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Are You Pledging Today for Tomorrow’s Jewish Future? FEDERATION'S FUTURE ROBBINS STEERS THE JFGA TOWARD GOOD WORKS WITH THE RIGHT MOMENTUM.

RABBIS MAKING MOVES LOCAL CONGREGATIONS FILL LEADERSHIP ROLES WITH NEW AND FAMILIAR FACES.

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Contributors This Week BOB BAHR DAVE SCHECHTER JAN JABEN-EILON KEVIN C. MADIGAN RABBI JOAB EICHENBERG-EILON RACHEL STEIN SHAINDLE SCHMUCKLER

Leading the Charge When it comes to serving the needs of the Atlanta Jewish community, there are some agencies that lead the charge. We spotlight a number of them in our Jewish Agencies issue, including the Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta, the Marcus JCC, Jewish Family & Career Services and Jewish Home Life Communities. In general, we inquired about the organizations’ recent progress and plans for the future. Among the findings, we share one architect’s rendering of a proposed renovation of the Federation’s headquarters at 18th and Spring streets, which could offer space for other Jewish groups to gather. In addition, we explore the history of Jewish educational services in Atlanta and ask key community and education leaders about the prospects for re-establishment of a local bureau of Jewish education here. Mike Leven, chairman and CEO of the Georgia Aquarium, is our Lowdown feature this week. As a companion piece,

he tells the AJT about his efforts to encourage donors to direct at least 50 percent of their assets left for charitable purposes to Jewish causes and/or Israel. As several rabbis have or will be taking the helm of Atlanta synagogues, we specifically introduce you to the new rabbi of Temple Beth David in Snellville and the newest spiritual leader at Congregation Bet Haverim, who will also serve the unaffiliated. Columnist Dave Schechter discusses the long involvement of the American Jewish Committee in improving blackJewish relations in Atlanta and efforts on the national level to do the same. In the arts, we interview renowned artist, illustrator and author Maira Kalman, whose work inspired an Atlanta theater production and whose art and children’s books will be featured in local exhibits. This week's Closing Thoughts is an emotionally charged piece by columnist Shaindle Schmuckler about how she counseled someone bent on self-destruc-

THIS WEEK tion, despite her best efforts. Our Jewish agencies certainly try to reach beyond their comfort zones to include and involve all they can in the Jewish fold. Stay tuned for next week’s 40 under 40 issue in which we highlight the achievements of the younger set who also tends to exceed expectations. ■

CONTENTS LOCAL NEWS���������������������������������� 4 ISRAEL PRIDE��������������������������������� 8 BUSINESS����������������������������������������� 9 OPINION����������������������������������������� 10 JEWISH AGENCIES��������������������� 12 ARTS������������������������������������������������ 23 CALENDAR������������������������������������� 24 COMMUNITY��������������������������������� 26 BRAIN FOOD���������������������������������� 29 OBITUARIES���������������������������������� 30 CLOSING THOUGHTS����������������� 32

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LOCAL NEWS Rabbi Gottfried Takes on New Role at CBH By Eddie Samuels Well known teacher, artist, activist and writer Rabbi Pamela Gottfried is taking on a totally new role at Congregation Bet Haverim as its second rabbi, splitting her time between leading and teaching congregants and working with and meeting unaffiliated Jews in the community. The new program is called “Your Jewish Bridge: New Pathways for Your Jewish Connection”. As a fixture of the Atlanta Jewish community for 20 years, Gottfried is an active member of Rabbis Without Borders — she traveled to the Southern border with other Atlanta-area rabbis and educators in December — and is a volunteer and supporter of the Southern Jewish Resource Network for Gender & Sexual Diversity (SOJOURN). Her most recent position was dean of Jewish studies at The Weber School. “I was really happy teaching and I loved my job at Weber, and I wasn’t really looking for a job,” she said, “but when I found out about this position, I was really drawn to it.”

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Most of Gottfried’s experience has toral work she was already doing. “At Weber it was a lot of curriculum been as an educator, which she’ll condevelopment, tinue within the and we were able congregation, to integrate a lot but much of the of arts into Jewexcitement for ish education,” her was in being she said. “But a resource for when you’re a those who are full-time teacher not synagogue and rabbi in a members. high school set“It was a diting, adult educarection that I was tion and pastoral working in and work is not as moving in even mission-driven.” as I was a classIn terms of room teacher,” her outreach to she said. “And the unaffiliated this particular Jews of Atlanta, blend, this dual Gottfried emphaportfolio really sizes it isn’t about allows for a lot simply encouragof flexibility and Photo by Paula M. Gould// Rabbi Pamela ing them to join creativity in outGottfried is the newest rabbi of CBH a congregation or reach.” Beyond simply the age of the stu- to celebrate their milestones, instead her dents, Gottfried is excited by the prospect focus is about providing them a resource of merging her education skills with pas- for all their Jewish needs.

“I think the external portfolio really provides a lot of reach. It’s not just about marrying them and burying them, but about providing access to Jewish education that meets their needs,” she said. Noting that there is a lot of restructuring in the Jewish community, Gottfried explained that many aren’t formally connected to a single synagogue or congregation. “All of us would love to have the luxury and ability to do more work with these people,” she said. “But when you’re so connected to an institution — employed, for lack of a better word — it can be hard to dedicate time to reach out.” The position was in part funded by both a PROPEL Innovation Grant from the Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta, and a Reconstructing Judaism innovation grant, said CBH Executive Director Amy Robertson. “There are people who need a rabbi or want to be connected in some other way,” she said. “That’s why I think it’s really important that not only CBH, but Federation and other arms of the Jewish community create these roles.” ■


LOCAL NEWS

Never Stop Learning: Rabbi Jesse Takes Bimah at TBD By Eddie Samuels Concluding a nearly three-year search, Temple Beth David is welcoming Rabbi Jesse Charyn to Snellville to serve as the congregation’s newest spiritual leader. Charyn, or “Rabbi Jesse,” as he likes to be called, stepped into the role July 1. And despite high expectations from such a long search, he is not letting that pressure bother him. “I’m not worried or nervous about the expectations because I just have to be me. I love Judaism, and as a rabbi, it’s what I do 24/7. It’s so vast and varied that there’s always something to learn.” Charyn’s journey to TBD is a long one, full of many twists and turns and Among Rabbi Jesse Charyn’s favorite pastimes is hiking, which he previously did in North Georgia while living in Dahlonega. each step defined by that learning he cherishes so much. Out of high school, Charyn traveled to Israel to educate him- given serious thought to becoming a the desert to the flatlands of Oklahoma, self firsthand on a place that was so cen- rabbi?’” Charyn remembers, “I started to to the greenery – and humidity – of Geortral to his Jewish identity as a child. gia.” realize that it was something I could do.” “I grew up with this idea that the In terms of his goals for the congreFollowing his 2011 graduation from entire Jewish community had this ob- ASU, Charyn enrolled in the Ziegler gation he now leads, Charyn explained ligation to build and protect Israel in School of Rabbinic Studies in Los Angeles. that his initial focus is on building a comwhatever way we can, so when I was 18, I “It was very long, and I was on many munity identity. followed my brother to the Young Judaea different journeys,” he said. “I trans“I want to make it that TBD is not Year Course program,” he said. ferred to the Reconstructionist Rabbini- just a place to go and pray, but a place Making many close Israeli friends, cal College in Philadelphia; I was reading he loved discussing politics and what he Mordechai Kaplan’s book and thinking saw firsthand while in the country with about Judaism more as a civilization them. than a religion, and then I learned in a “They said, ‘we appreciate all your yeshiva in Israel.” ideas and information, but we’re going to Ultimately, Charyn was ordained at be conscripted to the the Jewish Spiritual military and this is Leaders Institute in what we have to do,’” 2018. he recounted. “When “It’s a nondethey said that, I realnominational proized it was my coungram that was the try too and I feel a culmination of all my sense of belonging to years of learning,” this place. I thought, Charyn explained. I’ll also volunteer.” “People ask me, While serving in ‘What kind of rabbi the military, Charyn are you?’ I self-idenmet his wife Shira. He tify as a post-denomiwas in Gaza during national rabbi, or just the pull-out in 2005 a rabbi.” and was discharged Last month, shortly before the Charyn was on his beginning of the Secjourney across the ond Lebanon War in Rabbi Jesse Charyn is the new spiritual country, driving from leader of Temple Beth David. 2006. While Charyn Arizona to his new loved Israel, he felt a longing for the Unit- home in Snellville, explaining that the ed States. process was as much about reflection He returned to school at Arizona and mindfulness as it was about getting State University, during which time he from one place to another. thought for the first time about becom“I have my four-legged companion ing a rabbi. with me, Mr. Shimmy. My dog is my copi“I was working at a Conservative lot. But it’s also about properly preparing shul, teaching seventh grade, … religious and having the right headspace,” he said. school. The rabbi asked me, ‘Have you “You can really see the transitions from

where people feel like it’s a home away from home,” he said. TBD board president Barry Nickelsberg shared some of the challenges that finding a new rabbi created for the congregation. “It took us some time to figure out what we really wanted in a new rabbi,” he said. “We’ve had great rabbinical leadership and we were looking for someone who could combine the best of our former rabbis all in one.” Nickelsberg explained that Charyn’s energy and ideas were evident from their very first interactions. “We asked every candidate, ‘what do you bring to the table,’ and he seemed to have it all in one,” Nickelsburg said. “He’s very interested in outreach, and the question he keeps asking out loud is, ‘What is it that TBD is not doing?’ and he’s filling in the blanks.” ■ Charyn will be installed July 12. On Saturday, Peter Yarrow of Peter, Paul and Mary will perform. Tickets are available online, $18 for adults and $9 for children. For more information, visit bit.ly/TBD-Peter2019.

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES JULY 12, 2019 | 5


LOCAL NEWS

David Makovsky was an observer at the Trump Administration’s Peace to Prosperity Workshop in Bahrain.

The Center for Israel Education and Emory's Institute for the Study of Modern Israel have presented its summer workshop for educators for the past 18 years.

Kenneth Stein is professor of modern Israel history at Emory University and founder of the summer Israel education program.

Bahrain Workshop Reopens Peace Question By Bob Bahr The Trump Administration’s recent opening shot at restarting the Middle East peace process got a tepid response in Atlanta from a prominent authority on the Middle East. David Makovsky, who directs the Project on Arab-Israel Relations at The Washington Institute for Near East Policy, spoke June 26 in a prerecorded interview at the annual Educator Enrichment Workshop on Modern Israel. The workshop was conducted by the Center for Israel Education and Emory Univer-

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sity's Institute for the Study of Modern Israel. Makovsky described last month’s administration-sponsored economic workshop in Bahrain as “basically an admission that the full Trump peace plan for the Middle East is not ready to go.” During the final years of the Obama administration, Makovsky was a senior adviser to Secretary of State John Kerry on Israel-Palestinian negotiations. Makovsky is also a former editor of The Jerusalem Post. He told the Atlanta conference for teachers and educational administrators

that, “if the administration thought they had a good start with their peace plan they would have rolled it out together with the economic part.” Last week, in a July 1 op-ed piece for The Washington Post, Makovsky reinforced his view that the fate of the economic plan will be determined by whatever political solutions the Administration is expected to put forward later this year. “The White House’s inflexible approach,” he wrote, “means that if the final ideas offered by the political portion of the plan don’t gain support, the economic package goes down the tubes. The linkage is almost certainly doomed.” The “Peace to Prosperity Workshop” in Bahrain, which was put together by President Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner and the administration’s Middle East envoy Jason Greenblatt, debuted an ambitious investment plan. Outlined in a 96-page document, the plan aims to fund billions of dollars in regional economic projects over the next decade. Over half of the money would go to Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza through investments from the Arab world and the private sector. Representatives from Arab nations such as Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Qatar and Jordan attended. Israel was not invited, and the Palestinian Authority boycotted the meeting. Head of the Palestinian Authority Mahmoud Abbas proclaimed that “the deal of shame will go to hell.” Palestinians face rampant unemployment and economic stagnation. They could use the money but are unlikely to modify many of their longtime political goals in exchange for the cash. Makovsky, who attended the Bahrain conference as an observer, commented that without a political plan to solve the Palestinian and Israeli stand-off, the economic proposal wouldn’t be getting much traction. “Everybody’s going to say, where’s

the beef? This is great. Sixty-two billion dollars over five or 10 years, but is it real money? Is it a vision that is going to be operationalized? If there is not a political plan, who is going to cough up that much money?” During a July 3 conference call with reporters, Kushner said that “there is no plan to make these investments before achieving … political progress.” He described the Palestinian reaction to the plan and the Bahrain meeting as “hysterical and erratic and not terribly constructive.” Still, it is not likely that there will be immediate proposals to address the important political questions that have confounded negotiators for decades. Any new proposals will have to wait until at least November, after Israel’s elections and the formation of a new government. Even then, just a year before America’s national election, Makovsky wondered whether they would lead to a serious attempt at diplomacy. “What is real here and what is aspirational, that is the question I keep asking myself. I think the later we get into the political cycle the more we are talking about aspirational than real. I think if the spectrum is on one side aspirational and the other side plans that you want to negotiate on tomorrow morning, I think we are moving further and further on the spectrum toward the aspirational side.” The economic conference in Bahrain neatly coincided with the educator conference June 23-27. For the past 18 years, the summer institute has been presented by the CIE and ISMI. Funding for the weeklong event has been provided over the years by The Avi Chai Foundation, which was financed by the prominent investor Zalman Bernstein. Kenneth Stein, who founded the program and has run it since its inception, this year handed the program over to Rich Walters, his associate director at CIE. ■


ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES JULY 12, 2019 | 7


ISRAEL PRIDE

News From Our Jewish Home Israeli Tech Company Can Hack Any iPhone or Android

Cellebrite, an Israeli company that specializes in helping law enforcement agencies unlock cellphones, announced it has found a way to break into any iPhone ever made, as well as many Android phones, according to The Times of Israel. The product that will help break into these phones enables full file system extracting, which allows a copy of the phone’s data to be transferred to a client’s computer. It lets law enforcement agencies obtain “access to third-party app data, chat conversations, downloaded emails and email attachments, deleted content and more,” Cellebrite said. Cellebrite was reportedly the company the FBI used in 2016 to hack into the iPhone of the San Bernardino shooter after Apple refused the U.S. government’s request to build a back door into its famously secure operating system. The company is calling this hacking technology the UFED Premium “as the only on-premise solution for law enforcement agencies to unlock and extract crucial mobile phone evidence from all iOS and high-end Android devices.”

