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NEXT WEEK: HEALTH & WELLNESS

VOL. XCIV NO. 31 | BACK TO COLLEGE

AUGUST 9, 2019 | 8 AV 5779

Coping as an Empty Nester

BACK TO COLLEGE ADVICE FOR STUDENTS AND PARENTS AS THEY PREPARE FOR THE YEAR AHEAD

MACCABI WRAP-UP TEAM ATLANTA BRINGS HOME GOLD AND OTHER STORIES

ATLANTA BIRTHRIGHT TRIPS UNITE OUR COMMUNITY'S YOUNG ADULTS


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Contributors This Week CHANA SHAPIRO DAVE SCHECHTER FLORA ROSEFSKY JAN JABEN-EILON MARCIA CALLER JAFFE MARK FISHER RABBI JOAB EICHENBERG-EILON RACHEL STEIN

School House Rules While parents with children in primary school pack them up each day, those with kids in college often send them off for several months or longer. Saying goodbye can be a big adjustment for both the college student and the parents, especially if the last child is leaving, a stage of life commonly referred to as the empty nest. In this Back to College issue we talk with parents, a counselor, divorce lawyer and even a student about the transition. We introduce you to a finance professor at Emory University known for his business forecasts. And we chat with a Georgia Tech student who has special needs about his college path. A Jewish college tutoring professional offers tips for test-taking and a counselor discusses the appropriate level of parental involvement in college applications. Our Meet the Press is an interview with the latter, college coach Mark Fisher, who writes columns for us about the search process. For a student’s perspective, our summer intern Chloe Levitas shares her experience transferring to the University of

Georgia. We also discuss the Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta’s recent Birthright Israel community trips. Wrapping up the summer also meant the end of the JCC Maccabi Games, which brought nearly 1,000 traveling Jewish athletes to Atlanta from the U.S., Canada, Mexico, Panama and Israel. The last country in that lineup is also the topic of two stories, the “do-over” Israel elections and a new one-person play to foster difficult conversations about Israeli politics. Still one more political story this week takes us inside the Jewish Democratic Women’s Salon, which encourages its members to vote, promote progressive candidates and become involved in local campaigns. Making a difference. Adjusting to change. While these have been some of the themes of our back-to-back school issues, next week switches gears to developing good habits and taking care of our bodies. Get ready for Health and Wellness. ■

THIS WEEK Coping as an Empty Nester

Cover photo: Families learn to adjust when students leave for college.

CONTENTS LOCAL NEWS���������������������������������� 6 POLITICS������������������������������������������ 9 ISRAEL NEWS������������������������������� 10 OPINION����������������������������������������� 13 BACK TO COLLEGE��������������������� 16 CALENDAR������������������������������������� 24 COMMUNITY��������������������������������� 26 BRAIN FOOD���������������������������������� 31 CLOSING THOUGHTS����������������� 33

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LOCAL NEWS Maccabi Games Draw to a Close

Team Atlanta medaled in both baseball divisions, scoring a gold in 14-and-under and a bronze in 16-and-under.

By Eddie Samuels

lecting three gold, three silver and four bronze medals in addition to dozens of The JCC Maccabi Games took At- accolades for individual competitors. While impressive feats of athleticism lanta by storm, uniting almost 1,000 traveling Jewish athletes from the U.S., and displays of sportsmanship were cerCanada, Israel, Mexico and Panama with tainly the focus, volunteers were among the hosting delegation of nearly 600, be- the most important to keeping the event flowing. Around 1,600 fore drawing to a close volunteers worked toAug. 2. gether to rack up 10,000 “We were thrilled hours aiding the young by the size, scope and, athletes and making AtI would say, pageantry lanta feel like home. of the games,” said Do“I’ve been doing this ron Krakow, president for 20 years and this of and CEO of the JCC was a magical, magical Association of North week,” said JCC Maccabi America. “We gave Vice President Samantha kids … the chance to Cohen. “It was clear that see what it’s like to be part of such an ex- Team Atlanta medaled in the newest the entire Atlanta comtraordinary collection sport at the games, ultimate Frisbee. munity came together to put on this program that of young people under the framework of the JCC movement, and was so much more than sports. From the to see a place here in Atlanta where the first person who met the delegations off the bus to the last person to say goodbye, Marcus JCC is a flagship of our field.” Competing in 14 team sports, Atlan- it really was incredible.” Here are a few highlights and top ta was a force to be reckoned with, col-

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Teens came from as far away as Israel to compete in sports such as volleyball.

A Team Atlanta player sneaks a pass around two defenders.

the community and do good for others would be a wasted opportunity, according to Krakow. And that’s where JCC Cares comes in. Athletics “Sports is how we get the children The core of the games is undoubtedly the unity and sportsmanship conjured involved, but this is about so much more by uniting so many young Jews to com- than just sports,” Cohen said. “It’s really about Jewish values, pete. While hundreds of and one of those values medals were awarded to is giving back, tikkun teams and individuals, olam.” perhaps more imporEach year along tant were the memories with the games, the and friendships forged hosting community, in among the athletes. concert with the JCC “I loved swimming Association, picks orfor Team Atlanta,” said ganizations and causes athlete Will Solomon. of importance and or“A highlight of the week ganizes activities for was hosting two athparticipants. In Atlanta, letes from Denver at my Nicole Crain/JCC Association of the games partnered house.” North America // Teen wheelchair with Shepherd Center Echoing that sentibasketball exhibition. in Atlanta and the Israel ment was Jessica Siegel, who played volleyball for Team Atlanta. Sport Center for the Disabled. “Atlanta, in particular, was looking “My family and I enjoyed hosting girls from Team Houston. It was fun meeting at working with athletes with disabilities and the wider idea of inclusion,” Cohen people from all over the world.” Atlanta’s gold medals came in 14-and- explained. “I was in one of the two sessions and the gym was under baseball, 14-andpacked, but you could under boys basketball hear a pin drop. The and flag football. Silvers teens were completely were for ultimate Frisengaged.” bee, 16-and-under boys soccer and girls soccer, Star Reporter and bronze medals in What would a 16-and-under baseball, sporting event be withultimate Frisbee, flag out media? And the football, and girls basAJT wasn’t the only ketball rounded out the journalistic presence host delegation’s athletic achievements. Star Reporter participants interview at the games. Star Reporter, Maccabi’s own athletes, coaches, volunteers and more to find the stories at the initiative, allowed parJCC Cares heart of the Maccabi Games. ticipants to shape the Gathering so many Jewish teens in one place without pro- stories and feature narratives entirely of viding them the chance to give back to their own choosing. stories from a week filled with Jewish values, community building and fun.


LOCAL NEWS

Track and field medal winners from Team Atlanta pose for a photo.

“On opening day, we started with interviewing kids as they came in, and we do twice-a-day newsroom meetings and they shape their own stories,” said Michael Kogon, mentor to Star Reporter teens. “Then they spend most of the time as embedded participants like any other team member.” This year, the Star Reporter soared like never before, partnering with VOX ATL, a program that empowers teens to do their own storytelling through a variety of mediums. Teen members of VOX were on hand to serve as advisors and guiding hands for Star Reporter participants. “As a youth development organization that has been supporting teens’ media and content creation, we were an appropriate partner to get involved and build out the Star Reporter program,” said Rachel Alterman Wallack, VOX ATL mission director. From blogs and written content to photography and videography, the Star Reporter provided teens the chance to choose their preferred style to get their voices out there. According to Kogon, it also provided an opportunity to those who otherwise might not be participants in the games.

now president and CEO of Lost Tribe Esports. And the excitement surrounding the new activities was hard to miss, with hundreds of athletes and participants streaming in and out of the room throughout the week. “Sports is in my DNA. It is my life, my history and my career. This really isn’t about video games. It’s clearly about video games, but for me it’s always been about Jewish engagement,” Silberman said. “If I learned anything during my career, especially working with teenagers, it’s that you need to meet them where they’re at.” Games were available for free play during athletes’ down time throughout the week and culminated in exhibition tournaments that ended Aug. 1. Silberman explained that his goal with Lost Tribe Esports is to reach beyond what many other methods would allow. “It was pretty clear that the phenomena of esports was something big, and not just a fad. It just keeps getting bigger and bigger and bigger,” he said. “Finding Jewish teens in really small towns in Montana, or North Dakota, or Alaska, kids who would never be able to play in Maccabi because there’s no JCC there but who can get involved through gaming, is special.”

Boys basketball has medaled in back-to-back years.

tum and energy from the games would continue to invigorate her, as well as the community. “I think we want to continue to remind people how good it feels to be involved in some way and offer different opportunities and new ways to be connected,” she said. “We’re going to work very hard to find new ways to keep these people involved because we had everyone from families with young children to se-

niors involved with the games.” As participants made their way to the airport to get home in time for Shabbat, Krakow noted how many host families were there dropping them off. “I can’t tell you how many young people were delivered here by their host families and it began very early in the morning,” he said. “It’s weird to think about, but in one week they really have become family.” ■

Esports While television screens and computer Closing Ceremonies monitors might not be Unfortunately, the the first thing that come fun had to eventually to mind when thinkdraw to a close and 1,000 ing about the Maccabi visiting athletes had Games, this year the games featured the Teens gather in the esports roomto flights to catch. But not until the closing ceremovery first esports, which compete and during free time. nies reunited the masses are competitive video on Aug. 1 at Mercedes-Benz Stadium. games. Amy Rubin, Maccabi co-chair at the At the games was Lenny Silberman, a former Maccabi Games director and Marcus JCC, explained that the momen-

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES AUGUST 9, 2019 | 7


LOCAL NEWS

Playwright Encourages Difficult Conversation About Israel By Jan Jaben-Eilon After the 2014 Gaza War, Israeliborn photojournalist now living in New York City, Gili Getz, realized that political conversations with his father had become untenable. He recognized that his Latvian-born father, a former Labor Party politician who still lived in Israel, had moved “a little” to the right while Getz had moved “a little” to the left. Appreciating that other families also experienced difficulties talking about Israeli politics, Getz wrote his one-person play, “The Forbidden Conversation” to encourage those discussions among American Jews. “The play is about the difficulty the American Jewish community has discussing Israel,” Getz told the AJT. “It’s not about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict itself. This is about how we talk about Israel.” Getz, an actor and activist, will perform the play and moderate a conversation afterwards at a program Aug. 27 at Congregation Or Hadash sponsored by the Atlanta chapter of J Street, a liberal Israel advocacy group. Reflecting on his conversations with

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sponsored by the Atlanta chapter, including last year’s talk by former Ambassador Wendy Sherman, former U. S. undersecretary of state for political affairs. “J Street has had a presence in Atlanta for years, but put together a chapter only in the last couple of years. We are trying to keep a presence here and support the two-state solution. J Street is not outside the mainstream” of the Atlanta Jewish community, he said. “A lot of people don’t know about J Street or think it’s anti-Israel, but that’s based on a misunderstanding from its early days.” J Street supports a two-state solution for Israel and the Palestinians and is against the controversial boycott, divestment and sanctions movement. Suzman, who is originally from Gili Getz wrote “The Forbidden Conversation” about his South Africa, where he supported the anown family’s difficulty in discussing Israel. ti-apartheid movement, told the AJT that this father when he’d be back home in be able to have the conversation. In my he opposes BDS against Israel. “It can Beersheva, Getz “was very concerned play, I’m challenging and providing space morph into being anti-Israel and antiit would compromise our relationship. by confessing my personal story.” Semitic,” he said. I spoke to many people who pay a perBut he acknowledges that it can be Getz was born in Israel in 1974 sonal price. It costs a lot of relationships. just after his parents made aliyah from “hard to oppose the Israeli government People walk away from the Jewish com- Latvia. He was a photographer during while supporting” the State of Israel. He munity and feel alienated. I felt we must his military service in the early 1990s. says he participated in a J Street-sponsored “My last assignment was to photograph trip to Israel in 2016 and “was hugely imthe funeral of Prime Minister Yitzhak pressed. It was a very impactful trip. We Rabin,” he said. He moved to the United talked to Likud leaders, settlers and PalesStates in 1997. In recent years, his work tinian leaders. I got back home and found has focused on Jewish-American politics, there were many like-minded people who getting published in various Jewish and wanted to become more active.” Suzman exIsraeli media. plains that he He has perfound his way to formed the play J Street through more than 40 his support of the times, under the New Israel Fund, auspices of Federawhich financially tions, Hillels, synasupports non-govgogues, the Ameriernmental organican Israel Public zations that work Affairs Committee, on the ground for and J Street. civil rights, pluralCedric Suzism and democracy man, co-chair of in Israel. J Street the J Street Atlanta and NIF are “two steering commitsides of the same tee, is excited about coin,” he said. “NIF bringing “The Forworks in Israel bidden Conversaand J Street works tion” to Atlanta. “It here” in the United explores the chalCedric Suzman co-chairs the J Street Atlanta steering committee. States. lenges of having a He believes that it is essential for conversation about Israel in the American Jewish community. Gili is a stand-up American Jews to speak up “if they are presenter with a serious message,” he critical” of Israeli policies. He’s hoping that “The Forbidden Conversation” will told the AJT. Suzman, who helped found and lead open up the discussion of Israel among both the World Affairs Council and the Atlanta Jews. The play and discussion will take Southern Center for International Studies, points out that the upcoming J Street place at 7:30 p.m. Aug. 27 at Congregation program follows a series of speakers Or Hadash. ■


