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NEXT WEEK: EDUCATION

VOL. XCIV NO. 36 | HOLIDAY FLAVORS

Jewish Holiday Traditions Held Dear From Far and Near

ATLANTA KOSHER BBQ THOUSANDS SHOWED UP FOR GRILLING AND FOODIE FUN.

HOLIDAY RECIPES

AJT SHARES HOLIDAY FAVORITES FOR YOU TO TRY AT HOME.

JANE: AN ABORTION SERVICE

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SEPTEMBER 13, 2019 | 13 ELUL 5779


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Carrot & Butternut Squash (Tzimmes)

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES SEPTEMBER 13, 2019 | 3


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PUBLISHER

MICHAEL A. MORRIS michael@atljewishtimes.com

MANAGING PUBLISHER & EDITOR KAYLENE LADINSKY

kaylene@atljewishtimes.com Executive Assistant

JODI DANIS

jodi@atljewishtimes.com

EDITORIAL Associate Editor

RONI ROBBINS roni@atljewishtimes.com Sr. Staff Writer & Web Editor

EDDIE SAMUELS

eddie@atljewishtimes.com Contributor & Proofreader

LEAH R. HARRISON leah@atljewishtimes.com

Contributors This Week BOB BAHR DAVE SCHECHTER FLORA ROSEFSKY JAN JABEN-EILON KEVIN C. MADIGAN MARCIA CALLER JAFFE MARTINE TARTOUR SHAINDLE SCHMUCKLER

Flavors to Savor The fall holidays are especially conducive to family gatherings around the table. To prepare you for the holiday season, we offer a sample of holiday recipes, including those from AJT staff and contributors. In other flavorful news, we give you a peek at the new location of the popular deli, The General Muir, in City Springs. We introduce you to Tradition Kitchens, which organizes home kitchen classes, complete with favorite holiday recipes. And we review District M sushi, not to mention our On the Town with Jen & Michal at Rozina Bakehouse & Coffee. A highlight of the week was the annual finger-licking Atlanta Kosher BBQ Festival, which we recap for you in case you missed it. While mouth-watering vittles are the main course this week, we have plenty of other tasty morsels for you to sink your teeth into. Our resident French correspondent Martine Tartour gives us a glimpse of high holiday traditions in her native

country, stemming from her Sephardic origins. Flora Rosefsky shares how her family remembers departed loved ones at Yom Kippur. There’s also our Chai Style Home tour of a Virginia-Highland bungalow that doubles as a workshop for his-andhers creative endeavors. We cover two women’s events: one promoting abortion rights and another a new initiative giving women a voice for change. Elan Carr, the special U.S. envoy watching and fighting global anti-Semitism, talks about his role and hatred in the world. Two upcoming elections also garnered our attention. We highlight the do-over election in Israel and announce Jon Ossoff’s return to the political battleground with his run for the U.S. Senate. You’ll be stocked and ready as we enter the holiday and election season, too, with our education issue next week. Study up. There’s much in store for you. ■

THIS WEEK

Cover Photo: This week's cover photo represents Jewish holiday flavors from our table to yours.

CONTENTS LOCAL NEWS���������������������������������� 6 OPINION����������������������������������������� 12 ISRAEL NEWS������������������������������� 14 HOLIDAY FLAVORS�������������������� 16 DINING�������������������������������������������� 26 CHAI STYLE����������������������������������� 27 CALENDAR������������������������������������� 30 COMMUNITY��������������������������������� 32 BRAIN FOOD���������������������������������� 36 CLOSING THOUGHTS����������������� 37

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ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES SEPTEMBER 13, 2019 | 5


LOCAL NEWS Sizzlin’ and Grillin’ at the Atlanta Kosher BBQ Festival

Photo by Lou Ladinsky // The grand champions were The BBQ N' Hebrew Hillbillies.

By Kevin C. Madigan Hot and amazing. That was the verdict on the 7th annual Atlanta Kosher BBQ Festival, according to chief organizer Jody Pollock. The event was held Sept. 8 at the City Green in downtown Sandy Springs under a blazing sun. “We had a great turnout,” Pollock told the Atlanta Jewish Times. “My thumb in the air estimate is 3,500 – probably

Photo by Doug Weinstein // Meat the Press booth this year was a takeoff on the wildly popular, “Game of Thrones.”

1,000 at any given time.” Pollock has been involved with the festival since its inception. “I was behind the scenes in the first two,” he said. “I cooked the first year and my brisket came in third. I took it over the third year, and this is the fifth year I’ve run it.” Does he still enjoy it? “It’s a lot of fun; it really is. To see it all come together is a blast and a half,” he said. But it’s not all fun and games. “The Photo by Lou Ladinsky // Dressler’s Jewish Funeral Care combined barbecue and business in their own tongue-in-cheek levity on the theme.

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Festival-goers enjoy grillin' and tefillin as local Chabad shares wrapping and prayer.

Volunteers Avery Evans and Gabrielle Cohen offer up plant-based tasting options donated by Beyond Meat.

biggest challenge is getting the right volunteers to do the right jobs at the right time, especially now that it’s time to clean up. Everybody’s burned out. Teams have been here since 8 o’clock last night, and they are ready to go home.” A film crew was recruited this year to shoot the entire festival, funded by an innovation grant from the Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta. Led by Atlanta director Adam Hirsch, the documentary “will take viewers inside the preparation process to the all-night smoking and the

excitement of taste buds of festival-goers and judges,” the AKBF said in a statement. “The film is going to blow us out of the water next year,” Pollock said. “It’s going to be ready for the Atlanta Jewish Film Festival in February as a short. Not sure how long the short is going to be, but the long and short of it is that it’s in the AJFF.” Pollock’s fellow organizer Dan Frankel, who calls himself a “general jack of all trades,” said, “The way we’ve done the food is a little bit different this year; we’ve added some more tasting capability. There


LOCAL NEWS

Photo by Lou Ladinsky // The Hebrew Order of David Lodge of Carmel served up more than brisket as the Brisketeers takes home a first place trophy for best chicken.

Photo by Lou Ladinsky // Char-Kol Nidre played off the upcoming high holidays with its name.

Photo by Kevin C. Madigan // Smokey and the Brisket won third place for team name, among several other trophies over the years.

Photo by Lou Ladinsky // Festivities began Saturday night and all items are supervised by mashgiach inspections.

Photo by Kevin C. Madigan // Organizers Jody Pollock and Ian Platt.

Photo by Lou Ladinsky // It was more than food at the festival. Atlanta’s Jewish organizations set up shop in the festival's vendor village.

are new vendors. The 50/50 raffle is new. “On the silent auction we’ve gone online; it’s now easier for folks to see how much items have been bid for, so if they want to track them and increase the bids, they can. In previous years we had everything on pa-

per, and it was kind of a struggle.” The silent auction had some impressive items available, according to volunteer Judy Friedman, who runs a company called Atlanta Antique & Estate Liquidators. “Round-trip airfare to Las Vegas, a $500

wine party, beautiful dinners, art – the deals are unreal,” she said. “This is much more colorful than any of my sales.” At the day’s conclusion, judges from the prestigious Kansas City Barbeque Society determined the first-place winners

in four meat categories: The Brisketeers (chicken); Smoke ‘Em If You Got ‘Em (chili and brisket); and The Barbeque N Hebrew Hillbillies (ribs). The latter also won the grand champion cup, with $600 thrown in for good measure. ■

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES SEPTEMBER 13, 2019 | 7


LOCAL NEWS

‘Agents of Change Training’ Begins in Atlanta pected,” said Wasserman, adding that the application period was open for several months. “We wanted to keep The Jewish Women’s Fund of the size down to allow for close conAtlanta is launching a new initianections and for them to feel like they tive designed to give Jewish women are in a cohesive unit. We’ll decide if the the tools to use their voices to bring size is right and tweak it if necessary.” about change. The women’s group According to Andrea Jaron, JWFA announced the names of 20 women chair since July 1, ACT will be an “evochosen for its groundbreaking new lutionary program. That’s the beauty of program called Agents of Change this: the willingness of the participants Training or ACT. to be flexible. They must be nimble. “This is a significant initiative One of the things I’ve always said about ACT participant Amy Fox’s goal ACT participant Gabby that came out of our strategic plan,” Executive Director of the Jewish the Women’s Fund is that we think outWomen’s Fund of Atlanta is to encourage more female Spatt is excited about JWFA executive director Rachel WasRachel Wasserman said it involvement in the Jewish the intergenerational side the box. This program provides an serman told the AJT. “This has been will be impossible to measure Federation of Greater Atlanta. aspects of the program opportunity for our trustees to have exour dream for years to have this prothe ripple effects of ACT. periences that are different.” gram. We’ve spent the last year on Jaron particularly pointed to the mentoring prodeveloping it. We’ve been a funding program, not an op- Spinrad, Jan Jay, Jennifer Mosbacher, Joanna Israel, Julie erational program. It’s been difficult to make an impact Mokotoff, Lauren Sturisky, Leslie Reitman, Dr. Lynn Bahr, gram that will be launched halfway through ACT. “It’s a only through grants. This is another way to impact the Melissa Kaplan, Rabba Melissa Scholten-Gutierrez, Sheryl two-way street in which everyone can be learning from each other,” she said. Atlanta Jewish community.” Lyss, Susie Greenberg, and Tracy Rosenbluth Howard. Wasserman called it a mentor/mentee program. Noting that JWFA’s mission is to promote social The women who were chosen all committed to atchange, Wasserman acknowledges that the organization tend every program with one absence. “We recognize “This won’t be top-down, from the trustees, but we hope will “never be able to measure the extraordinary ripple that they are very busy women,” said Wasserman, who that unofficially relationships will form. We’re looking at effects” of ACT on the Atlanta Jewish community. Each of noted that all the women self-identified as being in the partnerships,” she said. She acknowledged the challenge the 20 women in the pilot program, who are ages 30 to 68, Jewish community. “Almost all of the day schools and of making the appropriate matches, based on what each “come from their own community, family, work environ- many of the congregations are represented. We wanted woman is looking for in the program. Each woman is bement and organizations.” diversity in every way possible.” The group includes ing asked specifically what they want to work on. Amy Fox is very clear about her goal. “I am trying to The 20 women chosen for the nine-month program several doctors and holders of advanced degrees, and get more women of my generation – 30s to 50s – to be more are: Amy Fox, Andi Neiman, Beth Sherman, Caren Cohen, women from many different stages of their lives. Dr. Eve Wexler, Felicia Marable, Gabby Spatt, Hannah “We had significantly more applications than we ex- involved in the Jewish Federation” of Greater Atlanta. “I’ve been involved in the Federation for years and I’ve had conversations with colleagues about what types of programming can we do to get more women involved. Everyone is COSMETIC, IMPLANT & GENERAL wondering where this generation of women is going. They DENTISTRY FOR THE FAMILY. have so much going on with children and careers.” cosmetic & An international leader in cosmetic, implant and Fox explained that now that her children are in high Family Dentistry general dentistry for more than three decades, Dr. school, she is in a “transitional stage of my life and I want to know how I can have more impact in the community.” She David Mastro’s patients travel world-wide for his said she is excited about the new JWFA program. “I loved the Atlanta cosmetic dentistry and report that he is one concept. They’re helping us become a change agent.” of the country’s top cosmetic and general dentists. According to Fox, “There are so many amazing women in this community and I look forward to conNOT YOUR ORDINARY DENTIST, NOT necting with people who have been through what I’m going through. But I’m also thinking of ways to take YOUR ORDINARY DENTAL OFFICE. something small and get more people involved.” Dr. Mastro is a unique dentist with his artistic Gabby Spatt, who works for The Blue Dove Foundation, expression developed through years of hand which focuses on mental health, told the AJT that she’s intercrafting crowns, veneers and bridges. Today, with ested in the “intergenerational piece” of ACT. “A lot of womthe aid of the most advanced technology available, en don’t have children here and I don’t have a mother here. I look at other women who have done it all and I want to Dr. Mastro can care for patients’ complete dental learn from them. I don’t have children yet and I want to ask, needs from oral surgery and implants to fillings ‘How do you have a family, career and civic involvement?’” and general cleanings. Dr. Mastro is legendary for Spatt said she knows two of the younger ACT parquality dentistry and for transforming smiles for ticipants already but doesn’t know any of the older ones. people from all walks of life. “I believe in women-only experiences and I love trying new things.” According to Wasserman, the applicants included a number of women who are in the empty-nester phase or close to it and they are “evaluating where they are as a person. Their identity is changing in the same way as a woman who is just becoming a mother or a working mother.” Or as Jaron puts it, “Every woman coming to this program is coming from a different place with a different destination.” ■ By Jan Jaben-Eilon

Alluring

8 | SEPTEMBER 13, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES


LOCAL NEWS

U.S. Envoy to Review Global Anti-Semitism By Dave Schechter As the lead U.S. representative in action against “the world’s oldest hatred,” Elan Carr’s official job title is Special Envoy to Monitor and Combat Anti-Semitism. That means wherever anti-Semitism it is found, anywhere in the world – except, by statute, in the United States. Nonetheless, events in this country impact Carr’s global portfolio. Carr will discuss his mission on Sept. 15 at the Atlanta Jewish Academy in Sandy Springs, in a program sponsored by the Atlanta Israel Coalition. “The sky is not falling,” Carr told the Atlanta Jewish Times, speaking from Washington, D.C. “Let me be clear. We have urgent challenges that we need to confront. Is it worse today? Yes.” He said that his message will be “that the United States in general, and this administration in particular, is committed in an unprecedented fashion to the fight against anti-Semitism, the protection of the Jewish people throughout the world, and support for the state of Israel.” The 51-year-old Carr had been a deputy district attorney in the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s office for more than a decade when he was appointed special envoy on Feb. 5 this year by Secretary of State Mike Pompeo. President Donald Trump had left the position vacant during the first two years of his administration, rankling members of Congress and the leaders of Jewish organizations. “Although it is a global problem and is rising, there’s also good news. We have leaders not only here in this country but around the world who get it, who are appalled that this is happening. One of my jobs is to support with the full weight of the United States those friends and allies we have that understand the problem. I’m happy to report that we have no shortage of those at all levels of government. One of my great pleasures when I go overseas representing the United States is to see the passion they bring to the fight. That is incredibly encouraging and leaves me optimistic,” he said. Optimism but realistic. As a colleague in the United Kingdom told Carr, “If all we do is contain it at the current levels, that’s not sufficient. We have to roll it back.” Carr pointed to three sources of the scourge: “ethnic supremacists on the right,” “the Israel-hating radical left,” and “militant Islam.” “These are three perspectives on the world that should hate each other more than they hate anything else,” but all three have found a target in the Jewish people, he said.