Today in Israeli History July 5, 1950: The Knesset passes the Law of Return on the Jewish anniversary of the death of Theodor Herzl. The law offers an open immigration door to all Jews, formalizing a policy in place since the provisional government revoked the British limits on Jewish immigration in May 1948. The law is modified in 1954 to exclude those with criminal pasts who could endanger public welfare and in 1970 to try to define who qualifies as a Jew.

A memorial near Jerusalem honors the 16 people killed in the Bus 405 terrorist attack.

July 6, 1989: Palestinian Islamic Jihad member Abed al-Hadi Ghanem seizes control of the No. 405 bus as it passes a ravine outside Jerusalem and steers it over a cliff in an attack on the passengers traveling from Tel Aviv. Sixteen people, including one American and two 8 | JULY 12, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Students Win First Prize for

Students present their projects at a competition sponsored by Ben-Gurion University.

Get-Lawyer App

Students at Ben Gurion University created an app that matches public defenders with potential clients. It won first prize in a competition sponsored by the university, Google and Israel’s Justice Ministry. The Get-Lawyer app automatically selects an appropriate defense counsel based on a suspect’s personal data and criteria, including language, type of crime the person has been accused of, length of time in custody and the amount of work currently facing the public defender's office in a particular region. Defense attorneys who download the Get-Lawyer app to their phones will automatically receive notices whenever a new criminal file is opened, confirm their availability, and input how long it would take them to

Canadians, are killed, and 17 others are injured. Although Ghanem survives, he is often seen as the first suicide attacker of the First Intifada. He is one of 1,027 Palestinian prisoners released in 2011 in exchange for kidnapped Israeli soldier Gilad Shalit. July 7, 1957: Eliezer Siegfried Hoofien, who provided the pre-state Jewish community in Palestine and then the state of Israel with a half-century of financial expertise and leadership, dies at age 76. A native of Utrecht in the Netherlands, Hoofien became deputy director of the Anglo-Palestine Bank after making aliyah in 1912, then was named general manager in 1925. Israel made the bank its financial agent in August 1948. It was renamed Bank Leumi L’Yisrael in 1950 and became a commercial bank in 1954. July 8, 1958: Politician Tzipi Livni is born in Tel Aviv to two veterans of the Irgun paramilitary force. A former army officer and Mossad agent with a law degree from Bar-Ilan University, she is first elected to the Knesset in 1999 as a member of Likud. She switches to Ariel Sharon’s Kadima in 2005 and becomes deputy prime minister and foreign minister un-

make contact with the suspect. The app will then recommend the most appropriate lawyer for the case. Immediately after being chosen, the attorney is sent preliminary information about the suspect on his or her cell phone, even before arriving at the police station to conduct an initial interview. “This important project with Google harnesses the wonderful entrepreneurial forces on campus in order to upgrade service provided by the public sector and to improve the lives of ordinary citizens,” David Bareket, vice president and director general of Ben-Gurion University, said in a statement announcing the winners.

Jell-O cubes with DouxMatok’s sugar.

Sugar Reduction Startup Raises $22 Million

DouxMatok, an Israel based food tech company, claims it’s able to cut sugar levels in foods without affecting their

der Prime Minister Ehud Olmert. In the 2009 election, she leads Kadima to the most seats but can’t form a government. She creates the Hatnua party in 2012. July 9, 1967: Leonard Bernstein conducts the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra at a concert on Mount Scopus to celebrate the cultural unification of Jerusalem after the June 1967 war. The audience in the packed amphitheater includes Prime Minister Levi Eshkol, President Zalman Shazar, former Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion and wounded veterans of the war. Mezzo-soprano Jennie Tourel participates in the show, which features Mahler’s “Second Symphony.”

West German Chancellor Konrad Adenauer (left) meets with Nahum Goldmann at the King David Hotel in Jerusalem in 1966.

July 10, 1895: Nahum Goldmann, a founder of the World Jewish Congress and the Conference of Presidents of Ma-

taste, according to The Times of Israel. The money raised will allow the firm to move to large scale production and sales as it commercializes its technology in Europe and North America. The product is a sugar-based solution that maximizes the efficiency of the delivery of sugar to the mouth’s sweet taste buds. DouxMatok engineers sugar grains so that most of the flavor reaches the taste buds, where the sweetness is felt, in contrast to normal sugar, where 80 percent of the sugar goes directly into the stomach. The DouxMatok technology coats sugar molecules onto a tasteless mineral or a fiber or protein that is made for the purpose, which, the company says, ensures more of the sugar lands on the taste buds. The product was “tested independently and validated by third party panels as well as major food companies.” Consumers cannot tell the difference between the modified sugar and the real thing, DouxMatok said. “The task of providing a sugar reduction solution is not only important for the consumer, but also for food corporations that rely on sugar to create the world’s top-selling products,” said Yishai Klein, managing partner of BlueRed Partners. ■

jor American Jewish Organizations, is born in Visznevo, Lithuania. Goldmann is drawn to Zionism as a child in Frankfurt, Germany. Starting in 1935, he lobbies for the partition of Palestine into Jewish and Arab states as the Zionist representative to the League of Nations. He initiates negotiations with West Germany to pay Israel reparations for Nazi crimes, and he co-founds the Claims Conference to support Holocaust survivors. July 11, 1920: Rebecca Sieff, Vera Weizmann and Edith Eder found the Women’s International Zionist Organization at a conference in London attended by representatives from England, Palestine, Germany, Poland, the Netherlands, Russia and South Africa. The three wives of Zionist leaders are inspired to help improve the lives of pioneering Jewish women in Palestine after a tour of the land in 1919. WIZO aims to provide child care, housing, schooling, home economics education and other services. ■ Items are provided by the Center for Israel Education (www.israeled.org), where you can find more details.


BUSINESS

Allen Fagin is Orthodox Union’s vice president

Kosher Food Lifeline Feeds Hungry Atlanta Jews By Chloe Levitas An Atlanta nonprofit, Yad L’Yad, is among kosher food programs nationwide to receive money from a new division of the Orthodox Union. Kosher Food Lifeline offers need-based help for food pantries and other social service programs and agencies feeding the local community. Kedem Foods, which specializes in kosher, gluten-free and all-natural foods, provided a $200,000 grant to launch the new program prior to Passover 2019. Through the program, Yad L’Yad received money to spend on Kedem products, selecting 30 Passover food items to help Jewish families in need. Yad L’Yad is

a grass roots organization established to offer short-term assistance to local Jewish individuals and families. “The OU’s next step is to help Yad L’Yad with donations and lowering the costs of foods to those in need there,” said Allison Deal, founding director of the Kosher Food Lifeline. The organization receives kosher food through its partnership with the Orthodox Union. “Food insecurity is an important issue for us,” said Kedem Vice President Charles Herzog. “We are always looking for ways to work with our communities and help where we can, and OU’s Kosher Food Lifeline program ensured that we

were sending exactly what was needed, where it was needed. We look forward to future partnerships with KFL and its network of kosher pantries.” More than 150,000 pounds of Kosher for Passover food were distributed to 53 partnered organizations who delivered it to communities in Georgia and 15 other states, supporting more than 17,000 Jewish families in need. There are more than 215 agencies in 24 states across the country that provide low-cost or free kosher food to individuals and families who have challenges gaining access to food. “Financial strains within the Jewish community cannot be understated,” said Orthodox Union Vice

President Allen Fagin. “As the OU tackles affordability issues on a number of fronts, we recognize those in our community who struggle each day to put nutritious kosher food on the table.” KFL’s Deal said, “This is the first time a national program at this scale has addressed the needs of kosher food pantries, many which are run by hardworking volunteers with limited resources. By coordinating purchases and helping corporate food donors to direct donations where they are needed, we can increase efficiency, eliminate waste, bring prices down, and hopefully help these agencies provide more nutritious, protein-rich kosher food to those who need it most.” ■

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OPINION Atlanta Links to New Black-Jewish Caucus Relations between Jews and African The leader in creating the caucus was Americans have reached memorable peaks Rep. Brenda Lawrence, a Democrat from and suffered through regrettable valleys. Michigan. “This doesn’t happen without Through the Atlanta Black-Jewish Coher,” Wilker said. alition, the American Jewish Committee’s In a statement to the AJT, Lawrence regional office has invested 37 years in said, “In January, I spoke to a gathering of supporting dialogue locally. The program’s AJC advocates about the need to bring Afendurance is a legacy of Sherry Frank’s tenrican Americans and Jews together — in ure as regional director. Congress and around the country. I met The coalition’s longevity is a tribute to with the CEO, David Harris, as well as Dov the work started by long-time regional di- Dave Wilker, the director of black-Jewish relarector Frank, and continued by her succes- Schechter tions, and together we turned this idea into From Where I Sit sors, Judy Marx and Dov Wilker. a reality. I’m happy to partner with AJC in Now Wilker, the regional director an ongoing way on this vital initiative.” since 2011, has contributed to creation of the CongresAlong with Lawrence, the African American cosional Caucus on Black-Jewish Relations, a forum to sup- chairs are Rep. Will Hurd, a Texas Republican, and Rep. port dialogue on Capitol Hill. John Lewis, the Atlanta Democrat (and a co-founder Several months ago, Wilker assumed an additional of the Atlanta Black-Jewish Coalition). The Jewish corole as the AJC’s national director of black-Jewish rela- chairs are Rep. Lee Zeldin, a New York Republican, and tions. The position was created “in recognition that we Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, a Florida Democrat. needed to strengthen nationally our black-Jewish relaThe caucus was announced on the Hill June 3 by tions, but also because of the work that we do in Atlan- Lawrence and the AJC at its Global Forum in Washingta,” Wilker said. ton, D.C. In meetings with members of the Congressional Rep. Lucy McBath, the Democrat representing Black Caucus, the AJC asked, “What to them was the val- Georgia’s 6th Congressional District, joined the next day. ue of black-Jewish relations, what were priority issues As of late June, the caucus had 25 members. The offor them, and what were the synergies,” Wilker said. “A fice of Rep. Hank Johnson, the Democrat representing lot of issues were discussed. We found the easiest uni- Georgia’s 4th District, said that he hoped to be added to fiers around anti-Semitism in the U.S. and racism and the roster before the House’s August recess. bigotry in the U.S.” One member who attracted attention by joining

10 | JULY 12, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Julie Fishman Rayman

Dov Wilker

was Rep. Ilhan Omar, the Somali immigrant and Minnesota Democrat who has come under fire from some quarters of American Jewry (including caucus co-chair Zeldin) for comments seen as being anti-Semitic and/or anti-Israel. “This is not about Israel. The caucus serves a very specific purpose,” to deal with issues of hate directed at Jews and blacks in the United States, Wilker said. “The caucus can serve to help educate Jewish and black members and their staffs, and to generate support for legislation related to the priority issues.” “It’s an historic moment for both the black and Jewish communities, to acknowledge that we have the opportunity to be together, to advocate together, to learn together. It’s unfortunate that these are the issues around which we have to come together,” Wilker said. Asked where this ranks in his career, Wilker said, “To be able to be involved in the launching of a caucus that brings together black and Jewish elected officials, it’s at the top. I love telling people that this initiative just launched. It’s a great way to say that we recognize that black-Jewish relations have ebbed and flowed, but that this is a great time for this relationship.” A second link from Atlanta’s Jewish community on the AJC team is Julie Fishman Rayman, since 2012 the D.C.-based director of political outreach. “I started my political journey campaigning for Michael Coles during his first congressional race in 1996. My mom used to drive me to campaign headquarters as it was before I got my license,” the Alpharetta native recalled. Now the Atlanta coalition co-founded in 1982 by Sherry Frank, John Lewis and the late Cecil Alexander is linked to efforts by Wilker, Rayman, and the AJC and their colleagues to help foster black-Jewish dialogue in the nation’s capital in 2019. ■


OPINION

Publisher's Note

It has been 4 1/2 years since I ac- communities’ benefit. I would specifiquired the Atlanta Jewish Times, our com- cally like to thank Ellen Futterman, edimunity’s newspaper. Since January 2015, tor of the St. Louis Jewish Light, and Scott our community has Berzon, executive witnessed the AJT director, for their continually grow time and efforts and transform. We organizing a great strive to create an meeting and wonengaging, diverse derful event. and balanced pubThere are lication to entice a about 100 Jewish larger readership, publications in the offer a paper that U.S. Our very own has something for Adolph Rosenberg everyone, and enwas a founding sure we are inclumember of the AJPA AJT Publisher Michael Morris, right, receives one of the paper’s four AJPA sive to all members in 1967 (along with Simon Rockower Awards from Craig of our community. Bob Cohen, editorBurke of Mid-Atlantic Media. A tall order indeed. in-chief emeritus of In our effort to grow, evolve and learn, the St. Louis Jewish Light). The AJPA was our newspaper maintains an active mem- founded in Israel during the Six Day War. bership with the American Jewish Press Several editors and publishers, on a trip Association. Each year the AJPA hosts a to Israel, were stuck there when the war conference for Jewish publications from broke out. Today, the AJPA represents 60 around the U.S. and Israel, and their pub- publication members, and almost half atlishers, editors, writers and sales teams tended this year’s conference. gather to spend three days collaborating Believe it or not, Jewish media and and learning from one another. publications have their own Pulitzer Prize. The Jewish Light newspaper in St. These prestigious awards that honor Louis, Mo., hosted this year’s conference achievements in Jewish media are called right under the famous Gateway Arch. the Simon Rockower Jewish Journalism St. Louis is beautiful and the people Awards and are bestowed annually at this at the local federation and the Jewish conference. These awards were created in Light hosted a very productive and valu- 1979 as a tribute to Simon Rockower by his able conference that filled the attendees sons and family to honor his deep love for with ambition, knowledge and great the craft of Jewish Journalism. Rockower ideas to execute back home for their own believed that self-respect was gained by being proud of your religion and your people. I am honored to report that the Atlanta Jewish Times brought home four Rockower awards this year, recognizing stories and issues published during 2018. You may even remember a few of them:

AJPA members proudly display Rockower awards won by their publications.

inated to serve on the executive board of the AJPA for this upcoming term. As owner of this newspaper, I am very proud of our accomplishments. When I spoke with other Jewish newspaper professionals, I came to realize that the AJT is easily one of the top Jewish newspapers published in the United States. I can’t express enough gratitude to our subscribers and advertisers. It is your financial support that enables us to continue our mission of Keeping Jewish Atlanta Connected. I would be remiss if I did not encourage anyone not currently subscribing to the AJT’s home delivery to please do so. Not because you need the paper delivered in

your mailbox, but to support and help sustain your local Jewish newspaper. It’s only $1.30 per week. In closing, I am excited to announce that the 2020 AJPA Annual Conference and 39th annual AJPA Simon Rockower Awards are Atlanta bound. Please mark your calendars and get ready to host Jewish media professionals from all over the United States and Israel, tentatively scheduled for June 28 to July 1, 2020, at the Omni Atlanta Hotel at CNN Center. I personally want to invite our community to join the conference. Look out for more details later this year. ■

Award for Excellence in Single Commentary First Place: “A Stolen Son” by guest columnist Dr. Steven Waronker Award for Excellence in Feature Writing First Place: “Tikkun Olam: Different Strokes for Different Folks” by Dave Schechter Award for Excellence in Overall Graphic Design First Place: “Chanukah,” “Home & Garden,” and “Jewish Love” issues by Deborah Herr Richter

The city of St. Louis was the site of the annual AJPA conference this year.

Award for Excellence in Writing about Food and Wine Second Place: “A Jewish Thanksgiving” by Roni Robbins In addition, Kaylene Ladinsky, our managing publisher and editor, was nomATLANTA JEWISH TIMES JULY 12, 2019 | 11


JEWISH AGENCIES Pledging Today for Tomorrow’s Jewish Future By Dave Schechter Mike Leven is not the type to sit back and assume that someone else will take care of a problem. Addressing issues head-on is how Leven came to be referred to as an “industry icon” and a “marketing genius” in a decades-long career in the hotel and hospitality industry. Leven, currently the chairman and CEO of the Georgia Aquarium, has turned his attention to what he sees as a potential lost opportunity for American Jewry. Over the next 25 years, a staggering amount of money – estimates range as high as $60 trillion – will transfer from the Baby Boomers to the generations known as the millennials and Gen Z. An estimated $6.3 trillion is earmarked for charitable use, of which about 5 percent – more than $315 billion – will be in Jewish hands, Leven said at the recent annual meeting of the Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta. And therein, Leven said, lies the concern identified by multiple surveys of American Jews: “Each new generation’s relationship to Judaism is becoming more and more disconnected.” A 2017 report by the Public Religion Research Institute found that about one-third of Americans who identify as Jewish were “cultural Jews,” with no religious attachment, but that 53 percent of those younger than 30 qualified as “cultural Jews.” As Leven sees it, the risk in this disconnect is that wealth passed from one Jewish generation to the next will not be spent Jewishly. “This could happen due to a lack of conversation,” Leven said. He is determined that this conversation take place, and that it begins in Atlanta. Capturing even 50 percent of that $315 billion in Jewish charitable funds could amount to nearly $160 billion, including interest accruing from continued investment. “We have a monumental opportunity for sustaining the Jewish future, to sustain the Jewish people, not only here, but in Israel and all over the globe,” Leven told those attending the Federation meeting. “The job is to come up with a system that will allow us to capture that money.” That system, as Leven envisions it, is the “Jewish Future Pledge,” an initiative that will be road-tested in Atlanta. “We are trying to create a movement right here, starting in the Atlanta Federation, to secure the Jewish future,” Leven said. The first part reads: “I hereby pledge 12 | JULY 12, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Mike Leven started the Jewish Future Pledge to direct giving to Jewish causes and/or the State of Israel.

that at my passing, at least 50 percent of all my assets left for charitable purposes will be directed to strengthen and serve the Jewish people and/or the State of Israel.” Leven’s goal is that 180 members of the Atlanta Jewish community sign “My Jewish Future Pledge.” A stack of pledge sheets was left on tables at the Federation annual meeting. At this writing, a figure

on the number of pledges signed and returned was not available. The Federation is partnering with the initiative through its Atlanta Jewish Foundation. “We don’t need the money now. What we need is to make sure that through your heirs, you have charitable dollars to give and that at least 50 percent

The Jewish Future Pledge asks donors to leave at least 50 percent of their assets designated for charity to Jewish causes and Israel.

will go Jewishly,” Leven said. One investment vehicle is donor-advised funds. The money placed in these funds is owned by the Federation, as the sponsoring organization. Donor requests for allocation of these funds, often but not always in the short-term, generally are followed if the recipient is a qualifying tax-exempt organization. The donor, who receives a tax deduction for the amount deposited in the fund, can designate who will hold adviser status after their death, a way to involve children and grandchildren in philanthropy. Another method is the Life & Legacy program, in which specific amounts of money are bequeathed to local Jewish organizations and institutions. In its first year, the Federation received more than $14 million in commitments for such gifts. The Foundation also can create endowments and advise on other forms of giving. “Right now it’s just a pledge, but what the Foundation can go back and do is for all these people who have signed pledges, we can be the avenue that will help you to legalize it and formalize it to set it up,” said Renee Kutner, the Federation’s vice president of marketing. Through these funds, “we are actively securing now the future of this community with commitments,” Kutner said. Leven’s partner in getting the pledge program up and running is Amy Holtz, of Philadelphia, who left a successful business career to involve herself in a number of personal and professional Jewish enterprises. Holtz said that when the pledge was presented at a meeting with 25 “megadonors” in Atlanta’s Jewish community, everyone present said they would sign. She is particularly enthused about a second, non-financial part of the initiative, an “intangible” aspect that Leven did not mention at the Federation annual meeting. “We are asking you to write a legacy letter,” to tell your children and grandchildren “what are your life lessons, what did you learn, why is it important for you to be Jewish, why do you care,” Holtz said. “This is not just for rich people,” Holtz said, “because all the Jewish people have a stake in the Jewish future. It belongs to all of us. We want this to be for everybody. Everybody has life lessons to share.” Such a document has meaning well beyond guidance on how money is to be spent, but rather how a life is to be lived with meaning, Holtz said. “You’re going to tell them what’s in your heart,” she said, referencing wisdom from the Torah that “words from the heart go to the heart.” ■


The Lowdown I Bet You Didn’t Know …

Mike Leven

Atlanta is chock full of interesting movers and shakers, some bent on creativity, empire building, activism and/or just plain having fun and living the good life. Lean in to hear some off-the-cuff remarks about what makes “Mr. Hospitality” Mike Leven tick. Find out how he has led the entertainment management industry from whale sharks to Vegas, where hotel magnate Sheldon Adelson beckoned him to turn around his mega empire.

Leven is the chairman and CEO of the Georgia Aquarium. He was the CEO of the Georgia Aquarium from 2008 to 2009 and went on to lead Las Vegas Sands Corporation as president and chief operating officer. He also co-founded and served as CEO of U.S. Franchise Systems, Inc. (Microtel Inn & Suites and Hawthorn Suites) and was president and chief operating officer of Holiday Inn worldwide. Leven serves on the boards of The Marcus Foundation and the Birthright Israel Foundation, among others. Get to know him better right here.

My friends tease me about … Getting excited about small stuff. I have no patience with bureaucracy! What are you reading? “How to Think Like a Roman Emperor: The Stoic Philosophy of Marcus Aurelius” by Donald Robertson. Greatest extravagance? Flying to Scotland to play golf. I am often mistaken for … As a younger man, Frank Sinatra. Now … not so much. Which talent would you like to have? I would have been a terrific Broadway theater director. Guilty pleasure? Eating too much good apple pie. I do like a nice piece of fish at Kyma. I like Greek food in general. I’ve been known to freak out about … Missing a short putt. You’ve met a lot of famous folks. By whom were you most awestruck? Shimon Peres. Tim McGraw and Faith Hill more recently. … Very nice people. What’s the best advice you’ve ever gotten? After a speech, a training consultant pulled me aside and said, “That’s the worst presentation I’ve ever seen because you weren’t being yourself.” Best advice you gave your children. Brains are no substitute for hard work. Last time you cried, Singing “My Yiddishe Momme” which, by the way, is not a true translation. It was rewritten to be more ecumenical for all mothers. If you were a creature in the Aquarium, what would it be? A turtle because they live a super long time! ■

Reported by Marcia Caller Jaffe

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JEWISH AGENCIES

Robbins Steering Federation Into Future By Dave Schechter

A portion of the money allocated for Israel remains in Atlanta to fund Writing about the Jewish Federation the shinshinim, young Israelis who have graduated high school but not yet begun of Greater Atlanta inspires metaphors. Certainly, the Federation is the hub military service. They come to Atlanta to of a philanthropic wheel, its spokes rep- share their knowledge and love of their resenting the money it raises and distrib- homeland at synagogues, day schools, utes, the programs that connect elements and other programs in the Jewish comof a far-flung Jewish community, and the munity. If the general allocations are “old links it fosters with Jewish and non-Jewschool,” analog Federation, the Innovaish groups. Think of JFGA, founded in 1905 as tion Fund is the new, digital world. Sevthe Atlanta Federation of Jewish Chari- eral times a year that fund, increased ties, as an analog device retooled for the this year to $440,000, awards grants to support new and emerging efforts to endigital world. hance Jewish life in Three years Atlanta. ago, shortly before A third fundEric Robbins was ing vehicle selects hired as its presia set of recipients dent and CEO, the for what it calls tarFederation was degeted philanthropy. scribed in this space This past year fundas “an aircraft caring was earmarked rier, an enormous for PJ Library, a craft that requires program providing time to pivot in the books for Jewish water.” families; overnight After three camping scholaryears at the helm, ships; JumpSpark, Robbins feels that a teen programthe pivot is underEric Robbins, president and CEO of the ming initiative; and way. “I think we Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta. Repair the World, have a very clear direction. I think we have the right tal- which provides service opportunities. “We don’t just exist to fundraise for ent, both volunteer and professional, on board to get us there. And we have some the community. If that’s all there is you momentum,” he said during an interview could argue there is no relevance for at Federation headquarters in midtown us,” Robbins said. “But who is planning for the future of the Jewish commuAtlanta. Philanthropy involves channeling nity? Who is bringing the community money into good works, so any discus- together? Who is handling security on sion of the Federation, which is a 501(c) a community-wide perspective? Who is (3) non-profit under the federal tax code, helping to build relationships with the starts with money raised to meet three non-Jewish community?” After several more questions, Robpriorities labeled as: Ensuring a Jewish future, Caring for Jews in need, and bins ended with, “Who is beginning to think about what this community has to Strengthening Jewish community. For fiscal year 2019, which ended look like, not only tomorrow, but what it June 30, donations to the Federation to- should look like in 25 or 30 or 50 years?” According to the Federation’s fiscal taled more than $19 million, an increase from $17.5 million in fiscal 2018. There 2018 tax filing, the most recent available, were 300 first-timers among 3,559 do- Robbins was paid $394,641. The staff he nors, and 8 percent of donors gave more oversees has 58 full-time and 12 part-time employees. than $10,000. “I think Eric has done a good job of In late July, the Federation will announce how about two-thirds of the creating priorities and bringing people money raised in fiscal 2019 will be allo- together around a shared and common cated in fiscal 2020, which began July 1. vision,” said Dov Wilker, Atlanta regional About 65 percent will go to organizations director of the American Jewish Commitin Atlanta and the United States with the tee. “He has done the best job of any Fedother 35 percent designated to connect eration CEO in recent memory of being with Jews globally, including in Israel the convener in the community,” Wilker said, mentioning as an example the trip and in the former Soviet Union. 14 | JULY 12, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