POLITICS Jewish Democratic Women: Grassroots Activists By Flora Rosefsky Unless you live in an isolated cabin in the woods without access to a smartphone, computer, radio or television, it’s almost impossible not to notice the deep divide of opinions within our community when it comes to politics. Motivated by personal core Jewish values, Valerie Habif and Joanie Shubin Photos courtesy of JDWS // Joining the Women’s March in Atlanta in 2017 are JDWS members sought to create “a safe space for likeAmy Glass, Dee Kline, Alice Wertheim, Rachel Miller, Elisa Ezor and Karla Tievsky. minded women to freely talk about issues of social justice,” they said. enough to exercise our civic responsibilThe group founders were both disapIn 2011 they started with a small ity by voting, that level of engagement is pointed, “that the party that purports to group of 50 women, who showed up at simply no longer sufficient. JDWS aspires want smaller government and less regutheir first meeting to address disinforma- to engage our members beyond the voting lation has now given the government the tion spreading about the Affordable Care booth, to a focus on local issues where we right to have control over a woman’s right Act, also called Obambelieve we can have the to make her own deeply personal healthacare. Fast forward to most direct impact,” she care decisions,” she 2019 where their small said. said. grassroots effort known JDWS encourages JDWS is workas the Jewish Democratmembers to get to know ing closely with the ic Women’s Salon, Atlocal and state repre- two-year-old Jewish lanta, has expanded to sentatives. Democratic Council nearly 1,300 members. “Write to those of America in WashThe group’s top agenda who represent you,” ington, D.C., as it is doing on the national item is “getting out the Shubin said. “Let them level what JDWS aspires to do on the local vote, protecting the inknow your point of level. One member is now reaching out to tegrity of our elections, view on the bills that Members at a meeting to hear promoting progressive matter most to you. and learn from Teresa Tomlinson, candidates and getting Become a social justice candidate for U.S. Senate. members involved in activist.” their local campaigns,” Habif said. The women’s group focuses on a Thanks to member Kate Kratovil, number of issues, including reproductive who handles social media, the group rights, gun violence protection, local hate expands their membership and reaches crime legislation, non-discrimination into the community mostly through the laws, public education, refugee and imJDWS private and closed Facebook page. migration policy, and protection from About 1,000 JDWS climate change. members are engaged JDWS participated on a regular basis in in a late May coalition screen posts, sharing event supporting the progressive events, recInternational Human ommending local poliTrafficking Institute. ticians to support and The most recent event why, and connecting of the women’s group with each other. There was a meeting with are no dues, no fundTeresa Tomlinson, the raisers and no active soformer mayor of Colicitation of members. lumbus, Ga., who is “The current political running against incumenvironment at both bent David Perdue for the national and local his U.S. Senate seat. Postcards from a letter level resulted in a The group expects writing campaign. self-selection process to meet with other of so many Jewish women who seek an Democratic candidates for this position opportunity to be difference-makers,” as their campaigns are announced. Shubin said. “Hyper-partisanship seems to us to “Trump’s election served to rally promote fear and misunderstanding; it many who may not have fully grasped backs us into corners and promotes unthe critical importance of our electoral willingness to compromise, as demonprocess that is at the core of our democ- strated to us very clearly in the passage of racy.” Georgia’s anti-abortion law,” Habif said. Habif added, “Where once it was

contacts in Savannah, Macon and Columbus to see if other Jewish women want to emulate what JDWS is doing here. The group continues to build strong coalitions with other local grassroots groups such as No Safe Seats, Georgia Alliance for Social Justice, Pave It Blue and Red Clay Democrats. Shubin said, “Grassroots groups are not about the grass tops. Our strength is in our roots and we are growing them even stronger.” To that end, Habif said, “We hope more and more Jewish women will join us and lend their voices to our work in support of social justice. “Elections matter. Our civic responsibilities begin in the polling booth, but they certainly don’t end there.” To expand its reach further, JDWS hopes to launch a website “to create more accessibility for those who want to join but who prefer not to use Facebook,” she said. ■ To join JDWS, send a request to jdwsatlanta@gmail.com

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES AUGUST 9, 2019 | 9


ISRAEL NEWS September Elections in Israel: All About the Math By Jan Jaben-Eilon Just about five months since Israelis went to the polls to choose their legislature and prime minister, they are heading back to voting booths Sept. 17 in what the country’s media are calling a “do-over” election. That’s because Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who was tasked with putting together a coalition government after the April election, was unable to do so. He needed at least 61 of the 120 Knesset members, and he only had 60. It is unclear whether, even if the prime minister’s Likud party gains a majority of the seats, this election outcome will be any different. And that spells trouble for the political stability of the country. The September election is already making history. There have never been two national elections in one year. It is predicted that more historical records could be broken next month. Israeli voters will choose from 32 parties for which they will cast a vote. That is down from the record 47 parties

that were registered for the April vote. No ceived 35 votes. Polls of likely voters indisingle party in Israeli history has won an cate the two parties will come out on top outright majority. Instead, like-minded, in September, with about 30 seats each. So that may still not or similar-minded result in a coalition parties join together government without to form a coalition another party joingovernment. ing. There is also talk According to this time around of a Atlanta native Raunity government. chel Broyde, who is Avigdor Lieberman, the foreign spokesleader of the ultraperson for Likud’s nationalist party campaign in Israel, Yisrael Beiteinu, is the party is not interthe politician who ested in a unity govcannily and oneernment. handedly stopped “If early polls Netanyahu from are to be trusted, and creating a coalition that is a big ‘if,’ it is after the April eleclooking once again tion. Lieberman is like, barring a nasaying that he wants tional unity governa unity government ment made up pribetween Likud and Center for Israel Education’s Rich marily of Blue and the center-party Blue Walter said, “it’s all about the math.” White with Likud, and White, which formed out of a merger of smaller parties. that Lieberman and his Yisrael Beiteinu In April’s vote, those two parties both re- party will be in the role of kingmaker,”

suggested Richard Walter, vice president of Curriculum and Outreach at the Center for Israel Education. “Will Lieberman be willing to endorse [Blue and White leaders] Benny Gantz and Yair Lapid as prime minister? Will Likud tap another person if Netanyahu is unable to put together a coalition? Would Blue and White join a government with Netanyahu? The answers to these questions will be the key to seeing if things play out differently,” Walter told the AJT. “One thing to watch is how much of a bump Lieberman will get for his refusal to acquiesce to the religious parties in May. If he is able to win more than the five seats he got in the spring, that will put him in an even stronger position to demand what he wants for himself and his party from any potential government.” In any case, there may be fewer parties from which to choose and include in a coalition government. In fact, there may be only nine parties – which would be a historic low – that will meet the threshold to even make it into the Knes-

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ISRAEL NEWS set. One reason there may be fewer parties able to receive the required 3.25 percent of the votes to qualify is that several have merged, on the right and on the left, into larger parties. The United Right Party is an alliance of the New Right and the Union of RightWing Parties, most of whose members are religious. Yet, the party is now headed by former Justice Minister Ayelet Shaked, who is secular. Also on the right, and expected to capture about the same number of seats it won in April, are the ultra-religious parties, Shas and United Torah Judaism, both supporters of Netanyahu. The party that led the country for its first nearly 30 years, Labor, joined an alliance with Gesher, a more right-wing party that focuses on social and economic issues. To make things more interesting, Gesher’s head, Orly Levy-Abekasis, used to be a member of Lieberman’s Yisrael Beiteinu Party. Also on the left, former Prime Minister Ehud Barak – formerly a head of Labor – launched a new party and enlisted the leftist Meretz party as well as a young, popular former Laborite, Stav Shaffir, to form the Democratic Union party. In the 2015 elections, the Arab parties formed an alliance that resulted in

it becoming the third largest party in the ments. The Israeli attorney general has alKnesset, with 13 seats. In the April elections, the alliance split, discouraging ready announced his intention to indict many Israeli Arabs from even voting, and the prime minister on bribery and other resulting in only 10 Arab representatives corruption charges in three different casin the Knesset. This time around, the par- es, pending a hearing in which he and his attorneys can argue ties again united, but their case. That hearit’s unclear whether ing is scheduled for this will propel Arab Oct. 2-3, just weeks citizens to come out after the September and vote. election. In general, Some party there’s a fear of elecleaders, including tion fatigue for all Isthose of Blue and raeli voters, resulting White, have indiin an overall lower cated they wouldn’t turnout. One motivasit in a coalition with tor that has existed an indicted prime at least since the minister. If he were 2015 elections is a deto step aside for ansire among many Isother Likud leader, raelis to crown a new however, Blue and prime minister. Last White might join a month, Netanyahu government with surpassed founding Likud. Netanyahu is Prime Minister Daobviously under a vid Ben-Gurion as Likud’s foreign spokesperson lot of pressure. That the longest-sitting Rachel Broyde said the party is not interested in a unity government. is why 39 of Likud’s prime minister. Unlike the 2015 election, though, Netanyahu top candidates last weekend signed a peis under the shadow of impending indict- tition stating, according to Broyde, that

“only Prime Minister Netanyahu will serve as prime minister, and no other Likud member, regardless of the upcoming elections.” So, will Netanyahu be able to patch together a government after these next elections? “It’s all about the math,” summed up Walter. He indicated that the maneuverings on each side of the political spectrum could “lead to a different landscape than in April.” Or, “we may be back where we started in the spring.” ■

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES AUGUST 9, 2019 | 11


ISRAEL PRIDE

News From Our Jewish Home believe that there has never been a more critical time to develop technologies that bring real and sustained benefits to patients suffering from heart failure.”

Chalabala // Image of resusictation

after a heart attack.

New Heart Failure Treatment Funding

Magenta Medical has developed a miniaturized blood pump to help treat heart failure. It also raised funds from investors led by New Enterprise Associates, a U.S.-based venture capital firm. “Magenta Medical is developing a very unique and potentially disruptive technology that should greatly advance the field of mechanical circulatory support,” said Dr. Tak Cheung, a principal at NEA. Magenta Medical is NEA’s “first-ever medical technology investment in Israel, as it represents to us the pivotal role Israeli companies play in global life sciences innovation,” said Dr. Josh Makower, general partner and head of MedTech investing at NEA. Acute heart failure is a “family of clinical syndromes and presents an increasing treatment challenge to caregivers and clinical teams,” said Dr. David Israeli, CEO of Magenta Medical. “We

Today in Israeli History

Authorities go through Chez Jo Goldenberg after the terrorist attack on Aug. 9, 1982.

Aug. 9, 1982: Two Palestinian terrorists, believed to be part of the Abu Nidal Organization, attack a Jewish deli in Paris, Chez Jo Goldenberg, with grenades and machine guns. Six people are killed, and 22 others are wounded. The attack is one of dozens carried out by the group in the 1980s and 1990s, killing some 300 people. An Abu Nidal attempt to assassinate Israel’s ambassador to London is one of the causes of the First Lebanon War, which is ongoing during the Paris attack. Aug. 10, 1920: World War I’s victorious nations and the Ottoman Empire sign the Treaty of Sevres (a French town) to enact a plan for the breakup of the empire. The treaty incorporates the Bal12 | AUGUST 9, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Dr. Joachim Behar, a member of the Technion’s Faculty of Biomedical Engineering.