“It is critically important that we kah menorah in a former palace of Iraqi draw a distinction between nationalism President Saddam Hussein. Though the and ethnic supremastatutory mandate cism. It’s a pernicious of his office is antiinjustice to conflate Semitism outside of the two,” Carr said. He the United States, cited this as a tactic Carr said, “The White used by some critics House has specifically of Israel, founded as tasked me” to also foa national homeland cus on the issue dofor Jews. mestically. “I’m very Carr sees in the public about it and so, current environment when I go overseas, an opportunity to adthat’s actually a big dress the anti-Semasset.” itism that Arab and Even in “the most Muslim immigrants philo-Semitic country have brought with in the history of the them to Europe. “Alworld” a “metastatic most all of the acts Elan Carr comes to Atlanta to share cancer spreading over of personal violence his views on global anti-Semitism. the United States is the against Jews in western Europe have come from that popula- anti-Semitism that cloaks itself in the language of anti-Israel,” Carr said. tion,” he said. “The college campus in particular “I think we have more of a chance to move the needle in the Middle East than is an urgent crisis,” said Carr, a former ever before,” Carr said. He cited a geo-po- national president of the Jewish fraterlitical realignment due in part to regional nity, Alpha Epsilon Pi. “What’s going on antipathy toward Iran and events in the on college campuses is taking a measurGulf region, including some thawing of relations with Israel. “The institutional anti-Semitism that we see in the Arab and Muslim world is something I intend to focus on,” Carr said, citing “the indoctrination of children,” which he termed “mass child abuse.” His personal history may aid him in this arena. “My family comes from the Arab world. I think that’s very helpful for a number of reasons. Jewish unity around the fight against anti-Semitism is very important. Sometimes it takes someone from a different perspective to be a catalyst for unity,” he said. Carr’s mother fled Iraq after seeing her father, a leader in a once-thriving Jewish community in Baghdad, put on trial by Iraqi authorities after the founding of Israel in 1948. She traveled to Israel and later to the United States, where she met Carr’s father, who is of Ashkenazi descent. Carr grew up to become fluent in Hebrew and Arabic. A graduate of the University of California-Berkley and the Northwestern University Law School, Carr became a legal adviser to Israel’s Justice Ministry before joining the U.S. Army. Carr deployed to his mother’s homeland in 2003, serving with an anti-terrorism unit, and as a JAG (Judge Advocate General) officer, prosecuting insurgents before Iraqi judges in Iraqi courts. Carr also led services for Jewish troops, including the lighting of a Chanu-

able toll,” in declining support for Israel not only among Jewish students but also among evangelical Christian students. Acknowledging that accusing Jews of dual loyalty is part of the definition of antiSemitism, Carr rejected the suggestion that Trump was being anti-Semitic when he recently said that Jewish Americans who vote for Democrats are being disloyal to fellow Jews and to Israel. As the titular head of the Republican Party, the president is entitled to such political comments, he said. “The accusation of dual loyalty is a euphemism,” Carr said. “It’s about disloyalty. When anyone says a Jew has dual loyalty what they mean is Jews are disloyal to the United States.” Carr’s wife, Dr. Dahlia Carr, a rheumatologist, is the granddaughter of Holocaust survivors. The Carrs are the parents of two daughters and a son. They keep a kosher home and observe the Jewish holidays “very strictly,” Carr said. He won’t work on Shabbat, though he will drive. The family affiliates with the Orthodox movement, though the children attend a day school in the Conservative movement. “The kids speak fluent Hebrew. They speak Hebrew to each other,” he said. ■

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES SEPTEMBER 13, 2019 | 9


LOCAL NEWS

Atlanta Jewish Women Fight for Reproductive Rights By Jan Jaben-Eilon

She was referring to ACLU’s legal challenge of one of the country’s most restrictive abortion laws. A mostly female audiIn May, Georgia Gov. Brian ence filled the Plaza TheKemp signed the so-called atre Sept. 8 to be educated, “fetal heartbeat” law, efinspired and motivated to fectively banning abortion fight for women’s reproafter six weeks. ductive rights. Young noted that the The program was coACLU filed for a prelimisponsored by the Amerinary injunction against can Civil Liberties Union the law, with the first hearof Georgia, the National ing to be held Sept. 23. Council of Jewish Women Opening the program, Atlanta section, the Jewish Andrea Young says young Democratic Women’s Sa- women don’t know what life Young stressed that “womlon, Planned Parenthood was like before abortion was en have the right to make ruled legal 46 years ago. these decisions [about aborand others. It started with a screening of award-winning documen- tions] for ourselves. We are not going back” tary “Jane: An Abortion Service,” which to what life was like before Roe v. Wade. Staci Fox, president and CEO of reminded the audience what life was like before 1973 when the U.S. Supreme Court Planned Parenthood Southeast, noted that all three states under her group’s jurisdicruled abortion is legal. tion – Georgia, Alabama and The one-hour informaMississippi – passed restrictive film was followed by a tive abortion bans. She also Q&A with Heather Booth, pointed out that Planned Parwho launched “Jane” in enthood, the nation’s oldest Chicago in the 1960s to find and largest provider of family ways to help women get planning services, has 13 milsafe abortions, despite belion members, or about douing illegal. Ultimately, 12,000 ble the number of members of women were provided safe the National Rifle Association. abortions between 1968 “Remember, bans don’t and 1973. Today, despite the Sherry Frank said NCJW stop abortions,” she stated. groundbreaking case, Roe v. has been involved in “They stop safe abortions.” Wade, 84 percent of all U.S. all the major fights for Booth told the crowd counties don’t have abortion freedom in this country. that she is “cautiously opticlinics, and an increasing number of states are making access to abor- mistic that we will stop these bans. This is an attack on women at the core. Womtions more difficult. Andrea Young, executive director en should not be a political bargaining of ACLU of Georgia, told the AJT that it chip.” During the Q&A, Booth also made was important to sponsor the program a point of acknowledging the role Jews have played in fighting for for two reasons. “One, to social justice, including the help young people know civil rights movement of what’s at stake with these the 1960s. anti-reproductive rights When asked why it measures. It’s been 46 years was important for Jewish since abortion was ruled women to be involved in legal,” she said. “And two, the program, Sherry Frank, to bring the community president of NCJW in Atlantogether with male allies, ta, said “because we’ve been as well, who are so passioninvolved since the beginate” about this issue. Heather Booth founded ning. NCJW worked in the Young said she had no Jane, an abortion service suffragette movement. We problem lining up a long list that helped women access had offices to help with imof co-sponsors for the proabortions before they migrants coming in at Ellis gram. “Before I could even were ruled legal by the U.S. Supreme Court. Island. We worked in getting get the question out,” she said, people said “yes. People are very excit- Russian Jews here. We’ve been involved with ed that we’re doing this as we’re gearing up all of these issues.” She added that her orgafor the legislative year. The ticket sales are nization’s next meeting, Nov. 7, will focus on voting rights. ■ going to help pay for the legal case.” 10 | SEPTEMBER 13, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES


LOCAL NEWS

Ossoff Announces Senate Bid By Dave Schechter

U.S. House from Georgia’s 6th Congressional District. A special election in the traditionally Jon Ossoff, who rose from relative obscurity to become a nationally known, Republican district was required when Realbeit unsuccessful congressional can- publican Rep. Tom Price became Secretary didate, has entered the Democratic field of Health and Human Services in the Trump challenging Georgia’s incumbent Repub- administration, a position he resigned sevlican U.S. Sen. David Perdue in the 2020 eral months later following controversy surrounding travel exelection. penses. News of Ossoff’s In April 2017 Osintention to seek the soff received 48.1 perDemocratic nominacent of the vote in an tion was reported first open primary of 18 on Monday night by candidates, falling the Atlanta Journalshort of the majority Constitution. that would have won The 32-year-old Oshim the seat outright. soff, who grew up in He was forced into a DeKalb County and berunoff with Republican came a bar mitzvah at Karen Handel, who finThe Temple, becomes ished second with 19.8 the fourth candidate John Ossoff, who lost his percent of the vote. seeking the Democratic congressional race in 2017, At the end of a camnomination. The others announced he has entered the ring paign in which an estiare former Columbus again with a run for the U.S. Senate. mated $55 million was Mayor Teresa Tomlinson, Clarkston Mayor Ted Terry, and Sarah Riggs raised (more than $31 million by Ossoff), Amico, who lost to Republican Lt. Gov. Geoff Handel defeated Ossoff, 51.8 percent to 48.2 percent. Handel was later defeated in Duncan in the 2018 election. The Democratic primary is sched- her re-election bid in the November 2018 by Democratic Rep. Lucy McBath. uled for March 24, 2020. Ossoff graduated in 2005 from The In late August, Georgia’s other senator, Republican Johnny Isakson, an- Paideia School. He received a bachelor’s nounced that he would step down at degree in 2009 from Georgetown Univerthe end of the year, two years before the sity in Washington, where he studied at scheduled end of his term, because of the Walsh School of Foreign Service. He worked as deputy communicahealth issues. Ossoff told the AJC that planning for his Senate campaign was un- tions director on Hank Johnson’s successful 2006 campaign to replace fellow derway before Isakson’s announcement. Republicans currently hold a 53-47 Democrat Cynthia McKinney in Georgia’s 4th District. In 2007, while still a student, margin in the U.S. Senate. “David Perdue is a caricature of Wash- Ossoff acted as a legislative aide for Johnington corruption. My campaign will ex- son, primarily on military and national pose him, and a historic grassroots army of security issues, and continued in that poGeorgians will defeat him. Georgia is now sition after graduation. In 2013, Ossoff received a master’s dethe most competitive state in the country, and the Senate majority will be decided in gree from the London School of Economics. He became the chief executive offiGeorgia,” Ossoff said in a statement issued cer (and a 50 percent stakeholder) of InTuesday morning by his campaign. “We’re in a state where one in three sight TWI, which produces documentarural children live in poverty, where we ries focusing on government corruption have the worst maternal mortality in the and conflict around the world. Ossoff’s wife, Alisha, is an OB-GYN entire country, and in a half a decade, this guy hasn’t come down from his private is- resident working at Emory University land to do a single town hall meeting,” the Hospital. The couple lives in the Grant statement said. “He hands out favors to his Park neighborhood of Atlanta. Looking back at his 2017 race for Condonors. He runs errands for the president.” The campaign also touted an endorse- gress, Ossoff told the AJC, “I learned never ment by Rep. John Lewis, the Democrat and to be intimidated from telling my own stocivil rights movement icon who represents ry and touting my own accomplishments by the inevitable partisan smears that will Georgia’s 5th Congressional District. Ossoff will seek to rebuild the grass- come from super PACs in Washington. roots operation and fundraising machin- I’ve been through the fire. I no longer care ery that propelled his bid for a seat in the what they say about me.” ■

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ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES SEPTEMBER 13, 2019 | 11


OPINION Letter to the editor:

Letter to the editor:

It is good to see that free speech and open debate are alive and well at the AJT, unlike in so much of our media, universities and Hollywood. The recent letters from my friends Elliott Levitas, the distinguished former Congressman, and the passionate and courageous Israel supporter Chaya Leah Starkman, debating whether Jews should continue to support the Democratic Party, are sensible and instructive. But very respectfully, I think Congressman Levitas, a very smart and respected lawyer, is arguing a losing case. Starkman’s letter provoked three other letters as well, because she made an excellent, if inconvenient and depressing, point that Democrats try to avoid facing, but someday must. Congressman Levitas is, of course, correct that Israel should not become a partisan political issue. But this is hard to avoid when the state comes under frequent attack by very prominent, media-dominating Democrats like Representatives Ilhan Omar and Rashida Tlaib. He does not mention them, but they are becoming increasingly influential and powerful in the party, while other Democrats react to such attacks largely with passivity and silence, and pride in the “diversity” of their party. This is one reason why Ms. Starkman, also understandably and sensibly, writes that it “has become the party of hate, the party of divisiveness, the party of anti-Semites and Jew haters ... hijacked by the younger radicals and leftists in the party. No Jew should vote Democratic today. We must open our eyes and see the reality and climate of Jew-haters in the Democratic party.” Of course, Jewish Democrat leaders like Levitas should stay and try to prevent the party from becoming even more welcoming to and tolerant of radicals who spew hatred of America, Israel, the free enterprise system, Western culture, and, especially, Jews. Maybe the next election will change the composition of Congress somewhat for the better. But this is not going to happen if the voting habits do not change among Jewish voters, 79 percent of whom voted Democrat in the last election, and 70 percent of whom did so in 2016. The way things are going, Congressman Levitas may not have to make the decision whether or not to leave the Democratic Party -- it seems to be leaving him. It’s their loss. Lewis Regenstein, Atlanta

I cringed when I read Van Gelderen’s letter. The Jews have lived in the West Bank – Samaria and Judea – for centuries. When he was a World War II MIA/POW in Stalag 11b, my husband met three Hebrew- speaking prisoners. He had entered the British compound to trade cigarettes for bread in order to save his starving 94th Infantry Division buddies. They were fighting with the British to vanquish Hitler and had been captured in 1941 – three years earlier. Now, listen Van Gelderen, these are the Jews of the West Bank – 1944 mind you. On their shirts was sewn the word PALESTINE. Not only are these the indigenous Jewish people of the West Bank, but they are the Palestinians. If you want to reinvent history, then market it as a novel with the title, “Alice in Wonderland II.” Dr. Carol Fineblum, Needham, Mass.