If securing Jewish institutions has to Israel several months ago by 70 relibecome a priority for Federations nationgious and lay leaders. “It’s a sacred moment to be in this wide, that to-do list also includes connectrole at this time,” Robbins said at the ing millennials (born 1981-1996) to the start of his remarks to the Federation’s Jewish community at-large, never mind recent annual meeting in June, held in seeking a donation. Studies conducted in recent years have found that a significant the gymnasium of the MJCCA. Asked a couple of weeks later, Rob- percentage in this age group have little or bins said that by “sacred” he meant the no attachment to their Judaism. In the 2013 Pew Research Center opportunity to build and sustain the Jewish future. “I’m not sure that there’s ever study of American Jews, 68 percent of not been a sacred time, but I certainly millennial Jews identified as “Jews by religion” while 32 percent were classified think now is a sacred time,” he said. A year earlier, Robbins told the 2018 as “Jews of no religion.” A 2017 report by annual meeting audience that two things the Public Religion Research Institute found that about kept him awake at one-third of Amerinight: apathy and cans who identify relevance – issues as Jewish were “culthat remain in 2019. tural Jews,” with no “I still worry religious attachabout apathy, bement. PRRI also recause I think that’s ported that 53 perthe biggest threat to cent of those under Jewish life. People age 30 qualified as don’t want to buy “cultural Jews.” in. I will tell you Among the that we had a little Federation’s efbit of a wake-up forts to connect call in Pittsburgh this younger cohort and in Poway, and with the wider JewI don’t want that to Renee Kutner, vice president of ish community be the wake-up call, marketing for the Federation have been its supand that has me not sleeping for other reasons,” Robbins said. port of “Next Gen” involvement with He grew up in the Squirrel Hill neighbor- Birthright Israel, convening “The Interhood of Pittsburgh, home to the Tree of change” forum to explore how the JewLife synagogue, where 11 worshippers ish community can be more welcoming were massacred on Oct. 27, 2018, by a toward interfaith families, and through gunman spewing anti-Jewish venom. “For a program pairing younger social and a moment there, people said, oh, maybe business entrepreneurs with community Judaism is important and we need to pro- elders for mentoring and intergeneratect it, but it’s a shame that that’s what it tional learning. Renee Kutner, the Federation’s vice takes. That is the significant difference president of marketing, said that sucbetween ’18 and ’19.” How the community is secured will cess will not be measured by whether young adults come to the Federation anchange this summer. Cathal Lucy, the Secret Service vet- nual meeting, but whether it is “coming to eran who has been director of commu- them at the places where they want to be.” Where they want to be are sections nity-wide security for the Atlanta Federation since Oct. 2015, is stepping down in of Atlanta where the Jewish community July. He will be succeeded by his deputy, is growing. The northern reaches of the Zach Williams, who joined JFGA several metro area, a broad swath that includes months ago from the Georgia Emergency Alpharetta and Johns Creek, will be the Management Agency. [The decision was first focus of a five-year grant the FedLucy’s, Robbins said. Lucy did not re- eration has received to target neighborhoods. That effort will supplement the spond to queries from the AJT.] Robbins said that the Federation will “PJ connectors,” people working partincrease its engagement with the Secure time for the Federation creating Jewish Community Network, maintained by the programming in Smyrna, Brookhaven, Jewish Federations of North America, Dunwoody, Decatur and the North Metro which provides Jewish institutions with area. “None of this is about connecting to security updates and can provide personFederation. Federation exists to build the nel to assist local federations.


JEWISH AGENCIES

This rendering provided by JFGA reflects an architect’s conception of what a new Federation community building might look like, not a final design that will be built.

community … We want to connect people 1960s television cartoon – briefly apto the community in hopes that they’ll peared on a screen behind him. In an AJT interview, Robbins and support the community through FederaKutner stressed that the drawing was not tion,” Robbins said. “the” building, but Among other rather one archiplans on the drawtect’s idea. “That is ing board for 2020 the current renderand beyond, Robing of what we are bins said, “We’re exploring having in moving forward on this space, which is ideas to help supa multi-use buildport part-time and ing for Atlanta’s day school educaJewish commution in the comnity,” Robbins said. munity, and on the A feasibility study concept of a fammay begin in the ily camp. We have months ahead, fola vision of a camp lowed by preparathat operates yeartions for a fundround for families. raising campaign, We would prototype though no cost it, lease a site somefigure has been atwhere and try it.” tached yet to the A goal Robproject. bins had when he In addition arrived 2016, of to Federation’s gathering numerheadquarters, a ous Jewish organiCathal Lucy, Federation director new building could zations under one of community-wide security. house workspace roof, may be realized in a proposed renovation of the Fed- for smaller and emerging Jewish organieration’s three-acre headquarters at 18th zations, offices or satellite space for more established agencies, expanded space and Spring streets. When Robbins addressed the 2019 for the William Breman Jewish Heritage annual meeting, a sketch – now dubbed Museum, a small theater (for possible use “the Jetsons building,” a nod to the early by the Atlanta Jewish Film Festival), an

Israel experience center and, atop all of these, residential properties. “We believe that the greatest way to create energy in the Jewish community is that collision of organizations, and we’re going to create that capsule,” Robbins said. “The concept embodies exactly what we want to be in the community. This is not Federation’s building, don’t call it Federation’s building. This is a building that would be the home to many Jewish organizations and programs.” The Federation is also part of Atlanta’s broader philanthropic landscape. Alicia Philipp, executive director of the Community Foundation for Greater

Atlanta, said, “We have partnered with the Federation for years on various programs and events, and Eric has continued that commitment during his tenure. The Federation has deep roots in the Atlanta community and a strong history of being collaborative and thoughtful in their work with us at the Community Foundation and with other organizations working to addressing the needs of our communities.” Toward the end of the hour-long interview, Robbins said, “I’m more convinced than ever in the importance of Federation, in building and sustaining this community.” ■

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JEWISH AGENCIES

Janel Margaretta shares news about the MJCCA’s future plans.

The Marcus Jewish Community Center of Atlanta is trying to extend its reach beyond the Dunwoody campus.

Jared Powers is CEO of the MJCCA, which has plans to expand its programs and start new ones.

Marcus JCC Reaches Beyond Dunwoody Campus By Kevin C. Madigan Trying to learn about the latest developments at the Marcus JCC, we spoke with chief development/marketing officer Janel Margaretta about how the agency reaches beyond its core, about plans for a third preschool and the upcoming Maccabi Games there. AJT: There’s a large Jewish population intown that doesn’t necessarily want to go to Dunwoody. Margaretta: We do offer different programs for them. For example, we offer a pilot program with basketball in the Piedmont area. We were offering some programming at The Temple. We are trying different programs in different parts of the city to see what works. We also offer busing in the summertime from various places in the city to come to the Zaban Park campus or to Emory University. We also have an intown outreach coordinator, Lauren Checkanow, and she does

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various pop-up programs for young families. She was doing some programming at Chabad on the BeltLine, and she does a lot of public space programs in town. AJT: What are the activities you have at Emory? Margaretta: We have a very robust day camp program with over 100 options over the summer. Some are here at Zaban Park; some are at Temple Kol Emeth in East Cobb and at Emory where there is a drama camp. AJT: How do you serve people in Alpharetta, for instance? Margaretta: We have a large group of people from that area that come to Zaban Park to play catchball, … womens’ volleyball. They come via bus. AJT: What changes does the MJCCA plan, and do any of those include expansion? Margaretta: We are always looking

for opportunities but our plans right now are to do a lot of partnerships to connect to the Jewish community around Atlanta in ways that we can utilize existing space and to be able to take our programs on the road. AJT: Future plans? Margaretta: We are really excited. We have received a Federation innovation grant for a program that we are hoping to launch next year. We are calling it JCC on Wheels. The idea is that we would purchase a trailer and it would basically be almost a mobile classroom, and we would take it on the road, to Alpharetta or East Cobb, Roswell, intown. ... And we could offer our programming anywhere there is a demand for it, any neighborhood looking for Jewish connection, and we could be anywhere people need the JCC to be. We also have some funding from the Jewish Community Center Association of North America, but we still need additional funding to make this

dream a reality, hopefully sometime in the winter or spring. AJT: Anything else we should know? Margaretta: We recently opened our third preschool, The Schiff School, at Temple Emanu-El in Sandy Springs. We have our preschool here, The Weinstein School at Zaban Park, and The Sunshine School at Temple Kol Emeth. We are looking for other preschools that might enjoy having the JCC operate there, and to see if other areas of the city would benefit from our award-winning curriculum. We recently expanded our fitness offerings at Zaban Park. Maccabi is on the horizon, which of course you know. We have 1,800 campers on site this summer and 1,250 up at Camp Barney and another whole bunch in our preschool camps, so we are in summer mode. It smells like sunscreen around here. ■


JEWISH AGENCIES

NCJW confronts today’s most urgent social and economic challenges facing women, children, and families.

Terri Bonoff assumed her position as CEO of JF&CS last month.

New JF&CS CEO Sets Path for Agency By Jan Jaben-Eilon In the few short weeks Terri Bonoff has officially been the CEO of Jewish Family & Career Services, she is already fine-tuning her vision and setting down a new path for the agency that was established in 1891. “I find myself more committed to deepening our relationship with the Jewish community and strengthening our partnerships with our sister organizations,” she told the AJT, referring to other agencies like the Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta, the Marcus JCC and the William Breman Jewish Home. “It’s important to understand what we each provide.” Her message of inclusion is reflected in the marketing pitch for her agency’s annual campaign launched in July. “There’s so much more we can do with you,” she stated. “The need is greater in every program area. The demand is greater than we are able to fulfill. We also want to tell our story to more people. We want a broader audience supporting our work.” Bonoff is a former business executive and elected official from Minnesota, serving as a Minnesota state senator from 2005 to 2016. Since her husband joined Delta Air Lines a little more than three years ago, she’s been “observing the community,” she said. Since her appointment was announced at the end of April and before her job officially started June 3, the new CEO was busy meeting with Atlanta rabbis and lay leaders. Obviously, she was also observing JF&CS. Immediately she

set in motion several personnel changes. She altered the title of the former acting CEO, Faye Dresner, to chief impact officer, and has the Director of Human Resources, Lisa Bronstein, reporting directly to her. She’s hired an executive assistant and asked JF&CS past president Stacy Fialkow, who had been doing contract work for the agency, to head the major gifts and legacy office. Even before Fialkow started her new part-time job July 1, she had already met a goal of signing up 25 new legacy donors. “I was so in awe of her ability to connect with people,” Bonoff said. Bonoff noted that the agency also plans to hire a director of information technology. “Before, we outsourced our technical work, but we want to have a person on staff” to strategically handle JF&CS’ technology, she said Bonoff told the AJT that what has most surprised her in her new job is the “depth and breadth of our offerings. I knew we do tons of programming, but I’ve been moved to tears when I hear those who we’ve touched.” She referred to one 32-year-old client who had recently been placed in an independent residence. “This is the first time he’s lived independently. For 10 years, he’s been begging to live independently.” Another surprise is the “strong, varied opinions” among JF&CS donors. But she noted that she’s already enjoying her new role. “I love it,” she enthused. “I feel so fortunate to be in an organization with people who are so talented. This is the ‘A’ team. They are really doing impactful work.” ■

Contact the Atlanta Section of the National Council of Jewish Women today at

404-843-9600 or visit ncjwatlanta.org.

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JEWISH AGENCIES

Central Bureau of Jewish Education for Atlanta? By Jan Jaben-Eilon At one time, the Atlanta Jewish educational world was served by an organization known as Jewish Educational Services, or JES. The Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta later spun off that agency to become the Center for Jewish Education and Experiences or CJEE. That, in turn, became Tribe 360 before it closed its doors more than a decade ago. Since then, there’s been no central bureau or agency for Jewish education in Atlanta. Stan Beiner is former head of The Epstein School and was chair of the day school council. As he put it: “I think when they created a vacuum, it wasn’t filled.” Beiner, now principal of the Fulton County Academy of Science and Technology in Roswell, observed, “Without a central bureau, everyone goes into his own silo, and you sacrifice community.” But that’s all about to change. Jodi Mansbach, chief impact officer at the Jewish Federation, told the AJT that her organization has acknowledged the lack of a central community educational resource that could provide professional development for Jewish educators. Thanks to a two-year grant, the Jewish Federation will fund a part-time position for someone to convene educators of supplemental Jewish education. “We’re in the process of hiring and hope to have someone by late summer,” Mansbach said. The goals over the next two to three years will be to focus on educator training with an emphasis on experiential education and to bring together a cohort of Jewish educational organizations already existing in Atlanta that prioritize innovation. “We’re not trying to recreate a CJEE,” she said. “We’re not trying to create a huge infrastructure. And we’re not trying

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Kelly Cohen’s JumpSpark is setting up a community partner network.

Paul Flexner said the recession brought down many central bureaus of Jewish education.

to say it has to be at the Federation, but we can start by incubating it.” Last fall the Jewish Federation started bringing a small group of educators together to figure out exactly what is needed in the Jewish community. “Our first step is to build a community of practitioners. We will be working with synagogues to determine the needs. We know there’s a need for high-quality educator training.” Mansbach noted that the Federation may work with a national organization such as The Jewish Education Project in New York City that has begun reaching out nationally to provide educational support to local communities. Mansbach pointed to the model used by JumpSpark, an innovative teen programming group that serves as a connector, partner and funder for program development for teens, their parents and Jewish professionals. JumpSpark is part of a national Jewish Teen Education & Engagement Funder Collaborative that is also funded by the Jim Joseph Foundation and the Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta.

