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Sale News Winter 2013 - Spring 2014


Auction Calendar january 7TH 21 & 22 ST

ND

23RD

Woolley & Wallis

Salisbury Salerooms Ltd. 51-61 Castle Street, Salisbury Wiltshire, SP1 3SU T: +44 (0) 1722 424 500 enquiries@woolleyandwallis.co.uk www.woolleyandwallis.co.uk

Furniture & Works of Art Silver Jewellery

february

1

Tribal Art Clocks, Watches & Scientific Instruments Fine Porcelain & Pottery The Raymond Dennis Collection of Porcelain

11TH 19

th

25TH 25TH

MARCH Clarice Cliff & Art Deco Paintings

5TH 19

TH

april 1ST 29

TH

& 30

TH

Furniture & Works of Art Silver

may 1ST 7TH 21ST & 22ND

Jewellery English & European Ceramics & Glass Asian Art

june Paintings – Modern & Contemporary Arts & Crafts Tribal Art

4TH 18TH 19TH

juLY 8TH 22 & 23 ND

24TH 30TH

RD

Furniture & Works of Art Silver Jewellery Clocks, Watches & Scientific Instruments

FREE AUCTION VALUATIONS Every first Friday in the month the specialists will be providing free auction valuations at our Castle Street salerooms, with the exception of January which will be on the 10th. 10am - 1pm. No appointment necessary. Please call 01722 424 509 for information.


Front cover. A rare Chinese jun yao purple-splashed bowl, Song dynasty 960-1279 AD, 11.3cm dia.

Provenance: an English private collection, purchased from John Sparks Ltd. on the 1st January 1946 for £275, and is to be sold with its original receipt. Previously it had been in the collection of the late Dowager Viscountess Harcourt. Estimate: £15,000 - 25,000

Back cover. A carved

1. A collection of European

2. An exceptionally

bone ‘tiki’, attributed to J. F. Robieson. Estimate: £400 - 600

artists’ lay figures. Varying estimates. To be sold 7th January Furniture sale.

fine Chinese white jade incense burner and cover Qianlong/Jianqing. Sold for £230,000 in the May Asian Art sale.

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Issue 111

contents 4

Furniture & Works of Art

6

Silver

8

Jewellery

10 Tribal Art 12 Clocks, Watches &

Scientific Instruments 14 Fine Porcelain & Pottery 16 The Raymond Dennis

Collection 18 Clarice Cliff & Art Deco 20 Paintings 22 Asian Art 24 Sale Review

chairman’s introduction

As I write this in mid December it looks like our turnover for 2013 will be in the region of £17 million which represents a healthy 15% increase on 2012. I have been doing some statistical analysis of our sales and of the 72 lots we have sold this year in excess of £25,000 no less than 52 (72%) were in the Asian Art sales, accurately reflecting the current buoyancy of the Chinese market. Of the remainder, 15 lots (20%) were in jewellery which is a terrific achievement and a credit to Jonathan Edwards and Marielle Whiting who in the past few years have built a highly successful department quite capable of competing for goods with the London auction rooms as well as our regional competitors.

Not surprisingly this pattern is repeated at the top end of the market and of the 14 lots we sold in excess of £100,000, nine were Chinese works of art and three were jewellery. The other two comprised the wonderful 1796 American half-cent coin which realised £185,000 and a picture that we sold by private treaty. In the past eight years we have been privileged to sell 9 lots in excess of £1 million headed by the magnificent Qianlong jade buffalo that we sold for £3.6 million in 2009. This year our top lot was a much more modest £230,000 for a jade incense burner and cover sold in May; and while it is always great fun to sell the headline-grabbing £1m+ lots, I find it encouraging that this year our

growth has been more organic and across the departments, rather than being based on one or two mega-lots. As ever we remain enormously grateful to all our vendors for entrusting us with their chattels and we will do our very best to ensure that we continue to offer a professional, courteous and friendly service in the coming year. Paul Viney Chairman

*Please note all prices quoted in this article are hammer prices only.

Contents | 3


Furniture 7th January 2014

“These drawers are given to Dorothy Emily Briggs on her second birthday, September the 19th 1894 by her Grandma Emily Briggs�

4 | Woolley & Wallis


Specialists: Will Hobbs +44 (0) 1722 339 752 willhobbs@woolleyandwallis.co.uk

Mark Richards +44 (0) 1722 411 854 markrichards@woolleyandwallis.co.uk

1. A private collection

2. A large Victorian black

3. A George I walnut

4. A marble bust. Thomas

of assorted firearms. Varying estimates.

japanned chinoiserie breakfront wardrobe. Estimate: £800 - 1,200 Provenance: Aubrey House, Holland Park, London.

bachelor’s chest. Estimate: £10,000 - 15,000 Provenance: Attingham Park, Shropshire.

