity customers areoperations. a paradox. You loveteams them (production, and you sales, finance, etc.) understand the information better and work hate them. They can enhance value or they can destroy it. together to drive toward the goals. There becomes a shift in to These large customers cansame be essential to allow a company people’s Instead of are spending time refining theirbe jobnavigated cost system, survive,focus. but the waters dangerous and must management spends time figuring out how to operate more efficiently with care. It can be done. There are many examples of small to drive sales and production through the plant. Most importantly, it manufacturers that have built very healthy and sustainable leads to increased profitability and organizational direction that businesses working with large customers. However, there are ultimately resultbusinesses in increased that enterprise value. to exist because also countless have ceased they didn’t navigate the waters safely. If you deepen your Changing the way organization operatesand andbecome managesagile, information understanding ofan your financial engine is no easy endeavor Past practices, especially those that have beenbe you’ll find you can grow profitably and enterprise value will consistently followed in successful companies, make it challenging enhanced through all of your customer relationships, not just to move away from. Not every organization has the ability to make this the big ones. shift in philosophy. However, those that do will have a competitive advantage in the marketplace. Rob Tracy is a Principal in the Manufacturing and Distribution group of LarsonAllen. Rob can be reached at 888.529.2648 or Dave Hopkins and Brent Terhaar are Principals in the Manufacturing and tracy@larsonallen.com. Distribution group of LarsonAllen. They can be reached at 800.525.2826 or dhopkins@larsonallen.com; bterhaar@larsonallen.com. To learn more about Learn more at: larsonallen.com LarsonAllen, visit our website at www.larsonallen.com.

GREA AT INNOV INN ATTIONS BEGIN WITH SIMPLE IDEAS. We help our manufacturing clients innovate, change, and grow. Contact David H Hopkins opk at 800-525-2826 opkins or dhopkins@larsonallen.com.

Improving profitability | Accelerating growth Reducing risk | Planning for succession

Noticeably ly Dif Different. fffe erent. july/august 2011

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Manufacturing has led the recovery since the recession ended in June 2009 and has created more net jobs than any other industry segment. In other words, the manufacturing industry is the goose that lays golden eggs in the form of products for domestic use and export and the jobs it takes to produce them.

MANUFACTURING IS LEADING THE WAY TO ECONOMIC RECOVERY STORY BY MICHELE NASH-HOFF

IN THE JUNE REPORT ISSUED ON JULY 1ST by the Institute for Supply Management™ Manufacturing Business Survey Committee, Chair Bradley J. Holcomb, CPSM, CPSD, said, “The PMI registered 55.3 percent, an increase of 1.8 percentage points from May, indicating expansion in the manufacturing sector for the 23rd consecutive month. New orders and production were both modestly up from last month, and employment showed continued strength with an increase of 1.7 percentage points to 59.9 percent.” Dean Maki, chief U.S. economist at Barclays Capital Inc., said, “Manufacturing is driving U.S. recovery” when he spoke with Bloomberg’s Mark Crumpton about U.S. manufacturing and housing data and the outlook for the economy and Federal Reserve monetary policy.

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Feature Story // PrecisionNews

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AS A NATION, WE CAN’T ALLOW GOVERNMENT TO KILL THE GOOSE THAT LAYS THE GOLDEN EGGS ...

The Seventh Quarterly Report, written by the White House’s Council of Economic Advisors, a group of three economists who were all handpicked by Obama, was released on July 1st. The report chronicles the economic impact of the “stimulus” in adding or saving jobs. The council reports that, using “mainstream estimates of economic multipliers for the effects of fiscal stimulus” (which it describes as a “natural way to estimate the effects of” the legislation), the “stimulus” has added or saved just under 2.4 million jobs - whether private or public - at a cost (to date) of $666 billion. That’s a cost to taxpayers of $278,000 per job.” This means that “the government could simply have cut a $100,000 check to everyone whose employment was allegedly made possible by the “stimulus,” and taxpayers would have come out $427 billion ahead.” We need to be adding thousands more jobs than the 18,000 nonfarm jobs added in June, and the 25,000 jobs added in May to absorb the millions of workers that a 9.2 percent unemployment rate represents. Economists say that about 100,000 jobs are needed each month just to keep up with the normal growth of the labor force and hold the unemployment rate steady. With this weak job picture, the last thing we need government to do is raise taxes or create new taxes to be paid on specific products, such as a tax on “biz jets” and yachts. While some business jets are converted airliners often used by celebrities with a large entourage or press corps, or by sports teams, they face operational restrictions based on runway length or local noise restrictions at smaller airports. Thus, there is emerging market for so-called “very light jets” and "personal jets, which are smaller and far cheaper than current models of business jets. Many of the very light jets (VLJ) are used by the air taxi industry. Cessna has developed the Mustang, a six-place twinjet (2 crew + 4 passengers) available for $2.55 million USD. A number of smaller manufacturers have planned even cheaper jets, and it remains to be seen whether the new jet manufacturers will complete their designs or find the market required to sell their jets at the low prices planned. Business jets and yachts represent companies in the aircraft and boat building industries that provide jobs for thousands of people. There are approximately 11,000 business jets in the worldwide fleet with the vast majority of them based in the United States or owned by U.S. companies. The European market is the next largest, with growing activity in the Middle East, Asia, and Central America. Business and private jets are one of the high technology products that the United States exports to the rest of the world. Increasing production of these classifications of aircraft would help achieve President Obama’s goal of doubling exports.

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When you increase taxes on a particular product, it causes sales to drop, so if you increase taxes on business aircraft for all of the U.S. manufacturers, you would decrease sales for these aircraft and give an advantage to foreign aircraft manufacturers. Because of their low-volume productions and long lead times, new aircraft orders can take two to three years for delivery. This results in a large pre-owned marketplace, with aircraft available immediately. The loss of jobs wouldn’t be limited to the aircraft and yacht manufacturers; it would affect their vendors, such as engine manufactures, avionics and electronics manufacturers, and interior manufacturers. Large corporations such as Ford Motor Company and Chrysler have their own flight departments that manage all aspects of aircraft operation and maintenance. Charter operators own or simply manage all aspects of operation and maintenance of private jets for multiple clients. Since 1996, the term “fractional jet” has been used in connection with business aircraft owned by a consortium of companies. Costly overheads such as a flight crew, a hangar, and maintenance can be shared by the consortium. Fractional Ownership is commonly known in the industry as “time share.” An individual or corporation pays an upfront equity share for the cost of an aircraft, such as 1/4 of the aircraft price, known in the industry as a “quarter share.” The individual or corporation is now an equity owner in that aircraft and can sell their equity position if necessary. This entitles the new owner to 100 hours of flight time on that aircraft, or any comparable aircraft in the fleet. Additional fees include monthly management fees and incidentals like catering and ground transportation. President Obama may have forgotten that Congress tried to increase revenue by imposing a luxury tax on private planes and yachts once before. In the 1990 deal between President George H.W. Bush and a Democratic Congress, yacht and private plane owners were the designated villains. Yachts and private planes were, after all, owned by “millionaires and billionaires” who didn’t pay their fair share of taxes. Who could object to taxing these “fat cat” rich people a bit more? So Congress passed a 10 percent luxury tax on yachts priced at more than $100,000 and on private planes that cost more than $250,000. After the tax took effect in January 1990, hundreds of builders of large and small boats spoke of it as a stake driven into the heart of an industry already suffering from the effects of the recession 1990-91 and tighter bank rules on financing and fallout from the gulf war. The result was the virtual destruction of the domestic boatbuilding industry. Sales of luxury boats dropped 70 percent within a year. In the subsequent two years, about 100 builders of luxury