Letter to the editor: Leon Van Gelderen writes: “Hank Johnson did not refer to Jews as termites, but rather referred to the effect of right-wing settlers usurping Palestinian land and destroying the social fabric of the West Bank like termites in a house.” Hank Johnson later apologized for using the word “termites,” so he himself realized it’s defamatory. More important though, is the implication that before there were “right-wing settlers,” the West Bank was OK. That’s wrong. Prior to the 1948 war, which was started by Arab regimes, there were Jewish communities there. For example, there was an ancient Jewish community in Hebron, at least until the 1929 massacre; its 90th anniversary was commemorated recently. In 1948, when Jews accepted a two-state solution, and Arabs rejected it, the Jordanian army destroyed the Jewish communities in the West Bank and smashed all synagogues in East Jerusalem. The West Bank is not simply “Palestinian land.” During its annexation and control of the West Bank from 1948 to 1967, Jordan did nothing to develop the area. After the Six Day War, Israel did try to develop the region, instituting the first four-year colleges for Arabs. Ironically, those were later to become Hamas strongholds. As always, identity has far more emotional pull than economic development. The real decline came when the PLO took over after the Oslo Accords. Its corruption and incitement to violence continue to this day. Mahmoud Abbas’ $20 million-plus mansion, built with filched aid money, receives little attention. And what sort of “social fabric” is it that runs television programs for kindergarten-age children, urging them to become suicide bombers? Nor can Israel just withdraw from the West Bank. It is one thing to hand over land to an opponent who accepts your existence. It is another to hand it over to a movement whose sole obsession is the destruction of Israel, especially when Israel is small, and missiles from the West Bank could destroy all its coastal cities, just as the ongoing rockets from Gaza are making life difficult in its south. Doron Lubinsky, Atlanta

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Letter to the editor: A brief history lesson is in order. Arab violence, aimed at preventing Israel’s rebirth in the Jews’ ancestral homeland, actually denied the Arabs of Palestine their first-ever chance at self-rule. Between 1949 and 1967, the land the Palestinians now claim for their state was controlled by Egypt and Jordan. Neither offered the Palestinian Arabs any degree of autonomy, but both occupiers allowed areas under their control to be used as staging grounds for terrorist attacks on Israel. In 1967, Israel liberated Gaza and the “West Bank” (Jordan’s name for eastern Jerusalem, Judea and Samaria) during the Six Day War. The war had been instigated by Egypt and Syria with the open intention of destroying Israel and annihilating her people. Israel did not attack Jordanian positions until Jordan fired on western Jerusalem, which was under Israeli control. Shortly after the war ended, Israel offered to withdraw from liberated land in return for recognition and peace. The Arab League responded, “No negotiations. No recognition. No peace.” Palestinian leaders have kept to this intransigent stance. Both Yasser Arafat (2000/2001) and Mahmoud Abbas (2008) flatly rejected Israeli proposals that would have led to the establishment of the first-ever-to-exist Arab State of Palestine, even with the possibility of shared governance in parts of Jerusalem. No Palestinian leader endeavored to explore the ramifications of Benjamin Netanyahu’s call for a demilitarized Palestinian state co-existing, peacefully, with the nation-state of the Jews, as outlined at Bar Ilan University in 2009. The Palestinians have also summarily rejected the Trump Administration’s yetto-be revealed “Deal of the Century.” So, President Trump has decided to let the Palestinians know that their intransigence will no longer be tolerated. He moved the U.S. Embassy from Tel Aviv to western Jerusalem. (This doesn’t limit Israel’s ability to allow a Palestinian capital in eastern Jerusalem if Israel wants to do so.) President Trump recognized Israeli control of the Golan Heights, (necessary to prevent the Syrians from resuming shelling of Israeli communities at the base of the Heights). And President Trump cut U.S. funding to UNRWA [United Nations Relief and Works Agency], recognizing that millions of descendants of Arabs who fled Arab-initiated violence in the 1940s should have been rehabilitated by Arab countries long ago, just as Israel absorbed and uplifted Mizrachi Jews thrust from their homes in Muslim countries in the first two decades of modern Israel’s existence. There are some signs that the Trump strategy is working. The predicted violent reaction to the embassy move did not materialize. The Gulf nations have criticized the Palestinians’ rejection of the Trump administration’s peace plan. And, most recently, the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination censured the Palestinians’ hatemongering against Israel and Jews. Toby F. Block, Atlanta

The AJT welcomes your letters. We want our readers to have an opportunity to engage with our community in constructive dialogue. If you would like your letter to be published, please write 200 words or less, include your name, phone number and email, and send it to editor@atljewishtimes.com.


ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES SEPTEMBER 13, 2019 | 13


ISRAEL PRIDE

News From Our Jewish Home

Photo via European Athletics // Lonah Chemtai Salpeter stands alone atop the European women’s 10K podium after smashing the record in the Netherlands.

Israeli Runner Breaks European 10K Record

Israeli runner Lonah Chemtai Salpeter smashed the European women’s 10K record in a race in the Netherlands Sept. 1, finishing in 30 minutes and four seconds. The record was previously held by the U.K.’s Paula Radcliffe since 2003,

Today in Israeli History

when she finished with a time of 30:21. Chemtai Salpeter has been a major figure in Israeli athletics and is an upand-comer internationally. She won the Florence Marathon in November 2018, shattering the previous best time at the event by an astounding 11 minutes. While speaking to reporters after the race, Chemtai Salpeter explained that she was pleased with her performance, but not shocked as her training has been building toward the World Athletics Championships in Doha, Qatar, later this month. “I’m happy that I broke the European record, and I’m heading in the right direction,” Chemtai Salpeter said. She also holds the Israeli records in the 1,500, 3,000, 5,000, and 10,000 meters and the half marathon. She is also ramping up to take on the marathon — the Florence Marathon was only her fifth ever — at the Olympic Games in Tokyo next year. Chemtai Salpeter came to Israel in 2008 to serve as a nanny for a diplomat with the Kenyan embassy. Always a keen

runner, she was introduced to Israeli coach Dan Salpeter and the pair hit it off immediately. They married and now have a young son.

and integrated into the Israel Defense Forces. The move is part of a policy of depoliticizing the military that also applies to the Irgun and the Stern Gang. Yitzhak Rabin, a Palmach commander, writes in his memoirs about his ambivalence over the move.

rocco with Egyptian Deputy Prime Minister Hassan Tuhami to assess each side’s willingness to negotiate seriously toward a peace agreement. Morocco’s King Hassan brokers the talks at Dayan’s request. Dayan meets with U.S. Secretary of State Cyrus Vance soon after but does not mention the talks, which help set the stage for Egyptian President Anwar Sadat’s visit to Israel in November 1977.

Photo by Chanania Herman, Israeli Government Press Office // Prime Minister Shimon Peres

looks over notes in the Knesset beside Vice Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir in 1985. Under their coalition agreement, Shamir replaces Peres as prime minister in 1986.

Sept. 13, 1984: Shimon Peres becomes Israel’s eighth prime minister, leading a national unity government combining his Alignment (predecessor of the Labor Party) with Likud and six other parties. The coalition comes together two months after elections in which 44 Knesset seats go to Alignment and 41 to Likud. Under the coalition agreement, Peres serves as prime minister for two years, then yields the position to Likud leader Yitzhak Shamir. Sept. 14, 1948: Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion announces after a meeting with dozens of Palmach leaders that the Haganah strike force, formed in 1941, is being dismantled as an independent unit

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Richard Gladstone acknowledges in 2011 that his 2009 report on the Gaza conflict was flawed.

Sept. 15, 2009: Judge Richard Goldstone, a South African Jew who prosecuted 1990s war crimes in Yugoslavia and Rwanda, presents his U.N.-sponsored “Report on the Fact-Finding Mission on the Gaza Conflict.” The report criticizes Israel and Hamas for their actions in the fighting during the previous December and January. In April 2011 he recants parts of the report that suggest Israel intentionally killed civilians and acknowledges flawed investigative methods. Sept. 16, 1977: Israeli Foreign Minister Moshe Dayan holds secret talks in Mo-

AP Photo/Koji Sasahara // Sagi Muki of Israel, top, competes against Matthias Casse of Belgium during a men’s under81-kilogram final of the World Judo Championships in Tokyo Aug. 28.

Sagi Muki Wins at Judo Championships

For the first time in history a male Israeli judoka, Sagi Muki, was named

Sept. 17, 1978: Egyptian President Anwar Sadat and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin sign the Camp David Accords, brokered by President Jimmy Carter. The accords have two parts: an agreement about the future of relations between the two nations and a framework for implementing Palestinian self-rule. The former leads to the peace treaty signed by the two nations in March 1979, but Palestinian autonomy awaits the 1993 Oslo Accords. Sept. 18, 1949: The Compulsory Education Law, passed Sept. 12, goes into effect. It requires all children ages 5 to 15 to attend recognized educational institutions and provides for free elementary education; a 2009 law extends compulsory education through 12th grade. A provision allowing parents to send children to schools that are part of a recognized trend leads to separate public school systems for Arabs, religious

the winner at the World Judo Championships in Tokyo. Muki defeated Belgian Matthias Casse in the finals of the under-81 kilogram weight class to claim his title. On the road to the final, Muki narrowly bested Egyptian Mohamed Abdelaal, who refused to shake hands after the match, echoing a previous gesture by an Ethiopian athlete at the 2016 Rio Olympics. While there was the potential for more controversy, Iran’s Saeid Mollaei was defeated by Casse in the semifinals. While Iranian athletes in the past have forfeited rather than face Israeli opponents, it was reported earlier this year that Iranian regulations had changed. Mollaei “is a terrific guy,” said Israel’s coach Oren Smadja. “I think he would have competed [against Muki] if he had made it to the final.” While he is the first Israeli man to win the title, the first Israeli was Yarden Gerbi, who in 2013 won gold in Brazil in the women’s under-63 kilogram weight class. ■

Zalman Shazar, Israel’s first education minister and third president, is shown during his schoolboy days.

Zionists and Haredi Jews, in addition to the secular system serving most Jews. Sept. 19, 1988: Israel launches its first space satellite, the 340-pound Ofek 1, from an undisclosed location near the Mediterranean Sea. Named for the Hebrew word for horizon, Ofek 1 completes an Earth orbit every 90 minutes at heights of 400 to 1,600 miles. The mission marks Israel as the ninth country able to launch a satellite and reveals its ballistic missile capability. Foreign Minister Shimon Peres declares the civilian project to be about technology, not an arms race. ■ Items are provided by the Center for Israel Education (www.israeled.org), where you can find more details.


ISRAEL NEWS Former Atlantans Ready to Vote for Second Time in 2019 By Jan Jaben-Eilon In the last days of the do-over election campaign in Israel, former Atlantans now living in the country report being bombarded with text messages from all sides of the political spectrum, as well as from pollsters. “The last round in April was worse, but I expect that to pick up in the final weeks,” said Jonathan Adler, who grew up in Atlanta before making aliyah. “Everyone is tired of it and just wants to get it over with. We’re ready to have a working government.” Israelis went to the polls April 9, but subsequently Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu failed to put together a coalition government and convinced the Knesset – the Israeli parliament – to call for new elections. So, for the first time in Israeli history, voters are being asked to vote for a second time this year, on Sept. 17. Meanwhile, several members of Netanyahu’s government – essentially cabinet members – have either been fired or resigned, and the Knesset isn’t meeting, so the business of the government isn’t advancing. Unlike the April election, Israeli voters will have fewer parties from which to choose this time around. On both the right and left sides of the political spectrum, parties have forged alliances and mergers because the aim of the game is to create a coalition of at least 61 voting members, or a majority of the 120 Knesset members. Parties must receive 3.25 percent of votes cast in order to meet the threshold to sit in the Knesset. If a party receives fewer than that percentage – which equals four Knesset seats – those votes essentially don’t count. No one is certain that the results of the September election will make it any easier for Netanyahu, or his main opponent Benny Gantz of the center Blue and White Party, to attain a majority of seats. Eyes remain on Avigdor Lieberman, the head of right-wing Yisrael Beiteinu Party, who refused to join Netanyahu’s coalition after the last election because of disagreements with ultra-Orthodox coalition partners and about who could be the kingpin again this time around. Because there’s no precedent for a do-over election, pollsters are at a loss to predict whether voters will vote this time around. In Israel, election days are holidays, but that doesn’t mean Israelis are happy about it. Although some observers express concern over election

Jonathan Adler and wife Hila are probably splitting their votes.

Rabbi Adam Frank hopes for a unity government without Benjamin Netanyahu.

Jim and Leigh Lando are making a special effort to vote in this election.

fatigue, former Atlantans who were contacted are as determined as ever to vote. And while American Jews are mostly confused about the Israeli electoral process, those who made aliyah are carefully and strategically making their voting choices. “I live in a split household,” Adler said. He plans to vote for Netanyahu’s party, Likud, while his wife plans to vote for Yemina, a right-wing party headed by popular politician Ayelet Shaked. Both of them want Shaked in a government headed by Netanyahu, but they are weighing how important it is for Likud to capture enough votes to be tasked with patchworking a coalition together versus mak-

ing sure Shaked is in the government. “I am not a political strategist,” Adler contended. He, like all Israeli voters, in effect, must figure out how to make each of their votes count exactly the way they want. According to the August 2019 Israeli Voice Index, a monthly survey conducted by the Guttman Center at the Israel Democracy Institute in Jerusalem, only 27 percent of Israelis want a right-wing government led by Netanyahu. Almost twice as many prefer either a unity government led by either Netanyahu or Gantz, or a coalition led by the latter. Former Atlantan Rabbi Adam Frank

plans to vote as he did in April: for the Blue and White Party. “I consider myself a centrist. Blue and White has a chance to get the most mandates, but the question will be whether they can put together a coalition,” said Frank, who made aliyah in 2001. “I think we need new leadership,” he told the AJT, even though he believes Netanyahu has been strong on the economy, international relations and security. These are areas, he said, most Israelis care about. “But there’s enough I find problematic about Netanyahu” to vote against him, he said. “I think he kowtows to the right-wing nationalists and ultra-Orthodox. He does what is in his own best interests. I believe he’s been involved in corrupt activity, as the indictments he’s facing claim. And he’s made poor decisions about Diaspora Jewry,” said Frank, who formerly led a Conservative synagogue in Jerusalem and is now an activist with two organizations. One challenges the monopoly of the ultra-Orthodox-dominated rabbinut and the other fights for animal welfare. Frank said that if he were a betting man, he would bet that a Likud-led, rightwing government will result from the upcoming election, with Lieberman joining the coalition and the ultra-Orthodox parties bending to Lieberman’s priorities in exchange for staying in power. “I’m afraid this will happen. However, my great hope is that Lieberman holds out, Netanyahu can’t put together a coalition and there will be a unity government with Blue and White, but with a Likud that doesn’t include Netanyahu,” Frank said. Former Atlantans Jim and Leigh Lando, who go back and forth between Pittsburgh and Beersheva, are making a special effort to vote Sept. 17. They’ve been in Pittsburgh with family and only planned on returning to Israel after the holidays in October. “But I was pissed that my first vote as an Israeli in April was cancelled by Netanyahu,” said Lando, who worked as an epidemiologist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention while living in Atlanta. So, he is flying back to Israel just for a few days to vote. He told the AJT that he was torn between voting for Blue and White and the left of center Meretz party in April, before choosing Meretz. This time around, he will “most likely vote for Democratic Union Party” which is a merger of Meretz, former Prime Minister Ehud Barak’s party, and former Labor Knesset Member Stav Shaffir. Israel “needs to be a place I want to live in,” he said. ■