Technion Team Helps Detect Sleep Apnea

An international research team led by the Technion–Israel Institute of Technology, has developed an innovative artificial intelligence-based software to detect obstructive sleep apnea, which is a condition in which people stop breathing for about 10 seconds or more while they are asleep. This syndrome increases with age and affects more than one in five individuals in the general adult population, particularly males and those who are overweight, reported The Times of Israel. “The model we developed is a reliable and effective tool for identifying sleep apnea in large populations and it four Declaration’s language calling for “a national home for the Jewish people” to be established in Palestine. The Ottoman sultan, Mehmed VI, endorses the treaty, but the Turkish National Assembly, set up by Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, rejects the pact. It is replaced by the Treaty of Lausanne in 1923. Aug. 11, 1929: The 16th Zionist Congress ratifies the creation of a broadly representative Jewish Agency for Palestine on a vote of 231-4 with four abstentions. The League of Nations’ Articles of Mandate in 1922 called for such an agency to represent Jewish interests in Palestine, and the World Zionist Organization filled that role. But WZO President Chaim Weizmann wanted an agency reflecting the views of all world Jewry, including non-Zionists, and it took seven years to complete the negotiations to achieve that goal. Aug. 12, 1944: Labor Zionist leader Berl Katznelson dies of a hemorrhage in Jerusalem at age 57. A native of Belorussia, Katznelson made aliyah in 1909 as a foundry worker but became disillusioned with the poverty of Jewish work-

could help mass screen for the condition,” said Dr. Joachim Behar, a member of the Technion’s Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, who led the study. The technology that Behar and his team developed is based on data and biomarkers obtained from 887 subjects from the general adult population in Sao Paulo, Brazil. “This model can in the longer term be used to develop a suitable mobile application, and eventually be part of a smart watch or bracelet that includes an oximeter to extract the necessary biomarkers and perform an accurate selfexamination for OSA”, Behar said

Orthodox Union Hosts NCSY Summer Program in Israel

More than seven teens from Georgia joined more than 2,500 Jewish teens, staff and guests from 29 states, Canada, Israel, Argentina and the U.K. participating in summer programs operated by the Orthodox Union. They came to Park Ra’anana last month for American barbeque and to listen to live musical performances at Yom NCSY. “NCSY (National Conference of Synagogue Youth) provides innovative, informal Jewish education, leadership training, retreats and summer programs that foster positive Jewish identity and connection to Israel, preparing the next generation of ers. He developed the idea of a cooperative group of small landholders that led to the moshav movement. His 1919 program for labor unity became the basis for the Mapai party, created in 1930. He also helped start the Histadrut Labor Federation and the newspaper Davar. Aug. 13, 1995: Aharon Barak, a Supreme Court justice since 1978, is appointed to serve as the court’s president, a position he holds until 2006. He uses his time as Israel’s chief justice to expand the court’s power, especially in reviewing government and military actions and in protecting civil liberties. A landmark decision in 1995 states that in the absence of a constitution, Israel’s Basic Law: Human Dignity and Liberty and Basic Law: Freedom of Occupation are preeminent. Aug. 14, 1944: U.S. Assistant War Secretary John J. McCloy writes a letter to Leon Kubowitzki, the head of the rescue department of the World Jewish Congress, to notify him that the U.S. military will not bomb Nazi death camps and their infrastructure. McCloy is explicit that the United States could conduct

committed Jewish communal leaders,” according to a press release about the event. “Yom NCSY represents the very essence of what NCSY Summer is all about. At the event it doesn’t matter what your religious background is, it’s about a united non-judgmental, encouraging environment celebrating our shared connections in the home of the Jewish people,” said NCSY Summer Director David Cutler. “The palpable energy, cheering, singing and dancing has made this the highlight of the summer.” In addition to the festivities, the event marked the end of a 72-hour teenled initiative to fund scholarships for next year’s summer programs as well as dedicate a United Hatzalah ambucycle, which will respond to emergency medical calls throughout the country. “The energy and enthusiasm of these young people was contagious. It was wonderful to see them all come together – from all parts of the world and from many different religious backgrounds – to celebrate their summer together, sharing in a love of Torah and Israel,” said Orthodox Union Executive Vice President Allen Fagin. “These NCSYers bringing such passion to their summers. It only highlights the goals of our programs — to inspire leadership, and the love and responsibility towards Israel and the Jewish people.” ■ such missions but believes that air operations elsewhere are a more effective use of resources to defeat Germany.

Soldiers erect a barrier between Israel and the Gaza Strip as part of the disengagement.

Aug. 15, 2005: Soldiers and police begin carrying out Prime Minister Ariel Sharon’s plan for Israeli disengagement from the Gaza Strip, as approved by the Knesset in February. After the Aug. 14 deadline for settlers to leave, evacuation orders are handed out in settlements, giving residents 48 hours to leave. “Believe me,” Sharon says in a speech, “the extent of pain that I feel at this act is equal only to the measure of resolved recognition that it was something that had to be done.” ■ Items are provided by the Center for Israel Education (www.israeled.org), where you can find more details.


OPINION

A Club No One Wants to Join I’ll spare you the details, both of which came back but in recent weeks I’ve bewith unwelcome news. come intimately acquainted The first procedure rewith a few of life’s indignities. moved what I’ve termed a lifeSuffice it to say that I time achievement award that will contribute to any eflikely dates back to not wearfort to redesign the hospital ing enough sunscreen (then gown that leaves your backreferred to as suntan lotion) side open to a breeze. Other during countless hours spent things I will not mention. on tennis courts decades ago. At some point, though, you Dave As these things go, it was the have no choice but to sur- Schechter less encumbering of the two From Where I Sit render a measure of dignity surgeries and will leave a notfor the sake of your health. too-visible scar. Hearing the “C” word sends your The other item required more extenthoughts to some pretty dark places. But sive testing, which led to a good newsif you’re fortunate, you’re offered a silver bad news call. The initial area of concern lining to that cloud. showed no problem, the specialist said, That’s where I now find myself, on a but – and that BUT started my head spinpath of indeterminate length (much like ning – something that we didn’t expect life itself, I’ve been reminded), one that turned up elsewhere. offers no iron-clad promises but at least The mystery item was removed in the opportunity to be optimistic. a more invasive procedure and sent for Under the circumstances, that’s not testing that came back with THAT word. bad. It was quite the birthday present. I know people who are or have been The silver lining is that it appears to in more dire circumstances, so I don’t of- have been caught early – again, thanks fer myself as a poster child for anything, to that sore shoulder – but still requires other than the potential perils of not see- treatment that will last for however long ing your doctor regularly. it needs to last, with the ever-present For want of a sore left shoulder, who chance that the problem could return. knows what might have been lost. After So that’s where I am. months of increasing discomfort, I finalOr I should say, that’s where we are. ly made an appointment. Had it not been I may be the patient, but my wife and for that shoulder, who knows how long it our children are on this journey, as well. would have been. Their love and support has made the earPhysical therapy should help that ly difficult steps a bit easier. shoulder, the doctor said. Great, that’s all I have no profound words about I came for. experiencing a spiritual awakening or Not so fast, the doctor said. You renewed commitment to faith. On the haven’t been here for a while, so let’s do other hand, it has prompted an overdue a more thorough exam. assessment of all the stuff that accumuThe doctor identified two possible lates over the years and a desire to lightproblems and recommended, strongly, en that load. that I seek more specialized opinions, I’ve heard frightening cost figures

for my various tests and procedures. Thankfully, health insurance should limit, but not eliminate, the expense of what has been done and what will be done. Anyone who has spent hours on the phone with billing departments and insurance companies knows the frustrations of navigating the financial side of health care. It is easy to understand why many Americans fear being one accident or illness away from financial ruin. I recommend taking a look at the website ClearHealthCosts.com and watching the TED Talk by its founder and CEO, journalist Jeanne Pinder, which

is posted on its home page. Politicians who want to make a kitchen table appeal to voters will make the cost of health care their priority. It behooves the journalists covering the 2020 campaigns to study this issue as they report on the programs the candidates propose and the promises they make. My youngest sister says that I am now a member of a club that no one wants to join. This brings to mind the Groucho Marx quip: “I don’t want to belong to any club that would accept me as one of its members.” I didn’t ask to join, but nonetheless, here I am. ■

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ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES AUGUST 9, 2019 | 13


OPINION Letter to the editor:

Letter to the editor:

Regarding: Atlanta Scores Big at Maccabi 2019 Eighteen years ago, I was part of the MJCCA’s professional team that welcomed the Maccabi Games to Atlanta. This week, upon the return of Maccabi to our city, we were honored to play a very small role in what should be recorded as one of our most successful community events. As volunteers we observed: a dream-team of Maccabi leadership – volunteers and professionals alike. We marveled at how the volunteers were recruited and trained, the strategic programmatic choices, and of course, the logistical nightmare that looked from the outside like a well-oiled and experienced process. Here are three highlights of our Maccabi experience. Most significant was the sense of community and teamwork that we felt. As a community we strive for the “high” that we know comes from being a part of something greater than ourselves. The Games delivered! Maccabi is truly so much more than sports. We had the chance to hand out a Midot Medal (values/ good deed) to a teen from Cleveland. In addition to winning in sports, Maccabi recognizes acts of kindness and Jewish values. We saw the teen show off his medal and we know that he will never forget receiving that recognition. Finally, we observed a commissioner of a sport speaking with a coach who was “out of line” in how he was directing his players. The commissioner, like we, was a volunteer and the stand he took to redirect the coach toward fair play was truly a beautiful thing to watch. Thank you to all of the players, volunteers, donors and professionals who made the 2019 Maccabi Games in Atlanta such a success. We have no doubt of the lasting effect the Games will have on our sense of community, readiness to volunteer, and interest in investing as donors in the wellbeing of our Jewish community. Beth and Richard Gluck, Atlanta

I wanted to tell you about my recent experience while buying kosher meat at Costco. I bought a London broil. It looked like a nice thick piece of meat, which is what a London broil should be. I got it home, defrosted it and found, to my absolute horror, that it is not one piece of thick meat, but four or five very thin pieces of meat that were stacked on top of each other. Teva [Foods] packaging is incredibly deceptive, and it was absolutely not what they advertised it to be. It was not mislabeled by Costco. I have tried to contact Teva Foods, but they have no website. Costco corporate is equally difficult to pin down. I thought deceptive packaging and advertising for kosher food might be of interest to your readers. Julie Jacobson, Atlanta

Letter to the Editor: I am a reasonably well-informed citizen and resident of Rep. John Lewis’ congressional district and have been unaware of any substantive acts of friendship that he has performed for Israel. After reading Rabbi Berg’s and Rabbi Lesser’s column in the Aug. 2 AJT, “Congressman Lewis is a Friend to Israel,” I remain unaware of those acts. Their column asserts that he is a friend without providing any support or examples. In fact, if we were to agree that being a friend to Israel is simply doing things considered friendly by the citizens of Israel itself (as opposed to what some living in the U.S. might consider in their best interests), Congressman Lewis has not been a particular friend of the State. At times he has been positively unfriendly. Readers of the AJT are well aware of Rep. Lewis’s votes for the Iranian nuclear deal; he refused to even attend the Israeli prime minister’s speech to Congress on the topic. Congressman Lewis refused to condemn the Obama administration’s December 2016 decision to abstain from a viciously anti-Israeli resolution in the U.N. and he voted against a House bill which criticized the administration for the abstention. More recently, Representative Lewis voted for Rep. Ilhan Omar’s thinly veiled pro-BDS bill. All of these actions are at odds with the wishes of a majority of Israelis as indicated by their elected representatives. I am unaware of any statement from Rep. John Lewis supporting the U.S. embassy move to Jerusalem, something that is wildly popular in Israel and would certainly be supported by a friend. I think most Israelis would say about John Lewis: with friends like that, who needs enemies! John Markson, Atlanta, Ga.