“We saw what Kelly Cohen has done with teens, with the support of a national network and then they created a community network,” said Mansbach, referring to JumpSpark’s director. Atlanta is one of 10 cities that received funding from the national network, Cohen said. “Our funds are matched by the Federation and every city differs. But we work out of common goals and outcomes.” JumpSpark was launched in 2017. Cohen started in August 2017, becoming the director a year later. “Our goal is to raise the bars for Jewish teens,” she said. “This is not a youth group; you can’t join it. It’s not a classroom program. It’s an impact hub. We’re funding ways to reconceptualize Jewish learning.” Cohen, who taught at The Davis Academy for six years and has a master’s degree in Jewish education, explained that the centralized program of Tichon that provided after-school Jewish education for teens years ago, “doesn’t fit the world anymore. We must rethink what we mean by education to meet the needs of teens today.” Indeed, the world of Jewish education has dramatically changed over the last century. According to The Breman Museum archives, the Atlanta Bureau of Jewish Education was first founded in 1945. The purposes of the bureau were: “a) to bring about the coordination of all Jewish schools and other educational agencies in Atlanta, to the extent that their work may be promoted through common and cooperative efforts; b) to render pedagogic and educational services to all Jewish schools and other groups and agencies seeking such assistance; c) to encourage intelligent planning and creative effort in the field of Jewish education calculated to promote the religious, cultural and spiritual growth of

the individual and the community, and to make the community more conscious of the program and needs of Jewish education.” The bureau included all accredited rabbis, chairmen of committees of education of affiliated schools, and all professional heads of affiliated schools. One of the services offered was a centralized Jewish library, a resource that Atlanta Jewish leaders have noted was lost when CJEE closed. Paul Flexner, who was brought to Atlanta in 2004 to head CJEE, notes that central bureaus of Jewish education in many U.S. communities started closing their doors in the early years of this century. According to Rabbi Scott T. Aaron, education director of the Jewish United Fund/Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Chicago, some of this was due to the recession that struck the country in 2006. “Communities were slow to respond to the cultural and economic changes, and when we had the recession, central agencies became the target of those who were upset with Jewish education. Many thought the central agencies were outmoded and in need of changes.” Even the national agency funded by the Federation system to provide a centralized bureau of Jewish education, the Jewish Education Services of North America, folded during the recession. Aaron, who is also the chair of the Association of Directors of Central Agencies, explained that the models for Jewish education have changed over the years. “Central agencies were initially set up to be equivalent to boards of education,” he said. “They provided opportunities to streamline resources and sometimes to run centralized schools, originally known as Talmud Torahs. Synagogues didn’t have the wherewithal to have their own schools.” In the 20th century, as the Jewish community became more suburban, synagogues set up their own schools. National denominations such as Reform and Conservative provided curricular help and teacher training, but Aaron said they don’t any longer. And, he pointed out, “libraries are now obsolete.” Many communities, like Atlanta, closed their central bureaus. Some brought them into their Federation systems. Not surprisingly, Aaron told the AJT, “I believe in central resources. Many of our communities are adrift. We let this stuff go on autopilot for too long. Now we need to talk to our communities. There’s no template out there anymore. Each city must figure it out for itself.” That seems to be what is finally happening in Atlanta. ■


JEWISH AGENCIES

Jewish HomeLife Shortens Name, Adds Services By Jan Jaben-Eilon The Atlanta Jewish agency that encompasses facilities and services for the aging population is in the process of renewing itself with a new name, expanded services and a new tagline: Care for a New Age. As of this September, Jewish HomeLife Communities is dropping the last word in its name “because we don’t want people to think of us as only bricks and mortar,” explained President and CEO Harley Tabak. “We also see many people in their homes. We see ourselves trying to find new ways to meet the needs of an aging population.” The organization that started in 1951 and includes the William Breman Jewish Home, Aviv Rehabilitation Center, The Zaban Tower, The Jewish Tower, The Cohen Home, Berman Commons, The One Group, JHLC Medical Services and Weinstein Hospice wants to raise $3 million to launch a geriatric physicians practice that would care for those at the beginning of dementia. “There’s a huge shortage of geriatric physicians,” Tabak said. He considers the demand a virtual tsunami as baby boom-

Harley Tabak says there’s a tsunami of the aging population.

ers are aging. “I believe this will be one of the most challenging issues we’re facing” as a community and as a country. According to Tabak, Americans have come to almost take for granted that they want the best healthcare, the best surgery and cancer care. “What we don’t like to talk about is: What do we do with all these people who have survived” these illnesses? “There are those in their 70s who are caring for parents in their 90s. Every year there are more and more aging, so

that’s why the analogy to a tsunami is good. I started in this field 40 years ago and the aging population is just getting bigger and bigger.” In addition to a new name, new tagline, and hopefully, a geriatric practice, Tabak wants to do more partnering with other agencies. “AgeWell is a collaboration of us, the Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta, Jewish Family & Career Services and the Marcus Jewish Community Center of Atlanta, putting all the dif-

ferent programs for older adults into one seamless organization,” he said. “We are launching an updated website over the summer and will have an intake person. When I started, there were overlapping services, but not anymore.” Jewish HomeLife is also looking into the possibility of launching a senior facility in the Toco Hills area. “We’ve been in conversations,” Tabak said. Jewish HomeLife offers educational services to help better educate people about aging, and various programs on dementia and other relevant subjects. In September, it will hold a program on medical marijuana for those suffering from chronic illness. Known as the “singing CEO” because he likes to sing Jewish melodies and American folk songs, Tabak always knew his career would be focused on geriatrics. Since he came to Jewish HomeLife Communities as CEO 15 years ago, the agency’s budget has grown to $35 million and it now employs 400. “It was probably one-third of that when I started. We’ve expanded our scope of services to wherever people are in the aging journey. Our mission is to support the aging journey using Jewish values.” ■

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES JULY 12, 2019 | 19


JEWISH AGENCIES

Directory of Jewish Agencies in Atlanta ALEF Fund 1440 Spring Street NW, Atlanta 30309 678-222-2739 www.aleffund.org The ALEF Fund offers Georgia taxpayers a simple way to redirect a portion of their state income taxes to become scholarships at any of the 16 participating Jewish preschools and day schools.

American Friends of Magen David Adom 3300 PGA Boulevard, Suite 970, Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410 561-835-0510 www.afmda.org American Friends of Magen David Adom is the largest supporter of Magen David Adom. MDA is Israel’s national ambulance, blood-services, and disasterrelief organization, serving as emergency medical first responders for the state’s 8.8 million people.

Anti-Defamation League 3490 Piedmont Road, Suite 610, Atlanta 30305 404-262-3470 www.atlanta.adl.org For more than 100 years, ADL has led the fight against racism, bigotry, intolerance and anti-Semitism. ADL is the leader in providing diversity education in schools, communities, and workplaces.

Atlanta Kosher Commission 1855 LaVista Road NE, Atlanta 30329 404-634-4063 www.kosheratlanta.org An Orthodox, community-based kosher supervision agency, the AKC certifies over 150 companies in the Southeast and beyond, including manufacturing facilities, bakeries, supermarkets, restaurants, hotels and caterers.

American Jewish Committee 404-233-5501 www.ajc.org/atlanta AJC’s Atlanta regional office works to bridge the gap between the Atlanta Jewish community and other ethnic and faith communities. AJC Atlanta also works with the diplomatic corps representing foreign governments across the Southeast.

Berman Commons 2026 Womack Road, Dunwoody 30338 678-222-7500 www.bermancommons.org Jewish HomeLife’s kosher assisted living and memory care community offers an active lifestyle for adults who require some level of assistance, to those with advanced dementia. The only secure Memory Care neighborhood in Georgia certified as an I’m Still Here Dementia Care Center of Excellence.

Anne Frank in the World 5920 Roswell Rd, Ste. 209 Sandy Springs, GA 30328 770-206-1558 Located just above the Sandy Springs Welcome Center, this 600 photograph exhibit with more than 8,000 words tells the story of young Anne Frank. The powerful, moving exhibit provides visitors a chance to learn, explore, share and remember the history and lessons of the Holocaust and its continued relevance today.

B’nai B’rith International 1120 20th Street NW, Suite 300 N, Washington, D.C. 20036 770-289-8964 www.bnaibrith.org B’nai B’rith International has advocated for global Jewry and championed the cause of human rights since 1843. Our local Atlanta lodge continues to advocate and support human rights with programs like Pinch Hitters, “Unto Every Person There is a Name”, and Enlighten America. Our social events promote tolerance and understanding.

20 | JULY 12, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Birthright Israel Atlanta 1440 Spring Street NW, Atlanta 30309 404-832-6944 www.jewishatlanta.org Birthright Israel Atlanta community trips each year bring a total of 120 young adults to Israel for 10 days. The Atlanta community trips are organized by Israel Outdoors, the largest Birthright provider.

Center for Israel Education P.O. Box 15129, Atlanta 30333 404-395-6851 www.israeled.org Center for Israel Education’s mission is to educate broadly about modern Israel.

Conexx: America Israel Business Connector 400 Northridge Road #250, Atlanta 30350 404-843-9426 www.conexx.org Conexx creates business opportunities for Israelis looking to expand in the U.S. and for Americans looking for entry into Israel. The business connector provides access to groundbreaking technologies and to partners in the Southeast, Israel and beyond.

Friends of the Israel Defense Forces 678-250-9030 www.fidf.org FIDF offers educational, cultural, recreational and social service programs and facilities to support the well-being of the soldiers who protect Israel and Jews worldwide, as well as their families.

Friendship Circle of Atlanta 5065 High Point Road, Atlanta 30342 404-843-2464 www.fcatlanta.org Friendship Circle of Atlanta addresses the challenges facing families of individuals with special needs. Innovative programming and volunteers create friendships and inclusion, bridging the gap between the general and special needs communities.

Hadassah Greater Atlanta 1050 Crown Pointe Parkway, Suite 500, Atlanta 30338 678-443-2961 www.hadassah.org/atlanta The area chapter of the Women’s Zionist Organization of America raises money for Hadassah projects in Israel and the United States, promotes issues of women’s health and family well-being, educates, and has fun.

HAMSA 4549 Chamblee Dunwoody, Atlanta 30338 1-833-HAMSA-HELPS https://jfcsatl.org/services/clinical-services/hamsa HAMSA provides recovery support and tools through a Jewish lens, helping people navigate the system of resources and ensuring continuity of care for all levels of recovery. HAMSA is in a unique position to facilitate change and significantly impact the Jewish recovery landscape.

Hebrew Order of David Locations across metro Atlanta www.hodnorthamerica.org HOD is an international fraternity of Jewish men dedicated to the continuity of the Jewish people and performing acts of charity to enhance the lives of HOD brethren and the community at large.

Hillels of Georgia 735 Gatewood Road NE, Atlanta 30322 404-963-2548 www.hillelsofgeorgia.org Hillels of Georgia serves more than 5,000 students across the state through Jewish programming, leadership training and advocacy to ensure that the next generation of Jews will be ready to carry the Jewish torch.


JEWISH AGENCIES

Interfaith Family 675 Ponce de Leon Avenue NE, Suite 8500, Atlanta 30308 404-991-2238 www.interfaithfamily.com/atlanta IFF/Atlanta offers programs, from “Love and Religion” workshops to holiday parties and Shabbat gatherings, and strives to be as welcoming and inclusive as possible to support and empower interfaith couples and families.

Israel Bonds 3525 Piedmont Road, Atlanta 30309 404-817-0617 www.israelbonds.com Israel bonds was established in 1951 and is a FINRA-member broker dealer and underwriter for securities, issued by the State of Israel in the United States.

Jewish Community Relations Council of Atlanta 1440 Spring Street NW, Atlanta 30309 678-222-3740 www.jcrcatlanta.wordpress.com JCRC Atlanta, the local affiliate of the Jewish Council for Public Affairs, educates and advocates on vital issues and provides a common table for Atlanta’s Jewish community. The organization monitors textbooks and provides curricula about Israel and Judaism to our community.

Jewish Educational Loan Fund 4549 Chamblee Dunwoody Road, Atlanta 30338 770-396-3080 www.jelf.org JELF provides interest-free loans to Jewish students in need for higher education throughout a five-state region (FL, GA, NC, SC, and VA).

Jewish Family & Career Services 4549 Chamblee Dunwoody Road, Atlanta 30338 770-677-9300 www.jfcsatl.org JF&CS improves the quality of life and builds self-sufficiency for individuals and families in greater Atlanta through counseling, career support, addiction programs, dental care, and services for older adults and for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta 1440 Spring Street NW, Atlanta 30309 404-873-1661 www.jewishatlanta.org The Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta provides opportunities, care, connection, support and strength for the Atlanta Jewish community, for Israel and for Jews globally.

Jewish Fertility Foundation 60 Lenox Pointe NE, Atlanta 30324 678-744-7018 www.jewishfertilityfoundation.org The Jewish Fertility Foundation provides financial assistance, educational awareness and emotional support to Atlanta Jewish families facing medical fertility challenges.

Jewish HomeLife Locations across metro Atlanta 404-351-8410 www.JewishHomeLife.org Residential care communities and athome support services for older adults at any stage of the aging journey, located in Buckhead, Dunwoody and Johns Creek. JHLC Medical Services 3156 Howell Mill Road, NW, Atlanta 30327 404.665.4190 www.JewishHomeLife.org Jewish HomeLife’s primary and urgent care clinic located in Buckhead, managed by Nurse Practitioners who specialize in geriatrics. We accept Medicare and are open to the community.

Jewish Interest Free Loan of Atlanta 5115 New Peachtree Road, Suite 200A, Chamblee 30341 470-268-5665 www.jifla.org JIFLA provides interest-free loans to help fellow Jews in the Atlanta area maintain financial stability through periods of financial distress with an alternative to high-interest-rate debt.

Jewish National Fund 6065 Roswell Road, Suite 214 Atlanta, GA 30328 404-236-8990 www.jnf.org JNF, which helped re-establish a Jewish homeland in Israel, is following its “$1 Billion Roadmap for the Next Decade,” an innovative plan for Israel’s future. Its Blueprint Negev program has made the Negev Desert an attractive place to live, work and visit.

Jewish Student Union of Atlanta 311 Briarvista Way, Atlanta 30329 678-666-5678 www.jewishstudentunion.com JSU supports clubs at public and non-Jewish private high schools and offers activities outside school to give thousands of students the chance to do something Jewish.

Jewish War Veterans Post 112 Atlanta, GA www.jwv.org JWV Atlanta Post 112 supports military veterans and active-duty personnel.

Jewish Women’s Connection of Atlanta Atlanta, GA www.jwcatlanta.org JWC Atlanta is a project of the Atlanta Scholars Kollel and a partner of Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta.