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES SEPTEMBER 13, 2019 | 15


HOLIDAY FLAVORS Holiday Celebrations – French Sephardic Style Praying with dates and chard at Rosh Hashanah and breaking Yom Kippur’s fast with quince jam allows me to keep my French habits in Atlanta and respect the traditions of my JudeoSephardic family. Let me share with you more about these holiday rituals:

Rosh Hashanah

Martine Tartour

This celebration marks the beginning of the year, and we hope that this year will be full of colors. My Rosh Hashanah table is therefore joyful, abundant and fragrant, marking the intent for a joyful life. As part of this tradition, we do not eat fish because the word dag, (fish, in Hebrew) is close to de’aga, (concern). It is also customary not to eat nuts during the Jewish month of Tishrei because the word egoz (nuts in Hebrew) has the same numerical value as the word het (sin). In Atlanta, my guests are mostly American Ashkenazi Jews and therefore, descendants of Jews from Eastern Europe. Being used to only dipping apples in honey to celebrate a sweet new year, they are surprised to discover on my white tablecloth so many dishes waiting for a prayer. I am delighted to give them an explanation of all these symbols which remind us to: 1- Multiply Our Merit Pomegranate: This fruit supposedly contains 613 grains – nobody counted! – like the number of mitzvot. I suggest perfuming them with orange blossom water. It’s divine. We recite the prayer in which it is said that we hope that our merits will be as numerous as the grains of the pomegranate. Sesame: The same idea as the pomegranate, to see our merits increase like sesame seeds. Some families prefer beans. Jujubes: Same idea, that our virtues will be multiplied because more than a thousand of these tiny apples – the size of olives – are harvested on a single tree. While it is impossible to find jujubes in Atlanta, in France, they are everywhere on the street markets during Rosh Hashanah. 2-Keep Our Enemies Away Here is the tradition that surprised my friends in Atlanta the most: prayers on chard, squash, garlic … cooked as fritters and dipped in honey. Why these vegetables? Because their translation in Hebrew or Judeo-Aramaic is phonetically close to 16 | SEPTEMBER 13, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

words meaning to avoid, to destroy, to move away. Our hopes and wishes for this new year. These traditions find their sources in the Talmud, written in Hebrew and Judeo-Aramaic. By eating them, we eat the words in order to dominate them. Eating becomes a spiritual action. Chard: In Aramaic salka, is close to the word ystalkou, in Hebrew, which means “disappear.” We pray that our enemies will disappear. Squash: In Aramaic, kra is close to kara, which means “tear.” We pray that all the bad decrees against us will be torn. Garlic: In Hebrew, choum, close to the word choumdava, which means “nothing.” We pray in the hope that our enemies will be destroyed and reduced to nothing. I like to relate that the late French Rabbi Leon Ashkenazi, full of humor, used to eat a banana because of the phonetical similitude between banana and bonne année, good year, in French.

Linda Nataf Goldmann, a gallery owner in Paris and friend of Tartour’s, holds up head of fish from her holiday table. She is pictured with her husband, Daniel.

3-Find Our Place The fish head: We do not eat it. It serves as a symbol of blessing to ask to be placed at the top and not at the bottom of the list of nations. Among Jews from Kurdistan, Morocco and Tunisia, it can be a sheep’s head that is placed on Rosh Hashanah’s table. Of course, it is not put with a sprig of parsley in the nostrils (as some butcher shops do in France). It is cooked in the oven, with vegetables, often including beans, once again to evoke multiplicity. Holiday Meal In Atlanta, brisket is “de rigueur.” This is absolutely not the case in France, even in the Ashkenazi families. For me, this is the time to take out my salads cooked with all sorts of vegetables; I love for them to be very colorful. Men wear white kippot. My challah is round and sometimes I make it in the shape of a pomegranate. All I have to do is make a little ball of bread and place a crown

on top, and then to the oven. But the highlight of the dinner is this incredible dish: the pkaila. So delicious that the renowned chef Yotam Ottolenghi presented it as a culinary marvel and gave the recipe for it to The New York Times in September 2018: “Tunisian Jews make a condiment called pkaila or bkeila, which is extraordinary. It is prepared by cooking down plenty of spinach for hours in a generous quantity of oil. The spinach – Swiss chard is often used as well – loses all its water, and very slowly fries in the oil, resulting in a small amount of greasy paste as black as crude oil, which is used to flavor all kinds of soups and stews.”

On the table, a number of foods symbolize the prayers and hopes for a new year.

Yom Kippur Everywhere in the world where Jews celebrate Yom Kippur, this day of fasting is dedicated to prayer. The fasting is not a goal in itself, but a way to surpass oneself, to overcome one’s weaknesses and to primarily reconciliate with oneself. I frightened more than one friend in Atlanta by speaking about the kapparot. Oddly, many people were unaware of this rite, even though it is still practiced by thousands of Jews in Israel, as well as by some people in France. And one quickly understands why this ritual has been abandoned: it consists of sacrificing a chicken as a sign of atonement. Historically, the kapparot consisted of rotating a white bird over someone’s head three times while reciting prayers. This ritual, which dates back to the Middle Ages, has sparked anger among animal rights activists. And this is completely understandable. It was therefore abandoned as a sanctioned practice. However, many Sephardic Jewish families continue to buy as many roosters as there are males in the family and as many hens as there are females in the family. For my part, I‘ve never agreed to this tradition, neither have my parents, but we have the habit to cook all Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur’s main dishes with chicken: roasted chickens, stuffed chickens, chicken soups … Day Before We usually have seven meals all day long, and I keep doing it because it amuses the kids. Breakfast begins with sandwiches, then a snack with lemonade and cakes, and we end with a wonderful main dish called the “Bride’s Couscous,” which fea-

tures chicken. We listen to the Kol Nidré at the synagogue, and back home, my father tells the story of Moses, as he does every year in front of his grandchildren because it is the most fascinating character for him. Fast Day The custom in Tunisia, which we kept in France, and which I continue to practice in Atlanta, is to inhale the scent of the quince perfumed with cloves, which we prepare the day before. In small damp cloths, we spread crushed cloves, place the quince on them, and wrap them in the cloth so that they soak up the smell all night long. Breathing in the fragrance of the quince helps overcome headaches and dizziness, it is very efficient. Break the Fast In most synagogues in France, there is a magnificent tradition at the time of the kohanim prayer: the head of the family joins his loved ones in the courtyard of the synagogue. He gathers under his tallit all of his family to bless them while the shofar sounds. It looks like a sea of white tallit. It is beautiful. Once, at home, everyone has his traditions. My sister-in-law, whose family is from Turkey, breaks her fast with a pepitada, a milk beverage with melon seeds and vanilla, then, as a main dish, an egg and lemon soup called avgolemono, in Ladino, the Judeo-Spanish language. In my country, Tunisian Jews prefer to drink lemonade, flavored with orange blossom, a calming post-fasting drink. Then, quince jam and cakes satisfy the connoisseur’s palate, as well as biscotti dipped in zabayon (2 egg yolks and 2 ounces of powdered sugar beaten until a smooth cream is obtained). Then we serve a rishta soup, with pasta … and chicken again! ■


HOLIDAY FLAVORS

General Muir is Coming to Sandy Springs By Bob Bahr Beginning early next year, fans of New York Jewish deli food will have a new opportunity in Sandy Springs to satisfy their insistent cravings for the perfect pastrami or corned beef on rye. The General Muir, which for the past six years has raised the deli experience to new heights in the Emory University neighborhood, is opening a second location within the retailing space in the City Springs civic complex on Roswell Road. The restaurant, which has won national recognition for its ability to pump new The layout of the new restaurant is expected to include an exhibition kitchen and informal seating arranged similarly to the location at Emory Point. life into an old ethnic tradition, is doubling down on its commitment to Jewish deli classics. Our vision is to create an anchor, a real so much from that trip.” Chef Todd Ginsberg will not only be Over the Labor Day weekend earlier hub for the film festival at City Springs serving the smoked meats and deli clas- this month, he taught a class at Limmud- and nothing brings people together like sics that have won him nominations as Fest in the North Georgia mountains with food and movies.” the James Beard Foundation’s Best Chef the well-known Sephardic food expert, Residents in Sandy Springs and in the Southeast but he will be adding hot Susan Barocas, from Washington D.C. In Dunwoody still lament the demise of bagels fresh from the oven in his exhibi- January, just before the new restaurant locally-beloved The Brickery restaurant tion kitchen all day long. opens, he’s helping to lead a weeklong run by Sally and Bruce Alterman. It dis“We’ll have bagels coming out of trip to Israel for local food mavens that’s appeared almost four years ago after its the oven every 30 minutes for everyone organized by the Jewish Federation of location was redeveloped into an apartto see. Then all day long you’ll have that Greater Atlanta. ment complex. Ginsberg hopes to resurfresh bagel smell coming off the ovens, The restaurant deal was put together rect that restaurant’s braised brisket and which is intoxicating,” Ginsberg said. by Selig Enterprises, which developed a In addition to one of the best bowls of residential and shopping community admatzo ball soup in the jacent to the complex city, he promises his that houses Sandy own take on such stanSprings city offices dards as cheese blinand a large performtzes, chopped liver, and ing arts center. smoked fish platters. The City Springs They’ll be served up Theatre Company from early morning to there played a major evening in the restaurole in the Atlanta rant and an enclosed Jewish Film Festival patio or available for earlier this year. The takeout, something festival offered hot that is not done at the coffee and snacks in Chef Todd Ginsberg stands besides Emory location. the lobby of the thepictures of the U.S. troop transport “We’ll probably ater and drinks in a ship, The General Muir, that brought have an expanded bar that adjoins the Jews from Europe after World War II. menu there and a large theater, but the need to-go section. Matzo ball soup in pints and for something more was evident. quarts and all sorts of specialties, prepackThe new restaurant, with its hot bagels aged and ready to take home.” and schmears, deli platters and a tempting You can also expect to see some pastry case, is likely to be a popular stop trendy Sephardic dishes from Israel join- for the thousands who regularly attend the ing the largely Ashkenazic menu based popular festival screenings. The restauon the foods of Eastern Europe. Last sum- rant, which has just finalized its kitchen mer, Ginsberg was part of a trip orga- design and general layout, hopes to be up nized by Israel’s Ministry of Tourism to and running before next year’s film festihelp popularize the newly trendy dishes val, which opens in early February. of Israel’s Sephardic population from The executive director of the AJFF, North Africa and the Eastern Mediterra- Kenny Blank, sees a natural synergy benean. The foods he ate and the people he tween Jewish food and Jewish film. met made an enormous impact on him. “This is the perfect marriage of food, “We had the best time ever. I learned film, location and audience. There can so much. I saw so much, and I took away be no better nexus for all of those things.

The General Muir restaurant in Sandy Springs expects to have a full menu of deli favorites.

sweet noodle kugel along with the sense of community that was so much a part of its almost legendary appeal. “The Brickery had that community feel where you can go every week and get a brisket and salad and matzo ball soup,” he emphasized. “Whether you’re with family or whether you’re by yourself, or whether you’re with friends, you could do that and feel like you were home. I want to bring back the brisket and bring back that spirit as well.” ■

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES SEPTEMBER 13, 2019 | 17


HOLIDAY FLAVORS

The Levys Connect Food Cultures

Photos by AtlantaCoffeeShops.com // Julia and

Iris Levy give welcoming introductions at the first Tradition Kitchens event.

By Marcia Caller Jaffe Mother-daughter duo Iris and Julia Levy have new “fish to fry” and more challah to braid. Perhaps Spanish Jewish tapas, or pastrami eggrolls. In an effort to urge families to preserve their own generational recipes, they formed a new startup, Tradition Kitchens, which organizes groups to meet in home kitchens to record and preserve memories. Iris and Julia have been cooking together since 1986. After growing up in Marietta, Julia moved to New York City for many years. When she moved home about two years ago, she began cooking with her mom. Julia said, “It’s brought back many memories and created new ones. One morning while reading a cookbook, my mom had the idea for Tradition Kitchens.”

Alice Simmons sprinkles Corn Flakes on top of the kugel with her mom, Marisa L. Simmons.

Joshua Bernstein samples noodle kugel as Lesle Kalick Wolfe serves the dish. Julia Levy records audio for a future podcast episode.

The recipe card of Rosanne Kalick, mother of Leslie Kalick Wolfe.

ing and teaching, we anticipate expanding the frequency.

were a centerpiece at every family celebration, including Rosh Hashanah. Combined with sweet jam, nuts, chocolate chips, cinnamon and sugar, they are a nostalgic holiday dessert. It also reminds me of sleepaway camp because she somehow managed to smuggle them in to me in surprise packages.

recruiting writers of all levels — from budding journalists to accomplished storytellers — to record these memories from their family members or other generations from their community. The audio and written posts will be featured on our social media and website.

Marcia: Are you sharing anything special for Rosh Hashanah meals? Iris: As we learned about historic culinary traditions, we were intrigued by the Sephardic seder, which features symbolic foods beyond apples for a sweet year ahead. In that spirit, a Spanish chef will be teaching dishes inspired by apples, dates and pomegranates. We’ll also feature fun and relevant recipes on our social media. Marcia: You have both male and female participants? Jewish and nonJewish? Iris: Food connects people so we’re bringing together a diverse group for our classes. We welcome all ages, cultures and genders.