Letter to the editor: Regarding: John Lewis Shame on you John Lewis! You have fallen for one of the oldest tricks in the book. Yes, H.R. 496 appears to support our freedoms, but it also paves the way for the antiIsrael BDS supporters to claim their efforts are backed by Congress and the courts. A sophisticated politician should not be suckered by this kind of language trick. What sounds innocent at first reading can be easily manipulated to Israel’s detriment. Reps. Omar and Tlaib are not Israel’s friend. You say you are Israel’s friend, but your sponsorship of this resolution brings that support into question. George Nathan, Sandy Springs

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OPINION Letter to the editor: The Trump administration and the Israeli government haven’t retreated from a Two State solution; they’ve simply realized that the Palestinian idea of Two States differs radically from the Israeli and American vision of a Palestinian state coexisting, peacefully, with Israel. Unfortunately, the Palestinian leaders seek a Palestinian state from which all Jews have been banished and an Israel which has been converted into a Muslimmajority state. They seek to accomplish this by having Israel overrun by 5,400,000 Palestine refugees. (United Nations Relief and Works Agency, UNRWA, designation). Between 400,000 and 700,000 Arabs fled Palestine in the late 1940s. The Arab League, abetted by the U.N., decreed that they and their descendants would remain in refugee limbo until Israel gave them the homes they claim their forebears lost. The leaders proceeded to feed the refugees a steady diet of anti-Jewish invective, while honoring and rewarding people for murdering Jews. Yet, the leaders reason that democratic Israel will surely do what Arab leaders have refused to do, grant citizenship to the refugees. The new citizens would then be able to vote to remove any vestige of Judaism from Israel’s legal system. In contrast, Israel didn’t trap 800,000 Jewish refugees from Middle Eastern and North African countries in transit camps, waiting for Muslim countries to compensate them for their lost homes. Israel absorbed and uplifted the Mizrachi Jews, whose descendants now comprise the majority of Israel’s citizenry. Israel integrated the Mizrachi Jews while also rehabilitating Holocaust survivors as well as recovering from war damages caused by Arab forces, and dealing with terrorist incursions from land illegally occupied by Egypt and Jordan. Surely, the Arab nations should’ve welcomed the Palestine refugees, who shared language, religion and culture with their own citizens, but the Arab leaders chose to use the Palestine refugees as pawns in their efforts to destroy the nation-state of the Jews. Toby F. Block, Atlanta

The AJT welcomes your letters. We want our readers to have an opportunity to engage with our community in constructive dialogue. If you would like your letter to be published, please write 200 words or less, include your name, phone number and email, and send it to editor@ atljewishtimes.com. ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES AUGUST 9, 2019 | 15


BACK TO COLLEGE Coping as an Empty Nester Julie Rubenstein Cohen unifying presence and if the never quite prepared for the unifying presence is leaving empty nest when she behome, they are faced with came a mother 21 years ago. looking at the relationship “You grow up … You with a different lens. get married; you want to “The primary focus of have kids. You don’t think their marriage has been the about when the kids get to daily lives of their kids.” But be adults,” said Cohen, a with the children managing divorced mother of two coltheir own lives, couples can lege kids. “It’s good for them, Roni spend time “reconnecting as Robbins but it’s sad for us.” partners in a way connectCoping with the empty ing as parents didn’t necesnest when children leave for college is sarily allow them to do.” certainly an adjustment for many parBut the empty nest can also be a deents – and students. Whether saying structive force. goodbye for the first time or sending off Divorce attorney Randy Kessler estitheir youngest, parents often see this mates that 20 to 25 percent of his clients stage of life as a time to enjoy their new- come to his practice around the time they found freedom and find opportunities for have at least one child out of the house. self-fulfillment. But some also experience They tend to be stay-at-home mothers mental health and marital challenges. contemplating their golden years or tryThe AJT spoke with a Jewish coun- ing to reimagine their identity after their selor and a family law attorney about primary job as caretaker ends. this phase in a parent’s life and how to “One that shocks me as a divorce find the silver lining instead of a fog of lawyer is that, … in times of crisis, when despair and divorce. you think people would stick together, “Launching your child to his or they don’t. Sometimes it brings out the her next experience is developmentally worst in people.” Parents may try to wait necessary,” said Dan Arnold, director of until their children are out of the house, clinical and counseling but they may not make services at Jewish Family it, said Kessler, who & Career Services. is also an Emory Law “You want the child School professor. to leave the nest to find Divorce rates are a passion and claim declining in the U.S., but independence. It’s bitrising among adults 50 tersweet, he said. “As a and older, according to family you set a rhythm the Pew Research Center. and work with them for That’s the demographic 17 or 18 years, and sudthat tends to experience denly it’s about finding a the empty nest. new rhythm. It’s sad and Since the 1990s, scary and at the same the divorce rate for For many couples, the empty nest that time really exciting.” population is an opportunity to reconnect, In most cases, it’s has doubled, the said Dan Arnold of JF&CS. the mother as the trareport showed. ditional primary caregiver who seeks With people living longer, they counseling, Arnold said. may decide, “I don’t want to spend “When the child leaves for college, the rest of my life unhappy,” Kesthe primary caregiver role is not as im- sler said. Whereas when the life mediate. The question is a struggle for expectancy was 60 or 70, “clients what their identity will become. Sud- in their 50s may have just toughed denly [parents] have more time to do the it out to have companionship,” things they enjoy doing, commit to hob- he said. “But now that people are bies or other work, friendships and rela- living to 100, many may conclude tionship” with their spouse, Arnold said. they do not want to live another 30 When the empty nest issues emerge, years being unhappy and they have a the client may already be in counseling chance at a new and better life.” for anxiety, depression, or communicaWhen the primary focus of a martion and connection challenges in the riage is the children and that changes, marriage. parents may “not realize how unhappy “Oftentimes the children provide a they were ‘til the kids were gone. When 16 | AUGUST 9, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

they’re gone, they may realize that the ing personal goals. Or as Jodie refers to this phase, regreat relationship they had with their children was so much better than the turning to her “past life before kids.” For relationship with their spouse, which is her it might mean more travel, pursunow the only relationship in the house ing a career, creative endeavors such as painting, or returning to the tennis court. and it is not satisfying.” “I spent so much time Kessler believes the and energy taking care empty nest is a bigger of them.” In terms of sayturning point in the relaing goodbye to Sydney tionship than marital afsoon, she said, “With the fairs, which are less prefirst it was really hard on dictable and may inspire me. I almost feel like this couples to work on their go around is going to be marriage. easier because it was so Jodie Jackson is hophard the first time. I’m ing she’s prepared when not quite there yet. Ask her youngest child, Sydme in three weeks. It’s ney, leaves later this really gonna hit me in month for Tulane UniSeptember.” versity. After all, she Husband Steven, a went through the initial Randy Kessler believes the empty nest is a bigger turning point for personal injury attorney, shock of sending her couples than marital affairs. is practical about what eldest, Cameron, to the University of Virginia two years ago and he sees as the next chapter of their lives. To cope with the change, he said he’s survived. “You go through 18 years of being so “embracing the fact that the child that involved in their everyday lives and then has left the nest is thriving and doing so [the house becomes] a lot more stagnant well. In some ways, it has made me grab and quieter,” said Jackson, a stay-at-home on and squeeze Sydney a little tighter.” Parents are not the only ones experimom. The void was a bit debilitating for encing the separation. “Choosing to go out of her, but it’s also a chance to reconnect state for college was with her husband, have more an exciting, but freedom for dates and ner ve-racking travel and time decision for for achiev-


BACK TO COLLEGE me,” said Jordan, Julie Cohen’s daughter. “I am sixth generation Atlantan and most of my family still lives in the Atlanta area, so I knew it would be hard leaving my family behind. I was lucky enough to be close with my freshman-year roommate, but even after joining a sorority at the beginning of the year, I was struggling to find the homey atmosphere I was looking for,” Jordan said. “I fell in love with Florida State from the beginning, but I questioned my purpose there throughout the entire first year as I was attempting to adjust. I missed my family desperately and went home often. I knew it was hard for my mom especially, as we are very close, and I am the oldest of my siblings. “I felt guilty leaving her without someone to share experiences with and knew it would take a lot of adjustment for her as well. Now that my brother is in college, I know she must miss us. “But it has also been a great experience watching her grow into her personal life just as we are growing into fullyfunctioning adults.” Dan Arnold of JF&CS offered this advice for parents and students learning to let go and navigate this new phase. Keep in contact: Plan how you are going to be in touch with each other,

Steven, Sydney, Jodie and Cameron Jackson at Sydney’s graduation.

Quinn, Julie and Jordan Cohen enjoy what little time they can spend together with the children off at college.

how often and what form of communication. Are you going to call or text? If the student is local, schedule time to get together. Arnold recommends consistency, perhaps a phone call once a week with texts in between. “I think there’s comfort in having some structure, some predictability in saying ‘This is when we are going to touch base.’ “They don’t have to always be on call

or high alert waiting for that contact, and we want each, both student and parent, to have the confidence in themselves to successfully navigate that separation.” Let go: “You want the student to have the opportunity to fully engage in their new environment and the parent to loosen the cord and give the student the freedom to flex and also discover what they want to be doing and redefine their lives.”

Fill the void: For parents: “Consider volunteering with a community organization or if you put a career on hold, rejoin the work force. It’s about allowing yourself to branch out and reconnect with your old interests or discover new interests.” For students: Connect with someone across the hall or in the seat near you in class. Explore campus offerings such as Friday night Hillel. Leave your dorm room open when you’re in there to invite passersby to introduce themselves. Be supportive: “Encourage your child to take some risks and try some new things.” Promote activities that allow your child to use their strengths. “Find those opportunities to connect while also recognizing they are feeling the loss. Part of it is not knowing other people and maybe mourning the comfortable friendships they had in high school. Making the transition can be overwhelming or intimidating.” As a parent, you want to be supportive, kind and encouraging, “reminding them that they are capable and able to do this.” Seek help: If parents notice a pattern of social isolation, anxiety or stress, they can suggest the child seek counseling available on campus. ■

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES AUGUST 9, 2019 | 17


BACK TO COLLEGE

Making the Transition As I head back to the University of Georgia for my junior year as a public relations major with a minor in fashion merchandising, I am excited for my new classes, having been recently admitted to the Grady School of Journalism. I finally get to get my hands dirty and take classes for my major and mi- Chloe nor. This will be my second Levitas semester at UGA, and I am looking forward to living with my best friends, game days, exploring new parts of Athens, and trying new restaurants. My college experience has not been the most traditional one you plan. I started my college career at Georgia College and State University for 1 1/2 years. At GCSU I did not know anyone; it was a fresh start for me, but also kind of nerveracking. I decided to rush a sorority, Delta Zeta, as a way to meet new people and make new friends. Since I didn’t know anyone, I could just be myself without anybody having any preconceived notions about who I was in high school (The Weber School). This

18 | AUGUST 9, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

was the best thing I could have ever done because I got out of my comfort zone and started introducing myself to random people. Rush was oddly relaxing for me because I enjoy talking to people and having different conversations, which took me out of my head to ignore the anxiety I had about being in a new place. The thing about the first year in college is that everyone is terrified to start over, whether they show it or not. Everyone is seeking new friendships and a chance to meet new people. It’s not easy to make friends, even if you join a sorority or fraternity, club or sports team. Putting myself out there helped me make friends because, if I didn’t, I wouldn’t have had any. Being at GCSU was not what I was used to, but very refreshing for me because it was the first time I was out of the Jewish bubble. I had been in Jewish day schools for as long as I can remember, and I never had a friend that was not Jewish or of a different ethnicity. Most of my

Chloe (second from right) enjoys spending time with her family: Graham, Robyn Rousso, and Tony Levitas.

friends at GCSU are Christian, and I had Jewish friends. This summer, I have spent most of two token Jewish friends. It was a completely different experience for me, and I my days in the office of the Atlanta Jewloved it. At times it was difficult, though, ish Times as an editorial intern, where that I couldn’t always relate to my non- I have gained an incredible experience Jewish friends, but they wanted to learn under Kaylene Ladinsky’s wing. The about Judaism and traditions I do with staff at the Jewish Times is none like I my family. They loved getting to know have ever experienced before. Everyone is extremely kind, easy to work with, this part of me. GCSU was great place for my first welcoming, and they took their time year-and-a-half of college, where I grew with me to help improve my writing as a person, learned new things about skills. This internship taught me about myself and life, made great friends, and responsibility and how to manage my made a name for myself in a small place. time better, especially when working But it had always been a dream with a deadline. I learned how to write of mine to attend UGA, so I worked my news articles and editorial pieces, intertush off to make great grades to have viewing local Atlantans, and taking photos at events around the opportunity to Atlanta. transfer if I wanted. This has been an As much as I loved my amazing summer for time in Milledgeville, me. I have gotten to I felt ready for a larger spend time with my school and craved more family and friends, go opportunities. I transon some trips, practice ferred to UGA this past yoga, and go on a few January with 10 of my hikes. One of my favorclosest friends, which ite memories this sumdefinitely helped make mer is baking burekas the process less scary. with my grandmother I was nervous to be at at Congregation Or UGA, but everything I VeShalom, because I learned at GCSU helped Best buddies: Sophie Spiegel, love cooking with my me remember that I Chloe and Gabby Kasten. grandmother and I love could take on this next chapter of my life with confidence. At burekas. I’m not going to lie, but I am goUGA, I applied to the journalism school ing to really miss my family in Atlanta. and got in, which was one of the great- It has been wonderful to see my Mom est feelings because I proved to myself and Dad every day and to hang out with that I am capable of anything if I put the my older brother so much. I almost feel work in. I re-affiliated with my soror- like I have empty nesters syndrome, but ity at UGA and made many new friends in reverse. I absolutely adore my family there, along with making friends in my and really enjoy doing activities with classes. I also went to many Shabbat din- them or just simply do nothing; they are ners at Chabad, which was something the coolest. Although I am going to miss I was missing at GCSU. It is the best of my family, hometown friends and my both worlds at UGA because I can be in AJT coworkers, I am so excited for all of the Jewish bubble again whenever I want. the new experiences that I am about to It is nice to have my Jewish, and my non- take on this year. ■


BACK TO COLLEGE

Applerouth on Changes in College Admissions

Jed Applerouth is founder and president of Applerouth Tutoring.