Jewish Women’s Fund of Atlanta 1440 Spring Street NW, Atlanta 30309 678-222-3716 www.jwfatlanta.org Jewish Women’s Fund of Atlanta expands opportunities in the lives of Jewish women and girls through the use of grants, advocacy and education, all applied through a gender lens.

JScreen 5115 New Peachtree Road, Suite 301 Atlanta 30341 404-778-8640 www.jscreen.org JScreen is a Jewish genetic screening program for anyone planning to start or expand a family. JScreen provides affordable, at-home saliva testing for more than 100 diseases.

JumpSpark 1155 Mt Vernon Hwy, Suite 800, Atlanta, GA 30338 770-648-2918 www.jumpsparkatl.org JumpSpark provides Jewish teens with interest-based programming and social opportunities using innovative resources in the Atlanta community and beyond.

Marcus Jewish Community Center of Atlanta 5342 Tilly Mill Road, Atlanta 30338 678-812-4000 www.atlantajcc.org MJCCA offers a myriad of fitness programs including group exercise classes, Stott® Pilates, strength-training equipment, and personal training sessions. MJCCA members have access to the Emory Student Activity and Academic Center, a recreational facility that features a fitness center, swimming pools, hard and clay tennis courts, a basketball gymnasium, sand volleyball courts, and more. ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES JULY 12, 2019 | 21


JEWISH AGENCIES

Museum of History and Holocaust Education 3333 Busbee Drive, Kennesaw 30144 470-578-2083 www.historymuseum.kennesaw.edu The Museum of History and Holocaust Education at Kennesaw State University presents public events, exhibits and educational resources focused on World War II and the Holocaust in an effort to promote education and dialogue about the past and its significance today.

National Council of Jewish Women Atlanta Section 6303 Roswell Road NE, Atlanta 30328 404-843-9600 www.ncjwatlanta.org National Council of Jewish Women tutors students and provides supplies and coats for Title I schools. NCJW raises money with the Bargainata store at 6600 Roswell Road in Sandy Springs, open Fridays and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

ORT Atlanta 3495 Piedmont Road NE, Building 12, Suite 418, Atlanta 30305 404-327-5266 www.ortamerica.org/regions/atlanta/ ORT America promotes the understanding and appreciation of Jewish values through a network of schools and training programs in 63 countries.

PJ Library in Atlanta 1440 Spring Street NW, Atlanta 30309 404-873-1661 www.jewishatlanta.org PJ Library in Atlanta, a program of the Harold Grinspoon Foundation powered by the Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta, gives age-appropriate, Jewishthemed books and CDs, along with diverse programming, to children ages 6 months to 8 years old. 22 | JULY 12, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Second Helpings Atlanta P.O. Box 720582, Atlanta 30358 678-894-9761 www.secondhelpingsatlanta.org Second Helpings Atlanta is a food rescue organization dedicated to fighting hunger and reducing food waste in metro Atlanta. SHA’s 400 volunteer drivers rescue excess nutritious food daily from 60 food donors and deliver it to 30 partner agencies that serve people in need.

SOJOURN 1530 DeKalb Avenue, Suite A, Atlanta 30307 404-275-4637 www.sojourngsd.org SOJOURN: The Southern Jewish Resource Network for Gender and Sexual Diversity advances lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer affirmation and acceptance across the South. SOJOURN works with faith leaders and local communities to increase education involving gender and sexual diversity.

The Berman Center 1200 Ashwood Parkway, Suite 400 Dunwoody 30338 770-336-7444 www.bermancenteratl.com The Berman Center is an Intensive Outpatient Program for adults who suffer with addiction, mental health issues and/or co-occurring disorders. The philosophy is based upon a Judeo-led values lens of inclusiveness, understanding and wholeness. Berman Center offers a customized, multidisciplinary treatment plan that supports both the individual and their family.

The Blue Dove Foundation 1200 Ashwood Parkway, Suite 400 Atlanta 30338 678-786-1213 www.thebluedovefoundation.org The Blue Dove Foundation was created to help address the issues of mental health and/or substance abuse in the Jewish community.

The Cohen Home 10485 Jones Bridge Road, Johns Creek 30022 770-475-8787 www.cohenhome.org The only assisted living community in Georgia certified in the I’m Still Here approach, The Cohen Home offers exceptional care and a meaningful and active social life that embraces our Jewish values.

The William Breman Jewish Home 3150 Howell Mill Road NW, Atlanta 30327 404-351-8410 www.wbjh.org Since 1951, The Home has provided high quality long term skilled nursing care in the Jewish tradition and excellent short-term rehabilitation through our Aviv Rehabilitation Center.

The One Group 3150 Howell Mill Road NW, Atlanta 30327 404-751-2277 www.JewishHomeLife.org Offering Jewish HomeLife’s tradition of high-quality care in your own home. Nurses and caregivers available 24/7/365.

The Simon Wiesenthal Center 1399 S. Roxbury Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90035 800-900-9036 www.wiesenthal.com This nonprofit international nongovernmental organization fights terrorism, hate and bigotry.

The Zaban Tower and The Jewish Tower 3160 Howell Mill Road, Atlanta 30327 404-350-7112 and 404.351.3536 www.JewishHomeLife.org For adults age 62+ with very low to moderate income, The Towers offer affordable apartments and the conveniences of a full-service retirement community, with rent subsidized by HUD. The Jewish Tower became part of the JHLC family in 2019.

The Sixth Point 470-210-6847 www.thesixthpoint.org The Sixth Point is an independent, nondenominational Jewish community in Atlanta for adults in their 20s and 30s(ish). Events once or twice a month range from social to cultural, spiritual to intellectual, and everything in between.

Tzarkei Naomi Fund 404-735-3342 www.tzarkeinaomi.org Tzarkei Naomi raises funds to help individuals and families who, often tragically, find themselves bereft of a spouse or parent.

William Breman Jewish Heritage Museum 1440 Spring Street NW, Atlanta 30309 678-222-3700 www.thebreman.org The Breman Museum is home to permanent exhibitions on the Holocaust, Southern Jewish history; and the Schwartz Gallery, which hosts a variety of traveling and rotating exhibitions. The Weinberg Center for Holocaust Education is an educational resource for students, teachers, and lifelong learners.

Weinstein Hospice 3156 Howell Mill Road, Atlanta 30327 404-352-4308 www.weinsteinhospice.com This community-based hospice and palliative care service offers comfort and the highest quality of care to individuals confronting life-limiting and end-of-life illnesses, as well as bereavement support for their families. ■


ARTS

The writing style of Kalman’s children’s books is sometimes very grown up.

“Max Makes a Million,” based on one of Kalman’s children books, runs through July 21 at the Alliance Theatre.

Maira Kalman and her dog, Pete

Hollywood is the subject of one of Maira Kalman children’s books.

Artist and Writer Kalman Is a Creative Dreamer By Bob Bahr Maira Kalman didn’t start out to be a world-famous illustrator, author and artist. Before she created a popular series of children’s books she was, as she puts it, a dreamer and a writer of poetry. Only in college did she start to draw. Her first children's book “Stay Up Late,” written in 1985, was a work based on the popular song by the pop group Talking Heads. She wrote it just after the birth of her second child. Over the next 30 years, she became a brilliant illustrator and the author of 18 popular books for children. This summer, Atlanta’s High Museum of Art is celebrating this artist and writer, whose Jewish parents came to America from Israel when Maira was only 4. Until Sept. 15, the High is presenting “The Pursuit of Everything: Maira Kalman’s Books for Children.” While the books have a quirkiness and a simplicity of style and language that is appropriate for younger readers, Kalman makes a point of never talking down to children. She makes no compromises with herself when she writes and illustrates her books for her young audience. “I don’t think differently for children than I think for adults. I try to use the same kind of imagination, the same kind of whimsy, the same kind of love of language.” Her children’s book “Max Makes a Million,” is about a dog and a poet named Max Stravinsky, who lives out his dreams in New York while coming up with a continuous stream of new ideas. Kalman, who says she has daydreamed throughout her life, writes in the book about Max’s life of spontaneous creativity. “I want to say that wonderful ideas can come from anywhere. Sometimes you make a mistake or break something, or lose a hat, and the next thing you know, you get a great idea. My idea was

to eat.” Eventually Max sells a book for a fortune and goes off to live his ultimate dream, as a poet in Paris. In another of the Max series, “Ooh-la-la (Max in Love),” his glamorous life in Paris leads him to a new love, a dog called Crepes Suzette. When asked about who inspired Max, Kalman is candid. “Max is based on me. A hapless wanderer trying to make sense of an absurd world. Sometimes loving things. Sometimes inconsolable.” In all her books for children or adults she believes in complex plots. Things just happen, just as she says they do in her own life. “My life is too random and too confused, and I enjoy it that way.” Whether through conscious planning or not, during her 40-year career Kalman has enjoyed great success. In addition to her children’s books she has written and illustrated more than a dozen books for adults, including an illustrated version of William Strunk’s instructional classic on good writing, “The Elements of Style.” She also wrote the lyrics to a nine-song concert at the New York Public Library in conjunction with the publication of her drawings. Her art has also been on a number of covers for The New Yorker magazine, including classics like the one entitled “New Yorkistan,” published in December of 2001. The imaginary map of New York features neighborhoods like Kvetchnya, Taxistan, Khandibar, Khouks, and Youdontunderstandistan. Reprints are a popular seller on the internet. She has written a series of illustrated columns for The New York Times, ran a pop-up art shop, created an exhibition at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art and played the role of a duck in “Peter and the Wolf,” created by designer Isaac Mizrahi for the Guggenheim Museum. Her latest books, both published last year, are “Bold & Brave: Ten Heroes

Who Won Women the Right to Vote,” coauthored by New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, and “Cake,” an illustrated cookbook written with food writer Barbara Scott-Goodman. And as if all of this is not enough variety, the Alliance Theatre has adapted her book “Max Makes A Million” for an original production that runs on the Hertz Stage of the Alliance through July 21. “The Pursuit of Everything: Maira Kalman’s Books for Children” was organized by The Eric Carle Museum of Pic-

ture Book Art, in Amherst, Mass., where the exhibit will be shown after the Atlanta run. An exhibit of her art is also at the Fay Gold Gallery in Atlanta. ■ For tickets and more information: “The Pursuit of Everything: Maira Kalman’s Books for Children” is running through Sept 15 at the High Museum of Art, https://high. org/exhibition/the-pursuit-of-everythingmaira-kalmans-books-for-children. “Max Makes A Million” is running through July 21 on the Hertz Stage of Alliance Theatre, https://alliancetheatre.org/ production/2019-20/max-makes-a-million.

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ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES JULY 12, 2019 | 23


CALENDAR SATURDAY, JULY 13

for erev Shabbat after the “Barchu.” Free. For more information, www.bit. ly/2ZpCRKD.

Peter Yarrow, Live in Concert – Temple Beth David, 1885 McGee Road SW, Snellville, from 8 to 10 p.m. Peter Yarrow of Peter, Paul and Mary fame will perform live in concert, with a share of the proceeds going to Operation Respect. $18 per adult, $9 for children younger than 13 and VIP rows $36 each. For more information, www.bit. ly/2WSemZA.

CANDLE-LIGHTING TIMES

Chukat Friday, July 12, 2019, light candles at 8:32 p.m. Saturday, July 13, 2019, Shabbat ends at 9:32 p.m. Balak Friday, July 19, 2019, light candles at 8:29 p.m. Saturday, July 20, 2019, Shabbat ends at 9:29 p.m.

SUNDAY, JULY 14

B’nai Torah Pool Party – Marcus JCC, 5342 Tilly Mill Road, Atlanta, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Join the JCC for some fun in the sun. The pool party is free and open to all family members. For more information, www.bit.ly/2ZesgSu.

Houdini in Early Cinema – William Breman Jewish Heritage Museum, 1440 Spring St. NW, Atlanta, from 2 to 4 p.m. Houdini historian and blogger John Cox has studied the life of Harry Houdini for more than 40 years and consults on Houdini projects for radio, television, stage and film. In this talk, Cox covers areas of Houdini’s life that are not generally known. Stay after this lecture for a Q&A session. Free for members, general admission for nonmembers. For more information, www.bit.ly/2KOmpzc.

$20 per person. For tickets and more information, www.bit.ly/2HqNasc.

JULY 15 – JULY 19

In the City Camp – Congregation Dor Tamid, 11165 Parsons Road, Johns Creek, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., $295 per child per week. For more information, www.bit.ly/2WvH5hZ.

TUESDAY, JULY 16

Anti-Semitism : The History of AntiSemitism – Chabad Intown on the BeltLine, 730 Ponce De Leon Place NE, Atlanta, from 8 to 9:30 p.m. A new three-part series from the Intown Jewish Academy. We are experiencing an increase in anti-Semitic incidents in the United States and around the world. Join Chabad for a timely look at the roots of hate and what we can do about it. $36 for the course. For more information, www.bit.ly/31qqrUn.

learning in a series of inspiring and engaging weekly classes. The lessons probe the depths of contemporary Torah thought with a special focus on issues surrounding spirituality, the human psyche, love and relationships. Free. For more information, www.bit. ly/2ZBX7Zn.

THURSDAY, JULY 18

Metulla Hadassah’s Morning with Milt – From 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. Join Hadassah for the third of four informal discussion groups led by Dr. Milt Tambor. Each session will focus on a unique aspect of Jewish life from a historical perspective. $5 per person at the door. For location and to RSVP, waltersanita@charter.net.

Shalom, 5303 Winters Chapel Road, Dunwoody, from 5 to 9 p.m. Join Beth Shalom for an entertaining movie that tells how Napa Valley became one of the greatest wine regions in the world. Following the movie, taste a variety of kosher wines available for purchase. $10 per person. To register and for more information, www.bit. ly/2ZfwLwf.