Economists say that about 100,000 jobs are needed each month just to keep up with the normal growth of the labor force and hold the unemployment rate steady.

boats cut their operations severely, and more than 25,000 workers lost their jobs. Several manufacturers filed for protection from creditors under Chapter 11 of the Federal Bankruptcy Code. Predictably, the tax didn’t even generate much new revenue because so few boats were sold. Finally, President Bush asked Congress to repeal the 10 percent luxury tax, and the tax was repealed by a bipartisan vote in 1993. “At the end of the day, the millionaires and billionaires were still rich, but thousands of hardworking middle-class Americans ended up out of work.” When discussing this tax issue with my adult son, he asked why “fat cat” rich people couldn’t afford to pay more taxes. I explained that it isn’t just rich people that own jets and yachts. Most owners are business people that have valid reasons for owning a jet or a yacht. For example, a company that has to send teams of three or more people around the country to do specific jobs such as land survey may find it less expensive to own their own jet to fly to smaller towns instead of flying to “hub” cities and renting cars and vans to travel to the smaller towns. “Yacht” is just a fancy name for a boat that costs more than $100,000, and there are many business reasons for owning a boat, such as sport fishing and vacation rentals in destination cities like San Diego and Miami. In addition, many people live on yachts in harbors where you can’t buy a condo, much less a house, for under $300,000. Michael Tanner, a Cato Institute senior fellow, wrote that the French economist and philosopher Frederic Bastiat addressed Obama’s fallacy some 250 years ago, describing “the seen and the unseen,” or in other words, unintended consequences. “Bastiat referred to the example of a farmer who plans to hire a worker to dig a ditch on his property, but is unable to do so because the money he’d have used to pay the ditch-digger went

instead to pay taxes. A government bureaucrat is able to use those taxes to spend on various projects. Of course, everyone can see the results of that spending, which undoubtedly makes the bureaucrat popular. But what goes unseen is the loss suffered by the poor ditch digger.” President Obama and others like my son seem to think if someone is wealthy, his or her money just sits around. In reality, people either spend their money or save and invest it. If they spend it, it helps provide jobs for the people who make and sell whatever it is they buy. If they save or invest their money, it provides the capital that is needed for entrepreneurs to start businesses and hire workers. People need to realize that every dollar that the government takes in taxes or borrows as debt is one less dollar that someone in the private sector has to spend, save or invest. The government then spends the money on the popular programs such as student loans, medical research, Medicare, etc., but this comes at a cost of the lost jobs and slower economic growth that result from the higher taxes. As a nation, we can’t allow government to kill the goose that lays the golden eggs, which would result in slower economic growth and lost jobs. We certainly don't need higher taxes for any selected group of businesses or individuals, such as business jet and yacht purchasers. We already have the second highest corporate tax rate in the world, and states like California in which I reside, have additional high corporate and personal tax rates. Instead, we need a tax code that is simpler and flatter, with low marginal rates and few deductions and tax loopholes.

Michele Nash-Hoff is the President ElectroFab Sales and the author of Can American Manufacturing be Saved? Why We Should and How We Can, available at www.savingusmanufacturing.com or www.amazon.com

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Flashpoints

//OPINION //

THE LIGHTER SIDE

“TEALEAF” PRESENTS:

LEARNING YOUR

DOMESTIC ABC’s by JEFF THREDGOLD

Anxiety - tens of millions of people are anxious about their jobs, their home values, the costs of educating their kids, the costs of health care, their retirements, and the perilous financial future of this nation. Any wonder consumer spending has slowed? Budget Deficits - averaging $1,400,000,000,000 annually in fiscal years 2009, 2010, and 2011, with $1 trillion deficits projected annually for as far as the eye can see. We add to the deficit by $160,000,000 every 60 minutes.

Housing - remember when home prices always went up…and used car prices always went down? Here’s hoping U.S. home prices stabilize early next year.

Inflation - financial markets are somewhat split as to whether inflation or deflation will be the fly in the ointment in coming years. Those fearing inflation see the Fed making some difficult monetary tightening decisions over the next 24 months. Jobs - solid employment gains in the private sector are the

College - yes it is too expensive, but a sharp rise in average annual and lifetime earnings eases the pain. To quote Derek Bok, “If you think education is expensive, try ignorance.”

Dollar - the trade-weighted value of the U.S. dollar has declined roughly 7% over the past year, making U.S. exports more competitive around the globe. Despite what the gold bugs constantly preach, the dollar will not stop being the world’s primary currency anytime soon.

most desirable solution to economic growth, income, and confidence challenges. Now, if the U.S. Congress would soon make some grown-up decisions about reducing future budget deficits…and then get out of the way.

Knowledge - and the Ability to Think - the key to individual success in an increasingly sophisticated economy. Ongoing education and training are now lifelong realities for many to be successful. Average annual earnings of a college graduate versus a high school graduate today?…70%-80% higher.

Energy - greater use of abundant natural gas, better access to oil and gas in Alaska and the Gulf of Mexico, and major progress in “clean burn” coal technology must be part of the equation in coming years…in addition to alternative sources.

Limits - to government spending?…to deficits? An important

Federal Reserve - its key short-term interest rate has been at a historic low of 0.00%-0.25% for 30 months, with no change expected anytime soon. Thirty-six of 38 national economists surveyed last week by The Associated Press (including yours truly) DO NOT want to see a third round of additional stimulus, known as QE3.

Manufacturing - don’t be surprised if rapidly rising global

Global Economy - overall global growth is slowing as the three largest players, the U.S., China, and Japan have eased back. Inflation anxiety is more pronounced around the globe, led by higher oil and food prices.

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concept now hitting home across Southern Europe…and sooner rather than later in the U.S. if we don’t get a grip.

costs and more competitive U.S. costs lead to a surprising renaissance in U.S. manufacturing activity in coming years.

National Debt - the gross national debt (quite descriptive actually) now exceeding $14,000,000,000,000, combined with budget deficits now exceeding $1 trillion annually, makes concrete moves toward fiscal sanity mandatory in the nation’s capital.