By Eddie Samuels and Caroline Solomon When Jed Applerouth, founder and president of Applerouth Tutoring, applied to school, he only sent one application. “I applied to one college, Penn [University of Pennsylvania], and didn’t do another application,” he said. “Today you just can’t do that. When I applied, the acceptance rate was in the 30s and this year it was 7.44 percent.” That changing face of higher education has been a big topic for Applerouth, who spoke to the AJT about his advice for parents and students going through the college admissions process. Applerouth explained that the landscape of education in Georgia has seen a dramatic shift since the advent of the HOPE Scholarship in 1993. “In 1993 I knew one person who did test prep, and now it’s ubiquitous. University of Georgia was a backup school and now it’s a reach for many students,” he said. “The HOPE Scholarship has really changed the face of education in Georgia.” Penn and UGA are far from the only schools to see acceptance rates plummet, and with those lower rates come higher expectations and demands on students, among them, Jewish high schoolers. “It’s really about class, rather than just Jewish students, and there are definitely pressures that exist in high-networth communities, especially those coming from families with higher levels of education,” he said. Applerouth pointed out that often when high schoolers are visiting relatives, one of the first questions out of their mouths is: “Where are you going to college?” “That conversation can definitely add to the stress,” he said. “Their identities are often tied to academic performance, and so the outcomes are often

A recent online interview titled, “The Myth of the Bad Test Taker,” took place last month.

more important, and more pressure is placed on doing well.” And while the pressure comes from families and schools, Applerouth noted that the causes of stress for students can differ drastically. “It varies a lot by the family. Certain parents are much more laissez-faire and others are much more involved,” Applerouth emphasized. “I work with a lot of independent college counselors, and some parents are hyper-involved to where it can be a problem.” Peer-to-peer stress is also a problem for these students, especially high school girls. “It’s an interesting gender thing to note, but they’re more concerned with the comparison than male students,” he said. “They’re more aware of their place in the hierarchy.” Applerouth also addressed a recent headline-grabbing topic, the SAT’s new adversity score, which College Board says measures “disadvantage.” “We had the announcement in the spring and we’re trying to tease out how much it matters. We have schools like Yale saying they use it in every application, but schools have always had access to this kind of information,” he said. While he noted that it was unlikely to overwhelmingly benefit Jewish students, who more often come from higher income brackets, it isn’t something that should really concern parents or students. “It’s profoundly premature to worry about it,” he said. Among topics Applerouth discussed with the AJT was standardized testing. He gave a recent online interview with academic life coach Maggie Wray titled “The Myth of the Bad Test Taker,” which aired July 23-25. “With every new batch of kids I hear, ‘my kid is not a good test taker,’ and I want to poke holes in that. I don’t believe

it,” he said. “Everybody can become better and markedly better at mastering [tests] by learning the language and content.” He explained that often parents come in with the notion of a bad test taker in their head, and he instructs them to remove the phrase from their vocabulary. Applerouth shared a few quick tips to improve test-taking ability: • Be willing to change your mindset: “This process requires a growth

mindset, and bad thoughts can loom and dominate and will impact your performance.” • Provide mastery experiences: “Practice tests are great but make sure to go over what was missed and why it was missed. Why did I choose the wrong answer? What trap did I fall in?” • Pacing is vital: “The same mastery applies to pacing, and that’s the joy of practice tests; you can practice more than just content.” ■

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES AUGUST 9, 2019 | 19


BACK TO COLLEGE

Parents’ Role in the College Admissions Process The counselor asks the student when he will be taking the SAT or ACT test. The student replies, “I don’t know, but my mother signed me up for the test.” The counselor says sarcastically, “I didn’t know that your mom was taking the test.” There are instances where one would think a par- Mark ent was the applicant rather Fisher than the high school student. The parent’s role starts long before their child’s high school career. Isn’t that early? No! Parents have been interacting with their children for a long time. In the high school years, the relationship is sometimes great, although for some it becomes strained. Now, the college discussions begin, and the parent-child relationship is often based on the daily interaction prior to any college planning. Readers are familiar with helicopter parents. And the opposite is the parent who plays a very small role, if any, in the college process. So much depends on the relationship the student has in the first place with his/her parents. In cases of divorce, much

20 | AUGUST 9, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

depends on custodial status, where one parent has sole or joint custody. In the end, the relationship with any parent becomes paramount. Some children depend a lot on parents. Other children appear more independent in the decisions that they make daily. Thus, first one must look at the relationships between parent and student. Remember, it is the student who is applying. Colleges want to hear the students “voice.” We want to hear from the student, admissions personnel say. Can they tell, in some ways? Yes. Examples: Is the parent always making calls to college personnel?; Or the essay does not sound like that of a student; On the college tour, one’s parent is asking all the questions; The student is tuned out or on their cellphone; The student looks disinterested, but the parent keeps asking questions. This counselor gives a warning to parents if they are invited into the student’s individual interview. Politely re-

fuse. If the parent participates in the interview, the admissions interviewer becomes confused as to who is applying to the college – the parent or the student. Parents have every right to be involved. Some may be concerned about status, the decal on the rear window of the car, what neighbors may think, or people back at the office. Once, at a social gathering up North, parents were talking about colleges, but never was a non-Ivy League college mentioned. Wondering to myself, the poor child who doesn’t get accepted to an Ivy where applicants have a 10 percent or less chance to be admitted. And there are so many fine choices besides those eight colleges. Other parents care about the “right fit” for their child. Where will my child enjoy college? Where will my student grow and succeed? And, for Jewish children, what opportunities does a college have when it comes to Judaism? That is a major factor for many families. I remember a scene with a student, his parents and me when we were discussing the Jewish aspect of college. The parents remarked that the college should have a reasonable number of Jewish students. The student exclaimed: I don’t care about Jewish students. The parents were stunned. The student added, “Why should I care? We live in an area where there are hardly any Jews. You only go to synagogue maybe twice a year. You do nothing Jewish.” As stated before, college admissions start way before the application process. There are other reasons for a student to own the college application process. They include responsibility, editing, proofreading, brainstorming essay ideas, meeting deadlines and honesty. Are these not traits that one needs in college and beyond? Why not sit down with your future college student and discuss some of these topics in a calm, unrushed atmosphere? These are just 10 of the questions to answer and discuss: 1. There are many types of colleges, such as four-year, two-year, and technical two-year colleges. Student: What are you thinking about? Parents: Are you in

agreement? 2. Why do you want to attend college other than “get a job”? Parent: What do you have to add to the student’s answer? 3. What college majors interest you? Parent: Let your student know why you agree or disagree. 4. There are a multitude of careers. Which careers are you thinking about? Why? What in your background leads you to those careers? Parent: Any other suggestions? 5. Talk about the distance from home. By car and/or plane. 6. A large, medium or small school? Discuss the options. Which sounds better based on your education to date? 7. Would you want a rigorous, challenging or less challenging curriculum? How does your answer fit in with your high school curriculum? 8. Campus life: What extra-curricular activities would you want to pursue? Fraternity or sorority? 9. What challenging aspects of the college application process do you feel will give you the most difficulty? 10. The BIG question: Finances. Sometimes this discussion occurs too late in the process. Example: The student applies and gets accepted to several colleges. Great, until April, when the parents let the student know that whatever scholarships and other aid was received, it was not nearly enough. All that work, tears flow, and the student is angry. Parents, talk about finances early in the process with your student. However, beware, there certainly is financial aid at private colleges. Don’t just look at the sticker price. Of course, this holds true for public universities. In the state of Georgia, we have the HOPE Scholarship. Familiarize yourselves with the financial aid programs. For sure, become familiar with the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). ■ Mark Fisher is a college and career consultant at Fisher Educational Consultants, www.fishereducationalconsultants.com, and a consultant for the College Planning Institute, www.GotoCPI.com.


BACK TO COLLEGE

Drew Shulman relaxes with dog Juno. He is a student in the Georgia Tech Excel Program entering his fourth and final year.

Shulman Returns to Finish Tech Excel Program By Marcia Caller Jaffe Fall semester, Drew Shulman will head back to Georgia Tech along with 27,000 others. He is positioned for his last of four years in the Tech Excel Program for young adults with special needs. Excel stands for Expanding Career, Education and Leadership, and there are about 40 students in the program who have intellectual and developmental disabilities. For Shulman, the program means classrooms, tests, independent living and like the most industrious of students – a concurrent job. As a younger child, Shulman attended The Davis Academy AMIT program, which he referred to as both “interesting and stressful,” highlighted by the class trip to Israel. The Davis Academy lists being a menschlichkeit community as a core value. From there, he attended The Cottage School, a nonsectarian school in Roswell, which focuses on special needs for middle and high school students “fulfilling their true potential as confident, productive and independent adults.” Some of his hobbies at that time were archery and photography, though he says sometimes it was hard to be patient to stand for a long time to get “just the right shot.” Now at Tech, he is all over the campus, riding the bus, and honing his life skills like budgeting, public speaking, resume production and time management. The Excel program assigns various Tech student as mentors to work with Drew’s group. “I have one overall coach and then others that teach us cooking, nutrition, social and academic skills … usually all meeting at least once a week,” he said. Shulman has also taken electives

such as psychology and technological innovation. “The Sustainability of Technology and Policy was pretty hard as we had to read about 26 pages a night!” In addition to classwork, students receive help with job placement from the Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency. Currently Drew is working at Hotel Indigo as a check-in desk clerk. “Actually, checking in is a lot harder than checking people out,” Shulman said. “Since I am pretty good with technology, I am also able to help out some of the other workers when computers have problems.” Prior to this job, Shulman worked in a dog day care facility and at the Atlanta Humane Society. Being around the family dog, Juno, a Bernedoodle, he enjoyed those jobs the most. “The dogs were always so happy to see me. That was the most fun job so far.” Shulman lives near the Tech campus in an apartment with three other young men. He likes keeping up with friends on Facebook, Snapchat and Instagram, where he likes to mix up stories with his photos. Like most young adults, his cellphone is at his nimble fingertips. He was especially proud of a new app he’s been fine-tuning where he can give quick instructions, such as for translating languages. This was well above my head, but it looked pretty cool, especially when he bade me farewell in Hebrew. Also, he has developed a shortcut to text Mom “SAFE” when he arrives at destinations. Often, he travels via Lyft. His parents are Dr. Rhonda Taubin, a brain injury physician at Shepherd Center, and Dr. Scott Shulman, an internist at Laureate Medical Group. Watch for more accomplishments from Shulman. Graduation this spring, here he comes! ■

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Popular Emory Prof Blends Skill and Passion By Marcia Caller Jaffe When you send your child to college, Jeff Rosensweig is the kind of professor you hope they might have: passionate, knowledgeable, mesmerizingly able to communicate, and well-credentialed. Rosensweig is the director of the John Robson Program for Business, Public Policy, and Government at the Goizueta Business School of Emory University. As an international business and finance professor, he focuses on investing and the global economy. He also specializes in financial, macroeconomic and business forecasting and is often quoted in the national business press, including Forbes, Fortune, and Bloomberg Businessweek and has appeared nationally on “ABC World News Tonight” and “Good Morning America,” the NBC “Today Show,” “NBC Nightly News,” “Nightline” and CNN. Active in executive education, Rosensweig was recently selected by The Wall Street Journal as one of the 12 favorite professors in all executive MBA programs worldwide.