Marcia: Explain your concept. You Marcia: Do you are a nonprofit? have any special tips Julia: We’re for Break the Fast transforming kitchthis year? ens into classrooms Julia: Bake Lesin neighborhoods lie Kalick Wolfe’s around Atlanta mother Rosanne’s taught by locals noodle kugel to Iris and Julia Levy share the story of with stories to share, break the fast. At Grandma Betty’s favorite apron. from bubbe to celeour first class, Leslie brated chefs to home cooks like you. It’s a taught us how to make it and shared her cultural, historical and intergenerational family’s story. It’s delicious and simple culinary experiment. Discover one reci- with its cornflake crunch. pe at a time and cultivate a community along with the classes. Marcia: What are three of your own family’s best, most sentimental high holiMarcia: How many events do you day recipes? have per month or year? Iris: My Aunt Helen made the most Julia: Our classes are pop-up style, incredible apple cake with a crust that set which means we post them with a few the dessert bar high in our family. It had weeks notice and invite guests to apply. a secret ingredient, orange juice, but we This fall, we’re piloting bimonthly class- can’t tell you how much! es. But with the strong interest in attendJulia: Grandma Betty’s rugelach 18 | SEPTEMBER 13, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Marcia: You reached out to Atlanta restaurateurs. Who are they and what did you learn? Julia: We’re in conversation with many prominent restaurateurs. Aaron Phillips and Ron Hsu from Lazy Betty are partnering with us on an Asian-Jewish fusion class. For a taste of authentic Israeli cuisine, we’ll be collaborating with Tal Postelnik Baum of Aziza. We’re learning about the stories that accompany what they cook. Marcia: How does one apply for a seat? Iris: To attend, guests apply for a seat by completing an interest form. We invite them to introduce themselves and their cooking curiosity as we strive to create a class of all ages, backgrounds and locations. Then, via a lottery system, guests are invited to reserve a seat. When we don’t have enough seats, guests who are not selected are placed on a waiting list. Marcia: The Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta has given you a grant to do what? Julia: As recipients of a 2019 PROPEL Innovation Grant from Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta, we’re part of this year’s class of Jewish Atlanta changemakers. Our grant supports our launch, providing us with advisors and resources to experiment with our creative culinary concepts to stir up social good. Marcia: What is a “kitchen scribe?” Iris: Filled with history, family recipes share important stories. We’re

Marcia: What’s your favorite food quote? Mine is George Bernard Shaw, “There is no love more sincere than the love of food.” Julia: “Pull up a chair. Take a taste. Come join us. Life is so endlessly delicious.” - Ruth Reichl. Here are some of Traditions Kitchens’ favorite holiday recipes:

Rosanne Kalick’s Noodle Kugel Submitted by Leslie Kalick Wolfe 1 pound wide noodles 1 pound cottage cheese 1 cup milk 1 1/2 teaspoons salt 4 tablespoons sugar 6 tablespoons melted butter or margarine Cornflakes for garnish Cook noodles, drain and rinse with cold water. Mix noodles with 1 pint of sour cream. Add cottage cheese. Place in shallow greased pan. Top with crushed cornflakes. Dot with butter or margarine. Bake at 375 F for about an hour.

Grandma Dora’s Pryanik Submitted by granddaughter Olga Zelzburg 1 cup whole milk kefir 1 tablespoon sour cream 1 stick margarine 2 tablespoons honey Generous amount of walnuts and raisins 1 teaspoon baking soda


HOLIDAY FLAVORS 3 eggs 3/4 cup white sugar 2 cups flour 2 tablespoons oil Oil and flour (or crumbs) for the cake dish Add the sour cream to the kefir. Let sit. Melt margarine. Add honey. While warm, mix in walnuts and raisins. Add baking soda to kefir and sour cream. It will bubble and grow. Combine with the margarine mixture. In separate dish, beat eggs and sugar. Mix in with the rest. Let sit for 15 to 30 minutes. Slowly add flour and oil. The batter will have a sour cream consistency. Let sit for another 15 minutes. Spray a cake dish – I use a Bundt pan - with oil and flour (or powder with crumbs). Warm oven to 425 F. Bake cake for 30 minutes. Turn off the oven and let sit for another 10 minutes. Cool and enjoy.

Normandy Apple Tart Submitted by Thomas Sergio of Olde World Artisan Bread Co. Pastry: 2 1/2 cups bread flour, plus extra for dusting 1 1/4 cups superfine sugar 4 ounces unsalted butter, at room temperature 1 egg Splash of cold water Frangipane filling: 7 ounces unsalted butter, at room temperature 1 cup superfine sugar 2 eggs and 2 yolks 1/3 cup all-purpose flour 1 2/3 cups ground almonds (ALDI stocks these inexpensively) Splash of Calvados (French apple brandy, also a great after-dinner drink) 4 dessert apples, cored, peeled, halved, and sliced thinly Apricot jelly, to coat Preheat oven to 400 F. (Best not to use convection, the top will brown too quickly.) Combine pastry ingredients in a bowl. Roll out on a lightly floured surface and line a 12-inch tart pan – best one with a removable bottom – very thinly coated with shortening. Cream the butter and sugar until fluffy and white, then add eggs and yolks one at a time to incorporate. Add Calvados,

flour and ground almonds and mix well. Spread the frangipane filling in pie crust. Fan the apples out over the filling from the edge to the center to form a cross. If the apple slices are small, you can also make six “arms,” which is what I do. Bake 25 to 30 minutes in the lower third of the oven, until golden brown. The frangipane should be set. Remove from oven and brush with apricot jelly/jam (which has been warmed in the microwave to soften) while the cake is still warm. This imparts a nice glaze but can be omitted. Serve while still warm. Wine pairing for dessert: Chablis, or other unoaked Chardonnay. Tayglach Submitted by Susan Tregerman in honor of her mother Esther Colchamiro when they used to cook together. Originally published in “Jewish Cookery” by Leah W. Leonard, Crown Publishing, 1949. 3 eggs 2 cups flour 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon ginger or nutmeg Chopped almonds (optional) Honey Syrup 1 cup honey 1 cup sugar 1 teaspoon ground ginger Beat eggs slightly in a mixing bowl. Sift together dry ingredients, except almonds, and stir in to form a stiff dough. Turn out on lightly floured board and knead 1 to 2 minutes. Pat into ½-inch thickness a small ball of this dough and cut into ¼-inch squares. Remove cut squares to a large plate and proceed with the rest of the dough until all of it has been cut. Or you can roll small pieces of dough between palms to form ¼-inch thick rolls, pencil fashion, and then cut ¼-inch pieces. Bring honey, sugar and ginger to a boil in a deep pot and drop the bits of dough a few at a time to prevent lowering temperature of syrup. Cook over reduced heat after all tayglach have been dropped into syrup, about 20 minutes, stirring with a wooden spoon to prevent boiling over. Do not stir while cooking. Turn over on a wet board and pat with a wet wooden spoon to an even thickness - ½ inch is about right. If almonds are desired, spread evenly on wet board before turning out tayglach mixture as evenly as possible without spreading the nuts too far apart. Let cool before cutting into small squares or diamond spaces 1 to 1½ inches in diameter or finger lengths 1-inch wide. ■ ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES SEPTEMBER 13, 2019 | 19


HOLIDAY FLAVORS

Remembering Loved Ones at Yom Kippur

Flora Rosefsky remembers departed loved ones at Yom Kippur with photos in addition to yahrzeit candles.

By Flora Rosefsky Yom Kippur commands us to remember. It is a time on the Jewish calendar where honoring the memory of those we loved, and who loved us in return, is part of the holiday. When we talk about those cherished family members or perhaps dear friends who have passed away, I call that a way to understand what everlasting life is about. How many times do I have a private conversation with my mother of blessed memory, as if she was with me physically to share the latest happening in my life, or to tell her something about our children or grandchildren? A new tradition I started during Yom Kippur in 2009 was to conjure up memories of the generations before me by putting out selected old family photographs. Photos of my parents, my husband’s parents, special aunts, uncles, our grandparents and other family members who are no longer with us became part of that year’s Yom Kippur photo selection pile. In addition to lighting the special yahrzeit candles that stay lit for over 24 hours, family framed or unframed photos are spread out on a desk, table or buffet with the yahrzeit candles lit nearby on a tray. After going through family photos stored in boxes, I also bring a small pile of old photos over to our Yom Kippur Kol Nidre family dinner table. My husband and I talk about our grandparents, whom those at our table – our children and grandchildren – have never met. In fact, some of them are named after these beloved relatives. I ask them what they would like to know about their great-grandfather, as 20 | SEPTEMBER 13, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

one example. Depending on who is sitting at the table, some will talk about him from their own memory and perspective. All of our four children have many good stories to share about their paternal grandfather, Harry Rosefsky of blessed memory, who lived to be 98 years old. He devoted himself to being a grandfather. He lived a few blocks from us. He often ate dinner with us. He was part of their everyday lives. The stories resonate strongly with my children, who want their children to know about that generation that no longer are with us. To get ready for the tradition, I go to a closet, a storage box under my bed, or shelves full of family albums, including wedding photos showing relatives who played an important part in our lives. Yom Kippur has been an appropriate time to put the albums out on a coffee table. We have family members sift through them and ask questions about the link from one generation to another. What do we remember most about the person we see in a photograph? If I were to talk about my mother, Julia Leff Greenbaum, I would say she loved being a “balabusta,” the Yiddish term for being a fine housekeeper-cook extraordinaire. Her joy was to visit us, put on an apron and start cooking, teaching me her favorite recipes. Retelling stories about the influence and personalities of loved family members or dear friends who are no longer physically present doesn’t have to only happen during Yom Kippur, but it is a good time to think about starting this kind of tradition of sharing memories, using photographs to start the conversation. ■


HOLIDAY FLAVORS

Holiday Recipes From the AJT In preparation for the holiday, our staff and writers share our favorite recipes of the season. From soup to nuts – on dessert, that is. Enjoy!

Sweet and Savory Brisket & Ladinsky Latkes Ladinsky Latkes: 4 medium russet potatoes, peeled 2 medium onions Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper 2 egg whites, beaten 1/4 cup chopped chives Vegetable oil, for frying Grate the potatoes and onions. You can use a box grater or food processor. Put the dry potatoes and onions in a bowl and season with salt and pepper. Fold in egg whites and chives to bind the mixture. Coat a large nonstick skillet with 1/4-inch of oil and heat to medium. Drop 2 tablespoons of the potato mixture at a time into the hot oil; gently flatten with a spatula so it fries up thin and crispy. Fry for 3 to 4 minutes on each side to desired texture. Place on paper towels to drain the oil and season with salt while the potato pancakes are still hot. Repeat until mixture is gone. Serve with applesauce. Kaylene Ladinsky is managing publisher and editor.

By Kaylene Ladinsky Servings: 10 4 to 5 pounds beef brisket, first-cut Kosher salt Coarsely ground black pepper 2 cups brown sugar 4 sprigs fresh rosemary, stripped needles from stem and chopped into small pieces 4 large garlic cloves, smashed 2 cups red wine 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil 4 large carrots, sliced into 3-inch chunks 3 celery stalks, sliced into 3-inch chunks 4 large red onions, halved 1 handful fresh, flat-leaf parsley leaves 3 bay leaves 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour (optional) 2 tablespoons wine or water (for gravy)

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Sweet and Savory Brisket: Preheat oven to 325 F. On a cutting board, mash the garlic and 1/2 teaspoon of the salt together with the flat side of a knife into a paste. Add rosemary and continue to mash until incorporated. Put the garlic-rosemary paste in a small bowl and add 2 tablespoons of olive oil; stir to combine. Season both sides of brisket with a fair amount of kosher salt and ground black pepper. Take brown sugar and cover the brisket with it. Place in a large roasting pan or Dutch oven over medium-high flame and coat the pan with olive oil. Put the brisket in the roasting pan and sear to form a brown crust on both sides. Lay the vegetables around the brisket and pour the rosemary paste over the entire entrée. Add the wine; toss in the parsley and bay leaves. Cover the pan tightly with aluminum foil and transfer to the oven. Bake for about 3 to 4 hours, basting every 30 minutes with the pan juices, until the beef is fork tender. Remove the brisket to a cutting board and let it cool for 15 minutes. Scoop the vegetables out of the roasting pan and onto a platter; cover to keep warm. Pour out some of the excess fat and put the roasting pan with the pan juices on the stove over medium-high heat. Boil and stir for 5 minutes until the sauce is reduced by half. Add the flour (if using) with the 2 tablespoons of wine or water and blend for gravy. Slice the brisket across the muscle lines at a slight diagonal.

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HOLIDAY FLAVORS

Baked Fish with Lemon Cream Sauce Submitted by Michal Bonell

Reprinted from RecipeTin Eats food blog My mother always baked fish for Rosh Hashanah. According to tradition, having fish on the table is an omen for blessings in the year to come. Cooking recipes that remind me of my mother keeps her as part of the holiday for us.

Grandma’s Potato Kugel Submitted by Roni Robbins

I remember watching my grandmother, Sarah Farkas, grating potatoes by hand in Rego Park, N.Y. My mom, Shirley Kayne, used a metal grinder, complete with wooden food tamper to push the chopped potatoes and onions through. I helped her when I lived at home in Hauppauge, N.Y., and more recently, Asheville, N.C. The recipe is a bisl (bit) of this and a bisl of that, to look and taste. So keep that in mind if you try to duplicate. It’s sort of how I cook today, especially the Jewish recipes, just to carry on a method of food preparation that has been passed L’dor V’dor. 6 potatoes 3 onions, grated 4 eggs 1/2 cup matzah meal (It’s not only for Passover) Salt and pepper to taste 4 tablespoons Mother’s margarine Preheat oven to 350 F. Mix ingredients, except the margarine, which should be melted in a baking dish to coat the pan. After the margarine melts, pour the rest of the mixture into the dish. Bake for about an hour until brown on top and bottom. A little carb-heavy for my tastes today, but certainly brings back holiday memories of extended family seated around long tables in my grandparent’s New York City home to enjoy Jewish cooking at its best. Roni Robbins is associate editor.

22 | SEPTEMBER 13, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Four 6-ounce fish fillets (1/2inch thick, skinless and boneless) 4 tablespoon unsalted butter 1/4 cup heavy cream 1 to 2 garlic cloves, minced 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 1/2 tablespoon lemon juice Salt and pepper, to taste 1 1/2 tablespoons finely chopped shallots (or yellow onion if you prefer) Fresh parsley and lemon slices Preheat oven to 375 F. Place fish in a baking dish, ensuring there’s room between pieces. Sprinkle fish with salt and pepper. Place butter, cream, garlic, mustard, lemon juice, and a dash of salt and pepper in a microwave dish. Heat for 30 seconds, stir, then heat for another 30 seconds until melted and smooth. Sprinkle fish with shallots and pour sauce over the top. Bake for 10 to 15 minutes until fish is fully cooked. Garnish with parsley and lemon, if desired. Michal Bonell is senior account manager.


HOLIDAY FLAVORS Brenda’s Fruity Trifle By Brenda Gelfand

Angel food or pound cake (store bought is fine) 4 bananas, sliced 1 pound fresh strawberries, sliced, or pound of fresh raspberries Package Oreo cookies, crushed 8-ounce package Heath toffee bits 3 large cartons of lite or fat-free Cool Whip Reserve a handful of cookies or berries for topping, if desired. In a trifle bowl, layer angel food cake, bananas, fruit, cookies, toffee, and whipped topping. Repeat, ending with whipped topping. Sprinkle a little crushed cookies, toffee bits or fruit on top for decoration. Brenda Gelfand is senior account manager.