Sundays on the River Concert Featuring Joe Alterman – Chattahoochee Nature Center, 9135 Willeo Road, Roswell, from 6 to 9:30 p.m. Only 29 years old, jazz pianist Joe Alterman has already released four critically acclaimed albums and played some of the best venues in the country. $16 to 24 | JULY 12, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Sweet Summer Series – Locations around Atlanta from 5 to 6:30 p.m. PJ Library’s Summer Series is back again, with a twist. Sweet Summer Series will run every Wednesday night for nine weeks at a local ice cream shop. Each week they will hold Sweet Summer Series in a different location around Atlanta. For more information and locations, www.bit.ly/2Yq9ozA.

Torah Studies – Chabad Intown on the BeltLine, 730 Ponce De Leon Place NE, Atlanta, from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. The acclaimed Torah Studies program brings you the tradition of classical Jewish

THURSDAY, JULY 25

Babyccino – Alefbet Preschool, 5303 Winters Chapel Road, Atlanta, from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Babyccino chic meet for mod moms and their tots (babies to toddlers) led by the Alefbet Preschool’s Babies educator. Every Thursday in the Babies Room. Free. For more information, www.bit.ly/30kViRZ.

Brain Health Boot Camp – Jewish Family & Career Services, 4549 Chamblee Dunwoody Road, Atlanta, from 3 to 5 p.m. Join in to help maintain and enhance your memory and brain function. $25 per class. For more information, www.bit.ly/2Ob6bCB.

FRIDAY, JULY 26

WEDNESDAY, JULY 17

Movie, Kosher Wine Tasting and Hors d’oeuvres – Congregation Beth

Tamid, 11165 Parsons Road, Johns Creek, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., $295 per child per week. For more information, www.bit.ly/2WvH5hZ.

Shabbat in the Park – Grant Park,

Open Play Games – Marcus JCC, 5342 Tilly Mill Road, Atlanta, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Open play tables are set up every week on MJCCA’s Main Street on Mondays and Wednesdays for you to enjoy popular strategy and skill games while making new friends. Free for members, $5 for the community. For more information, www.bit.ly/2H6mYRt.

JULY 22 – JULY 29

In the City Camp – Congregation Dor

Mahjong for Beginners & Advanced Players – Congregation Beth Shalom, 5303 Winters Chapel Road, Dunwoody, from 6:30 to 9 p.m. You are welcome to join if you have played in the past and just need some reminding or have just learned and want to improve. If you are experienced, come alone or with your group. Open to the public. $2 for Sisterhood members, $5 for non-Sisterhood members. RSVP, 770-399-5300 or office@bshalom.net.

FRIDAY, JULY 19

Rockin’ Shabbat – Congregation Beth Shalom, 5303 Winters Chapel Road, Dunwoody, from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Everyone is welcome to join Beth Shalom for its musical “Friday Night Alive Service.” Join Rabbi Mark Zimmerman, congregants and guests for a night of music, camaraderie and ruach. Musical Kabbalat Shabbat service will be followed by traditional Ma’ariv service

Cherokee Avenue, Atlanta, from 5:45 to 7:30 p.m. Shabbat in the Park is a casual, fun and family-friendly Friday evening potluck dinner held monthly in a local park. Featuring a Shabbat sing-along led by Rabbi Ari Kaiman. Enjoy a vegetarian-friendly meal and an evening of socializing with Shearith Israel. Free. For more information, www.bit.ly/2IaIuGP.

JULY 28 – AUGUST 2

2019 JCC Maccabi Games – The Maccabi Games are returning to Atlanta for the first time in 18 years. Free. For everyone who wants to be a spectator, volunteer or host family, you must register, www.bit.ly/2MIj1sv. For questions and location, call or email Jody Miller at 678-812-4033 or Jody.Miller@ atlantajcc.org.

SUNDAY, JULY 28

Kabbalah and Coffee – Chabad Intown on the BeltLine, 730 Ponce De Leon Place NE, Atlanta, from 9:30 to


JULY 13-AUGUST 4 Find more events and submit items for our online and print calendars at:

www.atlantajewishconnector.com

Calendar sponsored by the Atlanta Jewish Connector, an initiative of the AJT. In order to be considered for the print edition, please submit events two weeks in advance. Contact community relations director, Jen Evans, for more information at jen@atljewishtimes.com.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 24

One People One Heart – Cobb Energy Performing Arts Centre, 2800 Cobb Galleria Parkway, Atlanta, from 6 to 9 p.m. The Chabad Centers of Georgia invite you to an evening of unity and inspiration, “One People, One Heart,” celebrating the teachings and impact of the Lubavitcher Rebbe Rabbi Menachem M. Schneerson of righteous memory. $18 advance tickets, $25 tickets at the door, $90 preferred seating, $500 underwriters’ reception. For more information, www.bit. ly/2Y9szhz.

11 a.m. Discuss, explore and journey through the world of Jewish mysticism and learn how to apply these profound teachings to your daily life. This ongoing class probes the esoteric through a unique program of English text-based study. No prior kabbalistic experience required. Free. For more information, www.chabadintown.org

FRIDAY, AUGUST 2

Reform Community Shabbat – Temple Kehillat Chaim, 1145 Green Street, Roswell, from 7 to 9 p.m. Join the rest of the Atlanta Reform Jewish community to celebrate Shabbat together this year at TKC. 7 p.m. is the pre-reception for guests and attendees, 7:15 p.m. learn new music, 7:30 p.m. worship service followed by oneg Shabbat. Come out and help Kehillat Chaim host the Atlanta area Reform community. Free. For more information, www.bit. ly/2Y0ZS65.

JULY 29 – AUGUST 2

In the City Camp – Congregation Dor Tamid, 11165 Parsons Road, Johns Creek, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. $295 per child per week. For more information, www.bit.ly/2WvH5hZ.

MONDAY, JULY 29

Cafe Europa for Holocaust Survivors – Congregation Beth Jacob, 1855 Lavista Road, Atlanta, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Cafe Europa is a monthly social gathering for Holocaust survivors at Congregation Beth Jacob held the last Monday of the month. This event includes entertainment or a speaker and a kosher catered lunch. Free. For more information, www.bit.ly/2MEdRxG.

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4

Blood Drive – Ahavath Achim Synagogue, 600 Peachtree Battle Ave. NW, Atlanta, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Everyday blood donors help patients of all ages, accident and burn victims, heart surgery and organ transplant patients and those battling cancer. In fact, every two seconds, someone in the U.S. needs blood. We schedule an appointment through the Red Cross. Free. For more information, www.aasynagogue.org. ■ ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES JULY 12, 2019 | 25


COMMUNITY

Last month, Rabbi Ari Sollish presented the first in a series on Jewish Women in the Bible for Hadassah Greater Atlanta/Metulla. During the engaging and lively discussion on the story of Ruth, Rabbi Sollish highlighted the strengths and weaknesses of the major characters: Elimelech, Naomi, Ruth, Boaz, Orpah, and Ploni. He also showed the connection between the story of Ruth

and the qualities of leadership and decision-making between what is easy and what is right. Rabbi Sollish is a noted author, teacher, founder and director of the Intown Jewish Academy. He also teaches Jewish studies at Emory University’s continuing education program. The next in the series is set for Aug. 12, when Rabbi Sollish will discuss Deborah. ■

Front: Helene Jacoby, Helen Ehrlich; second row: Dominique Levin, Esther Low, Maxine Schein, Marylan Karp, Joan Solomon, Kaethe Solomon; third row: Susan Adair, Bernice Mellman, Eileen Schlenker, Evelyn Baron, Sherry Seidman, Nancy Bracker, Leora Wollner, Karen Feibel, Arlene Glass; back: Tamara Meaux, Peri Rosner, Shirley Michalove, Sharon Freedman. (Not pictured: Gerry Taratoot, Annie Loventhal, Elaine Clein, Barbara and Marvin Shams).

Hadassah Visits CDC Hadassah Greater Atlanta’s Ketura group last month visited the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The tour focused on the David J. Sencer CDC Museum’s “The World Unseen – Intersections of Art and Science.” The exhibit includes the work of 10 international artists who draw upon microbiology, biotechnology, anatomy and texts in their investigations of microbes and cells, DNA, the history of disease and science, the body and beauty. The artists share a deep interest in science, and some are scientists or collaborate closely with researchers. The docent-led tour also explored the history of the CDC and its historic efforts addressing environmental health and injury prevention, fighting modern health threats and biological, chemical, 26 | JULY 12, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

nuclear and radiological threats at home and abroad – using teamwork to accomplish its missions. Hadassah learned why the CDC is based in Atlanta. At the outbreak of World War II, the government made it a priority to eradicate malaria around military bases and training centers in the U.S. South and started the Office of Malaria Control in War Areas under the Public Health Service, which continued to work from Atlanta. At the end of the war, MCWA’s leadership proposed continuing the agency’s work on a national level, and the MCWA morphed into the CDC in 1946. The CDC’s mission correlates with the work of Hadassah Medical Organization in Israel and its efforts to research and fight disease. ■


COMMUNITY SIMCHA SPOTLIGHT

Mazel Tov

Dr. Steven B. Wertheim

Dr. Steven B. Wertheim, an orthopaedic surgeon with Atlanta-based Resurgens Orthopaedics, was named a Distinguished Arthroscopy Leader by the Arthroscopy Association of North America. Wertheim is among 21 leaders from across the nation named to the prestigious group. He was selected based on his education, research and achievements in the advancement of arthroscopy, and his dedication to improving patient outcomes. He is the only doctor in the Atlanta area to receive this honor.

B’nai Mitzvah Notices:

May 2019 Reed Aaronson, son of Tara and Richard Aaronson. Cole Belinfante, son of Karina and Josh Belinfante. Natalie Brevick, daughter of Jen and Sean Brevick. Emily Cohen, daughter of Laurie and Alan Cohen. Eden Dwoskin, daughter of Joannie and Owen Dwoskin. Hannah Hassell, daughter of Tarece Johnson and Gerald Hassell. Sarah Marcus, daughter of Amy Silverman and David Marcus. Jordan Pearlstein, daughter of Caroline and Jonathan Pearlstein. Katherine Poch, daughter of Debra and Gary Poch. Ava Jane Bowie, daughter of Julie and Larry Bowie, on June 1. Jeremy Ridge Gassman, son of Jennifer and Joshua Gassman, on June 8.

Have something to celebrate? Births, B’nai Mitzvah, Engagements, Weddings, Anniversaries, Special Birthdays and more ... Share it with your community with free AJT simcha announcements. Send info to submissions@atljewishtimes.com.

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES JULY 12, 2019 | 27


COMMUNITY OY VEY! HAVE I GOT A PROBLEM... has caused a conDear Rachel, g problem, which sin es oc h pr a s ha mie, tra support throug My daughter, Ja er. She receives ex re ca l ol al ho sc ith r w he en ughout at home. Ev stant struggle thro m private tutors fro lp he to n tio in addi range. remains in the C the resource room her GPA typically e, nc w she will make ta sis Ho as y: l rr na the additio is fall, and I wo th ol ho les? sc gh hi ng ted so many hurd Jamie will be starti tary school presen en m le ele nd if ha s ar to ye xt four not sure how it through the ne rve ball, and I’m cu a us w re th s nt Recently, my pare , nounced gleefully it. Holidays,” they an gh Hi e dth an r te gr t af l es ae our eld “We’re going to Isr tra special to take ght it would be ex ou th e W s. ” ek u? we “for two ie come, won’t yo could urse, you’ll let Jam d anticipation. I child along. Of co ith excitement an w y kl ar many sp e es th ey d e, e Wall an They peered at m ven: praying at th wo g in and be e” s m m ho ea g eir dr of “comin practically see th hilarating sense ex e th ts, ng an vi ur ha , sta er re togeth s, enjoying other holy places at pristine beache g w in m Ho . im er sw th ge le, r peop our land to being among ou nce as they tour rie pe ex g in nd ious bo and having a glor s opportunity? weeks hter this priceles ug da y take off two full m can I deny e, allow Jamie to nc cie ns issed m co e od th l go h up on al And yet, can I, in ill be able to catc w e ersh nd y wo wa a no ve ere is ubtedly ha from school? Th ce? She will undo en e ig gl sh if ne t r ee ha sh W not be what cost? work! Would this memories, but at us o io to ec s pr wa I ith e w us return grade beca ful vacation and d to repeat ninth lle pe m co be ill and w fails her classes o”? “N y sa to spineless om M ed us nf A Co

Jewish Joke of the Week

Dear Confused Mom, What an incredibly generous offer your parents have made! How fortunate are you and your family to have such doting grandparents! School is certainly vital and prepares our children to face their futures. I believe, however, that the school of life is sometimes an even better educational tool. A child like Jamie may suffer from low self-esteem. It is intensely difficult to feel “dumb,” to constantly see low grades coloring the tops of papers and tests. No matter how hard she tries, she feels doomed. Surely, she must want to throw her hands up and say, “Why bother?” Concerned mom that you are, you probably afford her opportunities to shine in other areas so that she doesn’t view herself as a complete failure. And yet, it is still so challenging to be that struggling student. After all, school takes up the bulk of a child’s life! Would you consider meeting with Jamie’s teachers and discussing why you feel it is vital for her to go on this Israel trip? The myriad benefits practically spring from the offer: special time with her grandparents, inspiration, seeing the words and lessons of our Torah come alive. Especially for a child who struggles, this trip could be such a boon for her! If the teachers are understanding, maybe they can adjust their expectations accordingly. You didn’t mention if Jamie’s academic issues affect her social status. Since these problems often go in tandem, that would appear to be yet another reason to proceed with the plan. Among her peers, she may be ostracized. In the company of her grandparents, she will have two full weeks to bask in their undivided, loving attention. It sounds like the perfect balm for her ailments! And upon her return to school, I can picture her classmates gathering around to see her pictures, their mouths hanging open in wonder. And who knows? If they suddenly see Jamie in a new light, perhaps the new impression will stick? Despite the tone of my response, I must add a disclaimer: I was actually quite studious back in the day. I am a strong proponent of a good, well-rounded education. But I also feel that there is so much more that contributes to molding a loving, responsible, moral adult. Eye-opening experiences that cannot be duplicated can be a game changer for Jamie. And so, Mom, I hope you allow her to go and spread her wings. As they say in Israel, “Nesiyah Tovah!” (Have a good trip) Warmly, Rachel Atlanta Jewish Times Advice Column Got a problem? Email Rachel Stein at oyvey@atljewishtimes. com, describing your problem in 250 words or less. We want to hear from you and get helpful suggestions for your situation at the same time!