During 9/11 he was on the national news every half hour allaying fears and being honest about the future of investments. “Since I worked there previously, I have tremendous confidence in the Federal Reserve’s integrity and being able to figure things out.” In terms of the media attention, “I have academic credentials plus the experience of having worked inside the system on a practical level. I’m very popular during the threat of a global recession. When things are stable, the news is about O.J. Simpson.” Rosensweig grew up in a Jewish Long Island household near the Hamptons. He received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees, summa cum laude, in economics from Yale University and a doctorate in economics from MIT. He also received a master’s degree in philosophy, politics and economics at Oxford University. He teaches both undergrads and MBA students. For the former, he said, “I like working with the seniors who are interested in global business and in exploring their own moral identity. It’s a vulnerable part of life. They are eager to learn

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and I aspire to be a role model. On other They do enjoy life outside of class too! end, I also enjoy training MBAs, the exec- ... I may be a dinosaur, but I still require utive MBAs who are on the fast track and class attendance. I may soon change that whose companies think highly enough to watching the lecture on video, then coming to class ready of them to sponsor. … to discuss.” Plus the two-year fullWhen asked time MBA students about the subjects of of which there are modern theses, he 140, one of the largest states that most are classes.” about forecasting and He further notes trending what lies that Emory does not ahead. “With things accept MBA students like Uber, change is straight from unso rapid.” dergraduate school In terms of Emowithout several years ry’s political climate of work experience. for students to have There is still an impartisan interchange, balance of males over he said, “There is females, although massive division on there’s an effort to reJeffrey Rosensweig has his finger on all campuses. Emory cruit more women for the pulse of the economy and future has an atmosphere of a better balance ratio. of business with strong academic tolerance, and I think Since Emory is credentials and experience having worked “inside the system.” our president has among the 20 top-tier business schools, he believes that even done a good job of valuing free speech the four-year undergrads can secure versus not tolerating hate speech. It is a great jobs, most even before graduation, delicate balance. I think it’s good that stuperhaps where they interned. “Many go dents are socially aware, but all universiinto accounting, consulting or market- ties are just one incident away.” What’s the best advice you give to ing. Emory attracts a good amount of Northeasterners – many of whom are young folks? “Find something you feel both pasJewish – who lean towards finance so they can go back to New York City and sionate about and for which you have a get Wall Street or high powered finance skill. Warren Buffet parlays just the forjobs like in Manhattan investment bank- mer. To me, if you just have passion and no skill, it won’t work. Nor will vice versa ing.” He does not find millennials to be – skill with no passion. It’s not enough lazy as they are sometimes portrayed. “I to just follow your passion. It has to be find them to be interested, prepared and a combination. When I was president of motivated, especially if the professor is my junior high class, I knew I possessed interesting like I aspire to be. They may good public speaking skills, then added not put in as many hours as we did, be- the desire to help young people. … I found cause they use sophisticated technology. my career.” ■


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CALENDAR Synagogue has been a sponsor of this mitzvah. Become part of this meaningful tradition. For more information, www. bit.ly/2S8gUNL.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 9

JCC Dive into Shabbat Pool Party – Marcus JCC, 5342 Tilly Mill Road, Atlanta, from 5 to 7 p.m. Celebrate Shabbat outside at the MJCCA’s pool and splash park with family and friends. Open swim and activities begin at 5 p.m. followed by Shabbat songs and blessings with Rabbi Brian Glusman at 6 p.m. Bring your own food and purchase drinks at the snack bar. Free challah, grape juice and ice pops for children. Free and open to all. For more information, www.bit. ly/2Ygh0oz.

Scholar in Residence: Jewlicious Founder David Abitbol – 4320 Kimball Bridge Road, Alpharetta, from 7 to 9 p.m. David Abitbol has a remarkable story to tell. He helped convince a member of the hateful Westboro Baptist Church family to leave along with her sister and become an advocate for coexistence. Abitbol, a founder of the game changing website Jewlicious, and Amy Oppenheimer Abitbol, will share their expertise on non-violent communication and how our words can help shape the world we live in. For pricing and more information, www.bit.ly/2X66oar.

SUNDAY, AUGUST 11

Kabbalah and Coffee – Chabad Intown on the BeltLine, 730 Ponce De Leon Place NE, Atlanta, from 9:30 to 11 a.m. Discuss, explore and journey through the world of Jewish mystical teaching and learn how to apply these profound teachings to your daily life. This ongoing class probes the esoteric through a unique program of English text-based study. No prior kabbalistic experience required. Free. For more information, www. chabadintown.org

CANDLE-LIGHTING TIMES

Devarim Friday, August 9, 2019, light candles at 8:12 p.m. Saturday, August 10, 2019, Shabbat ends at 9:09 p.m. Va'etchanan Friday, August 16, 2019, light candles at 8:05 p.m. Saturday, August 17, 2019, Shabbat ends at 9:01 p.m.

table seat. For tickets and more information, www.bit.ly/2Muk3bq.

Beth Shalom Welcomes David Nissan – Israel Intelligence Expert – Congregation Beth Shalom, 5303 Winters Chapel Road, Dunwoody, from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. Join enlightened speaker, David Nissan, who has 23 years of experience in the Israeli intelligence and security establishment followed by a question/answer discussion. Refreshments will be served. Free. For more information, www.bethshalom.net.

Empowering Young People in the Aftermath of Hate – The Howard School, 1192 Foster St. NW, Atlanta, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Erin Beacham, ADL education director, will discuss the tools and resources available to aid parents in having conversations about frightening and violent global events. $10 per person. For more information and to register, www. bit.ly/320O6Ll.

TUESDAY, AUGUST 13

Atlanta Cyclorama – Atlanta History Center, 130 West Paces Ferry Road NW, Atlanta, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Greater Atlanta Hadassah Metulla will visit the Atlanta Cyclorama at the Atlanta History Center. $18 per person. For more information, contact Nancy Schwartz, nshadassah2016@comcast.net.

THURSDAY, AUGUST 15

Babyccino – Alefbet Preschool, 5303 Winters Chapel Road, Atlanta, from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Babyccino chic meet for mod moms and their tots (babies to toddlers) led by the Alefbet Preschool’s Babies educator. Every Thursday in the Babies Room. Free. For more information, www.bit.ly/30kViRZ.

Brain Health Boot Camp – Jewish Family & Career Services, 4549 Chamblee Dunwoody Road, Atlanta, from 3 to 5 p.m. This can help maintain and enhance your memory and brain function. $25 per class. For more information, www.bit.ly/2Ob6bCB.

Sunday on the River Concert Featuring Sam Lewis – Chattahoochee Na-

Mahjong for Beginners & Advanced Players – Congregation Beth Shalom,

ture Center, 9135 Willeo Road, Roswell, from 6 to 9:30 p.m. The soulful Sam Lewis has discovered what most musicians spend lifetimes working for, the place where feel-good music meets vital social commentary. $16 per lawn seat, $20 per

5303 Winters Chapel Road, Dunwoody, from 6:30 to 9 p.m. If you have played in the past and just need some reminding, you are welcome to join. If you have just learned and want to get better, you are welcome. If you are experienced, come

24 | AUGUST 9, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

alone or with your group. Open to the public. $2 for Sisterhood members, $5 for non-Sisterhood members. RSVP, 770399-5300 or office@bshalom.net.

B’nai Torah Back to Shul BBQ – Congregation B’nai Torah, 700 Mount Vernon Highway NE, Sandy Springs, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Meet, greet and eat. Open beer and wine bar and cookout food for purchase. Free to enter. For more information, www.bnaitorah.org.

Say “Chai” at CSI – Congregation Shearith Israel, 1180 University Drive, Atlanta, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Shearith Israel will host a community festival to kick off the new school year. The event will feature breakfast tacos, an espresso bar, Bloody Marys and information about CSI’s committees and groups. See what’s on tap for 5780 and how you can get involved. Free. For more information, www.bit.ly/2LW5Cen.

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 21

Open Play Games – Marcus JCC, 5342

FRIDAY, AUGUST 16

Community and Prospective Member Dinner – Congregation Beth Shalom, 5303 Winters Chapel Road, Dunwoody, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Join Rabbi Mark Zimmerman and fellow congregants who will lead song and prayer. Enjoy a barbecue Shabbat dinner and learn about Beth Shalom’s warm and inviting community. For more information, www.bit.ly/2G3KcIv.

SUNDAY, AUGUST 18

Tilly Mill Road, Atlanta, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Open play tables are set up every week on MJCCA’s Main Street on Mondays and Wednesdays to enjoy popular strategy and skill games while making new friends. Free for members, $5 for the community. For more information, www.bit.ly/2H6mYRt.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 23

Shabbat in the Park – East Cobb Park, 3322 Roswell Road, Marietta, from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Join Congregation Etz Chaim for its annual outdoor Shabbat in the Park at East Cobb Park. If you are new to the area, we invite you to join us for games, food, fun and a Shabbat service. $7 per person and $28 per family. For more information, www.bit.ly/2XHtHrE.

Habitat for Humanity NW Interfaith Build – Latreece Williams Household,

Shabbat in the Park – Glen Lake Park,

2490 Perkerson Road SW, Atlanta, from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Volunteers are needed for this year’s Habitat for Humanity NW Interfaith Build. This year marks the 26th year Ahavath Achim

1121 Church St., Decatur, from 5:45 to 7:30 p.m. Shabbat in the Park is a casual, fun and family-friendly Friday evening potluck dinner held monthly in a local park. Featuring a Shabbat sing-along led by


AUGUST 9-28 AMAZING TRIPS ARE WAITING! MULTI-GENERATIONAL TRIP TO ISRAEL DECEMBER 23, 2019-JANUARY 2, 2020

See the cities and sites that make history come alive in this exciting tour. Visit Tel Aviv, the Galilee, the Dead Sea, Masada and awe-inspiring Jerusalem. Spend New Year’s Eve in Israel this year with your family and friends.

ISRAEL AND EGYPT

MARCH 9-MARCH 29, 2020

Visit both countries or just join for one. Tour enchanting Israel and visit the Pyramids, Cairo, Alexandria, Luxor,and more.

ALL ADULT TRIP TO ISRAEL

LED BY RENEE WERBIN | GUIDED BY THE INIMITABLE MOSHE NOV

APRIL 21-MAY 6, 2020

Visit the cities you’ve dreamed about, enjoy jeep rides, visit Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, Elat with a day trip to Petra, the Galilee and more. FOR DETAILS ON THESE TRIPS, PLEASE PHONE RENEE WERBIN AT 770-451-9399 OR EMAIL RENEE@SRITRAVEL.COM

SUNDAY, AUGUST 25

Camp Fed – Jewish Federation’s NextGen Signature Event – The Foundry at Puritan Mill, 916 Joseph E. Lowery Blvd. NW, Atlanta, from 2 to 5 p.m. Each ticket to Camp Fed includes one drink, delicious camp snacks such as s’mores and grilled cheese, access to all activities and a $2 donation to Federation’s camp scholarship program, helping send hundreds of children to summer camp. $25 in advance and $28 at the door. For tickets and more information, www.bit.ly/2NPJO6P.

Rabbi Ari Kaiman. Enjoy a vegetarianfriendly meal, and an evening of socializing with Congregation Shearith Israel. Free. For more information, www.bit. ly/2IaIuGP.

MONDAY, AUGUST 26

please call ahead to determine schedule. Included with general admission to the CNC. $6 per child, $10 per adult, $7 for seniors 65 and up, $7 for students ages 13 to 18, free for CNC members and children 2 and younger. For more information, www.bit.ly/2JnQXba.

Jewish Women in Judaism – 1050 Crown Pointe Parkway, Dunwoody, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Greater Atlanta Hadassah Metulla will meet in Dunwoody for the Jewish Women in Judaism study group with Rabbi Ari Sollish. The topic will be “Deborah.” $5 per person. For more information, contact Nancy Schwartz, nshadassah2016@comcast.net.

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 28

JELF Major Event – Coca-Cola Roxy at

TUESDAY, AUGUST 27

Artists in the Wild – En Plein Air Art– Chattahoochee Nature Center, 9135 Willeo Road, Roswell, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. every Tuesday through August. The CNC partners with the Roswell Fine Arts Alliance to present local painters creating en plein air art focused on spring and summer blooms. Visit with the painters and observe them at work. Artist availability may be dependent on weather so

The Battery, 800 Battery Ave. SE, Suite 500, Atlanta, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Join JELF for its fundraising event featuring entertainment industry expert Jeffrey Stepakoff. With a 30-plus year career in the entertainment industry, Stepakoff is an accomplished producer, screenwriter, novelist and entertainment industry expert. He’s written and produced dozens of television series, including the Emmy Award winning “The Wonder Years” and breakout hit “Dawson’s Creek.” $50 per person under 40, $75 per person 40 and over, $450 per table for 10 seats for under 40, $700 per table for 10 seats 40 and over. For more information, www.jelf.org/stepakoff/.