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Challah to Share By Lilli Jennison

4 packages yeast 3 1/2 cups warm water 1/4 cup sugar 1 1/2 tablespoons salt 13 cups flour plus about a cup for kneading 6 eggs 1 cup vegetable oil plus some for greasing the bowl Glaze: 1 egg Poppy seeds, sesame seeds, or Trader Joe’s Everything but the Bagel Sesame Seasoning Blend Preheat oven to 375 F. In a large bowl, dissolve yeast in warm water. Add sugar, salt, and 6 cups of flour. Mix well with hands. Add eggs and oil. Mix in remaining 7 cups of flour. Mix until dough begins to pull away from sides of the bowl. Turn onto floured surface to begin kneading. Only use enough flour to keep dough manageable. Knead for about 10 minutes or until dough springs back when pressed with fingertip. Grease bowl with oil. Place dough in bowl then flip so top is greased as well. Cover with damp towel and place in a warm spot to rise for 2 hours. Punch down 5 times every 20 minutes. Separate dough. Divide into 4 to 6 sections to make loaves. For Rosh Hashanah, shape into round loaves. Makes 4 to 6 challahs. Place shaped loaves on parchment paper-lined baking sheets. Brush tops with beaten egg and sprinkle with toppings. Bake each loaf for 30 minutes. Remove from pan and cool on wire racks. Lilli Jennison is creative and media designer.

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HOLIDAY FLAVORS

Bubbe’s Brisket Submitted by Jodi Danis

3 to 4 pounds boneless brisket of beef 4 cups beef stock/broth 2 cups dry or sweet red wine (I use half dry red and half Manischewitz grape) 1 large onion, sliced 1 clove garlic, minced 2 tablespoons brown sugar 3 tablespoons ketchup (add more as cooking, if desired) Salt, to taste (I only add if using low-sodium broth) Trim meat of excess fat. Brown meat well on both sides under broiler in oven, 4 to 5 minutes per side. Place remaining ingredients in large, heavy stockpot. Stir until well combined. Bring to a boil and then reduce heat to low. Add browned meat to the pot. You may have to cut into two large pieces to fit. Cover and cook on low until meat is very tender, 2 1/2 to 3 hours, turning over from time to time. When meat is tender, remove from pot and let stand 10 minutes before slicing. Taste cooking liquid and adjust seasoning as needed. If desired, cook liquid uncovered until slightly reduced, but do not thicken with flour. Gravy should be thin, but well flavored. Serve sliced brisket with gravy immediately or keep warm in a covered pan in oven on low temperature until ready to serve. It’s best if made a day before and reheated. Make ahead suggestion: Layer the sliced meat and gravy, including onions, in a large rectangular foil pan. Add 1 to 2 cans each of drained (or fresh) sliced carrots and mushrooms, and cover with heavy-duty foil. Refrigerate overnight and heat oven to 375 F about one hour before serving. Remove foil halfway through reheating to ensure brisket heats through fully. Jodi Danis is executive assistant.

Jaben’s Kugel By Jan Jaben-Eilon

Tzimmes

Submitted by Marcia Caller Jaffe My high holidays would not be complete without my sister Susan’s tzimmes recipe, which probably came out of the hometown newspaper 50 years ago. She also doctors it up with flanken meat and apricots or pears. Servings: 8 to 10 2 pounds carrots, cleaned, sliced one-half-inch thick 3 pounds sweet potatoes, peeled, sliced into chunks 12 ounces dried pitted prunes 1/4 cup honey 1/2 cup firmly packed brown sugar 2 cups water Heat oven to 350 F. In a 4-quart casserole, combine all ingredients. Cover and bake one hour. Uncover and continue baking another hour at 320 F, stirring occasionally, until potatoes and carrots are tender and water has evaporated. Marcia Caller Jaffe is a contributer. 24 | SEPTEMBER 13, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

This is good at any time of the year, but because it includes apples, I almost always make it for Rosh Hashanah. One 12-ounce or 16-ounce package of wide noodles 4 apples, peeled and sliced small 2 medium sized onions, browned in oil 3 eggs, separated Cinnamon, sugar and salt to taste Raisins (optional) Heat oven to 350 F. Cook noodles according to package directions. Stir in onions and some of the oil. Add egg yolks, slightly beaten, apples, salt, sugar and cinnamon (and raisins). Fold in stiffly beaten egg whites. Bake for about 45 minutes. Can be frozen ahead of time. Jan Jaben-Eilon is a contributer.


HOLIDAY FLAVORS

ARE YOU SATISFIED WITH YOUR DENTURES? Allow us to help you to be satisfied

Flora’s Pumpkin Soup By Flora Rosefsky

An easy recipe for Sukkot or Thanksgiving. Recipe originally from daughter Ellen’s mother-in-law, Marion Cohen, of Port Washington, N.Y.

REPAIRS WHILE YOU WAIT

Servings: 10 cups One 29-ounce can Libby’s 100% Pure Pumpkin Organic puree or two 15-ounce cans of Libby’s Pumpkin Organic, or other brands. (Not the same as pumpkin pie filling) 3 large cans chicken broth or 1 box of Empire Kosher organic chicken broth, 32 ounces. I used 48 ounces of chicken broth. 4 tablespoons margarine 2 white onions, finely diced. I used two small boxes. 2 large carrots, sliced 4 ribs celery, diced 3 to 4 tablespoons flour 1 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon white pepper Curry powder, to taste. I used 1 tablespoon. Spray bottom of large pot with cooking spray. Melt margarine. Saute onion until golden brown, along with sliced carrots and diced celery. Make sure the vegetables don’t stick to bottom or turn too brown. Can add more margarine if needed. Keep stove top temperature on low heat. Blend in flour. Add pumpkin puree. Raise heat. Gradually add chicken broth and seasoning. Bring to boil uncovered. Stir every so often so the mixture doesn’t stick. Cover and simmer on a low heat for 30 minutes Pour the soup a little at a time into a blender, so it doesn’t splatter or spill over when you turn on the machine. Start the blender for a few seconds on a slow speed, and then puree, which is faster. Add curry and stir into the pureed soup. From the blender, pour into a container with a lid. Soup is good hot or cold and freezes well. The soup can also be served in scooped out small pumpkins or mugs. I put a fresh sprig of dill on each serving. You can also use parsley if you prefer. Enjoy! Flora Rosefsky is a contributer.

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DINING Authenticity is the Key to District M

The favorites are green tea panna cotta with red bean paste, right, and “not too sweet” chocolate mousse with rum, foreground.

Thinly sliced smoked hamachi with jalapeños is a winning opening choice.

By Marcia Caller Jaffe Chef Jackie Chang split from the much-touted Umi Sushi in Buckhead, where the likes of Elton John have been spotted. Open just five months, District M is taking on Sandy Springs, perhaps with less competition for upscale contemporary nigiri, sushi, Japanese hot dishes and signature cocktails, all artfully assorted. On our night to visit, Chef Yang was running the kitchen. The two-level interior has a snazzy entrance and view into the open kitchen and 16-seat sushi bar. The body of the res-

taurant has two levels darkly lit, black on black. No shouting here. The music also is not so loud as to limit conversation, which seems to be the trend today. Our server was knowledgeable, stating that shipments come in two times a week from Korea and Japan and vary with seasons, like the snapper season, which we just missed. Service is on authentic black stoneware with Japanese script, often recessed in wood block boards. We started with the Minty Cucumber signature cocktail: Ketel One vodka muddled with fresh mint, cucumber, lemon juice and agave, not too sweet

26 | SEPTEMBER 13, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

“Over the top” taste on this dish: Blue fin tuna topped with black truffles and caviar, left, and wasabi salmon with citrus and green tea salt, right.

Grilled tomatoes on the left. Sea bass on the right. No leftovers here!

and very refreshing. The wines were very artfully done with mysterious layers about $10 a glass. Next time we will try and worth fighting over. the Cherry Blossom: including Cointreau and a strawberry passion fruit cube, • Desserts were unusually well which sounds intriguing. presented and “rich without being rich.” Since it was a rainy night, we started Table favorite was the green tea pudwith miso soup, which came piping hot, … ding and the chocolate mousse laced with not distinctive enough for rum–not at all sweet, another go. The seaweed which made it stand out. salad was mixed with One dessert was accentquinoa for a nice touch, ed with red bean paste and the field green salad and artful use of fresh (enough to share) was inraspberries and blueberdeed farm fresh with firm ries. Japanese pudding yellow tomatoes and avoon caramel was my least cado wedges. The salad favorite, but I normally came with a choice of gindon’t go for the flans. ger or pineapple dressing. We opted for the ginger, Bottom Line which was just fine but District M is not inprobably from a bottle. expensive, but there’s a Think pineapple here. heightened quality that Chef Yang knows her way The hot dishes are one might find in Japan’s around a sushi knife. The open kitchen is a delight to witness. prepared (infused) over northernmost archipelthe charcoal grill; but the server was quick ago, feeling like whoever sliced the fish to point out that the food never touches or positioned it on the plate had serious the fire. We particularly liked the side of and intentional thought about what they grilled tomatoes and the Chilean sea bass were doing. District M’s success may lie entrée. The latter had a moon shape of with event times tied to the very nearby crushed red pepper to add at one’s own City Springs performing arts venue and pace. Don’t expect rice to be served as a the wellspring of new upscale apartments side dish. and townhouses nearby. If you like your Next time I would go for the bronzini tuna purple and plump, it’s sure to please. with sumiso sauce or miso-glazed black cod. More adventurous diners would go for “Chef’s Special” combinations such as What We Went Crazy Over • Contemporary nigiri with rows four-set course Bishamonten (Japanese of wasabi crème fraiche salmon with green Buddhish god of wealth and treasure) for tea salt, and citrus bits on one side, with su- $60 or a six-set course for $90. There are per fatty tuna topped with black truffles on tempuras and “by the piece” for smaller appetites. The menu is extensive and the other. Caviar is a smart addition. Someone said the truffles were challenging enough to interpret, which “massaged,” but other than kale being the servers are happy to do. ■ “massaged,” I’ve not experienced that. District M is at 6125 Roswell Road in the They sure were flavorful. Modera Sandy Springs apartments adjacent • Smoked hamachi carpaccio, to Casi Cielo. There is valet parking, but also shaped like a starfish and topped with free retail parking in the rear. It is open seven days a week for dinner. Initially they opened jalapenos. • Spicy tuna, shiso, avocado roll – for lunch but eliminated that option.


Photos by Dark Rush Photography // Krista and Scott hang out on the front porch with macaw

Ziggy (19) and umbrella cockatoo Buddy (33+). The birds are very vocal and laugh at jokes.

Chai Style Home

La Vie Bohemia

Scott constructed this entire wall for his Tibetan art collection. His mother was co-owner of a trekking agency to exotic locations.

Art encourages thought, especially when it’s with a CPA. I always get asked, “Was your dad in the Mafia?” a quirky attitude and tour de force eccentric treasures No, he was not, but many Jewish accountants there in from faraway places. Krista Harris and Scott Engel’s Vir- the early days did have some clients who were “not of ginia Highland bungalow is a workshop for creativity: the highest repute.” hers and his. As a young man, I was a carpenter in California and There aren’t many rules in this informed moved to Atlanta in 1988. I always had a exuberance of whacky sophistication. There love of the arts. While on a visit to a gallery are fascinating birds, an aerial massage stuin Sonoma County, I had an epiphany that dio, and a top-notch frame shop. Master picture framing would be a combination of framer Scott said, “I see my framing as a form both. When I returned to Atlanta, I trained of art integrating art into the frame but stopin framing at the Larson-Juhl framing ping short of detracting from the art itself.” school in Norcross, the largest in the U.S. I Krista is a licensed massage therapist, set up my empty basement as a frame shop yoga and certified therapeutic sound pracand was busy very quickly framing for titioner who specializes in various techsome of the city’s top designers and collecniques, including suspended yoga and mas- Marcia tors. My first clients were with the Atlanta sage – her creation – therapeutic sound, Caller Jaffe Symphony Orchestra. and Ashiatsu Oriental Bar Therapy. Marcia: What’s happening in the lower level? Tour their idiosyncratic wonderland. Scott: I have over 3,000 moulding samples here that range from high-end to budget. The finest mouldings in Marcia: How did you evolve into framing as art? the world are still hand-made in Italy and constitute a Scott: I grew up in Las Vegas where my father was large part of my collection. … I have a huge range, in-

cluding handmade Italian marquetry, for every kind of project. I have 22-karat gold mouldings for $120 a foot as well as budget moulding starting at $4 a foot. My framing is all custom hand done and archival quality, … nothing from chain stores is found here. My niche is taking framing “to the edge.” The art throughout the house is what I personally liked, then framed. I have framed many ketubot, including my daughter’s. See samples at www.framewise.com. Marcia: Describe your fascination with Tibetan art. Scott: I constructed the showcase front entrance based on my photos of monasteries in Tibet and Nepal. The art and icons I brought back from there, others were shipped. My mother was co-owner of a trekking agency that pioneered exotic adventure travel. I acquired collections from different cultures. The statues and images are from the Tibetan Buddhist tradition, also known as Tantric Buddhism, not to be confused with the newer Western sexualized form of “tantra.” I have Mongolian pieces which are quite different. I was involved in the first showing of contemporary Mongolian art, which is heavily influenced by Tibetan art. Note that thangkas

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES SEPTEMBER 13, 2019 | 27


CHAI STYLE Scott researched his collection of classic rock star photography. Shown here is Bob Dylan with the Grateful Dead (1987) by Herb Greene. Scott says, “These were taken long before the digital world.”

In the home studio, Krista flowingly echoes the positioning of the silk screen serigraph by Russian artist Mihail Aleksandrov with her aerial yoga pose.

were not intended to be art but used in meditation. They just happen to also be beautiful. I was the official framer for many years for the Oglethorpe University Museum, which started during the 1996 Olympics when the museum brought in “Sacred Objects of the Dalai Lamas” exhibit. Interestingly, the museum showed “The Art of Dachau.” Prior to the Holocaust, it was one of the most important art colonies in Europe, but this legacy was practically erased due to its association with the death camp.

first photographer for Rolling Stone magazine. This 1987 photo of the Grateful Dead (Herb Greene) captures an iconic moment uniting the San Francisco scene with Bob Dylan. Greene was known for his intimate portraits of luminaries like Janis Joplin, the Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane and Santana. Here’s a print by Flournoy Holmes, who did the “Eat a Peach” album cover for the Allman Brothers. I treasure this shot of Dylan’s old-fashioned typewriter showing his original lyrics.

