Page 1

THIS ISSUE: Boiling A Frog / Regulatory Review / Leveraging New Tech / Metal Joining / Coolant Filtration

.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... The NTMA SW Regional Magazine Featuring Arizona, San Diego, San Francisco and North Texas

ARIZONATOOLING.ORG JULY / AUGUST 2012

PrecisionNews TM

TECHNOLOGY . BUSINESS . EDUCATION . EVENTS . DIRECTORY

Ti (Titanium)

Classification: Transition Metal, Atomic Number: 22, Atomic Weight: 47.88, Density (g/cc): 4.54, Melting Point (K): 1933, Boiling Point (K): 3560

/ DO YOU HAVE WHAT IT TAKES /

TO MAKE THE CUT? THE STRENGTH ISSUE

NTMA SW BRINGS YOU:

THE EXPERIENCE AND INSIGHT TO GET THE JOB DONE!

This CoroMill 690 is developed specifically for high-productivity 2D profile milling of titanium components beginning on p.14

Inside: COMPETITIVE TITANIUM MILLING NEW STEPS SHOW YOU HOW TO DO EACH PHASE AS EFFECTIVELY AS POSSIBLE TO THE RIGHT LEVEL

THE WORLD IS KEEPING SCORE GOOD GRADES AND GOOD CREDIT SCORES MATTER. BUSINESS RESULTS MATTER, TOO

GETTING OUT THE WORD ARE YOU MAKING SURE THAT EVERYONE UNDERSTANDS YOUR GOALS?


JULY/ AUGUST 2012 VOLUME 2 • ISSUE 4

Contents Features

Departments

SPECIAL ADVERTISING FEATURE

10 12 14

COOLANT FILTRATION

03 President’s Letter

More companies are becoming aware of the value that filtration can play into decreasing the overall metalworking fluid cost and extending fluid life.

04 Policy Matters 06 Trend Watch

GROWING A BUSINESS IS LIKE GROWING A FAMILY

08 People Power 18 Shop Floor

The people that businesses touch are like family, and in fact, owners even call their companies their “babies.” As with being a family leader, owning a business is not always easy, and worrying is part of the job.

20 Websites that Work 20 Arizona Chapter Info

NEW STEPS TO COMPETITIVE MILLING IN TITANIUM

26 San Diego Chapter Info

Titanium alloys are more demanding to machine compared to most other workpiece materials. Titanium components are not difficult to machine using the right means and methods, just more challenging and in need of a different approach.

28 North Texas Chapter Info 30 San Francisco Chapter Info 32 Best Practices in Action

OUR MISSION:

“WE JOIN TOGETHER AS MEMBERS OF THE SW REGION PRECISION CUSTOM MANUFACTURING COMMUNITY TO ACHIEVE BUSINESS SUCCESS IN A GLOBAL ECONOMY THROUGH ADVOCACY, ADVICE, NETWORKING, INFORMATION, PROGRAMS AND SERVICES.”

The NTMA SW Regional Magazine Featuring Arizona, San Diego, San Francisco and North Texas EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR & EDITOR Chris Mignella

PrecisionNews

TM

.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ....................................

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS ATMA Safety Team, Dante Fierros, Margaret Jacoby, Omar Nashashibi, Brent Terhaar, Robert J. Tracy, Ted Szaniawski ADVISORY BOARD Chris Mignella, Lisa Ellard, Glenn VanNoy, Gail Houser EDITORIAL, ADVERTISING & ADDRESS CHANGES Chris Mignella, Executive Director & Editor Phone: 602.388.5752 Email: ExecutiveDirector@arizonatooling.org

Precision News is published bi-monthly by the Arizona Tooling & Machining Association (ATMA). Opinions expressed are those of the authors or persons quoted and not necessarily those of the ATMA. While efforts to ensure accuracy are exercised, ATMA assumes no liability for the information contained in either editorial or advertising content. ATMA assumes no responsibility or liability for unsolicited manuscripts or artwork. Reproduction in whole or part without the expressed written consent from ATMA is prohibited. Precision News is the registered trade name of this publication. Copyright ©2012 by ATMA. All rights reserved.

july/august 2012

arizonatooling.org

PrecisionNews

01


Consolidated Resources, Inc. Industrial Recycling Specialists

• Aluminum • Nickel • Stainless Steel • Copper • Brass • Titanium • Aerospace Alloys

• Glass • Wood • Plastic ATMA M EMBE R • Paper • Cardboard • Certified Material Destruction • All Ferrous Grades

20th

Anniversary

Call Kerry 623.931.5009

kerry@consolidatedresources.com

02

PrecisionNews

arizonatooling.org

july/august 2012

Consolidated Resources Inc. 4849 West Missouri Glendale, AZ 85301 Office: 623.931.5009 Fax: 623.931.5852 www.consolidatedresources.com


.................................................................................................................................... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..

First Word PRESIDENT’S LETTER

BOILING A FROG . . .. ..

SOMEHOW, THE FIRST HALF OF THIS YEAR HAS WHIZZED BY in a blink of the eye and many are thinking of more relaxing pursuits like vacation and perhaps a slowing down during these “warm” summer months. This reminded me of that old story about “boiling a frog” (unsure who would want to) but it is said that if you can increase the temperature of the water in which a frog sits ever so slowly, little by little, before you know it, he is “boiled” without even making an attempt to get out of the hot water.

IF RISING TEMPERATURES CAN BE EQUATED TO CAUTIONARY FLAGS RELATED TO OUR BUSINESS NEEDS, EMPLOYEE ISSUES AND REGULATORY CONCERNS, THEN THIS ISSUE OF THE PRECISION NEWS SHOULD BE OF GREAT INTEREST. DANTE O. FIERROS President 602.980.1907 dante@nicholsprecision.com

Take a look at the update on government regulations (“A Regulatory Review-18 Months and 116,000 pages later”) provided to us by Omar Nashashibi of Franklin Partners LLC (NTMA’s partner in helping to represent us to Congress). It is enlightening and sobering. People issues? See the latest offering from Ted Szaniaswski of The HRGroup and Margaret Jacoby from MJ Management Solutions Inc., entitled “I Am Their Leader…Which Way Did They Go?!?!” It is very helpful indeed. Want to grow your business? Read the insightful perspectives and specific plans offered by our ATMA Sponsors, Clifton Larson Allen. Robert J. Tracy offers his superb perspective in “Growing a Business is Like Growing a Family”. It is a very specific game plan. To top off a very successful and enjoyable presentation by Mr. Scott Walker, President of Mitsui Seiki last month at our dinner meeting, we have included a very in depth article on the subject of machining titanium by National Sponsor Sandvik Coromant. In continuing our ATMA effort to providing you with the latest information in the quickest way, we continue to focus most of our communication process via our website. Please check out the useful information ranging from safety subjects to resumes and business opportunities. While you are at it, why not toot your own horn and make sure your company details are listed correctly. Whether your business “temperature” is comfortable or getting uncomfortably hot, getting involved and communicating your thoughts and needs insures you at least have a hand on the temperature control.

july/august 2012

arizonatooling.org

PrecisionNews

03


fyi: .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..As.. ..of.. June . . .. ..18,.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .the . . total . . . new . .. .. rules . . . .and ..................................... regulations issued in 2012 Policy Matters by the federal government ADVOCACY EFFORTS whether previously-issued reached 1,629, totaling 34,127 pages. + rules and regulations should be “modified, streamlined, expanded, or repealed.” The directive also establishes an open and ongoing public comment process to allow businesses and others to provide input on any regulation – even those not up for review. The White House has by OMAR S. NASHASHIBI created a website to promote and facilitate this review process: http://www.reginfo.gov/ public/jsp/Utilities/index.jsp Washington, D.C. – The National Tooling list (TRI) rule; EPA regulation of Nickel as a and Machining Association (NTMA) recently harmful carcinogen; OSHA Employer Safety President Obama issued his first regulatory held a legislative conference in Washington, Incentive and Disincentive Policies and review directive in January 2011. Eighteen D.C. representing the manufacturing industry Practices; and the SEC Conflict Minerals as part of the One Voice federal government Rule among others as those that are directly months later, 144 pending regulations are undergoing active review, the most being at impacting the industry. They also reinforced advocacy effort. During that week of May 7, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in their letter that small and medium-sized 2012, the federal government implemented with 29 pending review actions. However, middle-market manufacturers are often 62 new rules and regulations totaling 1,577 in these eighteen months federal agencies trapped between their much larger pages. This came in addition to the 45 new published an additional 116,546 pages of customers and suppliers and government rules federal agencies proposed that week regulations, a lot by any measurements, regulators. Even if a regulation does not while manufacturers advocated for their particularly small businesses forced to specifically target small businesses or the industry on Capitol Hill. As of June 18, the comply or face a fine. industry, these businesses and their total new rules and regulations issued in employees still feel the trickledown effect. 2012 by the federal government reached While the President has taken some 1,629, totaling 34,127 pages. important steps to reform the regulatory Ahead of this effort by Republicans in the process, it appears many of his agencies House of Representatives, President On January 18, 2011, President Obama continue to disregard his directive and issued Executive Order 13563 – “Improving Obama, on May 10, 2012, issued a new conduct business as usual. The EPA Executive Order (E.O.13610) – “Identifying Regulation and Regulatory Review,” estimates compliance with its new TRI and Reducing Regulatory Burdens.” This mandating all federal agencies change the rule will cost 11 labor hours for a typical order seeks to build upon his January 2011 way they regulate Americans and their manufacturer. However, our industry experts Executive Order calling for a regulatory businesses. The President directed federal assert it will take 56 hours to comply – lost review period. Many are calling this recent agencies to “only propose or adopt a time for companies producing and creating Presidential directive one of the most regulation if its benefits justify its cost”; jobs in the U.S. significant since President Reagan. “identify alternatives to direct regulation”; and “change their enforcement approach.” Will agencies fully embrace the call for Under current practices, federal agencies President Obama mandated every agency reform of federal regulations? Only time implement new rules or regulations but review pending regulations for compliance will tell, but with each day that passes, an rarely go back to review their effectiveness, with his Executive Order. average of 300 pages of rules and regulaburdens or effects on businesses and the tions are added to the federal register. This public. When a manufacturing business House of Representatives Oversight and summer, most of us will take a good book implements a new production process or Government Reform Committee Chairman with us to the beach to relax. Try printing installs a new machine, common sense Darrell Issa (R-CA) and Subcommittee on just one day’s worth of regulatory actions dictates that the business review whether Regulatory Affairs Chairman Jim Jordan (Rand it is sure to put you to sleep under the OH) recently asked the business community or not the new actions are meeting their warm sun but keep you awake at night. to provide specific examples of burdensome expectations and needs. Would a business and ineffective federal rules and regulations. owner purchase a $1 million machine and never check on its productivity? This is The NTMA along with several other trade OMAR NASHASHIBI is a founding essentially what the federal government has associations responded to the partner at The Franklin Partnership, LLP, a done to a great extent with regulations – Congressmen’s request on June 1, 2012 bi-partisan government relations firm “fire and forget.” providing input from manufacturing retained by the National Tooling and businesses across the country. Machining Association in Washington, D.C. For the first time, the President’s May 2012 Executive Order officially requires agencies The Associations listed several regulations Learn more at: www.franklinpartnership.com to establish review processes to examine including EPA’s Toxic Release Inventories

A Regulatory Review

18 Months and 116,000 Pages Later

04

PrecisionNews

arizonatooling.org

july/august 2012


THE ARIZONA TOOLING AND MACHINING ASSOCIATION

FOCUSED ON THE FUTURE:

MANUFACTURING IN ARIZONA AND PROVIDING THE CAPABILITIES YOU NEED TODAY!