Opportunity - challenge breeds. continued on page 24


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MEETING THE GROWING NEEDS OF INDUSTRY

ATMA PRECISION 2011 ATMA BOARD OF DIRECTORS President MARK WEATHERS Excaliber Precision Machining Vice President DANTE FIERROS Nichols Precision

Accuwright Industries, Inc. is a full service Metal Spray facility utilizing State of Art Robotics and Controls for precision Flame Spray applications. Featuring Plasma Flame Spray, Twin Wire Arc Spray, Combustion Powder/ Wire Spray, and HVOF (High Velocity Oxygen Fuel) Spray. With Quality programs and certifications such as ISO 9001-2008 and FAA Repair Certificates we can meet the growing changes of your industry. Recently combined with our Metallizing capabilities, we now have the Cold Gas-Dynamic Spray (Low Pressure Cold Spray) available for specialized services.

Executive Director CHRIS MIGNELLA Secretary DAVID LAIR Dynamic Machine & Fabricating Trustee JOHN LEWIS Lewis Aerospace

BOARD MEMBERS Refurbish worn or damaged shafts/spindles? • Don’t throw away those worn shafts/spindles • Think green and repair • Surface restoration for worn or damaged shafts/spindles • Similar and Hard surfacing repair for longer life Over/under sized machined parts? • Don’t weld • Don’t throw away • Let us rebuild material on incorrectly machined parts • Coatings to match part material • Coatings to provide harder materials • Increase longevity Can’t quote that new job? Never heard of Flame Spray? • It is called Metallizing, Thermal Spray, Plasma Spray, HVOF Spray, Arc Spray, Combustion Spray, Cold Spray • We can do it • Material engineering • Quick turn around times And the Benefits? • Fast turn time • Engineering services • Friendly Service • Knowledgeable Staff • Pick-up/Delivery Valley wide • Consulting/Specification selection • In-house testing procedures

Bob Marusiak Micro-Tronics, Inc. John Raycraft Arizona Precision Industrial Jeremy Lutringer Unique Machine & Tool Gary Watkins MarZee Associate Member Liaison Mickey Gartman Gartman Technical Services

Arizona Tooling & Machining Association A Chapter of the National Tooling & Machining Association P.O. Box 3518 Scottsdale, AZ 85271 Office: 602.242.8826 Fax: 480.970.8501 arizonatooling@cox.net

TM

Accurate Thermal Spray Technologies Accuwright Industries, Inc. Contact: David Wright 480.892.9595 (toll free 877.247.9108) www.accuwright.com

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july/august 2011

PrecisionNews

THE RIGHT TOOLS. THE RIGHT TEAM. THE RIGHT TIME.

arizonatooling.org


PrecisionNews // ARIZONA TOOLING & MACHINING ASSOCIATION

MEMBER LISTINGS REGULAR MEMBERS Hein Tran

3D Machine & Tools

480-329-8254

Robert Marusiak

Micro-Tronics, Inc.

602-437-8995

Dave Wright

Accuwright

480-892-4595

Mark Lashinske

Modern Industries, Inc.

602-267-7248

Brandon McDermott

Aerostar / Aerospace Mfg.

602-861-1145

Phillip LoCascio

National Aviation

480-966-1097

Chuck Eriksen

Allied Tool & Die Company, LLC

602-276-2439

John Anglin

Nelson Engineering

602-273-7114

John Raycraft

Arizona Precision Industrial, LLC

480-785-7474

Dante Fierros

Nichols Precision

480-804-0593

Charles A. Van Horssen

Axian Technology, Inc.

623-580-0800

Tom Osborn

Osborn Products, Inc.

623-587-0335

John Cain

AZ Industries for the Blind

602-269-5131

Steve Macias

Pivot Manufacturing

602-306-2923

Kevin Burbas

B&B Tool, Inc

520-397-0436

Loyal Clausen

Plastic Engineering, Inc.

480-491-8100

Tim Smith

Bar S-Machinery, Inc

928-636-2115

James Buchanan

Powill Manufacturing & Eng, Inc.

623-780-4100

Jeff Buntin

Barnes Aerospace - Apex Mfg. Div. 602-305-8080

Ilene Price

Precise Metal Products Co.

602-272-2625

Tony Miglio

Bartino Tooling & Machine, LLC

602-248-7880

Tony Costabile

Precision Die & Stamping, Inc.

480-967-2038

Norela Harrington

Bent River Machine, Inc.

928-634-7568

Shaun Schilling

Premier Tool Grinding

602-442-0698

Pat DeLanie

BID Machine

480-892-7304

Michael Dailey

Prescott Aerospace, Inc.

928-772-7605

Mike Sniegowski

Blue Streak Grinding, Inc.

602-353-8088

Tyler Crouse

Pro Precision

602-353-0022

Keith Adams

C.G. Tech, Inc.

623-492-9400

John Bloom

R & D Specialty/Manco

602-278-7700

Greg Gaudet

CAD Tools Company, LLC

480-753-4290

Susan Scarla

Rae Tech, Inc.

602-272-4223

Joe Cassavant, Jr.

Cassavant Machining

602-437-4005

Paul Shelton

Shelton Industries

520-408-8026

Steve Schwartzkopf

Chips, Inc.

602-233-1335

Mark Willmering

Sonic Aerospace, Inc.

480-777-1789

Kim Rice

Cling's Manufacturing

480.968.1778

Jeff Gaffney

Southwest Swiss Precision

602-438-4670

Ron Gilmore

Continental Precision, Inc.

602-278-4725

Steven Yeary

Southwest Turbine, Inc.

602-278-7442

Allen Kiesel

Creative Precision West

623-587-9400

Mike Gudin

Southwest Water Jet

480-306-7748

Daniel Krings

Deck Machine & Tool, Inc.

602-253-1080

Ruben Cadena

State Industrial Products, Inc.

602-275-0990

John Maris

D-Velco Mfg. Of Arizona

602-275-4406

Dennis Miller

Summit Precision, Inc.

602-268-3550

David Lair

Dynamic Machine & Fabricating

602-437-0339

Scott Higginbotham

Sun Grinding LLC

602-238-9595

Frank Eckert

Eckert Enterprises, Ltd.

480-820-0380

Craig Berland

Systems 3, Inc.

480-894-2581

Grant Evans

Evans Precision Machining, Inc.

623-581-6200

Todd Aaronson

T.A. Custom Designs, Inc.

623-221-4922

Mark Weathers

Excaliber Precision Machining

623-878-6800

Jacque Cowin

Tram-Tek, Inc.

602-305-8100

Jeff Hull

Foresight Technologies

480-967-0080

Jeremy Lutringer

Unique Machine & Tool Co.

602-470-1911

Alex Curtis

Hamilton Industries

480-967-9339

Bill Ankrom

Vitron Manufacturing, Inc.

602-548-9661

Joe Koenig

Hawkeye Precision, Inc.

480-926-8642

Robert L.Wagner

Wagner Engineering, Inc.

480-926-1761

Tim Malin

Helm Precision, Ltd.

602-275-2122

Bruce Treichler

Zircon Precision Products

480-967-8688

Jeremy Schaulk

Hi-Tech Machning & Engineering

520-889-8325

Don Theriault

Industrial Tool Die & Engineering

520-745-8771

Sam Ehret

Inline, Inc.