Find more events and submit items for our online and print calendars at:

www.atlantajewishconnector.com

Calendar sponsored by the Atlanta Jewish Connector, an initiative of the AJT. In order to be considered for the print edition, please submit events two weeks in advance. Contact community relations director, Jen Evans, for more information at jen@atljewishtimes.com. ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES AUGUST 9, 2019 | 25


COMMUNITY New Friends from Home in the Holy Land

Photos via Jacob Ross // Participants pose for a photo in the Old City in Jerusalem.

By Eddie Samuels With the summer Birthright Israel trip season drawing to a close, Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta staffed

26 | AUGUST 9, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

three Atlanta Community Birthright Israel Trips uniting young people for 10 days of exploration, education and fun. Doug Ross, Birthright Israel Foundation local leader and national board

Those who didn't celebrate a b'nai mitzvah when they were younger are given the chance to have an abbreviated ceremony.

member, broke down some of the myriad opportunities for trips to the holy land. "Each year Atlanta sends about 800 young people who call Atlanta home on Birthright trips," he said. "Within that umbrella, … there are college trips and trips through Hillel and Chabad, but, … the Federation staffs three trips each year from Atlanta, each of those includes 40 participants who call Atlanta home." Those community trips are specifically designed for participants between the ages of 22 and 26, which Ross explained was an important age to reach young Jews in Atlanta. "These are people who, for the most part, have finished college," he noted. "Many of them are in the beginning or intermediate stages of starting careers, and if you go on a trip with similar young people who have decided that they’re going to stay here in Atlanta, there’s a different sense of cohesion." He wasn’t the only Ross to have some experience with Birthright. His son, Jacob, was among the staff members for one of the summer trips this year, his first time on staff. "I had lived in Israel for five years, so I was definitely very familiar with it,” Jacob said. “I hadn’t been back in a year-and-ahalf, so I thought of it as a free trip, but I got so much more out of it than that." Ross explained that he had developed a certain numbness to Israel after having spent so much time there, but seeing 40 people who had never been before experience it for the first time opened his eyes. "The trip really rejuvenated me. I remembered what I loved about Israel the

first time," he said. "I could see it daily as people said, ‘I finally understand Israel now.'" Federation President and CEO Eric Robbins noted that the Atlanta area trips offer not only the complete Birthright experience, but also "the lifelong gift of local community connections.” "Each trip builds an itinerary that forges new bonds to modern Israel and builds connections to eternal Jewish values, and our Atlanta busses are designed to create cohorts that can continue building their community when they return home, including microgrant funding from Federation to help alumni create and host their own events, such as Shabbat dinners, Passover seders, and Chanukah parties,” Robbins said. Even as a staff member, Jacob Ross felt that those connections would last. "Last Friday we had our first reunion dinner at Chabad Intown,” he said. "About 25 of us out of 45 showed up and it was great. I’ve seen people in the last month as well, at bars and just around town, so I’ve definitely kept in touch with people from my trip.” He added that he could see the change in participants wanting to be more active in the community while on the trip. "Meeting people from your own community on the trip and spending 10 intense days with them definitely builds strong bonds,” he said. "A lot come from backgrounds where they never had a Shabbat dinner before or never had a bar mitzvah. It forges a really strong connection."


COMMUNITY

Sunrise Masada hikes are a staple of many Birthright Israel trips.

Cecelia Borgman, former Federation Birthright Israel Fellow, has staffed three trips in two years and said she enjoys seeing community created, “both on and off the bus.” “Through Birthright Israel, I have grown closer to my heritage, Judaism and our Atlanta Community,” she said. “From

speaking with my participants, I know that they have been deeply moved by the experience as well.” While the Atlanta community trips are currently only open to 22- to 26-yearolds, Doug Ross explained that the 18 to 26 age range for Birthright is an area of experimentation.

Ross, front right, and participants enjoy a water hike in Ein Bokek.

"This last year, we’ve launched a pilot program, which was supposed to be modest at first; we budgeted for 400 places for the 27 to 32 age range," he said. "Within 48 hours of opening registration we had 5,000 applicants from around the United States. … We didn’t want young people to age out of the program and some of them

were." The future of that program is still up in the air and largely dependent on funding, he said. ■ To learn more about the Atlanta Community Birthright Israel Trips, contact Harper Landau, hlandau@jewishatlanta.org.

Atlanta community trip goers enjoy riding camels in the Negev Desert.

Participants on Ross' trip float in the Dead Sea. ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES AUGUST 9, 2019 | 27


COMMUNITY Meet the Press

From the Basketball Court to College Coach By Roni Robbins Growing up in New Haven, Conn., all Mark Fisher ever wanted to do was play competitive basketball. Living across the street from a basketball court, he came home from school for lunch and gulped down his food quickly so he could play before heading back to class. In high school, he was a star rebounder on his junior varsity team. He didn’t know if he’d make the varsity team, so plan B was joining the Jewish Community Center team. His shining moment was winning the team’s Joseph Weiner Sportsmanship trophy in his senior year. It’s a two-foot-tall bronze prize with a player on top, now with a broken hand, which he proudly sported during an interview with the AJT about his life leading up to his college-themed columns. “I went up for a rebound and was hit from behind.” The injury cut his basketball career short, but propelled him into his current field: college counseling. “It had a big effect,” he said. “I didn’t like to see people waste their talents.” When he couldn’t play anymore, he became a reporter and later sports editor for his high school newspaper. This led to the same role at the all-male Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster, Pa., where he majored in sociology. (He became co-editor of the college newspaper by his senior year.) Fisher traces his interest in career counseling to his own college counselor and when he was an orientation leader his sophomore year of college. He advised students and helped them find their path. “One student, years later, became president of the college.” In New Haven, to be a guidance counselor three years of teaching was

28 | AUGUST 9, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Mark Fisher wears a kippah and has put on tefillin every day since his bar mitzvah in New Haven, Conn.

When he was young, Fisher won this trophy showing his skills and sportsmanship as a basketball player.

required. So he taught social studies to inner-city children in junior high. With a grant from the state, the students learned math at one point by seeing how a hospital was built and estimating how many rooms, doctors and nurses were needed. To learn about transportation, they’d go in an airplane. “Some of them had never gone in an airplane in their life.” For communications, they’d visit television stations in New York, Fisher said with an excitement that reveals his pride. In 1975, as a result of connections between the directors of the New Haven and Atlanta Jewish federations, he was asked if he’d come to Atlanta to lead a new vocational services program. His initial concerns were: “Where is Georgia and where is Atlanta, and most importantly, are there Jews there?” recalled Fisher, who wears a kippah, wraps tefillin daily and regularly attends services at Congregation Beth Jacob near his home. The Atlanta Jewish Federation’s Employment Services became the Gate City B’nai B’rith Lodge Career and Counseling

Services. The program mostly catered to immigrants. In 1986 it became an independent agency, Jewish Vocational Service and eventually a part of Jewish Family & Career Services. Senior services were also offered. But Fisher longed to work again with children. So he started his own college and career counseling service in 1994, Fisher Educational Consultants. He showed me an example of one of four, 4-inch loose-leaf binders he keeps with detailed information and statistics on prospective colleges his clients can consider. The students take inventory tests to determine the best colleges, majors and career, and complete a higher education preference guide, which is 13 pages for most clients, with two extra pages for Jewish students to indicate their specific religious and social interests on campus. As a contributor to “The College Finder: Choosing the School that’s Right for You” by Steven Antonoff, he lists schools with Jewish populations and kosher food.

“The editor calls me when the next edition comes out” for an update, Fisher said. Towards the end of a list of about 10 steps for students working with him, Fisher indicates he helps with resumes. For instance, he offers students 143 “power” words to choose from for their resume, such as performed, organized and participated. “When I do college research, I have to be them. I have to look at the world as they look at it, not as I look at it. I have to know everything.” Among his college success stories, “There were students who nobody thought would go to college. It wasn’t easy. They found the right college and they became successful.” He also tells the story of his son-inlaw who got a doctorate from Stanford University in physics and initially worked for a company that invented a machine to analyze DNA quickly. But then he went to work for the Boston Consulting Group, and Fisher wondered why. The response: “Because he knew how to solve problems.” Fisher leaves college searchers with one last piece of advice: “Attend a school that’s a good-fit school, a school you can be successful at and enjoy.” He, himself, may not have fulfilled his childhood dream of playing college basketball, but he still plays an occasional game of hoops with his family. He has five married children and as of recently, 19 grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Two of his sons and a few of his grandsons seem to have inherited the basketball gene. When they get together for Passover, they are known to play two-on-two or three-on-three. But he has a few rules: “They don’t block my shots. They don’t steal the ball away and I don’t have to rebound.” ■


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Jake Isenberg and Jared Isenberg, sons of Leslie and Doug Isenberg of Atlanta, were called to the Torah as b’nai mitzvah in Israel June 15, 2019. Rabbi Brad Levenberg of Temple Sinai officiated. Jake and Jared are seventh graders at The Galloway School in Atlanta. Among their many activities, Jake is a member of the school’s debate team and Jared plays soccer with the Brookhaven Football Club. Following their b’nai mitzvah in Jerusalem, Jake and Jared attended Union for Reform Judaism URJ 6 Points camps: Jake was at Creative Arts Academy near Philadelphia and Jared was at 6 Points SciTech Academy near Boston. For their mitzvah project, Jake and Jared donated to and served dinner at the Jake Isenberg and Jared Isenberg. Ronald McDonald House, and collected and donated arts and crafts supplies to Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta. Jake and Jared are the grandsons of Lois Blonder and Betty and Dick Isenberg, all of Atlanta.

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B’nai Mitzvah Notices: June / July 2019 Sarah Behrman, daughter of Sheri and Alan Behrman. Jacob Jones, son of Emily and William Jones. Sam Rosenthal, son of Robin and Bert Rosenthal. Brian Silverboard, son of Hilary and Howard Silverboard. Josh Young and Anna Young, children of Terri and Bradley Young.

August 2019 Lilah Alexander Mott, daughter of Kelly and Joshua Mott, on Aug. 3.

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COMMUNITY OY VEY! HAVE I GOT A PROBLEM... g home anticipate comin Dear Rachel, office and would ’s or ct t seem do n’ a es in do y ar husband I work as a secret ren. However, my ild ch d an d an sb my hu . to spend time with ed my enthusiasm e ts, which has sour en but he seems mor im e, nt bl se e da es en th to share ich is comm wh , t, nt gh ta ni un at co ck ac lo an ter 7 or 8 o’c He works hard as n comes home af te By of . m He hi e. m ith w to e tim b than spend any quality wedded to his jo ildren don’t get to ch mplain that dine th co at to e th rv ns ne ea e which m us, but has th no ve ra ly n and I eat ab nd ta ders pect? The childre that time, he is un , what does he ex ell W . ed ’s coming ok he co en er d ov e know wh ner is dried out an courtesy to let m e th ve e refrigha t th n’ in es it he do should keep at 5:30! And since hours! Perhaps I r fo – lly he na rm sio wa ca od his fo However, oc home late, I keep rough the door. th s lk wa he en it wh time. erator and warm be ready by that t have his dinner has to so 0, 5:3 sy that he doesn’ at bu ar so pe does ap ertime, he is ov s rk s in a sit wo od he fo en en re is that wh tu He claims that wh na of law e th t, to let me know. Bu the time or focus t! ou y dr ill w it that we wind , o long en he gets home wh d warm oven for to oo m rk da the children n is in such a reling in front of ar Unfortunately, Be qu at th es tim s le to control ld him numerou n’t seem to be ab es do he up arguing. I’ve to t Bu . em ussions for frightening for th have severe reperc n ca it is unhealthy and at th e m ve s he doesn’t belie tive dynamic? himself, or perhap change this nega to do n ca I ng hi yt an e er th Is them. Signed, Unhappy Wife

Yiddish Word of the Week Kóyekh un Móyekh ‫ כוח און מוח‬Might and Mind Diaspora Jews have generally been powerless in the face of adversaries. Without physical, political or military force, their survival depended on mental abilities. Hence the high value placed on education, honed through religious learning. Yiddish folk culture expresses the might/mind equation in sayings like:

Dear Unhappy Wife, It sounds like you have your hands full! You have Ben’s dinner ready for his possible 5:30 homecoming, and then either keep it warm or rewarm it when he actually shows up. Instead of greeting you cheerfully, he growls, which probably makes you wish he would do an about-face and rush back to the office! What happens after his initial negativity? Do you respond in kind, igniting the embers into a full-blown conflagration? As unpleasant as it is to hear complaints, especially the moment he walks through the door, one-sided criticism can’t become an argument unless there is a response, which then triggers a snowball effect. I can only imagine how hard it would be for you to suffer through these confrontations in silence! And yet, that is what I would advise, due to your understanding that parents shouldn’t argue in front of their children. Children need to see peaceful interactions to feel secure. It rocks their foundation when they see the people who they love most at odds with each other. And when their safe haven becomes ugly, how do they feel? In addition, how do impressionable children learn? Of course, the answer is by example. Do you want to teach them that when someone says something negative, the correct response is to retort in kind? Or would you rather model restraint and self-control? And even empathy, such as, “Wow, Ben. Sounds like you had a really long, hard day. You must be exhausted and hungry. What can I do for you?” My other suggestion regarding the overall problem is to speak to Ben in private and share your feelings. Tell him that you feel hurt when he explodes the moment he comes home. Explain your concern about exposing the children to unpleasant interactions and gauge his response. If, after repeated efforts on your part, things don’t improve, I would advocate therapy. Even if Ben refuses to go – and if it comes to that, I hope he doesn’t – it might help you to get some new tools in your arsenal and have a listening ear. But let’s think positively. Maybe Ben will react well to your new attempts when he comes home, and perhaps he’ll treat your transparency with love and empathy – and your marriage will blossom! Wishing you a better journey as you navigate these hills and valleys, Rachel Atlanta Jewish Times Advice Column Got a problem? Email Rachel Stein at oyvey@atljewishtimes. com, describing your problem in 250 words or less. We want to hear from you and get helpful suggestions for your situation at the same time!