/

THE STATE OF ARIZONA has a broad and capable industrial base committed to providing low-cost manufacturing to OEMs

and Tier Ones around the world. Our agile and entrepreneurial small shops make Arizona’s high-tech manufacturing supply base one of the world’s most capable and cost-effective for machined and fabricated components. Our industry supplies the necessary precision tooling and machining for such vital industries as defense, automotive, aerospace, medical, appliance, business machines, electronics, agricultural implements, ordinance, transportation, environmental, construction equipment, nuclear and many more.

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// Arizona Tooling & Machining Association

ATMA PRECISION

Contact the Arizona Tooling and Machining Association and discover why doing business in Arizona will give your company the Competive Edge. CHRIS MIGNELLA, ATMA EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR PO Box 3518, Scottsdale, Arizona 85271 USA / phone: 602.388.5752 executivedirector@arizonatooling.org

arizonatooling.org


............................................................................................................................................ .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..

Trend Watch NEWS FROM THE CUTTING EDGE

Brazing:

Thoughts on Metal Joining from THE THERMOFUSION “BRAZING TEAM”

HOW MANY TIMES HAVE YOU HAD AN RFQ THAT INCLUDED “BRAZING” AND DIDN’T KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH IT (OR CONVERSELY, YOU KNEW EXACTLY WHAT TO DO WITH IT!)? THINKING OF BRAZING AS METAL JOINING, SIMILAR TO WELDING, MAKES IT MUCH MORE UNDERSTANDABLE.

Brazing is technically defined as the joining of metals through the use of heat and a filler metal, at a temperature higher than 450°C (842°F) and lower than the melting temperatures of the metals being joined. If a joint can be brazed, can it be welded? Of course, the answer is “it all depends”. If you’re joining dissimilar materials, say copper and stainless steel, then you’ll need brazing or non-traditional welding. If you’re trying to join a cover to a plate and want complete bonding across the plate, instead of on just the visible edge, then you’ll need brazing. And if you don’t want to melt the parts, then brazing is a good choice. There are many questions about brazing. In no particular order, here are some thoughts on each:

What brazing filler metal should I use? If cost is an issue, try to specify a nickel alloy. There are several that are good for brazing stainless steels, coppers and other materials. If cost isn’t an issue, gold alloys (usually mixed with copper) work well, and leave a very nice finish on the joint. How many times can I braze? If you mean, “can I have multiple braze steps to join many pieces onto one part”, then the answer is yes. Each braze step is done at a slightly lower temperature, and possibly with a different alloy, than the previous step. This prevents the alloy in the previous step from re-melting. If you mean, “I don’t like how the parts came out, I want the braze re-done”, the answer is “probably not”. Most braze joints are permanent, or require a lot of effort to separate without destroying the part.

What types of brazing are there? For high temperature brazing of stainless steel, copper, nickel, kovar, ceramic and titanium amongst others, there is vacuum brazing, hydrogen brazing and torch brazing. Vacuum brazing is typically done at vacuum levels exceeding 1x10-3 torr, and often approaching 1x10-6 torr. Hydrogen brazing is done in a hydrogen atmosphere, and torch brazing is done in air and uses a torch and flux. There is also “partial pressure” vacuum brazing, where the vacuum levels are in the 5x10-3 torr range, due to the backfill of the vacuum furnace with hydrogen or argon. So where’s the flux in vacuum and hydrogen brazing? Ah, a good question. Pre-cleaning, and then either the vacuum or the hydrogen provide the fluxing action for the braze alloy, keeping the parts clean both during and after braze.

fyi: Heat treating services include carburizing, nitriding, case-hardening, throughhardening, annealing, stress relief, vacuum and flame hardening, induction treating and cryogenic treating. +

06

PrecisionNews

arizonatooling.org

july/august 2012


................................................................................................................................. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. +

BRAZING: THE JOINING OF TWO OR MORE METALS WITH THE USE OF A DISSIMILAR MATERIAL OR ALLOY ABOVE 450C. BRAZING MAY BE DONE IN AIR, OR IN A PROTECTIVE ATMOSPHERE SUCH AS VACUUM OR HYDROGEN.

What about aluminum? Aluminum brazing is an interesting topic, as many aluminum alloys melt around 676°C (1250°F) and reduce to T-0 (no temper, dead soft) at braze temperature. There are two primary methods of brazing 6061 (and some other) aluminum alloys: vacuum brazing and dip brazing. Vacuum brazing, as we’ve discussed, is done in a vacuum furnace at vacuum levels approaching 1x10-6 torr. It’s a very clean process. But, without significant fixturing, it’s limited to brazing in one plane only, and it’s very expensive. Dip brazing, on the other hand, uses molten salt as the flux. The parts are cleaned, assembled and dipped in the salt

bath, where the alloy flows and joins the surfaces. Dip brazing is relatively inexpensive and much more forgiving than vacuum brazing. It allows joining of both thin and thick sections, and of intricate shapes with multi-plane braze joints. There’s a lot to consider when thinking about brazing. As with anything else, the first time you sub-contract for brazing will be scary, but with experience (on both the part of you and your brazer) the worry will lessen and the propensity for profit will increase. So get out there, get to know your brazer, and get to bidding those “braze included” jobs!

THERMOFUSION INC., specialists in Brazing and Heat Treating, has been solving customer’s metallurgical problems since 1968. Our heat treating services include carburizing, nitriding, case-hardening, through-hardening, annealing, stress relief, vacuum and flame hardening, induction treating and cryogenic treating. Our brazing services include vacuum, hydrogen, torch, induction and dip brazing. They are ISO 9001:2008 Certified.

Learn more at: www.thermo-fusion.com

Over 40 years of helping customers!

Aluminum Dip Brazing Vacuum Brazing & Heat Treating Hydrogen Brazing & Heat Treating Torch (Silver) Brazing & Soldering Next Day Quotes 7 to 14 day Turn Time Certified to AWS C3.6 and C3.7 ISO 9001:2008 Certified Engineering Assistance Leak Testing “Your satisfaction is our best reputation.”

510.782.7755 www.thermo-fusion.com

july/august 2012

arizonatooling.org

PrecisionNews

07


............................................................................................................................................ .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..

People Power INFORMATION FOR ACTION

I Am Their Leader. . . Which Way Did They Go?! by TED SZANIAWSKI

Leaders are responsible for annual, organizational goal setting. But they should also be responsible for “getting the word out” and making sure that everyone in the organization understands how they individually contribute to the organization’s success. An excellent way to effectively spread-theword is through a Performance Management System (a.k.a. Performance Appraisals). Now if you say “Performance Appraisal”, most people think of annual salary increases, but managing performance should also be also be linked to defining and measuring performance for each employee. It isn’t difficult to establish annual performance objectives for employees. Just make sure to link individual goals and objectives to the organization’s goals by assigning each employee at least one, and up to five, “S.M.A.R.T.” objectives: AN EFFECTIVE PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM STRENGTHENS COMMUNICATION BETWEEN SUPERVISORS AND EMPLOYEES AND ENSURES THAT THERE IS A CLEAR UNDERSTANDING OF PERFORMANCE EXPECTATIONS.

SPECIFIC: Employees must be clear on exactly what results and/or behaviors are expected in achieving each objective MEASURABLE: Success in achieving objectives should be measured through quantitative or qualitative means ATTAINABLE: Employees should be able to reasonably achieve the objectives established for the year RELEVANT: Objectives should be relevant to the employee’s job TIME-BASED: When possible explicit milestones/deadlines for each objective should be established for the year

08

PrecisionNews

arizonatooling.org

july/august 2012

Consider implementing an effective Performance Management System and accept that it’s a process. It should be on-going --- not just an annual event --- and include interim reviews and coaching sessions. These reviews and coaching sessions provide multiple benefits. They strengthen communication between supervisors and employees, ensure that there is a clear understanding of performance expectation and clarify how individual performance relates to organizational objectives. Finally, the Performance Management process promotes teamwork. As the leader of your organization you should set annual goals --- it’s critically important! However, if you establish goals and don’t effectively communicate them to your entire workforce you may not succeed in achieving your objectives. Remember that in the absence of well-defined objectives employees will do what they prefer to do or what they think you want them to do. You may feel that you’re their leader ... but if you don’t establish and reinforce expectations you may not know where they’re going!

TED SZANIAWSKI is the principal of HRGroup, LLC. He can be reached at ted@hrgrouponline.com Learn more at: www.hrgrouponline.com


.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ................................................................

Do We REALLY Need an Employee Handbook? Short answer, YES! Just as employees must understand what is expected of them in their specific work assignments, they should also understand the organization’s policies and procedures as well as its values and culture. Employees should have a “go-to” place that gives them a clear definition of the terms and conditions of employment and provides need-to-know information that is essential for both new hires and established employees. And let’s not forget that federal and state laws and the growing number of cases of employee related litigation against management strongly suggests that a written statement of company policy is a business necessity for firms of any size. While they often differ from organization to organization, topics that an employee handbook might address include: • A brief description of the organization’s history • Reasons for its success and how an employee can contribute • A mission statement, summary of values and objectives • A definition of the organization’s role in the community • Orientation information • Proof of identity and eligibility for employment (Form I-9) • Employee Classifications • Payment of wages and overtime • Information about benefits, vacation, sick leave, insurance • Information on leaves of absences, etc. • Anti-harassment and discrimination policies and procedures • Expectations about conduct and discipline practices • Complaint process • Alcohol & drug use • Workplace safety • Attendance policies • Confidentiality guidelines • Guidelines concerning social networks, use of email, internet, mail, telephone and other company equipment • Disclaimer that the handbook is not a contract of employment • Acknowledgement of Receipt of the Handbook By establishing well-written policies, the company can expect that supervisors and managers will (if properly trained) take approximately the same course of action in similar circumstances. It is not the handbook that is usually at fault but rather the way policies are administered or not administered by management. MARGARET JACOBY, SPHR President, MJ Management Solutions, Inc. Contact by email at: margaret@mjms.net Learn more at: www.mjms.net

PHOENIX METAL TRADING, INC. Industrial Scrap Specialists OUR MISSION: Our mission at Phoenix Metal Trading is to provide the best service at a fair price and to continually improve our company to be a leader in our industry.

EPA and ADEQ Environmental Compliance We Purchase All Types of Scrap:

Copper Brass Aluminum Steel Stainless Steel

Titanium Plastic Cardboard Nickel and Cobalt Alloys

State of the Art Fleet and Plant Equipment Never a charge for pickup

602-257-4660 www.phxmtl.com SCRAP METAL RECYCLING SINCE 1989 • ATMA MEMBER


.................................................................................... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..