602-278-9553

Jim Bowen

Joined Alloys

602-870-5600

Joseph Sirochman

JPS Manufacturing

480-367-9540

Jeff Barth

JWB Manufacturing

480-967-4600

Jim Carpenter

Kimberly Gear & Spline, Inc.

602-437-3085

Don Kammerzell

K-zell Metals, Iinc.

602-232-5882

Lee & Colleen Adams

L2 Manufacturing

480-829-9047

Matt Kalina

LAI International, Inc

480-348-5942

Ernest Apodaca

Layke, Inc.

602-272-2654

John Lewis

Lewis Aerospace

623-581-0764

Michael C. Majercak, Jr.

Majer Precision

480-777-8222

Edward Wenz

MarZee, Inc.

602-269-5801

Arle Rawlings

Mastercraft Mold, Inc.

602-484-4520

Paul Clark

Metal Spinning Solutions, Inc.

480-899-0939

Jeff Meade

Metalcraft

480-967-4889

Joe Tripi

Micropulse West

602-438-9770

ACHIEVE YOUR BUSINESS SUCCESS THROUGH ADVOCACY, ADVICE, NETWORKING, INFORMATION, PROGAMS AND SERVICES.

Get Turned-On to the ATMA! For more information contact Chris Mignella at: ExecutiveDirector@arizonatooling.org

july/august 2011

arizonatooling.org

PrecisionNews

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UPCOMING UPCOMING ATMA EVENTS! MARK YOUR CALENDAR WITH THESE

ATMA_0202_FINAL_Layout 1 6/18/11 7:04 AM Page 23

MARK YOUR CALENDAR WITH THESE

ATMA EVENTS! UPCOMING

MAY 5/11 MAY Safety Meeting (General Safety Standards) 11:30 Phoenix Heat Treat,Safety 2450Standards) W. Mohave, Phoenix 5/11 at Safety Meeting (General 11:30

ATMA_0202_FINAL_Layout 1 6/18/11 7:04 AM Page 23

ATMA EVENTS!

PrecisionNews // ARIZONA TOOLING & MACHINING ASSOCIATION

MEMBERUPCOMING LISTINGS MARK YOUR CALENDAR WITH THESE

ATMA EVENTS!

at Phoenix Heat Treat, 2450Marketing W. Mohave,& Phoenix 5/12MAY Combined Membership, Program 5/125/11 Combined Membership, & Technologies, Program Meeting 11:30-1:00 atMarketing Foresight Safety Meeting (General Safety Standards) 11:30 Meeting at Foresight Technologies, at Phoenix Heat Treat, 2450 W. Mohave, Phoenix 1301 W.11:30-1:00 Geneva, Tempe 1301 W. Geneva, Tempe

Membership, Marketing & Program 5/12 ATMA_0202_FINAL_Layout 1 6/18/11 7:04 AM Page 23Combined 5/17 Board of Directors Meeting 11:30-1:00 at 5/17 Board of Directors Meeting 11:30-1:00 at 11:30-1:00 at Foresight Technologies, Meeting Micro-Tronics, 2905 S. Potter, Tempe, Micro-Tronics, 2905 S. Potter, Tempe, 8528285282 Tempe 1301 W. Geneva, MAY CALENDAR WITH THESE MARK YOUR 5/25 General Dinner Meeting 5:00-8:00pm at Phoenix BoardDinner of Directors Meeting 11:30-1:00atatPhoenix 5/255/17 General Meeting 5:00-8:00pm 5/11 Safety Meeting (General Safety Standards) 11:30 Micro-Tronics, 2905 Potter, Tempe, 85282 ATMA_0202_FINAL_Layout 1 6/18/11 7:04 AM Page 23 Airport Hilton, S.S.47th Street, Phoenix Hilton,2435 2435 S. 47th Street, Phoenix at Phoenix Heat Treat, 2450 W. Mohave, Phoenix Airport A 2 Z Metalworker 602.412.7696 5/25 General Dinner Meeting 5:00-8:00pm at Phoenix JUNE 5/12 Combined Membership, Marketing & Program JUNE Airport Hilton, 2435 S. 47th Street, Phoenix Adams Machinery 480.968.3711 Meeting 11:30-1:00 at Foresight Technologies, Safety Meeting Safety Standards) 11:30 11:30 6/08 Safety 6/08 Meeting(General (General Safety Standards) JUNE 1301 W. Geneva, Tempe at Leavitt Group, 919 N. 1st St., Phoenix Arizona CNC Equipment 480.615.6353 at Leavitt Group, 919 N. 1st St., Phoenix 6/08 Safety Meeting (General Safety Standards) 11:30 5/17 Board of Directors Meeting 11:30-1:00 at 6/09 Combined Membership, Marketing & Program MAY ATS Industrial 602.276.7707 at LeavittMembership, Group, 919 N. 1st St., Phoenix& Program MARK YOUR WITH THESE Micro-Tronics, 2905 S. Potter, CALENDAR Tempe, 85282 6/09 Combined Marketing Meeting 11:30-1:00 at Foresight Technologies, 5/11 Safety Meeting (General Safety Standards) 11:30 Combined Membership, Program Bank of America 602.523.2044 Meeting 11:30-1:00 Foresight&Technologies, 5/25 General Dinner Meeting 5:00-8:00pm at Phoenix6/09 1301 W. Geneva, Tempeat Marketing at PhoenixAirport Heat Treat, 2450 W. Mohave, Phoenix Meeting 11:30-1:00 at Foresight Technologies, Hilton, 2435 S. 47th Street, Phoenix Compton W. Geneva, Tempe George Barry Metals 602.484.7186 Board of W. Directors 6/21 1301 Geneva,Meeting Tempe 11:30-1:00 at 1301 MARK YOUR CALENDAR WITH 5/12 Combined Membership, Marketing & THESE Program JUNE Micro-Tronics, 2905 S. Potter,11:30-1:00 Tempe, 85282 35105 N. 139th Way Board ofofDirectors Meeting 11:30-1:00 ChemResearch Co., Inc. 602.253.4175 Board Directors Meeting at at Meeting 11:30-1:00 at Foresight Technologies, 6/216/21 6/08 Safety Meeting (General Safety Standards) 11:30 Micro-Tronics, 2905 S. Potter, Tempe, 85282 6/29 General Dinner Meeting 5:00-8:00pm at Phoenix Micro-Tronics, 2905 S. Potter, Tempe, 85282 Scottsdale, AZ 85262 1301 W. Geneva, Tempe Consolidated Resources 623.931.5009 at Leavitt Group, 919 N. 1st St., Phoenix Airport Hilton, 2435 S. 47th Street, Phoenix 6/29 General Dinner Meeting 5:00-8:00pm at Phoenix 6/29 General Dinner Meeting 5:00-8:00pm at Phoenix 5/17 Board of Directors Meeting at & Creative Promotions MAY 11:30-1:00 6/09 Combined480.839.9511 Membership, Marketing Program ph 623.241.7300 Airport Hilton, 2435 S. 47th Street, Phoenix Airport Hilton, 2435 S. 47th Street, Phoenix Micro-Tronics, 2905 S. Potter, Tempe, 85282 Meeting 11:30-1:00 at Foresight Technologies, 5/11 Safety Meeting fx (General Safety Standards) 11:30 D D i - Solidworks 602.241.0900 623.444.5719 1301 W. Geneva,5:00-8:00pm Tempe 5/25 General Phoenix at Phoenix at Heat Treat, 2450 W. Mohave, Phoenix MAY Dinner Meeting george@totalprintsolutionsaz.com D&R Machinery Airport 480.775.6462 6/21Hilton, Board 2435 of Directors Meeting at S. 47th Street,11:30-1:00 Phoenix 5/12 Combined Membership, 5/11 Safety Meeting (General 11:30Marketing & Program Micro-Tronics, 2905 S.Safety Potter,Standards) Tempe, 85282 www.totalprintsolutionsaz.com EMJ Metals 602.272.0461 at Foresight Technologies, JUNE at Phoenix Heat Treat,Meeting 2450 W.11:30-1:00 Mohave, Phoenix 6/29 General Dinner Meeting 5:00-8:00pm at Phoenix Gartman Technical Services, Inc. (General 602.788.8121 1301 W. Geneva, Tempe 6/08 Safety Safety Standards) 11:30 5/12 Meeting Combined Marketing & Program AirportMembership, Hilton, 2435 S. 47th Street, Phoenix Meeting 11:30-1:00 atBoard Foresight Technologies, Group, 919 N. 1st St., Phoenix 5/17 of Directors Meeting 11:30-1:00 at HUB Internationalat Leavitt 602.749.4190 1301 W. Geneva, Tempe Micro-Tronics, 2905 S. Potter, Tempe, 85282 6/09 Supply Combined Membership, Marketing & Program Industrial Metal 602.454.1500 5/17 Board of Directors Meeting 11:30-1:00 at Meeting 11:30-1:00 at Foresight Technologies, 5/25 General Dinner Meeting 5:00-8:00pm at Phoenix Klontech Industrial SalesMicro-Tronics, 480.948.1871 2905 S.Airport Potter, Hilton, Tempe, 85282 1301 W. Geneva, Tempe 2435 S. 47th Street, Phoenix L.A. Specialties 5/25 General Dinner 602.269.7612 Meeting 5:00-8:00pm 6/21 Board of Directors Meeting 11:30-1:00 at at Phoenix JUNE Airport Hilton, 2435 S. 47th Street, Phoenix LarsonAllen, LLP 480.615.2300