Jewish Joke of the Week

Vu men dárf hóben móyekh, hélft nit keyn kóyekh - ‫האבן מוח העלֿפט‬ ָ ‫דארף‬ ַ ‫ווּו מען‬ ‫ניט קיין ּכוח‬- “When you need to be bright, no use having might.” In the pre-modern era, extreme erudition among Talmudic scholars triggered more critical views of learning, as reflected in this saying: Biz zíbetsik lérnt men un men shtárbt a nár - ‫שטארבט‬ ַ ‫ביז זיבעציק לערנט מען און מען‬ ‫נאר‬ ַ ‫“ – ַא‬Until seventy learning acquire, and still as a fool you expire.” As Yeshiva scholars competed on skills like pilpul – ‫ – פלפול‬literally “peppering,” code for hair-splitting debates on theoretical issues - Hassidism emerged, at least initially putting people at the center. Such ivory-tower scholars were the object of sayings like: Er kléert tsi a flíyen hot a púpik - ‫האט ַא ּפוּפיק‬ ָ ‫“ – ער קלערט צי ַא פליען‬He deliberates whether a flea has a belly-button.” Yet, both intellectual and street wisdom remained in high regard, expressed in the saying that a smart person knows how to get out of a situation that a wise person knows how to avoid. Both require séykhel ‫ שכל‬brains, the lack of which might be the object of the following description: Er hot séykhel vi in a klóyster mezúzes. - ‫האט ׂשכל ווי אין קלויסטער מזּוזות‬ ָ ‫“ – ער‬He has brains / makes sense just as a church has mezuzahs.” Rabbi Joab Eichenberg-Eilon, PhD, teaches Biblical Hebrew and Aramaic at the Israel Institute of Biblical Studies, eTeacher Group Ltd. 30 | AUGUST 9, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

The Value of Children Rachel and Esther meet for the first time in 50 years since high school. Rachel begins to tell Esther about her children. “My son is a doctor and he’s got four kids. My daughter is married to a lawyer and they have three great kids. So, tell me Esther, how about your kids?” Esther replies, “Unfortunately, Morty and I don’t have any children and so we have no grandchildren either.” Rachel says, “No children? ... and no grandkids? So, tell me, Esther, what do you do for aggravation?” Joke provided by David Minkoff www.awordinyoureye.com


BRAIN FOOD

Doing Tricks

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1. Taking things the wrong way? 6. Start of an upcoming fast day 11. Diminutive, in Glasgow 14. French for 'book' 15. Notable garbage can resident 16. ___ Eisley, "Star Wars" cantina town 17. Make like one abusing hachnasas orchim? 19. New England state sch. 20. "Jeopardy!" creator Griffin 21. Long long time 22. Thus 23. "Sweetums" 25. What we should do for the elderly, as a per a mitzvah? 27. One surrounded by hair, usually 28. HS elders 30. Window alternative 31. Rite that involves crying 33. It goes with a bag of chips? 37. Talk trash, perhaps? 42. The cinema 43. Thailand's old name 44. Something of value 47. A Reiner 49. Long-gone VCR maker 50. What most Jewish adults over 70 have done

54. Hit on the mark 56. Something taken that remains stationary 57. Word output, briefly 58. Jewish hero who died in Africa, familiarly 59. "Ledodi" preceder 60. What the starts of 17, 25,37, and 50 are 64. Holiday, e.g. 65. Be unmannerly with soup 66. January, to Juan 67. Vegas opening? 68. "___ directed" 69. Adjust, as a hem

13. Washed up, in a way 18. As a whole 22. Bunker and Wharton 23. Lipstadt and Reynolds, familiarly 24. Wyatt of note 26. Palindromic flatbread 29. Throw down 32. Least dangerous 34. Dropping it can be very dangerous, for short 35. He let himself go in "Avengers: Endgame" 36. Soundalike word 38. Partner of kin 39. El Al and United 40. Many an Olympics event 41. Made ___ dash for 44. Assault 45. Toyota minivan 46. Sloppy eater's leftovers? 48. Lag ___ 51. Big no-nos in Judaism 52. "In" things are in it 53. Capital and largest city of Ghana 55. Not very sensible 60. School in Dover, for short 61. "Black" CIA doings 62. "Black-ish" protagonist 63. What to do with wild oats

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30 years in the rabbinate. The Sandy Springs Traditional synagogue hosted the reception Aug. 13. ■ Caroline Aronovitz and David Adelman announced their marriage May 29 at Ahavath Achim Synagogue in a ceremony officiated by Rabbi Arnold Goodman.

15 Years Ago// August 6, 2004 ■ Attendance for the Anne Frank in the World exhibit at Kennesaw State University exceeded 40,000 visitors after its first seven months. The exhibit featured 600 photographs, a video and interactive components. ■ Sidney Kirschner, one of Atlanta’s top executives, resigned as chief executive officer of Northside Hospital. He was succeeded by Bob Quattrocchi, the president and chief operating officer of Northside at the time.

50 Years Ago// August 8, 1969

25 Years Ago// August 5, 1994 ■ Congregation B’nai Torah celebrated Rabbi Judah Mintz’s

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■ On behalf of Russian Jews, several Jewish groups approached a Soviet track team competing with American and British athletes, seeking religious and cultural freedom for Russian Jews and the right for them to emigrate to Israel. ■ As universities’ fall semester approached, B’nai B’rith Hillel Foundation announced new staff assignments at eight schools, including six new Hillel directors and a new associate Hillel director.

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES AUGUST 9, 2019 | 31


32 | AUGUST 9, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES


CLOSING THOUGHTS

My Horoscope

Anecdote for Beginning the School Year Faculty bonding at Eleanor Roosevelt Junior High School in New York occurred in the teachers’ break room, where we liked to share useful information. That was where I learned how to choose a sofa and what books to read. We obsessively bemoaned our inability to afford better apartments, Chana and it was morbidly enter- Shapiro taining to hear each other’s horror roach and evil-landlord stories. Mel, Stepha and Claudia brought different daily newspapers to the room, and Claudia took it upon herself to read and report everyone’s horoscope. “Chana! This is your day!” she exclaimed one morning. “You’re going to get something valuable. You’re gonna be rich!” “I don’t believe in horoscopes,” I announced. Mel looked for my horoscope in his paper. “Claudia’s right.” He affirmed. “Here it is in black and white. Today’s your day of prosperity. Keep your eyes open.” Not to be outdone, Stepha turned to

the horoscope in her paper. “Good grief, Chana! It’s in your stars! It’s the same in my paper!” “You’re all nuts,” I said. “I only wish it were true.” Naturally, I immediately started to consider various scenarios in which I would come into unexpected wealth. On the bus home, I smiled meaningfully at each and every passenger. Perhaps one of them was a benevolent zillionaire, who had watched me help people onto the bus each morning. In the elevator up to our apartment, I attempted a meaningful conversation with Mrs. Scafati, who was rumored to have, that very week, inherited a cache of priceless jewelry from her mother in Italy. Maybe the three horoscopes didn’t mean actual cash; it could also be jewels or gold. Early that evening, I met my friends, Hope and Claudia, for dinner at a kosher deli. Claudia remembered that this was my day to get rich, and when I reported that I was still living on a teacher’s salary (after taxes), she told me not to worry.

She explained to Hope that not one, not two, but three separate horoscopes had predicted my forthcoming affluence. I reiterated my dissenting view, surreptitiously scanning the floor under my chair, just in case a couple of 20s were lying there. Claudia caught me and smiled smugly, but she was smart enough not to say anything else. A true believer must be patient; she was a true believer, and it was only 6 p.m. Hope, always the sensible one, suggested that, in case I came upon a windfall during our meal, I should treat everyone. Claudia seconded her idea, and I laughed and agreed. It was after 8 p.m. when we left the deli. We split the check. At 8:30, I was nearing the subway to go home and was surprised when a former favorite student ran up to me. I hardly recognized him, even after he asked, “Remember me? I’m Jacob! I won the city poetry competition in ninth grade!” He looked much more handsome than when he was a young teen. He now had a beard, horn-rimmed glasses, a crisp lavender shirt and bow tie, and was carrying a gorgeous leather briefcase.

It’s true that Jacob was one of my favorites in ninth grade English. He wasn’t the best at the subjects his parents preferred, but his poetry was mature and clever, and he liked to include beautiful watercolor illustrations with his work. I had many conversations with him and his mother about Jacob’s talents, interests and opportunities. He was admitted to the High School of Music & Art, and eventually we lost touch. “It’s amazing to bump into you,” Jacob exclaimed. “A big gallery is showing my work. On Monday night, I’m going to read my poetry there, too. The press is coming to take pictures. You’re the one who convinced my parents about the best high school for me.” “I’ll be there!” I promised. “I’m so happy for you!” “It’s by invitation only,” Jacob explained, reaching into his briefcase. “Here’s a pass! Imagine seeing you again after so many years!” We talked for two hours. Our trains came, and we parted. Jacob was now a working artist and poet. That pass and our connection were worth much more than a million dollars or a diamond bracelet. ■

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As Seen On

• Business & Personal Contract Attorney & Litigator • Small Business Legal Work - Entity Creation, Deal Formation, and Contract Drafting & Review • Personal Attorney for breach of contract including recovery of wages, loans or services • Speaks Spanish

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It’s Time to Call for Help! FOLLOW

: PHOTOGRAPHER

The Wedding Napkin A beautiful keepsake for the Bride and Groom

Janet Galanti Designer

Dani Weiss Photography Fun and playful photographer specializing in People and events! New to Atlanta with 30 years as a photographer in Seattle. Bar/Bat Mitzvahs, Family Portraits, Corporate events, Parties and Weddings.

Partying is our Business. Peachtree Tents & Events will make your special event the talk of the town. We are experienced event professionals who work with event planners, corporate and social. We offer only the best, unique party rental equipment in the marketplace. And with locations in Atlanta, Nashville, Birmingham, Charleston, Savannah, Myrtle Beach & now Jacksonville... we’ve got the Southeast covered! Call Debbie Kilgore to receive your Jewish Times 10% Discount www.PeachtreeTents.com | 615-920-0345

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404-580-9276 • 770-396-5252 janetgalanti27@gmail.com

206.409.9982 | www.daniweissphotography.com


MARKETPLACE HOME

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as well as many other issues...

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Our other trades are garage doors, gutters, mantels and fireplaces

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Restrictions apply. Discounts may vary. Not available in all states. See your agent for details. Insurance is underwritten by Farmers Insurance Exchange and other affiliated insurance companies. Visit farmers.com for a complete listing of companies. Not all insurers are authorized to provide insurance in all states. Coverage is not available in all states. Life Insurance by Farmers New World Life Insurance Company, 3120 139th ave. SE, Ste. 300, Bellevue, WA 98005

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You Are Great. Together, let’s make sure your dream college knows it!

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Owners Mark and Joanne Bradley

470-808-9411 • 404-617-6483 www.amramp.com ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES AUGUST 9, 2019 | 35

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Profile for Atlanta Jewish Times

Atlanta Jewish Times, VOL. XCIV NO. 31, August 9, 2019  

Back to College: Coping as an Empty Nester

Atlanta Jewish Times, VOL. XCIV NO. 31, August 9, 2019  

Back to College: Coping as an Empty Nester