Oil Barron Bulletin SPECIAL ADVERTISING FEATURE

VOLUME 10:

Coolant Filtration by BRETT “THE COOLANT GUY” REYNOLDS, CMFS

Let’s talk about coolant filtration and what role it plays in increasing fluid longevity and part quality. Coolants are process fluids which serve as Liquid Tools® which perform various functions in the manufacturing and production process. Coolants provide a wide range of properties and aspects in the part making process; these include lubricating and cooling of the cutting tools and parts being machined. Coolants are also expected to provide excellent corrosion protection to the machine tool and parts; good chip evacuation along with an acceptable level of health and safety. So as you can see, there are heavy demands placed upon a metalworking fluid in order for it to fulfill its critical role in the manufacturing process. During machining, metalworking fluids become heavily contaminated with micron and sub-micron metal particles, as well as tramp oils. These tramp oils can be removed by skimming the free oil from the top of the emulsion, but the metal fines must be addressed by means of filtration. Filtration can come in many different forms and can range from simple decantation tanks and filter media, to more complex high speed centrifuges. Both provide the same end result - the removal of metal fines from the process fluid. But isn’t filtration expensive? In the past the cost of filtration verses the cost of metalworking fluids, was prohibitive for smaller shops to financially realize. However with the rising price of metalworking fluid concentrates and the high costs for spent coolant waste disposal; more companies are becoming aware of the value that filtration can play into decreasing the overall metalworking fluid cost and extending fluid life. So what’s in it for me? Coolant filtration can increase productivity and tool life and is beneficial in helping reduce scrap due to poor surface finish. Filtration increases manufactured part quality; this is due in part to superior surface finishes, thus improving a company’s overall part quality and image. Nice finishes = Happy customers! In the 2nd addition of Coolant Filtration, by James J. Joseph it states “The size of the operation no longer qualifies the need for filtration but it establishes the degree of filtration needed to show an economic return”. So now we see that all manufacturing companies regardless of size should be incorporating some degree of filtration. So the important questions we should be asking ourselves are these… Do I filter my coolant, and if not, why? What increases in productivity and tool life do I stand to gain by doing so? How much longer could my fluids last if I did? By not implementing filtration, you will fail to realize the full potential of your cutting tools and (if equipped) high pressure coolant system, let alone the metalworking fluid you are currently using. Re-cutting chips is not conducive to long tool life and a contaminated fluid does not produce excellent surface finishes. One more item to take into consideration; high levels of metal fines raises the probability for contact dermatitis in the shop environment, thus increasing costs, and profit loss due to employee sick leave and low morale. So if you are still kicking the idea around about whether or not you should purchase a filtration system? My question to you would be… Why wait any longer? Stay tuned for more useful coolant tips, from The Coolant Guy!

BRETT REYNOLDS, “The Coolant Guy” works for Blaser Swisslube Inc. If you would like more uinformation regarding metalworking fluids, or would like to find out more information about Blaser metalworking fluid products, please contact Brett at 801.722.4095 or via email at b.reynolds@blaser.com. The Oil Baron Bulletin is not affiliated with Blaser Swisslube Inc. or its subsidiaries. Learn more at: www.blaser.com and theoilbaronbulletin@blogspot.com

10

PrecisionNews

arizonatooling.org

july/august 2012


THE COOLANT. We are here to help you boost your productivity.

Exclusive distributor for the state of Arizona:

MAGNUM PRECISION MACHINES

Magnum Precision Machines 3614 E. Southern Avenue #1 Phoenix, AZ 85040 Phone (602) 431-8300

B laser S wisslube IInc. nc. Blaser Swisslube G oshen, N ew Y ork 1 0924, P hone 8 45-294-3200, w w w.blaser.com, mailboxusa@blaser.com mailboxusa @ blaser.com Goshen, New York 10924, Phone 845-294-3200, www.blaser.com,


Feature Story //

As I was casting for bass recently, I reflected on how proud I am of my family. It also struck me that I worry about them every day. I can’t help it – they’re part of me.

PrecisionNews

BY ROBERT J. TRACY

GROWING A BUSINESS IS LIKE GROWING A FAMILY I also hear pride and worry in the voices of manufacturing business owners with whom I work. There is tremendous pride in the businesses they have built and the positive impact their companies have on their employees, customers, suppliers, and communities. The people that businesses touch are like family, and in fact, owners even call their companies their “babies.” As with being a family leader, however, owning a business is not always easy, and worrying is part of the job. Raising a family and raising a business are not the same, even if both are extremely challenging and rewarding. However, it is possible to create parallels between these longtime endeavors. Growing up, establishing a work ethic, turning goals into action, focusing on results, and staying the moral course apply to both family and work. GROW AND LEARN Parents want to raise children who grow and learn by pursuing lifelong learning and deep talents that will allow them to be independent and enter into careers with opportunities. They need balanced lives with a broad perspective and skill sets that enable them to adapt to change. A manufacturing business also needs to grow and learn. It must have the talent to produce a product that the market needs today and be able to adapt in the future. One of the biggest challenges many small manufacturers face is that they are very deep in one market with one or two large-order customers, but they lack the broader skill sets that will allow them to adapt if their core markets change. Growing and Learning Action – Build diversification into long-term strategic plans by exploring the world outside your usual sphere. Take short-term action by creating opportunities to add exposure in new and existing markets and by increasing knowledge of new markets. Attend untapped trade shows. Read different magazines and offer to write articles for them. Diversification is challenging, it may take many years to learn and penetrate a new market, but the rewards can be a healthier, sustainable business. A Chinese proverb sums it up well: “The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second-best time is now.”

For better or worse, the world keeps score: Good grades and good credit scores matter. Business results matter, too.

12

PrecisionNews

arizonatooling.org

july/august 2012

D E V E L O P A P O S ITI V E AT TI TU D E TO WA R D S W O R K Children are taught that there’s no substitute for hard work, as good intentions and natural talent only take one so far. Hard work is a key ingredient for long-term success and a passion for quality is a direct reflection of character. Manufacturing cultures benefit from this same philosophy, although manufacturers are strikingly different when it comes to attitudes towards work. An environment where hard work is expected, encouraged, and rewarded becomes a place of innovation. Leaders who inspire people to achieve great things and set high expectations for each individual create breakthrough – and repeat – performances. When leaders have high expectations and provide inspiring environments where talented, independent people can thrive and grow, they break through barriers and lay the groundwork for success. On the other hand, workplaces that are overly controlling are slower to adapt and harder to sustain Developing a Positive Attitude Action – Walk through your shop and objectively assess the energy and engagement of your people. Once you have a picture of their overall level of performance, it’s time to take a good hard look in the mirror to understand how your leadership is reinforcing the current environment – positively and negatively. A trusted advisor or personal coach can help you maintain objectivity throughout this process and plot a course of action to help you build a truly high-performance team. I M P L E M E NT L O N G -TE R M G O A L S When it comes to raising kids, parents are good at breaking down longterm goals into short-term actions. For example, a child’s education stems from curriculum, classes, and daily work assignments. Business leaders, however, sometimes struggle to break down strategy into action steps. They pour endless hours into developing strategic plans that sit on a shelf. They do not take the essential steps in strategic planning: translating long-term goals into short-term actions. Companies that excel at the execution of strategy often have a management mechanism that facilitates the ongoing implementation of strategic tactics. Lean manufacturers employ hoshin kanri (policy deployment or strategy deployment). Traction: Getting a Grip on Your Business by Gino Wickman outlines such an approach for implementing strategy.


Implementing Long-Term Goals Action – Pull together your leadership team to review your company’s strategic and current-year plans and clarify the gaps between the current state and future goals. Once the gap is clear, identify the key actions that will be taken to close the gap. Focus on five to seven key initiatives. Finally, determine the actions that everyone will take in the next 90 days to move towards each goal. Complete these actions and move to the next step. By repeating this process every 90 days, your team will move steadily toward its goals. PAY AT TE N TI O N TO R E S U LT S For better or worse, the world keeps score: Good grades and good credit scores matter. Business results matter, too. When a business owner is trying to get funding to expand or is considering selling the business, financial results are important. Profits, of course, are a primary measure of business performance, as they allow for lower debt, more investment, and rewards for employees and shareholders. Unfortunately, the path to improving profitability can be as challenging as helping a child get better grades. For example, many contract manufacturers do not have a complete understanding of how the gross margin of an individual product impacts the overall profitability of the company. Standard cost accounting can sometimes lead manufacturers to turn away business that appears to be unprofitable on paper but in reality would substantially improve profits. Likewise, manufacturers sometimes take on business that looks to be profitable only to watch profits become stagnate or even shrink. Paying Attention to Results Action – Develop a plan to shift from a traditional, standard-cost system to one that is based more on direct costs. These systems are sometimes referred to as value-stream cost models, lean accounting, or direct costing. There are several good books on the topic, including: Who’s Counting? A Lean Accounting Business Novel by Jerrold Solomon; Real Numbers: Management Accounting in a Lean Organization by Jean Cunningham, and Practical Lean Accounting: A Proven System for Measuring and Managing the Lean Enterprise by Brian Maskell. continued on page 24


TITANIUM alloys are more demanding to machine compared to most other workpiece materials. In addition, the components involved often have quite complex features to be machined. As such, titanium components are not difficult to machine using the right means and methods, just more challenging and in need of a different approach. And this, not just to successfully achieve machining, but to do each phase as effectively as possible, with maximum security and consistently to the right quality level - in other words, more competitively.

Cover Story // PrecisionNews

Milling dominates as machining method for many titanium components, especially aerospace structural parts, and is an area where a lot of development has taken place recently, providing opportunities in manufacturing. In this first part, some newly developed milling tools will be in focus and in the second part, suitable application methods and programming with which to obtain the best performance and results will be discussed. /// PLANNING TO MEET THE CHALLENGE Titanium machining has up to now, for various reasons, been characterized by a conservative outlook. As such it did not follow a similar progressive development as has been the case with machining in most other materials and manufacturing areas. Being a challenging material to machine, many of the components being complex, highly security oriented and with specific quality issues have all meant that a safe approach was seen as the best strategy. However, with the larger number of titanium components, leading to a growing number of machine shops machining titanium and the need to be more competitive as a manufacturer, a new approach to productivity is inevitable. FROM THE PN EDITORS & SANDVIK COROMANT

NEW STEPS TO COMPETITIVE MILLING IN TITANIUM TITANIUM ALLOYS ARE MUCH MORE DEMANDING TO MACHINE WHEN COMPARED TO MOST OTHER WORKPIECE MATERIALS. IN ADDITION, THE COMPONENTS INVOLVED OFTEN HAVE QUITE COMPLEX FEATURES TO BE MACHINED. AS SUCH, TITANIUM COMPONENTS ARE NOT DIFFICULT TO MACHINE USING THE RIGHT MEANS AND METHODS, JUST MORE CHALLENGING AND IN NEED OF A DIFFERENT APPROACH. AND THIS, NOT JUST TO SUCCESSFULLY ACHIEVE MACHINING, BUT TO DO EACH PHASE AS EFFECTIVELY AS POSSIBLE, WITH MAXIMUM SECURITY AND CONSISTENTLY TO THE RIGHT QUALITY LEVEL - IN OTHER WORDS, MORE COMPETITIVELY.

14

PrecisionNews

arizonatooling.org

july/august 2012

When titanium is the workpiece material, it is above all a more comprehensive, detailed level of planning machining operations that is needed. The basic machining factors are similar to those arising with other materials but titanium has characteristics that make metal cutting not difficult, but unique and more challenging. Here, factors such as the capability values for machine tools, components size and features, fixturing, programming, choice of tool and method as well as the coolant-capacity are more acutely decisive as to the outcome of machining. /// IMPROVING PERFORMANCE... ...in titanium-alloy machining depends upon how well the challenges presented by the material are met with suitable cutting tools and machining methods. This is, of course, the case with all workpiece materials but with titanium, the risks from the material properties means that machining needs more rigorous attention with dedicated tools and methods. Moreover, if improved manufacturing competitiveness is an ambition, modern solutions are more essential.


To start with, the general machining rules of thumb for titanium are: • Limit the machining temperature through cutting speed to within the means of the tool being used. • Extending relatively shorter tool-life is a critical issue in titanium machining. • Use relatively sharp cutting edges to reduce the effects of the high frictioncoefficient of titanium. • Optimize metal removal rate and cutting time through the feed rate and avoid idling during tool engagement with material. • Limit machining temperature through the correct use of coolant; correctly applied high pressure coolant is the best. • Replace cutting edges at very early stages of tool wear.

/// NEW DIMENSIONS TO RADIAL ROUGH-MILLING There is a lot to be gained from considering an alternative method and tool for an operation by using better suited radial and axial cutter engagements, entries and exits. For example, a smaller radial engagement combined with a larger axial engagement is in many cases an advantage in two-dimensional milling. This is because the modern, for-titanium-dedicated long-edge milling cutter is generally the best tool for rough milling of external and internal faces, edges, profiles and deep shoulders. A new cutter has newly developed sharp insert geometries and coated insert grades, intended for higher feed possibilities, longer, safer tool-lives and lower power requirement. There are two new major advantages with the mentioned type of new long-edge milling cutter: insert location and locking with individual high-pressure coolant supply.