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS Linda Daly Richard Short Greg Whelan John Anderson Isaac Bunney Howie Basuk Steve Blok Kerry Vance Cindy Stewart Lou Gallo Randy Flores Steve Warner Mickey Gartman Jackie Bergman David Cohen Tim Kloenne Barry Armstrong Doug Berg Bob Von Fleckinger Jeff Trimble David Gundersen Michael Biesk Ray Limon Thomas Moore

UPCOMING Welcome ATMA EVENTS! TO OUR NEWEST ASSOCIATE MEMBER: Total Print Solutions

UPCOMING ATMA EVENTS! UPCOMING ATMA EVENTS!

MANY THANK Many Thanks MANY THANKS TO OUR 2011 ATMA VALUED SPONSORS: TO 2011ATMA ATMA TO OUR 2011 Micro-Tronics, 29056/08 S. Potter, Tempe, 85282 Safety Meeting (General Safety Standards) 11:30 VALUED SPONSORS! VALUED SPONSORS! 6/29 General Dinner Meeting 5:00-8:00pm at Phoenix at Leavitt Group, 919 N. 1st St., Phoenix TO OUR 2011 ATMA VALUED SPONSORS!

Pete Hushek

Airport Hilton, at 2435 S. 47th Street, Phoenix 6/29 General Dinner Meeting 5:00-8:00pm Phoenix North-South Machinery 602.466.2556 Airport Hilton, 2435 S. 47th Street, Phoenix Phoenix Heat Treating 602.258.7751

Steve Montgomery

Phoenix Metal Trading

602.257.4660

Arlene Helt

Ryerson-Phoenix

602.455.3386

Ron Swartzbaugh

S&S Machinery

602.714.0116

Jane Rousculp

Samuel Aerospace Metals

602.721.0176

Frank Encinas

Semiray

602.275.1917

Russ Kurzawski

Star Metal Fluids LLC

602.256.2092

Lisa Barnes

TDS/HDS Marketing

602.635.6404

John Drain

Tornquist Machinery Co.

602.470.0334

George Compton

Total Print Solutions

623.241.7300

Greg Burke

TW Metals

602.864.0014

Joseph Velez

Law Office of Velez

480.710.5079

Daniel Franks

Wells Fargo Bank

602.522.7805

Glen Zachman

MANY THAN

TO OUR 2011 AT MANY THANKS VALUED SPONSO

JUNE 602.264.0566 6/08 Safety Meeting (General Safety Standards) 11:30 Airport Hilton, 2435 S. 47th Street, Phoenix Magnum Precision Machines 602.431.8300 6/09 Membership, Marketing & Program at Leavitt Group, 919Combined N. 1st St., Phoenix Meeting 11:30-1:00 at Foresight Technologies, Makino, Inc. 602.228.0347 6/09 Combined Membership, Marketing & Program 1301 W. Geneva, Tempe Meeting 11:30-1:00 at Foresight Technologies, Marshall Tool & Supply 602.269.6295 6/21 Board of Directors Meeting 11:30-1:00 at 1301 W. Geneva, Tempe Metco Metal Finishing 602.276.4120 Micro-Tronics, 6/21 Board of Directors Meeting 11:30-1:002905 at S. Potter, Tempe, 85282 Moore Tool & EquipmentMicro-Tronics, 602.455.8904 2905 S.General Potter, Dinner Tempe, 85282 6/29 Meeting 5:00-8:00pm at Phoenix Leavitt Group

MANY THANKS TO OUR 2011 ATMA VALUED SPONSORS!