Yiddish Word of the Week Cházer ‫חזיר‬, a pig

Cházer ‫חזיר‬, a pig, from the same word in Hebrew, ‫ חזיר‬chazír. Animals play a prominent role in Yiddish in general and in popular sayings in particular. Ritually unclean animals (which may not be eaten or sacrificed), pigs were an integral part of life in the shtetl, and Yiddish attached to them attributes as it did to other animals. Those are particularly expressive in popular sayings, such as:

The Confessions Three friends were at the bar talking, and after many rounds of beer, one of them suggested that everyone admit something they have never admitted to anyone. “Okay,” says Peter, “I’ve never told anybody, but I’m gay!” John confesses, “I’m having an affair with my boss’ wife.” Moishe, begins, “I don’t know how to tell you ...” “Don’t be shy,” said Peter and John. “Well,” says Moishe, “I can’t keep secrets.” Joke provided by David Minkoff www.awordinyoureye.com 28 | JULY 12, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Aesthetically challenged: “Nu, Cháyele, how do you like my Mótl in his new Bar Mitzvah suit?” “Oy, es pást vi ah cházer a shtráyml – ‫ עס פאסט ווי ַא חזיר ַא‬,‫אוי‬ ‫ –שטריימל‬Oy, he looks like a pig with a fur hat!” Hopeless taker: “Yánkl, is your brother staying with you when he’s in town?” “No way! Los aráyn a cházer, kricht er oyfn tísh ‫קריכט ער ֿאויפן‬,‫לאס אריין ַא חזיר‬ ‫ –טיש‬Let a pig into your house and you’ll find him climbing on the table…” Blatant miser: “I know you need the money, so I’ll take the car off your hands, but only with a full tank of gas.” “Yósl, a húnt bíste shoyn, záy nisht káyn cházer! ‫ זיי נישט קיין חזיר‬,‫ ַא הונט ביסטו שוין‬,‫ יוסל‬- Yossel, you already are a dog [=a scavenger], you don’t have to be a pig [=miser] too!” No matter how you put it, a cházer bláybt a cházer ‫בלבייט ַא חזיר‬ will always be a pig…

‫ – ַא חזיר‬a pig

Rabbi Joab Eichenberg-Eilon, PhD, teaches Biblical Hebrew and Aramaic at the Israel Institute of Biblical Studies, eTeacher Group Ltd.


BRAIN FOOD Ready Player One

ACROSS

By: Yoni Glatt, koshercrosswords@gmail.com Difficulty Level: Manageable 1

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22. Dot or music 23. Refs enforce them 24. Refs throw them 25. What a model may strike 26. Iron Lady of Israel 29. Book believed by many to be 3300 years old 30. Not id 31. What "Some Like" in a Wilder classic 32. "Rad!" 33. Adam's third son 35. Repels, with "off" 36. Shrimp 40. Like Isaac and Rebekah 41. "Friends, Romans, countrymen" orator 42. Lior Raz on "Fauda", e.g. 43. Hand-held percussion instrument 44. Crush, as coffee beans 45. Fleming or Zellweger 46. "Uncle Vanya" author Chekhov 47. Toon Fudd 48. Essential for a healthy diet 52. Suggestion 53. "The" sch. in Columbus 54. Buck's companion 55. Elal landing info. 56. No longer working: Abbr.

commandment? 49. "Monopoly" payments 50. Many politicians 51. Interested 52. One illegally entering The Cave of the Patriarchs? 57. Bright signage light 58. "Gotcha" 59. A Benjamin 60. Refuse to grant, as access 61. Kitty sound 62. "Have ___!" (inviting words)

DOWN

1. J.F.K. tower grp. 2. "Constrictor" snake 3. "Harry Potter" letter-carrier 4. Feeling of uneasiness 5. The Giants made a shocking trade with them in March 6. Hawkins or Sink 7. Former planet 8. iPhone carrier, initially 9. Buzz or Woody, e.g. 10. Scissors 11. Wranglers rival 12. One from Tehran 13. Black ___, foe of Aquaman 18. Kind of time or value 21. Father of Meg, Chris, and Stewie

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION 1

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of Atlanta. The wedding was planned for October. ■ Rabbi Stephen and Naomi Weiss announced the birth of their daughter, Yael Bruria, on June 23. The community was invited to a simchat bat naming ceremony on July 10 at Ahavath Achim Synagogue.

15 Years Ago// July 9, 2004 ■ A Jewish family cultivates a winery in north Georgia. The Kritzer family owned and managed Frogtown Cellars, a 57acre vineyard and winery just north of Dahlonega. The Kritzers planted the vineyard in 1999 and celebrated their first harvest the following year.

50 Years Ago// July 11, 1969 ■ Ronald Goldberg of the University of Georgia is one of 30 students from 23 universities throughout the United States and Canada who will be participating in a Leadership Training Seminar in Israel.

■ Rabbi Michael Berger, a tenured professor of Jewish studies at Emory University, announced that he was set to become Yeshiva Atlanta High School’s new principal, replacing Rabbi Joseph Abrams, who served the previous six years.

■ Mr. and Mrs. Barry A. Eisenberg of Winston-Salem, N.C., announced the engagement of their daughter, Jennifer Beth, to Paul Jay Grosswald, son of Mr. and Mrs. Richard G. Grosswald

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Michael Berger will become the new principal of Yeshiva Atlanta High School.

■ The Day Treatment Center for Emotionally Disturbed PreSchool Children, run by the National Council of Jewish Women, is holding a summer camp for a dozen children in July. The program operates from St. Mark’s Methodist Church at Peachtree and Sixth Streets, offering recreational activities designed to help children with emotional difficulties adjust to a group environment. ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES JULY 12, 2019 | 29


OBITUARIES

Micheline T. Gerson 87, Atlanta

Micheline T. Gerson, 87, of Atlanta, died June 20, 2019. Micheline was born in Paris, France, to Jacques and Jacquelin Tindel Dec. 11, 1931. She had her bat mitzvah at Synagogue Chasseloup-Laubat in Paris. Micheline received her degree from College De Cannes. She married Bob Gerson March 10, 1964, in Atlanta. She enjoyed working with Bob at their local business, Robley Hats. She was considered a French gourmet cook. In her free time, she enjoyed gardening and traveling. Micheline is predeceased by her son, David Kalker. She is survived by her husband, Bob Gerson; daughters Judith R. Hathaway (fiancÊ Vann Causey) and Christina Cooper; daughter-in-law Corinne Kalker; grandchildren Rachel Pourchier, Samuel, Nicholas, and Jeremy Hathaway, Adam and Aaron Cooper, Alexander, Denali and Sean Kalker; and greatgrandchildren Crew and Hawk Pourchier. The family of Micheline Gerson wishes to extend its sincere thanks to Jan Champion, Frankie Richardson, Annette Lewis, Cortes Moss, Shy Ellison, Amedisys Hospice, Dr. Annie Cooper, and the staff at The Waters Pavilion. A memorial service was held June 28 at The Temple officiated by Rabbi Lydia Medwin. Arrangements are by Dressler’s Jewish Funeral Care, Atlanta, 770-451-4999.

30 | JULY 12, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES


OBITUARIES

Rita Goldstein 87, Atlanta

Rita Goldstein, 87, of Atlanta, died June 26, 2019. Rita lived in Atlanta for more than 60 years. She enjoyed working as an interior decorator, playing mahjong multiple times a week, volunteering her time for Hadassah, and attending book club and stock club with the same friends for more than 20 years. Survivors include her sister Norma Appel; daughters Robin Adams (Bruce Ailion) and Pam Goldstein; son Stuart Goldstein (Debbie); grandchildren Adam, Alyssa, Paige, Brandon and Alex; and her great-grandson Ethan. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to Hadassah, Compassion & Choices and the American Heart Association. A graveside service was held June 28, 2019, at Greenwood Cemetery. Arrangements by Dressler’s Jewish Funeral Care, Atlanta, 770-451-4999.

Andre John Kessler 79, Atlanta

Andre John Kessler, loving husband, father and grandfather, passed away peacefully June 25, 2019, at 79. Andre was born March 8, 1940, in Bucharest, Romania, to Olga Kessler and Ladislas Grunfeld. He is survived by his wife Marsha Tenenbaum Kessler; daughter Gena Kessler Hindman (Rusty); son Laurence Kessler (Lindsay Burnett Kessler); and four grandchildren: Samuel (11), Benjamin (8), Joseph (6) and Jordyn (6). As a Holocaust survivor and child of Holocaust survivors, Andre and his mother survived by living in hiding in a tiny room for 16 months; escaped across several country borders and oceans; and after many tribulations, arrived in Queens, N.Y., in 1951, when Andre was 11 years old. Andre spoke five languages, became a Navy corpsman, graduated from and played basketball at New York University, and afterwards was drafted into the NBA, where he played two years of professional basketball for the Philadelphia Warriors (now the Golden State Warriors). After his stint in the NBA, Andre worked for a textile company that brought him to Georgia, where he met Marsha. They celebrated their 45th anniversary in December 2018. Andre was a passionate proponent of Holocaust education, and in 1976 he began speaking at the Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta, The Bremen Museum and countless schools across the state of Georgia. He was appointed to the Georgia Commission on the Holocaust by Gov. Roy Barnes and was instrumental in the creation of Kennesaw State University’s Anne Frank in the World Exhibit. In an interview in 2013, when asked why it was so important for him to speak about the Holocaust and his experience, Andre responded: “Even though the Holocaust is one of the most documented events in human history, 40 or 50 years from now it’s all going to be on tape; it’s all going to be on film. There aren’t going to be any living survivors around. It is important that it is not forgotten, and that is why I do what I do.” A funeral service was held June 28, 2019, at Bonaventure Cemetery in Savannah. A memorial service was held July 1, 2019, at Congregation B’nai Torah in Sandy Springs. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made on Andre’s behalf to Congregation B’nai Torah or the William Bremen Jewish Heritage Museum. ■

‫זיכרונה‬ ‫לברכה‬ Obituaries in the AJT are written and paid for by the families; contact Managing Publisher Kaylene Ladinsky at kaylene@atljewishtimes.com or 404-883-2130, ext. 100, for details about submission, rates and payments. Death notices, which provide basic details, are free and run as space is available; send submissions to editor@atljewishtimes.com. ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES JULY 12, 2019 | 31


CLOSING THOUGHTS Not Your Usual Day That day, those many all, supporting and guiding years ago, started out like their emotional well-being. any other day. It just did not On the afternoon of end like any other day. what started out as any I sent my four girls off other usual day, I received a to school, as usual. Readied telephone call at work from myself for work, as usual. a client. This was not unusuAn old home was conal, most clients would call verted into offices, which in between their regularly is where my office was at scheduled meetings with the time and was less than Shaindle their social workers, just to 10 minutes from home. I, Schmuckler check and chat. My supervialong with my fellow office Shaindle’s Shpiel sory conversation with his mates and colleagues, loved social worker just the day our working environment. Our clients before indicated all was well. enjoyed the relaxed, homey feel. A swing Usual was about to take a fateful turn. set in the big backyard and a playroom John, (not his actual name) asked for served as perfect places for our children me in his usual polite and quite manner. to gather after school. One minute into our conversation, I As a counselor for a number of cli- knew all was certainly not well. He was ents, and supervisor for social workers shouting and rambling incoherently. Afassigned to their own clients, my days ter what seemed like an eternity, he was were full. I spent a large portion of my calm enough to engage in a difficult condays ensuring the clients’ proper use of versation, filled with anger and angst. medications, following up on their doctor I was feeling a bit concerned as I could appointments, searching for appropri- not determine where this frustration and ate government services, ensuring their angst was coming from. He was barely needs are met in a timely manner. Most of able to respond to my questions.

32 | JULY 12, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Suddenly I heard him shout, do not call the police. The police. John why would I call the police? John insisted he does not want to take his medications anymore. If I make him take his meds, he will kill himself with his loaded gun he was carrying around the living room. Are you alone John? Yes. I can’t stand people around me all the time. I kicked my dog, my granddaughter and my wife out of the trailer. I hit my emergency button for one of my colleagues. I wrote her a note with a brief explanation, to call the police, dispatch them to John and ask them to be sure not to sound their sirens, as it will rattle John even further. The police did not mute the sirens.

I could hear them in the background. John became completely unhinged. Yelling and cursing at me for lying to him, he shouted that the next sound I will hear will be my fault. First, I heard the police shouting while forcing John’s front door open; within seconds I heard the deafening sound of a gunshot. John is gone, the trauma of that usual day, sneaks up on me when I least expect it. Like today. Understanding the issues concerning suicide and mental health is an important way to take part in suicide prevention, help others in crisis, and change the conversation around suicide. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 1-800-273-8255. ■


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Atlanta Jewish Times, XCIV No. 27, July 12, 2019  

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Atlanta Jewish Times, XCIV No. 27, July 12, 2019  

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