• Program machining using kind-for-the-tool while optimum processes. • Follow recommended values for maximum chip thickness and feed per tooth for the tools in question. /// FOR PLANNING THE MILLING PROCESS... ...a number of points need to be addressed when the component and machine tool are being assessed. As a universal machining process today, milling represents several different types of operations which means that a larger number of factors can be varied to achieve the best result: • Milling cutter concept, type, size, geometry, number of teeth.

The need for extra stability for inserts in the cutter when milling titanium and the inherent weakness of long-edge cutters to withstand axial cutting forces has warranted the development of a dedicated tool solution. Inserts have been provided with newly designed support with the elimination of insert micro-movement in the seat. This means a new level of machining security combined with the potential for higher productivity through the possibility to machine at higher feed rates. The new insert location and locking concept in the cutter keeps close insert alignment in the cutter absolutely fixed in place and minimizes the risk of bottom insert-row failure, as is too often typical in this type of tool for these applications.

• Insert geometry and grade. • Tool holding, machine interface, integrated tools, coolant supply and modularity. • Programming, based on process establishing followed by simulation. • Cutting data, starting values, evaluation and optimization. Starting with the component to be machined, the planning process can be commenced with a description of the features to be milled: size, surfaces, two- and/or three-dimensional requirements, cavity sizes, character and depths, wall heights and thicknesses, grooves and slots, intermittent cuts, corner radii and surface quality limits. The most suitable machine tool should be selected on the basis of having sufficient power and torque capacity – especially at the spindle speed ranges, the milling cutter diameters and feed rates being considered. Sufficient spindle capacity, a suitable interface and internal coolant supply, along with the machine coolant-pump capability as regards volume and pressure, are all vital to good titanium milling practice and can be determined according to the tooling. As regards milling methods, there is today a wide selection to suit component features and the machine in question. In addition to face and square-shoulder milling, there are various ways to mill profiles, cavities and grooves: radial milling, linear and circular ramping, circular milling, plunge milling, peck milling, high-feed milling, and slicing of cavities and corners. Some of the methods are relatively new, evolved with CNC and multi-axis machining, and well suited to machining titanium - thanks to newly developed cutting tool concepts and application knowhow.

A big advantage also lies in that there is a coolant supply directed at high pressure for each cutting edge. In machine tools that can supply a coolant supply to and through the tool at a pressure of 50 to 70 bars, this cutter provides a considerable boost to performance by keeping cutting zone temperatures down, allowing for higher cutting speeds, prolonging tool-life considerably and smoother evacuation of chips to prevent the hazard of chip re-cutting. The somewhat higher investment in a modern, titanium-dedicated long-edge milling cutter - as opposed to a broader, general-purpose long-edge cutter - is paid back quickly when machining commences. /// ON THE TOOL-MATERIAL SIDE... ...developments have provided a series of indexable-insert grades dedicated for titanium milling that provides broad coverage. This, to cope with the varying demands that are encountered in the different milling titanium-component features. Two new insert grades dedicated to better performance in the face of the demands of milling titanium alloys have been introduced recently to complement existing, established grades. Although uncoated inserts have dominated in titanium milling, tool-material development has now come up with a new generation of coated grades that provides improvements in different directions – higher cutting speed in combination with longer tool-life alternatively, extra cutting edge strength for difficult conditions.

OPPOSITE: CoroMill 690 is developed specifically for high-

productivity 2D profile milling of titanium components

july/august 2012

arizonatooling.org

PrecisionNews

15


continued from page 15

TO BE COMPETITIVE, IT IS NOT ENOUGH TODAY TO ACHIEVE A SUCCESSFUL MACHINING PROCESS, TITANIUM MILLING HAS TO BE PERFORMED AS EFFICIENTLY AS POSSIBLE AND WITH MAXIMUM SECURITY, CONSISTENTLY TO THE RIGHT QUALITY LEVEL.

Different coating techniques have been used to arrive at these two titanium-dedicated insert grades. A sharp insert-edge, on an insert made of PVD-coated micro-grain carbide, has been shown to better resist the wear that dominates with higher speeds and longer cutter engagements. More difficult machining conditions, on the other hand, may include unfavorable cuts, entries, exits and even vibration tendencies and make completely different demands on the edge to achieve good productivity. A new CVD-coated insert grade, with a tough substrate, will stand up to these, more demanding cuts, providing a more secure, predictable tool-life. /// FOR SMALLER DIMENSIONS... ...needing small-diameter milling cutters, the conventional solution has been in the form of solid end mills, in cemented carbide as well as high speed steel. The solid carbide end mill has undergone considerable development in later years with geometries and grades dedicated to titanium milling. The disadvantage with these end mills is the long, slender tool length and that the tool in its entity is made from the tool material, negatively affecting stability, flexibility and tool cost. In the area overlapped by solid carbide end mills and indexable insert end mills – 10 to 25 mm – there is today a complimentary solution for many application in titanium milling: end mills with exchangeable heads. As regards type of operations and finish requirements, indexable insert cutters are flexible, high-metal-removal-rate tools, well suited for most operations while solid carbide cutters have close tooltolerances and can provide high finishes and accuracy, especially at large axial depths of cut thanks to long, ground radial cutting edges. End mills with exchangeable heads provide advantages from both tool types. The exchangeable head concept achieves indexability as well as accuracy, lending itself to any type of milling operation, with the exception of extensive side and face milling, limited-space operations requiring long tool reach and super-finishing. The solid carbide end mill remains the best choice where a long radial edge or slender reach is needed such as to machine closed pockets and light cutting at large axial depths of cut in operations like semi-finishing to super-finishing operations. Developments here have provided variable flute design with radial relief and various helix geometries for smooth cutting action and chip evacuation with internal coolant in titanium. Suitable tool-radii options for milling the profile and radius in fillets are invaluable when performing two-dimensional roughing in very confined cavities as well as four- and five-axis milling in closed pockets.

16

PrecisionNews

arizonatooling.org

july/august 2012

The indexable insert end mill, on the other hand, remains the best for general high-productive roughing to semi-finishing operations. The metal removal rate of exchangeable-head end mills is higher than that of solid carbide cutters while surface finish and precision capability is better than that of indexable insert cutters. The best concept has been achieved by a head based on a modern solid carbide tool concept, in this way achieving indexability as well as good accuracy. /// FLEXIBLE, STRONG AND COST-EFFECTIVE The modern exchangeable-head end mill is establishing itself in an important complimentary position offering several advantages for titanium milling. It does not have the long, spiral chip-channels of solid carbide end mills with a shank, which inevitably results in a relatively weak tool-core. It does, however, have some of the advantages of the indexable cutter but without the need for the loose parts of an insert-seat, with clamping screw or mechanism. If a solid carbide end mill breaks, it represents a substantial tool cost because the whole tool has to be replaced – the exchangeable head costs considerably less. Solid carbide tools are reground, representing loss of tool diameter, position and costs, whereas the small tool-head is used once, exchanged for a new one, and recycled when worn out.

a standard 340T milling insert manufactured by Sandvik Coromant

Flexibility is a big advantage of the exchangeablehead end mill. Changing tools is easy and quick in the machine or in the tool-room and the tool precision ensures cutting edge position. The balance between tool accessibility and stability is easily optimized with exchangeable-head end mills. Selecting the most suitable tool shank adapts the cutter to either long tool reach or to high rigidity through minimal-length tool shank. Key points for success with end mills having exchangeable heads are: • The design of the coupling between head and shank, including points such as a specially developed thread-profile and the stability from full-face contact. • The strength, precision and program of milling heads, to optimize roughing to finishing and to cover the majority of operation types. • The range of shanks available, for example, including solid-carbide shanks having good rigidity at tool overhangs of four to five times the tool-diameter. continued on page 28


Proven Experience. Certified Quality. Dependable Service.

Specialty Metals Leadership. Supply Chain Innovation.

1140 ATMA_0202_FINAL_Layout 1 6/18/11 7:02 AM Page 19E. Washington St.,

Suite 205, Phoenix, AZ 85034 602-864-0014 • 800-203-8000 twmetals.com

• Machining Excellence since 1997 • ISO 9001 + AS9100B Certified • Experienced senior machinists • Experts in stainless, aluminum, plastics and exotics • 8A Certified, Viet Nam Vet, Minority Owned Small Business • Eager to provide you with quality performance and quick responses

Contact Nichols at 480-804-0593 www.nicholsprecision.com

july/august 2012

arizonatooling.org

PrecisionNews

17


................................................................................................................................... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..

Shop Floor NEWS FROM THE FRONT LINES

Accident Investigations What happened here? And do I really want to know? from THE ATMA SAFETY COMMITTEE

It was an accident, right? I mean, accidents happen, the word itself means that it wasn’t on purpose. So why spend the time to investigate? I am a pretty busy person and it already takes forever to fill out the OSHA log and forms.

• A good accident investigation is about prevention, not who is to blame.

• Be prompt, investigate immediately. Get employee statement, interview witnesses as soon as possible.

• Determine the who, what, where and when and WHY. It is common for employers to think, that is why I have insurance, when an employee is injured or becomes ill in the workplace, and they file a claim, end of story.

fyi: As the owner or manager of a small business, your attitude toward job safety and health will be reflected by your employees. - OSHA

All of the above is true, accidents happen; it is time consuming to fill out all the forms. Adding one more thing on the “to do” list is overwhelming and we do have the insurance. Taking the time for accident investigations, that are designed to find the root cause of incidents in your workplace, can and will save you. The time spent on an investigation versus the cost associated with additional incidents is always beneficial. If your company does not already have a policy to investigate, or if you have one but don’t always utilize it; consider the following:

• To serve the purpose you should always investigate all injuries (even minor ones), all accidents with potential for injury and incidents that resulted in property damage.

• Take pictures if necessary when incidents occur. • Utilize your safety committee for the investigation – keep in mind confidentiality matters.

• Share the results (keep the names of those involved confidential) .

• Learn from the results. Do the procedures or processes need to be changed?

• Train the employees to work so that similar incidents are avoided. All workplace incidents cost employers more than just the work comp insurance premiums, lost production and/or down time is costly. Taking the time to investigate the root cause will pay off in the end. Your ATMA Safety Committee is available to assist or contact with any questions. Osha.gov is also an excellent source of information, type in “accident investigation” in their search menu for additional info.

• There are times when OSHA requires them. For example, if there is a death and/or 3 employees or more are hospitalized.

18

PrecisionNews

arizonatooling.org

july/august 2012

Learn more at: www.osha.gov and www.arizonatooling.org


ATMA_0202_FINAL_Layout 1 6/18/11 7:07 AM Page 32

ONE STOP SHOP

Are you looking for? ELECTROLESS NICKEL BRIGHT NICKEL PASSIVATION CHEM FILM - CLEAR OR YELLOW COPPER or CHROME PLATING POWDERCOATING POLISHING GLASSBEADING VIBRATORY DEBURRING or FINISHING ULTRASONIC CLEANING PRE & POST BAKE STRESS RELIEVE PAINT/NICKEL/CHROME STRIPPING Pick up and delivery upon request.