MANY THANKS MANY THANKS OUR 2011 ATMA TO OURTO 2011 ATMA SPONSORS! VALUEDVALUED SPONSORS!

arizonatooling.org / 23

ATMA EVENTS IN AUGUST Combined Membership, Marketing & Program Meeting Date and Time: August 11, 11:30-1:00 Venue: Foresight Technologies, 1301 W. Geneva, Tempe Combined Membership, Marketing & Program Meeting Date and Time: August 16, 11:30-1:00 Venue: Micro-Tronics, 2905 S. Potter, Tempe, 85282 ATMA MIXER Date and Time: August 24, 5:00-7:00 pm Venue: TBD

arizonatooling.org / 23

arizonatooling.org / 23

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ar


MARK YOUR CALENDAR WITH THESE

UPCOMING manufacturing ATMA EVENTS! estates MAY 5/11 Safety Meeting (General Safety Standards) 11:30 at Phoenix Heat Treat, 2450 W. Mohave, Phoenix

Providing precision machining and fabricating of diverse parts and assemblies

5/12 Combined Membership, Marketing & Program Meeting 11:30-1:00 at Foresight Technologies, 1301 W. Geneva, Tempe 5/17 Board of Directors Meeting 11:30-1:00 at Micro-Tronics, 2905 S. Potter, Tempe, 85282 5/25 General Dinner Meeting 5:00-8:00pm at Phoenix Airport Hilton, 2435 S. 47th Street, Phoenix JUNE 6/08 Safety Meeting (General Safety Standards) 11:30 at Leavitt Group, 919 N. 1st St., Phoenix 6/09 Combined Membership, Marketing & Program Meeting 11:30-1:00 at Foresight Technologies, 1301 W. Geneva, Tempe

www.BenefitWines.com/atma 6/21 Board of Directors Meeting 11:30-1:00 at BenefitMicro-Tronics, wines support the S. National Robotics League 2905 Potter, Tempe, 85282 and the Brock Babb Scholarship Fund. 6/29 General Dinner Meeting 5:00-8:00pm at Phoenix

Serving the Aerospace/Aircraft, Military, Oil Tool and Commercial Industries Our Quality System is AS9100 B Compliant Equipment Capacities range up to HS-4R HAAS 4-Axis Horizontal Milling Center @ 150” x 66” x 48” and Ikegai VTL CNC Lathe @ Ø 55” Diameter Centerless Grinding Capacities ranges from Ø1/8” up to Ø1-1/2” in Lengths up to 14’ long and Ø1-1/2” to Ø 3” RD With Weight Maximum of 50# Dynamic Machine and Fabrication Corp. and Dynamic Centerless Grinding 3845 E. Winslow Ave., Phoenix, AZ 85040

(602) 437-0339 (602) 437-8947 fax

www.

dynamic-machine.com

Airport Hilton, 2435 S. 47th Street, Phoenix

ATMA MANY THANKS PRECISION

TO OUR 2011 ATMA VALUED SPONSORS!

maui-wowi luau exhibits & hors d’oeuvres courtesy of the atma associate members

Save the date: October 26th from 4:00-7:30pm at The Phoenix Airport Hilton

win $1000 & other exciting prizes! (must be present to win)

Live Hula Entertainment! FREE EVENT * FREE APPETIZERS * FREE CHANCES TO WIN

july/august 2011

23 arizonatooling.orgarizonatooling.org PrecisionNews /23


Flashpoints LEARNING YOUR

PrecisionNews Presents

DOMESTIC ABC’s

WEBSITES THAT WORK FOR YOU

continued from page 18

Politics - childish and boorish behavior on both sides of the aisle in Washington DC is ridiculous…and all too typical. Is cooperation really that difficult? Quarterly Economic Growth - most forecasting economists see a 2.0%-3.0% real (after inflation) annual growth pace during the next four quarters, barring any other major shocks to the system.

Retirement - the term will take on new meaning in coming decades as more and more people “bridge the gap” (work two or three days a week) between working full-time and moving into full retirement. Millions of retirement-age Baby Boomers will prefer (or need) to keep one foot in the workplace for a long time to come.

Social Security - steps taken sooner rather than later to slow down the future growth rate of spending are required. It would be great if politicians would stop calling it spending cuts…and scaring people!

Taxes - boosting capital gains, dividend, and income tax rates on the top 3% of income earners remains the President’s goal, IF he survives the 2012 election. Like it or not, these are primarily the people who create jobs and invest. The Administration’s focus on “income redistribution” rather than on providing “incentives for U.S. economic growth” remains troubling. Uemployment - likely to remain above 8.2% during the next 1218 months, even as modest monthly job gains have returned. Why? Hundreds of thousands of people who previously left the labor force will continue to return as they (hopefully) hear about better employment prospects, with more than 270,000 returnees in May alone.

Arizona Chapter Website arizonatooling.org Arizona Department of Commerce-Job Training Grant Application azcommerce.com/workforce Arizona Department of Education azed.gov Arizona Manufacturers Council azchamber.com/amc Arizona MEP arizonamep.org Arizona State University Mechanical & Manufacturing Engineering Technology poly.asu.edu/technology/mmet/ City of Phoenix – Community & Economic Development Program phoenix.gov/ECONDEV/index.html EVIT (East Valley Institute of Technology) evit.com GateWay Community College gatewaycc.edu Greater Phoenix Chamber of Commerce phoenixchamber.com Human Resources, Safety & Environmental topics of interest (Also see link on the NTMA website: www.ntma.org) blr.com Maricopa Skill Center maricopaskillcenter.com Maricopa Community Colleges maricopa.edu

Vacations - remember them?

Maricopa Workforce Connection maricopaworkforceconnection.com

Wall Street - simply stated…I remain a long-term bull on stocks.

Mesa Community College mc.maricopa.edu

eXpectations - diminished for millions of people of all ages regarding careers, standards of living, and retirement. Fiscal sanity in Washington DC and around the globe would go a long way to reversing that view.

Mesa High School mpsaz.org

Youth - my parents “came of age” with Pearl Harbor…my peers

National Tooling & Machining Association ntma.org

with Kennedy’s assassination and Vietnam. For millions of Generations X and Y, September 11 and the “Great Recession” will be forever etched into their consciousness. JaZ z (Utah) - maybe next season…if there is one!

Jeff Thredgold can be reach through www.thredgold.com/tea-leaf/

24

PrecisionNews

arizonatooling.org

july/august 2011

National Institute for Metalworking Standards nims-skills.org

One Voice Advocacy metalworkingadvocate.org SCF Arizona scfaz.com U.S. Department of Labor dol.gov


WEBSITES YOU SHOULD KNOW

ncy n xperts that a an ed for ons, O2 th ants

Arizona Chapter Website www.arizonatooling.org

r 4, that n

Arizona State University Mechanical & Manufacturing Engineering Technology www.poly.asu.edu/technology/mmet/

upper s in a

anel qually to 30 ne a and

Arizona Department of Commerce – Job Training Grant application www.azcommerce.com/workforce Arizona Department of Education www.azed.gov Arizona Manufacturers Council www.azchamber.com/amc Arizona MEP www.arizonamep.org

City of Phoenix – Community & Economic Development Program www.phoenix.gov/ECONDEV/index.html EVIT (East Valley Institute of Technology) www.evit.com GateWay Community College www.gatewaycc.edu

Serving the Aerospace, Defense, Medical and Alternative Energy Industries Boeing (Silver Supplier) • ATK Sargent • Lockheed Martin

AS9100 Certified by DNV Mark Weathers, Owner 8737 NORTH 77TH DRIVE • PEORIA, ARIZONA 85345 P) 623.878.6800 • F) 623.878.0633 • C) 602.363.7929 mark@excalpm.com • www.excalpm.com

Human Resources, Safety & Environmental topics of interest (Also see a link on the NTMA website, www.ntma.org) www.blr.com Maricopa Skill Center www.maricopaskillcenter.com

ntal

Maricopa Community Colleges www.maricopa.edu

past nami one ld. m, n by buy

Hard Alloy Precision Machining Stainless Steels • Titanium • Maraging • High Temp Milling • Turning • Cylindrical Grinding

Greater Phoenix Chamber of Commerce www.phoenixchamber.com

the

ing an o

RIGHT. ON TIME.