Marcia: Describe your photography collection. Scott: These are real silver-gelatin photos dating back long before the digital age. Many were shot with Hasselblad equipment. I lean towards classic rock like Baron Wolman’s shot of Jim Morrison. Wolman was the

Marcia: What are some of your most unusual pieces? Scott: I collect Aboriginal art. … This pointillist serpent has a wild history created in an Australian prison by an Aborigine with art supplies donated by a Georgia drug runner who was also serving time. Aboriginal art

Scott framed this Aboriginal pressed bark painting depicting shamanistic themes.

This hand-applied metallic work by M. Martiros showcases an example of Scott’s creative framing.

Scott was involved in bringing original Mongolian art to Atlanta while he was the official framer of the Oglethorpe University Museum.

28 | SEPTEMBER 13, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES


CHAI STYLE Scott used a baroque frame to highlight this painting he brought back from Cusco, Peru.

This painting depicts a creation story of the Aboriginal tribes. It was painted by an Aborigine in an Australian prison in pointillist style using sticks and paints supplied by a fellow inmate, a convicted drug runner from Georgia.

is shamanistic and relates preliterate ancient tribes’ stories and creation. I have a triptych of Aboriginal art done on pressed bark. It is my job to enhance art with the frame. In this case I used burlap mats combined with a moulding that brings out the tribal or ethnic elements. We have a collage of French wine foils by Persian artist Gerard Purvis. Marcia: What transpires in your studio? Krista: Personalized sessions designed to reduce stress and anxiety. I teach therapeutic aerial yoga, sound meditation and neuromuscular massage. I developed a sensory experience like no other where clients are safely supported amid this inspiring and spiritual art in our urban retreat. I have six aerial hammocks suspended from steel beams tucked behind

the ceilings. My cocooning sound massage is popular, www.krista.com. Marcia: What’s with the birds? Krista: I rescued both: Buddy, umbrella cockatoo, and macaw, Ziggy. Sadly, Buddy was captured in the wild. Importing of birds is banned in the U.S. Though they are different species, they are “flock” animals, and we are their flock. Our lifestyle affords them much attention. They are highly complex and can live 90-plus years. We edutain (The Atlanta Parrot Encounter), www. BuddyandZiggy.com and Airbnb experience, www.airbnb.com/experiences/263569. They can be rowdy. When we clap and tell jokes, they get the punch line (even before the punch line) and let out shrieks of laughter. Amazingly at night they are quiet. ■

Scott takes special care in framing ketubot- ranging from $200 to $500. Especially sentimental was designing his daughter’s ketubah frame.

Scott chose this odd shaped frame to capture Jimmy Hendrix burning his guitar.

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES SEPTEMBER 13, 2019 | 29


CALENDAR

SEPTEMBER 13-20 TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17

Hadassah Greater Atlanta BRCA Testing Educational Forum – Con-

CANDLE-LIGHTING TIMES

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13

Ki Teitzei Friday, September 13, 2019, light candles at 7:29 p.m. Saturday, September 14, 2019, Shabbat ends at 8:23 p.m. Ki Tavo Friday, September 20, 2019, light candles at 7:19 p.m. Saturday, September 21, 2019, Shabbat ends at 8:13 p.m.

Second Friday Community Shabbat Dinner – Chabad Intown on the BeltLine, 730 Ponce De Leon Place NE, Atlanta, from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Enjoy a spirited Shabbat dinner with other in-towners with traditional and new Shabbat dishes. $10 per child, $25 per adult. For more information, www.bit. ly/2PpuVJg.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20

Shabbat in the Park – Noble Park, 1710

Prospective Member Shabbat – Temple Emanu-El, 1580 Spalding Drive, Atlanta, from 7:30 to 9 p.m. Join in on an exciting and spiritual Shabbat service with Rabbi Spike, Rabbi Rachael and Cantor Adesnik. Learn all about the amazing activities happening at Temple Emanu-El and how you can get involved. This event is kid friendly. Free. For more information, www.bit. ly/2Zl4Nnn.

White, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. This tour will provide riders the opportunity to ride along with wounded IDF veterans, who will share their incredible experiences. To register and for more information, www.bit.ly/2UeKxhq.

Ketura Hadassah Mahjong & Chai Tea – Huntcliff Summit Senior Living, 8592 Roswell Road, Sandy Springs, from 2:30 to 6 p.m. Play, eat and enjoy while contributing to the wonderful work of Hadassah hospitals. Raffle prizes throughout the play. Bring cash or check to purchase raffle tickets. For information and to RSVP, 770-977-3875.

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 15

24 Hour Phone-a-thon – The Jewish Fertility Foundation is having a Phonea-thon and it needs the community’s support as it works to continue to provide services to its growing client list. To donate, www.bit.ly/2HuW6Mh.

FIDF Southeast Bike Ride – Sosebee Cycling Park, 465 Simpson Road NE,

“Stopping Anti-Semitism, AntiZionism, Hate, and Intolerance” with Elan Carr – Atlanta Jewish Academy, 5200 Northland Drive, Atlanta, from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Speaker Elan S. Carr serves as the U.S. special envoy to Monitor and Combat Anti-Semitism. He advises the secretary of state and is responsible for directing U.S. policies and projects aimed at countering anti-

The SMART Place to Buy Diamonds!

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30 | SEPTEMBER 13, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Semitism throughout the world. $10 for general admission tickets, free for student tickets and $100 per patron ticket, which includes a VIP reception and advance seating. For tickets and more information, www.bit.ly/2PiC7ql.

Confluence: Art & Photography Exhibit – Chabad Intown on the BeltLine, 730 Ponce De Leon Place NE, Atlanta, from 6 to 9 p.m. A collaboration exhibition between artist Adam Podber and photographer Shelbelle Schusterman-Lapidus. Join Chabad for an unforgettable evening showcasing these two young creatives as they explore Judaism and Israel using modern methods. Free. For more information, www.chabadintown.org.

Noble Drive NE, Atlanta from 5:45 to 7:30 p.m. Shabbat in the Park is a casual, fun and family-friendly Friday evening potluck dinner held monthly in a local park. Featuring a Shabbat sing-along led by Rabbi Ari Kaiman. Enjoy a vegetarian-friendly meal, and an evening of socializing with Shearith Israel. Free. For more information, www.bit.ly/2IaIuGP.

Friday with Family – Temple EmanuEl, 1580 Spalding Drive, Atlanta, from 6:30 to 7:15 p.m. For children with their parents and/or grandparents to engage in a fun and interactive Friday night worship experience. Free and open to the community. For more information and to RSVP, www.bit.ly/2KIRovh.

SEPTEMBER 15 – 17

2019 AJFF On Campus – Emory University’s White Hall, Room 208, 301 Dowman Drive, Atlanta. This is a three-day version of the annual festival featuring five highly lauded AJFF film favorites and special guest speakers. All AJFF on Campus events are open to students, faculty and staff, as well as the general public. For featured films, showtimes and tickets, www.bit. ly/2L0BbCE.

Sober Shabbat in the Park – East Cobb Park, 3322 Roswell Road, Marietta, from 6:30 to 10 p.m. Anyone who identifies as in recovery and their allies will find a safe space to connect and celebrate Shabbat with prayers, blessings, games and dinner. Free. For more information, www.bit.ly/2MM0n2a.

Find more events and submit items for our online and print calendars at:

Max Haviv

www.atlantajewishconnector.com

Graduate Gemologist Follow us online!

Repair Services Available Hours: M-Th 10-5:30 & F 10-5

gregation Or Hadash, 7460 Trowbridge Road, Sandy Springs, from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. JScreen is launching The Peach BRCA Study, which includes free testing. Come to this educational event to find out more about BRCA, the study itself and to see if you’re eligible to participate. Free. For more information, www.JScreen.org/BRCA.

www.hajewelry.com

Calendar sponsored by the Atlanta Jewish Connector, an initiative of the AJT. In order to be considered for the print edition, please submit events two weeks in advance. Contact community relations director, Jen Evans, for more information at jen@atljewishtimes.com.


ROSH HASHANAH SERVICES SEPTEMBER 28 – OCTOBER 1

Happy New Year 5780

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28

Rosh in the Park – Murphy Candler Park, 1551 W. Nancy Creek Drive, Atlanta from 2 to 4 p.m. Celebrate Rosh Hashanah with The Sixth Point through its own version of an alternative to services. Participate in meaningful conversations and interactive discussions about the holiday. Also reflect on the past year and share intentions for the coming year. Free. For more information, www.bit.ly/2kug419.

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 29

The Temple Erev Rosh Hashanah Service with The Well – The Temple, 1589 Peachtree Street NE, Atlanta, from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Tickets are free. Register at the door or, to register ahead of time, contact Rabbi Sam at skaye@the-temple.org or Nalo Grant at Ngrant@the-temple.org.

Temple Sinai Erev Rosh Hashanah Service – Temple Sinai, 5645 Dupree Drive, Atlanta, at 8 p.m. Temple Sinai’s Erev Rosh Hashanah service is open to the community. Tickets are not required. For more information, www.bit.ly/2k41Rbg.

Erev Rosh Hashanah – Temple Emanu-El, 1580 Spalding Drive, Atlanta, from 8 to 9

Rosh Hashanah Services – Chabad of North Fulton, 10180 Jones Bridge Road, Alpharetta, from 7 to 8 p.m. each day. Free seating on a first-come first-served basis. No membership or tickets required. Reserve a seat guaranteed and marked with your name. Limited availability. Reserved seats are $120. For more information, www.bit.ly/2lChmHA.

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 30

Rosh Hashanah Day 1 – Temple Emanu-El, 1580 Spalding Drive, Atlanta, from 8 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. and 11:45 a.m. to 1:45 p.m. Community friends and out-of-town guests are invited to join Temple Emanu-El for High Holy Day services. $249 per adult. For tickets and more information, www.bit.ly/2jYuFlh.

Temple Sinai Rosh Hashanah Day 1 Service – Temple Sinai, 5645 Dupree Drive, Atlanta, from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Temple Sinai’s Day 1 Rosh Hashanah service is for members only. For more information, www.bit.ly/2k41Rbg.

The Temple Rosh Hashanah Day 1 Service – The Temple, 1589 Peachtree Street

NE, Atlanta from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. For more information, www.bit.ly/2lDZaNN. p.m. Community friends and out-of-town guests are invited to join Temple EmanuEl for High Holy Day services. Tickets are required and include all High Holy Day Rosh Hashanah Young Children’s Service – Temple Emanu-El, 1580 Spalding Drive, Atlanta, from 10:15 to 11:15 a.m. This is a special service that provides families services. For tickets and more information, www.bit.ly/2jYuFlh. with small children an opportunity to share in the High Holy Day experience. This service is free and open to the public. For more information, www.bit.ly/2jZLlZI.

SEPTEMBER 29 – OCTOBER 1

High Holidays at Chabad Intown – Chabad Intown on the BeltLine, 730 Ponce

Essential Rosh Hashanah Service at B’nai Torah – Congregation B’nai Torah, De Leon Place NE, Atlanta, starting at 9:30 a.m. on Sunday, Sept. 29. Celebrate the 700 Mount Vernon Highway NE, Sandy Springs, from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Free. For more high holidays with Chabad Intown. Whether you’ve joined Chabad Intown for the information, www.bit.ly/2lwaGLo. high holidays in the past or this is your first time celebrating with them, you and your family can look forward to celebrating the holy days enveloped by the upliftYJP Slacker’s Service – Chabad Intown on the BeltLine, 730 Ponce De Leon Place ing spirit of discovery and solidarity. For more information, www.bit.ly/2khY4r0. NE, Atlanta, from 6:30 to 10 p.m. Free. For more information, www.bit.ly/2lZAUpL.

Rosh Hashanah Services – Congregation Beth Shalom, 5303 Winters Chapel Road,

Dunwoody. Beth Shalom offers two services that do not require a ticket; these ser- SEPTEMBER 30 – OCTOBER 1 vices are open to the entire community: Erev Rosh Hashanah on Sunday, Sept. 29, New Toco Shul Rosh Hashanah Services – 2003 Lavista Road, Atlanta, from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. each day. Free. For more information, www.bit.ly/2lw8ZO2. at 6:30 p.m. and the second day of Rosh Hashanah, Tuesday, Oct. 1, at 8:30 a.m. For more information, www.bit.ly/2krnnXz.

To find more Rosh Hashanah services to attend, www.bit.ly/2lCqE6q.

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES SEPTEMBER 13, 2019 | 31


COMMUNITY Quilt Finds Way Back Home By Roni Robbins The journey of a quilt depicting the Psalms that made its way from Livingston, N.J., to Marietta, Ga., and back again, has as many dimensions as the illustrations stitched to its fabric. One might have thought it a magic carpet instead of a quilt, based on its nearly 1,800-mile multifaceted adventure from one Reform synagogue in the North to another in the South, nearly escaping the recycling bin, and safely returning to its creators. In December 2014, the quilt was created by an education class from Temple Emanu-El of West Essex in Livingston. It was taught by Susan Cosden, director of congregational learning. “They had been studying the book of Psalms and, at the end of the course, each person chose their favorite psalm as inspiration for an art piece,” said Heather Stoltz, a fabric artist and instructor who Cosden enlisted to help stitch the artwork into a quilt. Stoltz lives in Westchester, N.Y., about an hour from Livingston. Her website, “Sewing Stories: Fiber Art That Tells a Story,” says she creates quilted wall hangings and fabric sculptures inspired by social jus-

32 | SEPTEMBER 13, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Photo courtesy of Temple Sinai, N.J. //

The creators of the quilt are happy to have it back in New Jersey.

tice, Jewish texts and her life experiences. The quilt is composed of 20 square patches, many depicting scenes of nature, but one containing a Jewish star and another the Hebrew phrase for making a joyful aliyah: la’a lot artzah b’simcha. It hung on the wall of the Livingston synagogue until it closed in 2017. Temple Emanu-El gave the quilt as a parting gift to Cosden, who soon assumed the same position at Temple Beth Tikvah in Roswell. It hung in her office there too. Fast forward to earlier this summer, when the fabric really starts to unfold. As Cosden prepared to leave Marietta, her live-in mother, while packing and purging, placed the quilt curbside with other

items for the taking. Neighbor Jennifer Weber, who is a friend of mine, claimed a few of the discards, including the quilt and a tablecloth with Jewish stars she thought I’d like. She’s not Jewish, but her church participates in activities with my synagogue. When Weber brought the quilt to me in mid-July, I quickly noticed the telltale patch at its bottom right corner, which offered a key to its origins: “Created by Temple Emanu-El Lunch and Learn Class on the Psalms.” Another patch on the back provided more information about the class, teacher and date of creation. My first instinct was to direct Weber to our local Temple Emanu-El in Dunwoody. “Any luck?” I texted her later that day. “Well yes, but now it turns out it’s a different temple.” A receptionist at the synagogue “looked it up in their records and no records of that teacher or class. She also mentioned there was a temple [Emanu-El] in Florida and New York and some other places, but there were quite a few of them. What do you suggest?” A simple Google search and I located Stoltz. “Thank you for reaching out about the quilt you found! It’s sad to hear that it

was going to be thrown away,” she wrote in an email response to my inquiry. “I don’t know if the N.J. synagogue or any of the makers would want it back, but we can try to reach out to the community.” A few days later, Stoltz emailed back, “The synagogue where the quilt was made has merged with another synagogue – Temple Sinai. They would love to have the quilt back so they can display it.” Done. Last month I received an email from Audrey Napchen, executive director of Temple Sinai in New Jersey. “I’m happy to let you know that the quilt has arrived – and it is beautiful!” Meanwhile, back in Marietta, Weber is proud to have helped salvage an heirloom. “The experience left me with a good feeling that we did a good deed and I am glad I was able to play a small part in this,” she emailed me recently. In return I taught her a few Yiddish terms I don’t think she’ll hear in her usual circles, about being a mensch who performed a mitzvah. ■ Jed Weisberger, a reporter with the New Jersey Jewish News, contributed to this story.