L.A. SPECIALTIES, INC. 4223 North 40th Avenue, Phoenix, Arizona 85019

602-269-7612 barry@laspecialties.com • www.laspecialties.com Please feel free to contact us. We will be happy to assist.

july/august 2012

arizonatooling.org

PrecisionNews

19


PrecisionNews Presents

WEBSITES THAT WORK FOR YOU

ATMA PRECISION 2012 ATMA BOARD OF DIRECTORS President DANTE FIERROS Nichols Precision

Arizona Chapter Website arizonatooling.org Arizona Commerce Authority -Job Training Grant Application azcommerce.com/workforce Arizona Department of Education azed.gov

Vice President DAVID LAIR Dynamic Machine & Fabricating Executive Director CHRIS MIGNELLA

Arizona Manufacturers Council azchamber.com/amc Arizona Manufacturing Apprentice Program AzMap.org or gnhenninger@azmap.org Arizona State University Mechanical & Manufacturing Engineering Technology poly.asu.edu/technology/mmet/ City of Phoenix – Community & Economic Development Program phoenix.gov/ECONDEV/index.html EVIT (East Valley Institute of Technology) evit.com GateWay Community College gatewaycc.edu

Trustee MARK WEATHERS Excaliber Precision Machining Secretary JOHN O’LEARY Arizona Industries for the Blind Treasurer GREG CHAMBERS Noranco Jet Processing BOARD MEMBERS Bob Marusiak Micro-Tronics, Inc. John Raycraft Arizona Precision Industrial

Greater Phoenix Chamber of Commerce phoenixchamber.com Maricopa Community Colleges maricopa.edu

Jeremy Lutringer Unique Machine & Tool Gary Watkins MarZee

Maricopa Workforce Connection maricopaworkforceconnection.com

Joseph Koenig Exactitude, LLC

Mesa Community College mc.maricopa.edu

Bruce Treicher Zircon Precision

National Institute for Metalworking Standards nims-skills.org NTMA - National Tooling & Machining Association ntma.org NTMA - San Diego Chapter ntmasandiegochapter.org

NTMA - North Texas Chapter ntmanorthtexas.org

P.O. Box 3518 Scottsdale, AZ 85271 Office: 602.388.5752

National Robotics League gonrl.org

ExecutiveDirector@arizonatooling.org

One Voice Advocacy metalworkingadvocate.org

PrecisionNews

TM

U.S. Department of Labor dol.gov

PrecisionNews

arizonatooling.org

ATMA Ambassador Maxine Jones mjones14@cox.net Arizona Tooling & Machining Association A Chapter of the National Tooling & Machining Association

NTMA - San Francisco Chapter sfbantma.org

20

Associate Member Liaison Kerry Vance Consolidated Resources, Inc.

THE RIGHT TOOLS. THE RIGHT TEAM. THE RIGHT TIME.

arizonatooling.org

july/august 2012


PrecisionNews // ARIZONA TOOLING & MACHINING ASSOCIATION

MEMBER LISTINGS REGULAR MEMBERS Hein Tran

3D Machine & Tools

480-329-8254

Tom Osborn

Osborn Products, Inc.

623-587-0335

Dave Wright

Accuwright

480-892-4595

Jennifer Ayres

Phoenix Analysis & Design Tech.

480-813-4884

Sal Kielbus

Aerospace Contacts, LLC

480-967-1025

Steve Macias

Pivot Manufacturing

602-306-2923

Chuck Eriksen

Allied Tool & Die Company, LLC

602-276-2439

James Buchanan

Powill Manufacturing & Eng, Inc.

623-780-4100

John Raycraft

Arizona Precision Industrial, LLC

480-785-7474

Ilene Price

Precise Metal Products Co.

602-272-2625

Charles A. Van Horssen

Axian Technology, Inc.

623-580-0800

Roy Stenger

Precision Aerospace

602-352-8658

John O’Leary

AZ Industries for the Blind

602-269-5131

Tony Costabile

Precision Die & Stamping, Inc.

480-967-2038

Paul Bowman

B3 Precision, LLC

480-250-3366

Michael Dailey

Prescott Aerospace, Inc.

928-772-7605

Kevin Burbas

B&B Tool, Inc

520-397-0436

Tyler Crouse

Pro Precision

602-353-0022

Jeff Buntin

Barnes Aerospace - Apex Mfg. Div.

602-305-8080

Zach Wilsterman

Profile Tool & Engineering

480-894-1008

Norela Harrington

Bent River Machine, Inc.

928-634-7568

John Bloom

R & D Specialty/Manco

602-278-7700

Eric Stroot

Bolt’s Metallizing

602-244-2432

Paul Shelton

Shelton Industries

520-408-8026

Misty Curry

C & W Manufacturing

602-437-2929

Mark Willmering

Sonic Aerospace, Inc.

480-777-1789

Keith Adams

C.G. Tech, Inc.

623-492-9400

Jeff Gaffney

Southwest Swiss Precision

602-438-4670

Greg Gaudet

CAD Tools Company, LLC

480-753-4290

Steven Yeary

Southwest Turbine, Inc.

602-278-7442

Joe Cassavant, Jr.

Cassavant Machining

602-437-4005

Mike Gudin

Southwest Water Jet

480-306-7748

Steve Schwartzkopf

Chips, Inc.

602-233-1335

Ruben Cadena

State Industrial Products, Inc.

602-275-0990

Kim Rice

Cling’s Manufacturing

480.968.1778

Dennis Miller

Summit Precision, Inc.

602-268-3550

Ron Gilmore

Continental Precision, Inc.

602-278-4725

Scott Higginbotham

Sun Grinding LLC

602-238-9595

Allen Kiesel

Creative Precision West

623-587-9400

Craig Berland

Systems 3, Inc.

480-894-2581

Daniel Krings

Deck Machine & Tool, Inc.

602-253-1080

Karl Szanto

Tech Mold

480-968-8691

David Lair

Dynamic Machine & Fabricating

602-437-0339

Todd Aaronson

TMA Precsion Tube

623-221-4922

Diana Buchanon-Lovett

Eclipse Carbide, Inc.

480-214-3719

Jacque Cowin

Tram-Tek, Inc.

602-305-8100

Grant Evans

Evans Precision Machining, Inc.

623-581-6200

Walt Ahland

TriPlex, LLC

480-930-3493

Joseph J. Koenig

Exactitude, LLC

602-316-6957

Rick Lorenzen

Tri Star Design & Mfg.

480-345-1699

Mark Weathers

Excaliber Precision Machining

623-878-6800

Jeremy Lutringer

Unique Machine & Tool Co.

602-470-1911

Jeff Hull

Foresight Technologies

480-967-0080

Bill Ankrom

Vitron Manufacturing, Inc.

602-548-9661

Tim Malin

Helm Precision, Ltd.

602-275-2122

Robert L.Wagner

Wagner Engineering, Inc.

480-926-1761

Jeremy Schaulk

Hi-Tech Machning & Engineering

520-889-8325

Denise & Bob Wright

Wright Prototype

623-825-8671

Don Theriault

Industrial Tool Die & Engineering

520-745-8771

Bruce Treichler

Zircon Precision Products

480-967-8688

Joseph Sirochman

JPS Manufacturing

480-367-9540

Jeff Barth

JWB Manufacturing

480-967-4600

Jim Carpenter

Kimberly Gear & Spline, Inc.

602-437-3085

Don Kammerzell

K-zell Metals, Iinc.

602-232-5882

Matt Kalina

LAI International, Inc

480-348-5942

Ernest Apodaca

Layke, Inc.

602-272-2654

John Lewis

Lewis Aerospace

623-581-0764

Michael C. Majercak, Jr.

Majer Precision

480-777-8222

Edward Wenz

MarZee, Inc.

602-269-5801

Arle Rawlings

Mastercraft Mold, Inc.

602-484-4520

Paul Clark

Metal Spinning Solutions, Inc.

480-899-0939

Jeff Meade

Metalcraft

480-967-4889

Joe Tripi

Micropulse West

602-438-9770

Robert Marusiak

Micro-Tronics, Inc.

602-437-8995

Mark Lashinske

Modern Industries, Inc.

602-267-7248

ATMA EVENTS IN JULY/AUGUST 2012 Safety Team Meeting > 7/17 @ 11:30am (Leavitt) Membership/Mktng & Program Mtng > 7/19 @ 4:00pm Fiesta Inn/Raintree Room 4:00pm - 5:30pm Board of Directors Mtng > 7/24 @ 4:00pm (MicroTronics) Dinner Meeting > 7/25 @ Dave & Busters; Dinner, Speaker & Games ! Desert Ridge 5-8 pm Precision News Articles/Ads Due > 8/20 Safety Team Meeting > 8/14 @ 11:30am (Foresight)

Phillip LoCascio

National Aviation

480-966-1097

Membership/Mktng & Program Mtng > 8/16 @ 4:00pm Fiesta Inn/Raintree Room 4:00pm - 5:30pm

John Anglin

Nelson Engineering

602-273-7114

Board of Directors Mtng > 8/21 @ 4:00pm (MicroTronics)

Dante Fierros

Nichols Precision

480-804-0593

Greg Chambers

Noranco Jet Processing

623-869-6749

John Maris

NorthStar/D-Velco

602-275-4406

For more information contact Chris Mignella at: ExecutiveDirector@arizonatooling.org

july/august 2012

arizonatooling.org

PrecisionNews

21


MARK YOUR CALENDAR WITH THESE

PrecisionNews // ARIZONA TOOLING & MACHINING ASSOCIATION

UPCOMING ATMA EVENTS! MARK YOUR CALENDAR WITH THESE

UPCOMING ATMA EVENTS!

MAY 5/11 Safety Meeting (General Safety Standards) 11:30 at Phoenix Heat Treat, 2450 W. Mohave, Phoenix

MEMBER LISTINGS

5/12MAY Combined Membership, Marketing & Program Meeting 11:30-1:00 atSafety Foresight Technologies, 5/11 Safety Meeting (General Standards) 11:30 at Phoenix Heat Treat, 2450 W. Mohave, Phoenix 1301 W. Geneva, Tempe

ATMA_0202_FINAL_Layout 1 6/18/11 7:04 AM Page 23

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS

5/12 Combined Membership, Marketing & Program

5/17 Board of Directors Meeting 11:30-1:00 Meeting at Foresight11:30-1:00 Technologies,at Micro-Tronics, 2905 S. Potter, Tempe, 85282 1301 W. Geneva, Tempe

Linda Daly

A 2 Z Metalworker

602.412.7696

Richard Short

Adams Machinery

480.968.3711

Greg Whelan

Arizona CNC Equipment

480.615.6353

John Anderson

ATS Industrial

Isaac Bunney

Bank of America

JUNE Airport Hilton, 2435 S. 47th Street, Phoenix JUNE Safety Meeting (General Safety Standards) 11:30 602.276.7707 MARK YOUR CALENDAR 6/08 WITH THESE 6/08 Safety Meeting (General Safety 11:30 at Leavitt Group, 919 N. 1stStandards) St., Phoenix 602.523.2044

Howie Basuk

Barry Metals

602.484.7186

Board of Directors Meeting 5:00-8:00pm 11:30-1:00 at at Phoenix 5/255/17 General Dinner Meeting Micro-Tronics, S. Potter, Tempe, 85282 Airport Hilton,2905 2435 S. 47th Street, Phoenix

Get Turned-On to the ATMA! Chris Mignella at: UPCOMINGContact ExecutiveDirector@arizonatooling.org ATMA EVENTS! 5/25 General Dinner Meeting 5:00-8:00pm at Phoenix

at Leavitt Group, 919 N. 1st St., Phoenix

6/09 Combined Membership, Marketing & Program 6/09 Combined Membership, Marketing & Program Meeting Foresight Technologies, Meeting11:30-1:00 11:30-1:00 atat Foresight Technologies, 1301 W.W.Geneva, Tempe 1301 Geneva, Tempe

Marc Bissell

CadCam/Geometric

480.222.2242

James Burriss

ChemResearch Co., Inc.