Maricopa Workforce Connection www.maricopaworkforceconnection.com Mesa Community College www.mc.maricopa.edu Mesa High School www.mpsaz.org National Institute for Metalworking Standards www.nims-skills.org National Tooling & Machining Association www.ntma.org One Voice Advocacy www.metalworkingadvocate.org SCF Arizona www.scfaz.com U.S. Department of Labor www.dol.gov www.UniqueMFG.org • Sales@UniqueMFG.org • (602) 470-1911

july/august 2011

25 arizonatooling.orgarizonatooling.org PrecisionNews /25


SAN DIEGO CHAPTER

NTMA PRECISION 2011 BOARD OF DIRECTORS President MELINDA COLDWELL Cornerstone Machining, Inc. Vice President TONY MARTINDALE Martindale Manufacturing Recruitment Director Mike Brown Computer Integrated Machining Past President PETER NEVILLE B&H Tool Education Director HEATHER RUSSELL K-Tech Machine

BOARD MEMBERS Education Board Member John Riego de Dios Construction Tech Academy Board Member Glenn Van Noy Champion Risk Insurance Board Member Mark Selway Selway Machine Board Member Dave Stanton Digital Dimensions

PrecisionNews // NTMA -SAN DIEGO CHAPTER

MEMBER LISTINGS REGULAR MEMBERS Todd C. Lawson

Academy Machine Products

760.439.0109

Dennis Cope

Alphatec Spine

760.494.6774 760.494.6894

Sean Tillett

Alphatec Spine

Peter Neville

B&H Tool Company Inc.

800.272.8878

Lyle Anderson

C&H Machine and EDM Services

760.746.6459

Michael J. Brown

Computer Integrated Mach., Inc.

619.596.9246

Melinda Coldwell

Cornerstone Machining, Inc.

760.727.5228

Erich Wilms

Diversified Tool & Die

760.598.9100

Donovan Weber

Forecast 3D

760.929.9380

Andrew Allen

Henry Machine, Inc.

760.744.8482

Nhan Vo Young

Henry Machine, Inc.

760.744.8482

David Tuza

I-Source Technical Services, Inc.

949.453.1500

Dora E. Tuza

I-Source Technical Services, Inc.

949.453.1500

Jim Piel

J I Machine Company, Inc.

858.695.1787

Heather Russell

K-Tech Machine, Inc.

760.471.9262 760.471.9262

Stuart Russell

K-Tech Machine, Inc.

Cliff Manzke

Manzke Machine, Inc.

760.504.6875

Russell Wells Sr.

MarLee Manufacturing, Inc.

909.390.3222

Tony Martindale

Martindale Manufacturing Co.

760.744.3078

Mark Rottele

Roettele Industries

909.606.8252

Scott Cormony

Waterjet West, Inc.

760.471.2600

FOUNDING PARTNERS Glenn Van Noy

Champion Risk and

760.419.1393

Insurance Services Dave Stanton

Digital Dimensions, Inc.

858.279.2557

Jeff Schwen

East County Internet Marketing

619.315.5604

Gail Houser

National Tooling &

602.758.6912

Machining Assoc. Mark Selway

Selway Machine Tool Company

888.735.9290

Board Member Jeff Schwen East County Internet Marketing Chapter Executive Suzanne Coleman

“To form an alliance within the San Diego region of the local machining and tool industry and to foster mutual success through education, technology, opportunity sharing and act as one voice with the government and the community.” NTMA - San Diego Chapter 348 Saratoga Glen Escondido, CA 92025 Phone: 760.419.1393 ntmasandiegochapter.org

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SAN DIEGO-NTMA UPCOMING EVENTS San Diego - NTMA Board Meeting Date and Time: August 9, 11:30am Venue: Bruno’s Restaurant in San Marcos San Diego - NTMA Board Meeting Date and Time: September 8, 11:30am Venue: Bruno’s Restaurant in San Marcos San Diego - NTMA Meeting (TBD) Date and Time: September 21, 5:30pm Venue: TBD (see website for coming details) San Diego - NTMA Signature Event Date and Time: October 18, 5:30pm Venue: Seau’s in Mission Valley


HEAT TREATING ALUMINUM DIP BRAZING VACUUM BRAZING ...at the largest facility of its kind in Northern California. We are proven innovators in this highly technical industry. Our experienced metallurgists have accomplished the near-impossible for many satisfied clients. Because of our high standards of quality, service and just plain hard work, we encourage you to contact us for your next heat-treating or brazing project. We are committed to your success.

dbuttner@thermo-fusion.com TEL 510.782.7755 FAX 510.782.4197

“Your satisfaction is our best reputation.� ATMA_0202_FINAL_Layout 1 6/18/11 7:05 AM Page 27

www.thermo-fusion.com ESTABLISHED 1973

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President’s Letter

NORTH TEXAS CHAPTER

NTMA - NORTH TEXAS CHAPTER

REMAINING STRONG IN MEMBERSHIP AND GROWTH AS WE BEGIN THE SECOND HALF OF 2011, the North Texas Chapter remains strong in membership and growth. We have welcomed new Regular Members and new Sponsors. We strive to provide valuable resources, information and networking for our membership and advocacy for the manufacturing industry through our meetings, programs and services. We have been working closely with our educational partners to sponsor classes and formulate curriculum that will fit the future needs of our member companies. I urge all our members to participate fully in our meetings and events to realize their full benefit of membership. In addition to our regular monthly meetings, mark your calendars for our upcoming Night at the Ballpark Ranger Game event in July and also our Annual Golf Tournament in September. Also, I am hoping to see many of our members attend the Fall Conference at The Broadmoor in Colorado Springs, CO on October 13-16, 2011.

NTMA PRECISION 2011 BOARD OF DIRECTORS President TODD ELLARD Manda Machine Company Vice President JEFF SPENCER Clay Precision Treasurer BARRON SMITH R.W. Smith Company Chapter Executive LISA ELLARD Trustee WAYNE APPLEGATE Applegate EDM

BOARD MEMBERS Mike Berdan BE Technologies Frank Burch Southern Machine Works

Todd Ellard President, NTMA - North Texas Chapter

Bill Walter Ellison Technologies Micah Embrey CNC Precision/Shamrock-Bolt Don Halsey Halsey Manufacturing Ray Jones MWI, Inc.