COMMUNITY

Flavors of Israel in the Heart of Atlanta Sound the shofar so ingredients sourced as locally all may congregate and reas possible. Lavi feels a deep joice, there is a new Israeli obligation to support Georrestaurant in town! Rozina gia’s local agriculture, knowBakehouse & Coffee has ing that only the best quality made its debut on Facebook, is being used in his unique circulating and percolating takes on classic recipes. and tantalizing us with imRozina Bakehouse & Cofages of divine, sweet and fee is in a lively area bustling savory baked goods, succuwith foot traffic, from Georlent sandwiches, and rich, Jen Evans & gia State students and staff, to beautifully presented coffee, Michal Bonell local business professionals. On the Town encouraging us to get off It was nice to see an eclectic of our computers and head clientele eating lunch, drinkdowntown to the quaint location, just ing coffee, cozying up with a book, and steps away from Georgia State University chatting and laughing with friends. and Woodruff Park. We walked in and were transported We made our way to meet Shay Lavi to a European style café with brick walls, at his new restaurant venture, Rozina, rustic wood floors, picturesque window named after his grandmother, who in- décor, exquisite lighting, beautiful cast spired his love of cooking. Lavi has made iron chairs and railings throughout the a name for himself in the Atlanta foodie various sections. Soft Israeli music in the scene after working in various reputable background rounded out the ambience. restaurants, leading him to open his own Lavi presented us with assorted catering business “Let’s Eat!” which al- items, all accompanied by his homemade lowed him the creative freedom and flex- baked goods. To start, we were served butibility to cook with imagination. tery, flaky burekas that boasted freshness Now at his new location, Rozina, Lavi and flavor. To accompany the savory buoffers delicious, beautiful and simple foods rekas with a sweet treat, Lavi selected a with Euro-Mediterranean flavors, using scrumptious cookie stuffed with apples

Jen and Michal with ownerchef Shay Lavi of Rozina. Pictured are Rozina's bureka, baklava and apple stuffed cookies served with Turkish coffee.

that went perfectly with our aromatic rich and creamy Turkish coffee, which was presented masterfully in filigree ancientstyle cups with cute lids. Our main items included shakshuka, a delicious dish of poached eggs with tomato sauce, an earthy Israel-style couscous with roasted vegetables, an enormous tuna sandwich on homemade

challah bun, and a light and crispy falafel burger topped with tahini sauce, garlic pickles, tomatoes and onions, also on Rozina’s challah bun. Rozina is a great place for a casual meal, fresh baked goods, and delicious coffee. For additional information, visit www.rozinabakehouse.com To have us review your event or restaurant, contact us at 404-883-2130, jen@ atljewishtimes.com or michal@atljewishtimes.com. ■

HADASSAH GREATER ATLANTA DOES IT AGAIN! DON’T MISS OUT!

TICKETS & DONATIONS www.hadassah.org/atlanta Sunday, September 22, 2019, 2-5pm Spring Hall, 7130 Buford Hwy Tickets $36

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Conversation With the Rabbi Rabbi Bloom asked young Paul what his favorite Bible story was. “I guess the one about Noah and the ark, where they floated around on the water for 40 days and 40 nights,” Paul replied. “That was a good story,” said Rabbi Bloom, “and, with all that water, I bet they had a good time fishing, don’t you think?” Paul thought for a moment, then replied, “I don’t think so ... they only had two worms.”

Joke provided by David Minkoff www.awordinyoureye.com

Yiddish Word of the Week Tsholnt (tshol’·nt)

‫טשאלנט‬ ָ

traditional stew Also spelled “cholent” or said as “hamin” (‫חמין‬‎) in Hebrew. This is a traditional stew served on the Sabbath, kept warm from the day before. It is stewed for around 12 hours. It was originally conceived to conform with Jewish religious law that prohibits cooking on Shabbat. I am so hungry for some Tsholnt.

34 | SEPTEMBER 13, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES


COMMUNITY SIMCHA SPOTLIGHT

Bar Mitzvah

Evan Daniel Cohn Evan Daniel Cohn was called to the Torah on Aug. 31, 2019, at Temple Beth Tikvah in Roswell. Evan is the son of Michael and Marlene Cohn, and big brother to Lauren. He is the grandson of Harry Cohn of Boynton Beach, Fla., and the late Pearl Cohn (z’’l) and Ruth and Lee Zendel of Rochester Hills, Mich. Evan is an eighth-grader at Dickerson Middle School in Marietta, where he is an honor roll student. At school, Evan enjoys playing the alto saxophone in the symphonic band and competing on his school’s Jeopardy-style reading bowl team. He also enjoys playing tennis and skiing, leading the way between trees and down aggressive black diamond runs. Most of all, Evan loves spending summers with his close friends at URJ Camp Coleman. Evan is passionate about helping others. He has been volunteering with various food banks and food-related organizations for several years. This past year, he volunteered many hours at the Community Assistance Center in Sandy Springs, where he helps stock the pantry for neighbors in need.

B’nai Mitzvah

Michael Blumenthal, son of Renay and Ned Blumenthal, in August 2019. Harry Kitey, son of Meredith and Alan Kitey, in August 2019. Samantha and Emily Myers, daughters of Rachel and Carl Myers, on Sept. 7.

Have something to celebrate? Births, B’nai Mitzvah, Engagements, Weddings, Anniversaries, Special Birthdays and more ... Share it with your community with free AJT simcha announcements. Send info to submissions@atljewishtimes.com. ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES SEPTEMBER 13, 2019 | 35


BRAIN FOOD Classic Biblical Rock By: Yoni Glatt, koshercrosswords@gmail.com Difficulty Level: Manageable 1

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56. Coach Parseghian of 27-Across 1. Major artery 57. Estimating words 6. Fiddler on the reef? 58. Wooden in manner 10. Calc. prerequisite, often 61. First Lady between Hillary 14. Tool for climbing Everest and Michelle 15. "Aladdin" character played 63. Weigh station rig 64. David Bowie hit about by Gilbert Godfried 16. Judaism doesn't believe in it Absalom? 17. The Allman Brothers hit about 68. False god of war 69. Summertime snack Cain? 70. Late comic great Radner 19. "Enchanted" girl in a 2004 71. Late musical great Piamenta film 72. Certain groundfish 20. Advil alternative 73. Source for the latest celebrity 21. Sillier info. 23. Grimm beast 25. Simon and Garfunkel's "I ___ Rock" DOWN 27. Dame introducer, in Paris? 1. It constantly goes into our 28. Creedence Clearwater Rebodies vival hit about Isaac? 2. Andean stew veggie 32. Off kilter 3. Makes like Abraham with 33. "Bad" cholesterol letters Keturah 34. "___ Morris is Trash" (Funny 4. Items for Moses or Jobs or Die series) 5. Automobile rod 38. Whillikers or whiz lead-in 6. Stanley Kubrick's art 39. Aerosmith hit about Joseph? 7. One replaced Isaac 43. Enthusiastic reply to 8. Amalekite king slain by "Wanna?" Samuel 44. Word with "while," old-style 9. Irish singer born Paul Hewson 46. Sequitur or stop starter 10. Winkler's shark-jumping 47. Equally irate sitcom character 49. Steppenwolf hit about Esau? 11. Blazing again, as a fire 53. Accountant's review 12. In worse health

13. Highway light hazard 18. Lendl with eight Grand Slam wins 22. Yoko's surname 23. 18 or 21, usually 24. "Andy Griffith" character Pyle 26. The capital of Georgia 29. A NIS is measured against it, often 30. Oilers, on NHL scoreboards 31. ___-mo (replay technique) 35. Praiseworthy 36. Barbecue briquettes 37. "Buddy-boy" alternative 40. G.I. time off, informally 41. 1 billion years, in astronomy 42. "No way, laddie!" 45. The capital of Georgia 48. Inaugurated 50. 1936 National League homer champ Mel 51. "10 Items ___" (checkout sign) 52. A "god" defeated by Elijah 53. Analysis of an ore 54. What unborn babies are in? 55. Some change 59. Clapton who rocks 60. '20s art style 62. Give a push to 65. King-size or twin 66. One of eight Eng. kings 67. "Viva ___ Vegas!"

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Remember When 15 Years Ago// September 10, 2004 ■ Two years after Emory University students lobbied to add Yiddish to the mix of courses offered by the school’s Rabbi Donald A. Tam Institute for Jewish Studies, 11 students enrolled in Elementary Yiddish 1, one of two courses that were formally offered for the first time. Emory students set out to raise funds to match the $5 million challenge grant given by Arthur Blank, an Emory trustee and cofounder of Home Depot, in 2001.

36 | SEPTEMBER 13, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

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25 Years Ago// September 9, 1994 ■ Two hundred preschool teachers from Atlanta, Birmingham and Knoxville attended a conference sponsored by Jewish Educational Services and the Atlanta Preschool Directors Council. Educator Treasure Cohen presented ideas for integrating the arts, prayer, rituals and family into Judaism. ■ Georgia’s Jewish community was expected to donate 75,000 pounds of food to the hungry next week. Georgia was the only state with a major Jewish community food drive, according to Atlanta Community Food Bank officials. 50 Years Ago// September 12, 1969

■ Linda Zimmerman shared a message of inclusivity with Jewish Atlantans with disabilities. She listed synagogues that accommodate the disabled, including Congregation Beth Shalom’s cut-out pew that allowed people in wheelchairs to sit among the congregation; Ahavath Achim Synagogue’s elevator lift that enabled people in wheelchairs to be raised to the bimah; and Temple Emanu-El’s sign language interpreter during high holiday services.

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■ Laurence Frank accepts chairman position on the Atlanta Arthur Blank, an Emory University trustee, gave a $5 million challenge grant that helped start a Yiddish class at Emory.

Israel Bonds campaign during Israel’s 21st anniversary. Frank was concerned with the most effective ways to organize and conduct the Israel Bonds effort in Atlanta. ■ Mr. and Mrs. Max Fagelson of Atlanta celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary with a dinner party at the Diplomat.


CLOSING THOUGHTS

Birthday Dilemma Eyebrows to make women If it is true, that 50 is look younger than 50? Serithe new 40, then why in ously? the world would we need a How to discover my plethora of advice remindtrue self after 50? Had I ing us (women) we are over known I was lost, I would 50, as if we don’t know it, have searched in my 20s, and as if no generation bewhich must have been the fore us ever turned 50? A difnew teens! ferent, less stressful 50, no A new lipstick for women doubt. over 50 – no bleeding! UGH. I never heard my mom, Shaindle AARP The Magazine or anyone else’s mom, claim Schmuckler sent a “team of top-flight photo be the new 40, when they Shaindle’s Shpiel tographers all over the planet were 50. They all knew how to do their hair to show how life has changed” for people and their makeup. They were perfectly over 50. And your point is what exactly? ENOUGH I say. Do they (whoever capable of choosing their own style of clothes. Well actually, my mom had a they are) think we went dumb or stark standing appointment at the beauty shop raving mad when we hit that number 50? My hubby and I subscribe to a wide across the street. What in the world happened to us variety of magazines. We are avid readers for goodness sakes? Do we really need all of their words of wisdom and folly. I am completely befuddled as to why Sports this free advice? How to dress after 50? Hairstyles for Illustrated, Time, Newsweek, Travel, Forbes, Fortune, Wired, GQ, to name women after 50? Diets that REALLY work for women just a few, would see the need to address women over 50 with the tricks on how to after 50? Are the others just scams? Make up tricks for women after 50? maintain their inner beauty and health,

their outer beauty and youth, sometimes with fashion forward suggestions. People magazine is my very own “bible.” It’s the only time I get to feel the joy of a voyeur. Besides, the articles are the perfect length for a stop in the loo. Lo and behold they also feel the need for “helping” us deal with the perplexing “over 50” dilemma. Seriously, 50 is a dilemma? Please I beg of you enough already; I am developing whiplash turning from these words of wisdom to those words of wisdom, and back again. I admit I read these enlightening, sometimes frustrating articles, and stare at the photos of all these 50 and over sur-

vivors. After all, I don’t want to be left in the lurch; would you? Now, truth be told, I have chosen to remain in my 50s for as long as the lie holds up, or until I hear folks giggling while pointing their index fingers at me behind my back. I take my lie so seriously I take my shoes off at the airport. I don’t ask for senior discounts, and I shave years off my children’s ages. For me it is a small price to pay in order maintain my self-possession. Am I thankful for every birthday to date? Of course. However, I choose my own number. It’s my right, my privilege. No further explanation or discussion required! ■

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40 SEPTEMBER 13, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Profile for Atlanta Jewish Times

Atlanta Jewish Times, VOL. XCIV NO. 36, September 13, 2019  

Holiday Flavors: Jewish Holiday Traditions Held Dear From Far and Near

Atlanta Jewish Times, VOL. XCIV NO. 36, September 13, 2019  

Holiday Flavors: Jewish Holiday Traditions Held Dear From Far and Near