602.288.0394

Kerry Vance

Consolidated Resources

MAY 623.931.5009

Cindy Stewart

Creative Promotions

6/29 Standards) General Meeting AirportDinner Hilton, 2435 S. 47th5:00-8:00pm Street, Phoenixat Phoenix 5/11 Safety Meeting (General Safety 11:30 480.839.9511

Lou Gallo

D D i - Solidworks

602.241.0900

Randy Flores

D&R Machinery

480.775.6462

Steve Warner

EMJ Metals

5/12 Combined Membership, Marketing & Program TO OUR 2012 ATMA VALUED Meeting 11:30-1:00 at Foresight Technologies, 602.272.0461 1301 W. Geneva, Tempe

Mickey Gartman

Gartman Technical Services, Inc.

602.788.8121 5/17 Board of Directors Meeting 11:30-1:00 at

Jackie Bergman

HUB International

Micro-Tronics, 2905 S. Potter, Tempe, 85282 602.749.4190

Anna-Lena Seedhill

IFLEX Resource Management

5/25 General Dinner Meeting 5:00-8:00pm at Phoenix 602.412.7696

David Cohen

Industrial Metal Supply

602.454.1500

Tim Kloenne

Klontech Industrial Sales

480.948.1871

Barry Armstrong

L.A. Specialties

JUNE 6/08 Safety Meeting (General Safety Standards) 11:30 602.269.7612 at Leavitt Group, 919 N. 1st St., Phoenix

David Hopkins

CliftonLarsonAllen, LLP

480.615.2300 6/09 Combined Membership, Marketing & Program

Leavitt Group

Meeting 11:30-1:00 at Foresight Technologies, 602.264.0566 1301 W. Geneva, Tempe

Bob Von Fleckinger

Board Directors Meeting 11:30-1:00 at 6/216/21 Board ofofDirectors Meeting 11:30-1:00 at Micro-Tronics, 2905 S. Potter, Tempe, 85282 Micro-Tronics, 2905 S. Potter, Tempe, 85282 6/29 General Dinner Meeting 5:00-8:00pm at Phoenix

2435 S. 47th Street, Phoenix at Phoenix HeatMANY Treat, 2450THANKS W. Airport Mohave,Hilton, Phoenix

Airport Hilton, 2435 S. 47th Street, Phoenix

Jeff Trimble

Magnum Precision Machines

602.431.8300

David Gundersen

Makino, Inc.

602.228.0347 Micro-Tronics, 2905 S. Potter, Tempe, 85282

Michael Biesk

Marshall Tool

602.269.6295 6/29 General Dinner Meeting 5:00-8:00pm at Phoenix

Thomas Moore

Moore Tool & Equipment

Airport Hilton, 2435 S. 47th Street, Phoenix 602.455.8904

Glen Zachman

North-South Machinery

602.466.2556

Pete Hushek

Phoenix Heat Treating

602.258.7751

Scott Sherman

Phoenix Metal Trading

602.257.4660

Jim Perlow

Quality Advisory Services

602.910.1510

Arlene Helt

Ryerson-Phoenix

602.455.3386

Ron Swartzbaugh

S&S Machinery

602.714.0116

Jane Rousculp

Samuel Aerospace Metals

602.721.0176

Frank Encinas

Semiray

602.275.1917

Russ Kurzawski

Star Metal Fluids LLC

602.256.2092

David Senkfor

Top Gun Consulting

602.510.5998

John Drain

Tornquist Machinery Co.

602.470.0334

TW Metals

602.864.0014

Doug Pratt

Ulbrich Stainless Steel & Spec.

203.234.3464

Joseph Velez

Law Office of Velez

480.710.5079

Daniel Franks

Wells Fargo Bank

602.522.7805

ARIZONA SPONSOR MEMBERS Greg Kolton

Bank of Arizona

Jeff Anderson

National Bank of Arizona

623.872.2546

Jackie Bergman

HUB International

602.749.4190

480.459.2826

501.952.9391

Bennet Cromer

Federated Insurance

Jon Gale

CliftonLarsonAllen, LLP

480.615.2300

Ward Hickey

Heritage Bank

602.852.3462

David Pettycrew

Republic Indemnity

602.242.4602

Steve Piotter

MSC Industrial Tool

480.755.0415

PrecisionNews

arizonatooling.org

july/august 2012

MANY THANKS

TO OUR 2011 ATMA MANY THAN VALUED SPONSORS!

TO OUR 2011 ATM VALUED SPONSOR

6/21 Board of Directors Meeting 11:30-1:00 at

Greg Burke

22

SPONSORS:

MANY THANKS TO OUR 2011 ATMA VALUED SPONSORS!


Welcome! NEW REGULAR MEMBERS

Phoenix Analysis & Design Technologies Ms. Jennifer Ayres, Business Development Manager 7755 S. Research Dr. Suite 110 Tempe, AZ 85284 480.813.4884 jennifer.ayres@padtinc.com www.padtinc.com

Precision Aerospace Mr. Roy Stenger, Vice President Sales/Contracts 3011 W. Windsor Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85009 602.352.8658 roy@precisionaerospace.com www.precisionaerospace.com

Welcome! NEW ASSOCIATE MEMBERS

Quality Advisory Services Mr. Jim Perlow 8343 W. Via Montoya Drive Peoria, AZ 85383 602.910.1510 Jperlow.qas@cox.net

IFLEX Resource Management Anna-Lena Seedhill 3407 N. Navajo Trail Scottsdale, AZ 85251 602.412.7696 alseedhill@hotmail.com

/

/

A CUT ABOVE.

///////////////////////////////////////////////// We have the capabilities and the skills to get any job done.

ATMA WANTS YOU TO SAVE THE DATE! MEMBER APPRECIATION DINNER: SEPTEMBER 26, 2012 4:30 - 7:30 PM

CNC Machining 5-Axis Machining Multi-Spindle Machining Lights Out Machining Blade and Blisk Machining Electro-Discharge Machining Laser Machining Waterjet Machining Sheet Metal Fabrication Gun Drilling Jig Bore/Jig Grind Hydroforming Cylindrical Grinding Surface Grinding Curvic Grinding Tool Grinding Thread Grinding Creep Feed Grinding Chemical Milling

Swiss Turning Micro-Machining Honeycomb Seals Tube Bending High Speed Stamping Sand Casting Investment Casting Molded Rubber Plastic Injection Molding Rapid Prototyping Balancing Electromechanical Assembly Clean Room Assembly Wire Harness Production MIG/TIG Welding Resistance Welding Hydrogen Brazing Vacuum Brazing Laser Welding

Electron Beam Welding Heat Treating Vacuum Heat Treat Nitriding Shot Peening Cryogenic Processing Plasma Spray Coating HVOF Coating Diffused Aluminide Coating Electroless Nickel Plating Hard Chrome Plating Cadmium Plating Silver Plating Copper Plating Anodizing Phosphating Black Oxide Dri-Lube Painting

/

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// Arizona Tooling & Machining Association

Contact the Arizona Tooling and Machining Association and discover how you can put work unique skill-set to work in Arizona and give your company the Competive Edge.

ATMA

CHRIS MIGNELLA, ATMA EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR PO Box 3518, Scottsdale, Arizona 85271 USA / phone: 602.388.5752

PRECISION

executivedirector@arizonatooling.org

july/august 2012

arizonatooling.org

arizonatooling.org

PrecisionNews

23


MARK YOUR//CALENDAR WITH THESE Feature Story

UPCOMING ATMA EVENTS!

PrecisionNews

MAY 5/11 Safety Meeting (General Safety Standards) 11:30 at Phoenix Heat Treat, 2450 W. Mohave, Phoenix

GROWING A BUSINESS Combined Membership, IS LIKE5/12GROWING A FAMILYMarketing & Program Meeting 11:30-1:00 at Foresight Technologies, continued from1301 pageW. 13Geneva, Tempe

5/17 Board of Directors Meeting 11:30-1:00 at S E T A M O R A L Micro-Tronics, C O M PA S S 2905 S. Potter, Tempe, 85282 Teaching5/25 honesty, integrity, andMeeting respect may be the most General Dinner 5:00-8:00pm at Phoenix fundamental aspect of parenting. Seeing the good in Phoenix others and Airport Hilton, 2435 S. 47th Street, having the courage of one’s convictions are essential for a successful JUNE life – and6/08 business. A strong ethical foundation and moral compass Safety Meeting (General Safety Standards) 11:30 sustain people and companies through the decades and into the at Leavitt Group, 919 N. 1st St., Phoenix next generation. 6/09 Combined Membership, Marketing & Program Meeting 11:30-1:00 at Foresight Technologies, The leader of the company sets the tone for the entire organization 1301 W. Geneva, Tempe when it comes to integrity. Outstanding leadership and at a strong 6/21 Board of Directors Meeting 11:30-1:00 moral compass Micro-Tronics, will help the company rough seas and will 2905 S.weather Potter, Tempe, 85282 create a lasting legacy. 6/29 General Dinner Meeting 5:00-8:00pm at Phoenix Airport Hilton, 2435 S. 47th Street, Phoenix Many companies have value statements that are heavy on platitudes and light on substance. Authentic value statements truly articulate the key values that differentiate a company.

Providing precision machining and fabricating of diverse parts and assemblies Serving the Aerospace/Aircraft, Military, Oil Tool and Commercial Industries Our Quality System is AS9100 B Compliant Equipment Capacities range up to HS-4R HAAS 4-Axis Horizontal Milling Center @ 150” x 66” x 48” and Ikegai VTL CNC Lathe @ Ø 55” Diameter Centerless Grinding Capacities ranges from Ø1/8” up to Ø1-1/2” in Lengths up to 14’ long and Ø1-1/2” to Ø 3” RD With Weight Maximum of 50# Dynamic Machine and Fabrication Corp. and Dynamic Centerless Grinding 3845 E. Winslow Ave., Phoenix, AZ 85040

(602) 437-0339 (602) 437-8947 fax

www.

dynamic-machine.com

Setting a Moral Compass Action – Take time with your leadership team to define your company’s core values. Enlist the help of an outside facilitator to help sort through value statements regarding trust and respect. The process of developing company values together allows business leaders to identify what is really important.

MANY THANKS TO OUR 2011 ATMA VALUED SPONSORS!

CONCLUSION All in all, a fulfilling life and a thriving company depend upon growth, lifelong learning, a positive attitude, forward propulsion, being results-oriented, and not compromising when it comes to personal and professional values. If it sounds like a challenge, it is. That’s parenting.

ROBERT J. TRACY is a principal in the manufacturing practice at CliftonLarsonAllen LLP. He helps manufacturing business owners improve profitability, reduce risk, build business value, and plan for succession. Rob can be reached at Rob.Tracy@cliftonlarsonallen.com. About CliftonLarsonAllen CliftonLarsonAllen is one of the nation’s top 10 certified public accounting and consulting firms. Structured to provide clients with highly specialized industry insight, the firm delivers assurance, tax and advisory capabilities. CliftonLarsonAllen offers unprecedented emphasis on serving privately held businesses and their owners, as well as nonprofits and governmental entities. The firm has a staff of more than 3,600 professionals, operating from more than 90 offices across the country. Learn more at: www.cliftonlarsonallen.com

arizonatooling.org / 23

24

PrecisionNews

arizonatooling.org

july/august 2012


ATMA_0202_FINAL_Layout 1 6/18/11 7:05 AM Page 27

july/august 2012

arizonatooling.org

PrecisionNews

25


PrecisionNews // NTMA -SAN DIEGO CHAPTER

MEMBER LISTINGS

SAN DIEGO CHAPTER 2012 BOARD OF DIRECTORS President TONY MARTINDALE Martindale Manufacturing Vice President and Treasurer HEATHER RUSSELL K-Tech Machine Secretary SEAN TILLETT Alphatec Spine Membership MIKE BROWN Computer Integrated Machining Past President MELINDA COLDWELL Cornerstone Machining, Inc.

BOARD MEMBERS Education Board Member John Riego de Dios Construction Tech Academy Member at Large Cliff Manzke Manzke Machine, Inc.