NTMA PRECISION

Pat McCurley Midlothian Insurance Karla Chandler Education Liason

STAR CHAPTER AWARD 2010

“The Power of Connections” For more information on how you can become a member, please contact us at: ntc.ntma@gmail.com

NTMA - North Texas Chapter ntc.ntma@gmail.com phone: 214.536.4970 P.O. Box 541236 Dallas, TX 75354-1236 ntmanorthtexas.org

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CUT THROUGH THE CLUTTER.

NTMA

PRECISION NEWS READERS ARE KEY DECISION MAKERS THAT YOU AS AN ADVERTISER WANT TO REACH. OUR READERS WANT AN EDGE IN A CONSTANTLY EVOLVING INDUSTRY AND THEY FIND IT IN PRECISION NEWS!

Let your ad be a call to action! Contact Precision News today for more details at: ExecutiveDirector@arizonatooling.org

PRECISION

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Specialty Metals Leadership. Supply Chain Innovation.

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july/august 2011

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PrecisionNews // NTMA -NORTH TEXAS CHAPTER

MEMBER LISTINGS REGULAR MEMBERS

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS

Vincente Chan

Aeroweld Technologies, Inc.

972.247.1189

Larry Ellison

AJR Metalworks, Inc.

214.352.3766

Wade Whistler

A.C.T. Precision Sheet Metal, Inc.

214.678.9114

Tommy Thompson

Bodic Industries

972.840.1015

Wayne Applegate

Applegate EDM, Inc.

972.488.8997

Lewis Lance

Bodycote Heat Treat

817.265.5878

Steve Ingersoll

Bailey Tool & Manufacturing

972.974.8892

Rick Blair

Brook Anco Corporation

585.475.9570

Michael Berdan

BE-Technologies, Ltd.

972.242.1853

Craig van Hamersveld

Campat Machine Tool, Inc.

972.424.4095

Christi Cameron

Cameron Machine Shop, Inc.

972.235.8876

Claudia Pautz

Castle Metals

972.339.5000 516.536.8200

Jeff R. Spencer

Clay Precision, Ltd.

903.891.9022

Chris Simms

Champion Cutting Tool

Gary Embrey

CNC Precision Manufacturing, Inc.

972.241.3931

Fraser Marshall

Ellison Technologies

972.812.5500

Joseph Lodor

Commerce Grinding Company, Inc. 214.651.1977

Frank Vance

Frank J Vance

972.255.3925

Robert McNamara

Davis Machine & Manufacturing

817.261.7362

Norm Williamson

H & O Die Supply, Inc.

214.630.6660

Charles Gilbert

DNS Tool Cutter Grinding, LLC

972.241.5271

Mike Johns

Haas Factory Outlet

972.231.2802

David Ellis

Ellis Tool & Machine, Inc.

903.546.6540

Greg Kinney

Hartwig, Inc. -- Texas

972.790.8200

Rudy D. Kobus

Expert Tool & Machine, Inc.

972.241.5353

Matt Curtis

Hillary Machinery, Inc.

972.578.1515

Monte Titus

F& R Machine & Repair, Inc.

214.631.4946

Rod Zimmerman

Iscar Metals, Inc.

817.258.3200

Gary Fore

Fore Machine Company, Inc.

817.834.6251

Randy Joyce

Joyce Engraving Company, Inc.

214.638.1262

Larry Borowski

Greenslade and Company, Inc.

817.870.8888

Curtis Dahmen

Kaeser Compressors, Inc.

972.245.9611

David L. Hodgdon

H. H. Mercer, Inc.

972.289.1911

Mark S. Holly

Machinists Tools & Supplies

214.631.9390

Don Halsey, Jr.

Halsey Engineering & Mfg., Inc.

940.566.3306

Leland McDowell

McDowell Machinery & Supply Co. 214.353.0410

Keith Hutchinson

Lancaster Machine Shop

972.227.2868

Pat McCurley

Midlothian Insurance Agency

972.723.5171

Sammy Maddox

Maddox Metal Works, Inc.

214.333.2311

Ray Jones

MWI Inc. / Southwest Division

972.247.3083

Todd Ellard

Manda Machine Company, Inc.

214.352.5946

Mike Chadick

North Texas Precision Instrument

817.589.0011

Rodie Woodard

Maximum Industries, Inc.

972.501.9990

Reed Hunt

Reed Hunt Services, Inc.

817.261.4432

Woodrow W. Thompson

Metal Detail, Inc.

214.330.7757

Bob Severance

Severance Brothers

972.660.7000

Allen Meyer

Meyer Enterprises

972.353.9791

Alan VanHoozer

Top Tooling of Dallas, Inc.

972.278.8300

Glenn Wise

Wise Machinery, LLC

817.905.9473

Eddie Steiner, Jr.

O E M Industries, Inc.

214.330.7271

Morris Padgett

Padgett Machine Tools, Inc.

254.865.9772

Troy Paulus

Paulus Precision Machine, Inc.

940.566.5600

Joe O’Dell

Plano Machine & Instrument, Inc.

940.665.2814

Matt Harrell

Quickturn Technology, Inc.

469.643.5010

Barron Smith

R. W. Smith Company, Inc.

214.748.1699

Dion Casto

Rapid Tooling, Inc.

972.633.8872

Frank Burch

Southern Machine Works

580.255.6525

John Anselmi

Sunbelt Plastics Inc.

972.335.4100

Marshall B. Taylor

T & K Machine, Inc.

903.785.5574

NTMA-NORTH TEXAS MEETINGS&EVENTS Thanks to our 2011 General Meeting hosts: January 2011- Manda Machine Company February 2011- Ellison Technologies March 2011- Larson Allen LLP, Lunch & Learn April 2011- Midlothian Insurance Agency May 19, 2011- General Meeting, Commerce Grinding, Inc. June 16, 2011- General Meeting, Richland College Upcoming Events: August 18, 2011 – Applegate EDM September 22, 2011 – Golf Tournament at Indian Creek

“The Power of Connections”

Welcome TO OUR NEWEST MEMBERS: Monte Titus, F&R Machine & Repair, Inc. 7217 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas TX 75235, ph 214.631.4946 Mbtitus55@sbcglobal.net, www.fandrmachine.com Larry Borowski, Greenslade & Company, Inc. 2234 Wenneca Ave, Ft. Worth, TX 76102, ph 817.870.8888 lborowski@greensladeandcompany.com, www.greensladeandcompany.com Jake Bailey, Tower Extrusions Fabrication 1003 State Hwy 70 South, Olney, TX 76374, ph 940.564.5681 jake@towerextrusion.com, www.towerextrusion.com

Many Thanks TO OUR 2011 NTMA-NORTH TEXAS SPONSORS:

BILLOR MACHINE TOOL SERVICE Larson Allen LLP CPAs, CONSULTANTS & ADVISORS

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Profile for ATMA - Chris Mignella

Precision Magazine July August 2011  

Precision Magazine, the trade magazine from the Arizona Tooling and Machining Association. Featuring articles on manufacturing in Arizona, N...

Precision Magazine July August 2011  

Precision Magazine, the trade magazine from the Arizona Tooling and Machining Association. Featuring articles on manufacturing in Arizona, N...