REGULAR MEMBERS Todd C. Lawson

Academy Machine Products

760.439.0109

Jodi Deane

Advanced Maching and Tooling

858.486.9050

Steve Doda*

Aerotek Commercial Staffing

619.278.3014

David Stella*

Aerotek Commercial Staffing

619.278.3014

Sean Tillett

Alphatec Spine

760.494.6774

Peter Neville

B&H Tool Company Inc.

800.272.8878

Lyle Anderson

C&H Machine and EDM Services

760.746.6459

Margarita Brear

Compucraft Industries, Inc.

619.448.0787

Michael J. Brown

Computer Integrated Mach., Inc.

619.596.9246

Melinda Coldwell

Cornerstone Machining, Inc.

760.727.5228

Erich Wilms

Diversified Tool & Die

760.598.9100

Alex Fima

Directed Mfg.

512.355.1360

Donovan Weber

Forecast 3D

760.929.9380

Andrew Allen

Henry Machine, Inc.

760.744.8482

Dora E. Tuza

I-Source Technical Services, Inc.

949.453.1500

Jim Piel

J I Machine Company, Inc.

858.695.1787

Joel Schuman

JS Manufacturing

760.940.1322

Heather Russell

K-Tech Machine, Inc.

760.471.9262

Cliff Manzke

Manzke Machine, Inc.

760.504.6875

Russell Wells Sr.

MarLee Manufacturing, Inc.

909.390.3222

Tony Martindale

Martindale Manufacturing Co.

760.744.3078

Mark Rottele

Roettele Industries

909.606.8252

Scott Cormony

Waterjet West, Inc.

760.471.2600

Hernan Luis y Prado

Workshops for Warriors

619.550.1620

Steve Grangetto

5th Axis

858.505.0432

*National Associate Members

FOUNDING PARTNERS OUR MISSION “To form an alliance within the San Diego region of the local machining and tool industry and to foster mutual success through education, technology, opportunity sharing and act as one voice with the government and the community.”

NTMA - San Diego Chapter 348 Saratoga Glen Escondido, CA 92025 Phone: 760.419.1393 ntmasandiegochapter.org

26

PrecisionNews

arizonatooling.org

july/august 2012

Glenn Van Noy

Champion Risk and Insurance Services

760.419.1393

Dave Stanton

Digital Dimensions, Inc.

858.279.2557

Gail Houser

National Tooling & Machining Assoc.

602.758.6912

Mark Selway

Selway Machine Tool Company

888.735.9290

NTMA San Diego Chapter UPCOMING EVENTS Padres Baseball Game, vs Mets, $47 Contact Heather for details Aug 5th, 1:05 p.m. Meeting Featuring Guest Speaker Omar Nashashibi Sept. 18th, meeting at 5:30 p.m.


PrecisionNews // NTMA INITIATIVES

How Can NTMA Help You Grow Your Business? Profitability grows when revenue increases and costs are controlled. NTMA can help you with both. Though most of our members are small- to medium-sized companies, the power of the association can help you do business like a large corporation. REVENUE GROWTH • We organize regular business-to-business purchasing fairs, designed to operate like speed dating for suppliers. We invite 100 or more buyers from large companies and then give you opportunities to briefly pitch your products and services. As a result attendees leave with good contacts and solid leads, leading to increased business. Companies have been awarded millions of dollars in contracts as a direct result of these events. • We offer a program called Members First, designed to help members turn to each other to meet needs. Perhaps your next customer is an NTMA peer? Or perhaps an NTMA member would make an excellent vendor for you? Members First helps make the connections. • By interacting with fellow members in your local chapter, you may discover new business opportunities, or ways to work together with peers to increase business or market yourselves cooperatively. COST CONTROL • We offer discount programs with several large suppliers (including Grainger, UPS and Yellow Freight), allowing you to leverage NTMA’s combined buying power for your own benefit. • Our business insurance program keeps more money in your pocket by offering a necessary product in a low-overhead, notfor-profit manner. Our decision resources allow you to be smarter about how you use your resources, resulting in greater efficiencies and lower costs. Learn more at: www.ntma.org/initiatives

NTMA UPCOMING EVENTS NTMA Purchasing Fair > October 22-23, 2012 Location: Nashville, TN

WATER-JET CUTTING Providing...Tighter Tolerances / Minimal Machining Table Capacity of 120” Wide x 360” Long Up to 6” Thick Cutting Capacity

HIGH DEFINITION PLASMA BURNING

CONVENTIONAL PLASMA BURNING

Up to 5/8” thk Stainless & 1 1/4” thk Carbon Table Capacity of 120” Wide x 390” Long

Up to 6” Thickness Table Capacity of 132” Wide x 564” Long

Available Products... STAINLESS: 304H, 304L, 316L, 317L, 321, 347, 904L, 2205, 2507, 254-SMO, LDX 2101 CARBON: A35, W44, 514, 516-70, 572-50, 588, API-2H-G50 ALUMINUM: 5086, 5454, 6061, 7075, 7050, 2024

Range of Sizes...

NTMA 2012 Fall Conference > October 24-28, 2012 Location: Nashville, TN Visit: www.ntma.org

THK: 3/16” to 6” WIDTH: 48” to 120” LENGTHS: 96” to 528”

Value Added Services... LASER CUTTING, POLISHING, GRINDING, HEAT TREATING, SAW CUTTING, FORMING, ROLLING, SHEARING, BEVELING

NTMA - Manufacturing America’s Future Call: 888.904.6727

1-888-726-6385

samuelplate@samuel.com

www.samuel.com A2Z METALWORKER

july/august 2012

arizonatooling.org

• 47 • -XO\$XJ

PrecisionNews

27


Cover Story //PrecisionNews NEW STEPS TO COMPETITIVE MILLING IN TITANIUM

continued from page 16 /// CONCLUSIVELY, TITANIUM COMPONENTS... ...cannot be said to be difficult to machine any more. However, it does make demands on the use of right means and methods as titanium is more challenging and in need of a different approach to process planning, tool selection and application. Moreover, to be competitive, it is not enough today to achieve a successful machining process, titanium milling has to be performed as efficiently as possible and with maximum security, consistently to the right quality level. /// TITANIUM The metallurgical, chemical and thermal properties especially make titanium a unique material as a design material and as a workpiece material. Titanium alloys vary considerably as regards machinability, from the more traditional Ti6Al4V alloy to the stronger Ti10-2-3 and Ti5553 alloys but the basic common titanium alloy characteristics are: Titanium is often used in components that have to withstand exposure to high temperatures. It is a poor heat conductor which means that heat is not transported away from the cutting zone with chips as is the case with most other metals. This leads to higher machining temperature which rises rapidly with rising cutting speeds. Inserts have to tolerate a high thermal load. As a component material, titanium has excellent resistance to corrosion, but in machining it can be a smearing material which reacts chemically to the tool material. This means a tendency for titanium to weld to the cutting edge which can lead to rapid tool breakdown and poor security. Titanium has excellent material-strength values but a low modulus of elasticity. This means that during machining the material has a tendency to deflect away from the tool and, if not addressed, can lead to various machining problems. The surface of titanium alloys left after machining needs extra attention. It can be easily damaged through the appearance of very small cracks and scratches, welded material, plastic deformation and zones affected by heat as well as residual stress. These can lead to a degradation of the material properties in components if the surface integrity is not maintained to acceptable levels. During the cutting process, the contact area between segmented titanium chips and tool face is very concentrated, leading to high pressure on the cutting edge. This high compressive stress in combination with high temperatures is the main cause of why titanium is prone to edge deformation and other tool wear types. Together, these properties call for the right, dedicated cutting tools and methods to meet the machining challenge the material and often features presents.

SANDVIK COROMANT is the world’s leading supplier of tools, tooling solutions and know-how to the metalworking industry. They can be contacted at: 1.800.SANDVIK or 1.800.726.384. Learn more at: www.sandvik.coromant.com

28

PrecisionNews

arizonatooling.org

july/august 2012

NORTH TEXAS CHAPTER 2012 BOARD OF DIRECTORS President TODD ELLARD Manda Machine Company Vice President JEFF SPENCER Clay Precision Treasurer BARRON SMITH R.W. Smith Company Chapter Executive LISA ELLARD Trustee WAYNE APPLEGATE Applegate EDM

BOARD MEMBERS Mike Berdan BE Technologies Frank Burch Southern Machine Works Bill Walter Ellison Technologies Micah Embrey CNC Precision/Shamrock-Bolt Don Halsey Halsey Manufacturing Ray Jones MWI, Inc. Pat McCurley Midlothian Insurance Karla Chandler Education Liason

“The Power of Connections” NTMA - North Texas Chapter ntc.ntma@gmail.com phone: 214.536.4970 P.O. Box 541236 Dallas, TX 75354-1236 ntmanorthtexas.org


PrecisionNews // NTMA -NORTH TEXAS CHAPTER

MEMBER LISTINGS REGULAR MEMBERS

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS

Vincente Chan

Aeroweld Technologies, Inc.

972.247.1189

Larry Ellison

AJR Metalworks, Inc.

214.352.3766

Wade Whistler

A.C.T. Precision Sheet Metal, Inc.

214.678.9114

Tommy Thompson

Bodic Industries

972.840.1015

Wayne Applegate

Applegate EDM, Inc.

972.488.8997

Lewis Lance

Bodycote Heat Treat

817.265.5878

Tony Woodall

AST Waterjet

972.554.0383

Rick Blair

Brook Anco Corporation

585.475.9570

Steve Ingersoll

Bailey Tool & Manufacturing

972.974.8892

Craig van Hamersveld

Campat Machine Tool, Inc.

972.424.4095

Michael Berdan

BE-Technologies, Ltd.

972.242.1853

Claudia Pautz

Castle Metals

972.339.5000

Christi Cameron

Cameron Machine Shop, Inc.

972.235.8876

Chris Simms

Champion Cutting Tool

516.536.8200

Jeff R. Spencer

Clay Precision, Ltd.

903.891.9022

Frank Vance

Frank J Vance

972.255.3925

Joseph Lodor

Commerce Grinding Company, Inc.

214.651.1977

Norm Williamson

H & O Die Supply, Inc.

214.630.6660

Robert McNamara

Davis Machine & Manufacturing

817.261.7362

Mike Johns

Haas Factory Outlet

972.231.2802

Charles Gilbert

DNS Tool Cutter Grinding, LLC

972.241.5271

Stephen Draper

Hartwig, Inc. - Texas

972.790.8200

Dena Kupiec

Elijah Tooling, Inc,

940.591.1340

Matt Curtis

Hillary Machinery, Inc.

972.578.1515

David Ellis

Ellis Tool & Machine, Inc.

903.546.6540

Rod Zimmerman

Iscar Metals, Inc.

817.258.3200

Rudy D. Kobus

Expert Tool & Machine, Inc.

972.241.5353

Randy Joyce

Joyce Engraving Company, Inc.

214.638.1262

Monte Titus

F& R Machine & Repair, Inc.

214.631.4946

Curtis Dahmen

Kaeser Compressors, Inc.

972.245.9611

Gary Fore

Fore Machine Company, Inc.

817.834.6251

Mark S. Holly

Machinists Tools & Supplies

214.631.9390

Mike Lee

Fort Worth Centerless Grinding, Inc.

817.293.6787

Leland McDowell

McDowell Machinery & Supply Co.

214.353.0410

Larry Borowski

Greenslade and Company, Inc.

817.870.8888

Pat McCurley

Midlothian Insurance Agency

972.723.5171

Oscar Guzman

Guzman Manufacturing

972.475.3003

Nicki Smith

MSC Industrial Supply

817.590.2637

David L. Hodgdon

H. H. Mercer, Inc.

972.289.1911

Ray Jones

MWI Inc. / Southwest Division

972.247.3083

Don Halsey, Jr.

Halsey Engineering & Mfg., Inc.

940.566.3306

Mike Chadick

North Texas Precision Instrument

817.589.0011

Cory Trosper

K & D Tool & Die, Inc.

972.463.4534

Reed Hunt

Reed Hunt Services, Inc.

817.261.4432

Keith Hutchinson

Lancaster Machine Shop

972.227.2868

Scott Devanna

SB Specialty metals

800.365.1168

Scott Cody

LSC Precision, Inc.

940.482.9700

Bob Severance

Severance Brothers

972.660.7000

Sammy Maddox

Maddox Metal Works, Inc.

214.333.2311

Alan VanHoozer

Top Tooling of Dallas, Inc.

972.278.8300

Todd Ellard

Manda Machine Company, Inc.

214.352.5946

Glenn Wise

Wise Machinery, LLC

817.905.9473

David Evans

Manek Equipment, Inc.

903.439.6414

Rodie Woodard

Maximum Industries, Inc.

972.501.9990

Woodrow W. Thompson

Metal Detail, Inc.

214.330.7757

Allen Meyer

Meyer Enterprises

972.353.9791

Eddie Steiner, Jr.

O E M Industries, Inc.

214.330.7271

Morris Padgett

Padgett Machine Tools, Inc.

254.865.9772

Troy Paulus

Paulus Precision Machine, Inc.

940.566.5600

Joe O’Dell

Plano Machine & Instrument, Inc.

940.665.2814

Bill Gilliland

Quality Tool

972.221.0537

Matt Harrell

Quickturn Technology, Inc.

469.643.5010

Barron Smith

R. W. Smith Company, Inc.

214.748.1699

Mike Embrey

Red Rock Industries

940.665.0281

Gary Embrey

Shamrock Precision

972.241.3931

Frank Burch

Southern Machine Works

580.255.6525

John Anselmi

Sunbelt Plastics Inc.

972.335.4100

Marshall B. Taylor

T & K Machine, Inc.

903.785.5574

Jake Bailey

Tower Extrusions Fabrication

940.564.5681

MANY THANKS TO OUR NTMA-NORTH TEXAS SPONSORS:

BILLOR MACH INE T OOL SERVICE

NTMA-NORTH TEXAS MEETINGS & EVENTS Thanks to Our January- May 2012 General Meeting Hosts: Manda Machine Co., Ellison Technologies, Advanced Technology Complex, Shamrock Precision Upcoming Events: June 21, 2012 – One Voice Presentation - Southern Machine Works July 2012 – Night at the Ballpark Texas Ranger Game August 16, 2012 – Congressman Pete Sessions - Applegate EDM September 2012 – Annual Golf Tournament july/august 2012

arizonatooling.org

PrecisionNews

29


PrecisionNews // NTMA -SAN FRANCISCO CHAPTER

SAN FRANCISCO

MEMBER LISTINGS

CHAPTER

REGULAR MEMBERS 2012 BOARD OF DIRECTORS President DAVE BUTTNER ThermoFusion Vice President/Treasurer MICHELLE MYHRE R.M. Machining, Inc. Education Director DON CASTILLO FM Industries Membership Director PAT HAYES

OUR MISSION “Our mission is the advancement of machining and manufacturing businesses in the Bay Area, through collective effort and membership alliances.” NTMA - San Francisco Bay Area 950 Terminal Way San Carlos , CA 94070 Phone: 510.782.7755

Jimmy Kim

3D Access Industries

510.668.1248

Boris Kesil

ADEM, LLC

408.727.8955

Ron Wegstein

Advanced Grinding, Inc.

510.536.3465

Tim Green

All Weld Machine & Fabrication Co. 408.946.5890

Fred Matter

Alloy Metal Products

925.371.1234

Robert P. Dathe

Benda Tool & Model Works, Inc.

510.741.3170

Jim Deemer

California Brazing

510.284.0283

Tony Castruccio

Custom Gear & Machine

925.455.9985

Angelo Grestoni

D & H Manufacturing Company

510.770.5100

Dan McEachern

Dan McEachern Company

510.532.8228

Frank Dommen

Die & Tool Products Inc.

415.822.2888

Felix Q. Oramas, Jr.

E R C Concepts Company, Inc.

408.734.5345

Don Castillo

FM Industries, Inc.

510.668.1900

Gabor Paulovits, Jr.

G & S Tool Incorporated

510.633.9632

Alan Kalman

Kalman Manufacturing

408.776.7664

DeAnna Godfrey

McNeal Enterprises, Inc.

408.922.7290

Karen Myhre

R.M. Machining, Inc.

650.591.4178

Mark Serpa

Silicon Valley Manufacturing

510.791.9450

David J. Buttner

Thermo-Fusion, Inc.

510.782.7755

Doug Wright

True-Tech Corporation

510.353.1000

Bruce Tschida

Tschida Engineering, Inc.

707.224.4482

Dane Madsen

West Valley Precision, Inc.

408.519.5959

Alan Taikeff

Zap O Marks, Inc.

408.264.8610

Ken Fusselman

Perry Tool & Research Inc.

510.782.9226

Welcome! SAN FRANCISCO NEW MEMBERS

sfbantma.org

UPCOMING EVENTS NTMA - San Francisco Bay Area A’s Tailgate and Baseball Game July, 2012 Please call for details. Speaker: Omar Nashashibi September 20th, 2012 @ 5:30PM Please call for details.

California Brazing

True-Tech Corporation

37955 Central Court Newark, CA 94560 Phone: 510.742.7114

4050 Technology Place Fremont, CA 94538 Phone: 510.353.1000

Jim Deemer, Machine Shop Manager jimd@californiabrazing.com

Doug Wright, Executive Vice President dwright@true-tech.com

YOUR NEW TOOL OF THE TRADE. PrecisionNews TM

THE RIGHT TOOLS. THE RIGHT TEAM. THE RIGHT TIME.

30

PrecisionNews

arizonatooling.org

july/august 2012


 

• Machining Excellence since 1997 • ISO 9001 + AS9100B Certified • Experienced senior machinists • Experts in stainless,Served: aluminum, Industries plastics and exotics • Automotive • Aerospace • 8A Certified, Viet•Nam Vet, • Medical Firearms Minority Owned Small Business • Dept of Defense • Electronics • Eager to provide you with quality performance quick responses 2440 Cades Way,and Vista, California 92081 phone: 760.727.5228 fax: 760.727.0799

Contact Nichols at 480-804-0593 www.nicholsprecision.com www.cornerstonecnc.com

Manufactured with Pride in America!  

www.SunGrindingUSA.com

For All Your Grinding Needs!

We have the largest centerless grinder in the state!

Blanchard - Our 60 inch chuck will cut stock quickly and allows us to grind parts up to 72” diagonally.

Mattison - 32” wide and 168” long capacity. If it is one part or 100 parts at a time, we can do the job!

Sun Grinding, formerly known as BK Grinding, has been in the Phoenix fabrication industry for over 14 years. We are the leading surface grinding shop in Arizona. Family owned and operated. info@sungrindingusa.com / 522 E. Buckeye Rd. Phoenix, AZ. 85004

july/august 2012

arizonatooling.org / 19 9 arizonatooling.orgarizonatooling.org PrecisionNews /31


.................................................................................... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..

Best Practices in Action SPECIAL ADVERTORIAL

Technology, Performance, Success! Leveraging the Latest Technology THE CHALLENGE How can I dramatically reduce my lead-time and improve the quality of my products? How can I reduce my setup time? Is there a way for me to get more out of my existing equipment and people? These are the kind of questions companies are asking now more than ever… and the latest in advances in CAD/CAM technology are helping to deliver the answers. One company in Irvine, California was able to reduce design time by more than 95%, reduce programming time more than 75%, reduce rework and scrap by more than 20%, and reduce the overall lead-time for their products by more than 85%... all without adding any additional staff or equipment. How did they do it? By automating the entire business process from orders to parts, using the latest CAD/CAM technology. TECHNOLOGY AND PERFORMANCE In the early 90’s parametric, feature based, solid modeling was introduced for computer aided design (CAD). The advantages were immediately recognized. Thanks to feature based design, a complete 3D solid model could be developed, analyzed, tested, and approved in a fraction of the time previously required. In addition, because the features were both parametric and associative, the solid models would update automatically to design changes. However, initially these systems were expensive and only large companies could afford them. In the late 90’s and early 2000’s that started to change. Companies like SolidWorks® introduced fully functional solid modelers, at an affordable price. Currently, virtually all modern mechanical design is done using parametric, feature based, solid modeling and the latest solid modelers include API’s (Application Programming Interface) for automation and customization. Likewise, Computer Aided Manufacturing has followed. The latest CAM technology uses Feature Based Machining (FBM) to create parametric machinable features. For example, CAMWorks® by Geometric uses FBM and Automatic Feature Recognition (AFR) to automatically recognize and create 3D parametric, machinable features. Once created, the features are machined automatically using Knowledge Based Machining (KBM). Knowledge Based Machining can be used to capture and store the processes, tools, and speeds & feeds to program and machine features into the technology database. Once stored, KBM can then program the feature automatically, using the information from the technology database. Good CNC programmers and machinists are getting increasingly difficult to find. One of the major benefits to using KBM is Knowledge Based Machining can capture the “best practices” of a company’s best programmers and machinist into a database managed and owned by the company. As a result when a senior

32

PrecisionNews

arizonatooling.org

july/august 2012

programmer or machinists resigns or retires, his knowledge doesn’t have to walk out the door with him. In addition, quality is significantly increased because even new inexperienced employees can tap on the expert knowledge stored in the technology database. CNC Programming and machining becomes automated, standardize, and consistent. Even tooling costs are reduced, thanks to the consistent use of standard tools and proven processes. SUCCESS! CP-Carrillo in Irvine California has been the premier supplier of top quality performance products to the power-sports and sport compact industries since their inception in 1998. As the technological leader in piston design and development for all venues of motorsports, CP-Carrillo has always been focused on providing top quality industry leading products while maintaining the highest level of customer service. Karl Ramm, Sr. Technology Manager for CP-Carrillo is always searching for, and implementing, the latest computer technology in all phases of their business. When Karl recognized the potential of using API’s (Application Programming Interfaces) to automate the design and manufacturing process, he initiated a project to develop a fully automated CAD\CAM system and link it to order processing. The project is complete and now the entire process from initial order, to design of the solid model, and generation of the CNC programs occurs in seconds or minutes rather than hours or days. When an order is ready to be processed an employee simply enters the order number into the system. Once the order number is submitted, the system retrieves the design parameters from the electronic order form and automatically designs the custom piston. In seconds the design is complete and CNC programs are then generated automatically. The entire process takes literally seconds or a few minutes and no human intervention is required. The CNC programs are then used to manufacture the parts. Thanks to Karl and his team, the system is capable of designing and machining virtually any of CP-Carrillo’s custom pistons and creates CNC programs automatically for more than fifty different CNC machines. The final result… a 95% reduction in design time, a 75% reduction in programming time, a 20% reduction in reduce rework and scrap, and the overall lead-time for was reduced by more than 85%.

For more information, contact: GEOMETRIC TECHNOLOGIES 15974 N. 77th Street #103, Scottsdale, AZ 85260 Phone: 480.367.0132, Fax: 480.367.0420 Learn more at: www.camworks.com


mscdirect.com/vending


HANG ON TO YOUR PARTS!

Innovative workholding solutions for all 3,4, and 5 axis machines.

1(858)-505-0432

5axisfixtures.com

Made in

TM

Profile for ATMA - Chris Mignella

Precision News July/August 2012  

Precision News, the trade magazine from the Arizona Tooling and Machining Association. Featuring articles on manufacturing in Arizona, North...

Precision News July/August 2012  

Precision News, the trade magazine from the Arizona Tooling and Machining Association. Featuring articles on manufacturing in Arizona, North...