Sharp (1805-1882). Bust of Augustus FitzClarence. Estimate: £2,000 - 3,000

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1

3

4

The historical marble bust of Augustus FitzClarence by Thomas Sharp, was sculpted in 1831 (fig.4). The sitter was the illegitimate son of Prince William, later King William IV and his mistress, Dorothea Jordon, an Irish actress. He was vicar of Mapledurham, Oxfordshire from 1829 until his death in 1854 and when Queen Victoria discovered she had a natural cousin who was a vicar in a small Oxfordshire parish, she was genuinely amused. The bust has remained in the Old Rectory up until now. A collection of firearms, dating mainly from the end of the 18th century to the mid 19th century, give a fascinating insight to a lost craft (fig.1). The majority being pistols by well known makers of their time, from the simple pocket percussion pistol by Fenton to a pair of cannon barrel holster pistols by Robert Wilson and a rare four barrelled tap action flintlock pistol by

Wheeler, the variety will suit all collectors. The diminutive George I walnut bachelor’s chest has the characteristic fold-over top above four long drawers, measuring 30in (76cm) wide, and has been residing in the wonderful setting of Attingham Park, Shropshire (fig.3). A little note in one of the drawers states that ‘These drawers are given to Dorothy Emily Briggs on her second birthday, September the 19th 1894 by her Grandma Emily Briggs,’ obviously given with good intentions and would have a been a great addition to any infants’ nursery. Today we fill them with bright colours and squishy toys, but starting them young can only be a good thing! Also in the sale is furniture removed from Aubrey House, Holland Park, London, which when it was sold in 1997 was the city’s most expensive house. Included is this Victorian four door chinoserie decorated breakfront wardrobe (fig.2).

Furniture | 5


silver 21st & 22nd January 2014

6 | Woolley & Wallis


Specialists: rupert slingsby +44 (0) 1722 424 501 rupertslingsby@woolleyandwallis.co.uk

lucy chalmers +44 (0) 1722 424 594

Opposite. A set of four Victorian silver candlesticks, by Charles Stuart Harris, London 1876. Estimate: £3,500 - 4,500

2. Designed and made

4. A rare novelty Victorian

6. A selection of silver

by Andrew Bray, R.C.A, a modern silver dish, London 1965. Estimate: £800 - 1,200

silver sewing case and hand mirror, modelled as a dab flat fish. Estimate: £2,000 - 3,000

reference books (detail).

1. A late 18th century

3. A pair of Edwardian

5. A silver-mounted novelty

French two-coloured gold mounted blonde tortoiseshell snuff box. Estimate: £700 - 900

silver and enamel novelty silver pepper pots, by Louis Willmott, London 1907. Estimate: £600 - 800

tortoise table bell, by Grey and Co, Chester 1910. Estimate: £1,000 - 1,500

lucychalmers@woolleyandwallis.co.uk

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1

2

5

4 6

The January silver sale includes a 110 lot silver reference library (fig.6), which was built up over a number of years. The library consists of a good selection of books on Scottish silver and silver of British churches and Livery Companies. Titles include a complete edition of Nocq, Chinese Export Silver and the Gold and Silver of Windsor Castle and estimates range from £30 to £300. The collection also includes some good mixed quantity lots of silver reference books, which would be ideal for someone with a budding interest in silver.

Typifying the Victorian’s interest in naturalistic subjects; the novelty section is headed by a rare Victorian silver sewing case and hand mirror, by Louis Dee, London 1884, retailed by Clark, 33 New Bond Street, modelled as a dab flat fish, the underside with a lozenge shaped hinged cover set with a mirror, the cover opens to reveal a velvet lined interior holding an unmarked pair of scissors, a needle case, a thimble, a bodkin, a crochet hook and a spike (fig.4). Other novelty items included are tortoise table bell (fig.5) and a pair of Edwardian mannequin pepper pots (fig.3).

The Post War section has a dish designed and made for the Coal Factors Society, by Andrew Bray, London 1965 (fig.2). A rare and interesting item in the Antiques section is a George II provincial silver salver by William Partis, Newcastle 1739. Other items of interest are a set of four candlesticks in the late 17th century manner, engraved with the badge of The Rifle Brigade (illustrated opposite).

Silver | 7


je wellery 23rd January 2014

Like many Huguenots the Fabergé family left France in the 18th century and in due course set up workshops in Russia. Karl Fabergé was not himself an active goldsmith but immortalised his name through his ability to attract the finest workmasters in Russia and Scandinavia. Karl was personally involved with the artistic and technical supervision. It was not only the innovative designs that caught the eye of European Royal and

8 | Woolley & Wallis

aristocratic families, it was also the strict quality control demanded by Fabergé. Of the twenty or so principal workmasters, the Finn Viktor Aarne was particularly known for his expertise in enamel frames. In addition to his Cyrillic initials BA, he could be identified by the mother of pearl backs to the frames.

This Fabergé enamel and gold frame by Viktor Aarne was presented by Queen Alexandra to her maid of honour The Hon Violet Vivian and has passed through the family to the current owner.


Specialists: jonathan edwards fgaa +44 (0) 1722 424 504 jonathanedwards@woolleyandwallis.co.uk

marielle whiting fga +44 (0) 1722 424 595 mariellewhiting@woolleyandwallis.co.uk

Opposite. A Fabergé enamel and gold frame by Viktor Aarne, set with seed pearls and rubies, 4.9cm high. Estimate: £10,000 – 15,000

1. (a) A gold cat vesta case

3. A Victorian cabochon

5. A pair of diamond scroll

set with gem stones Estimate: £4,000 – 6,000

turquoise and diamond bracelet. Estimate: £4,000 – 5,000

earrings by Van Cleef and Arpels, c. 1939. Estimate: £5,000 – 7,000

4. A ruby and diamond

6. A diamond set bi-plane

scroll brooch. 1930s. Estimate: £5,000 – 7,000

brooch, c. 1930. Estimate: £2,000 – 2,500

(b) A Castellani gold and micro mosaic pendant. Estimate: £1,000 – 1,500 2. Four items of gem-set shaped jewellery. Varying estimates.

1a

2

1b

The reverse side of a piece of jewellery or precious object can often be revealing. If not only a reflection of its quality. The back of the cat vesta repeats the realistic fur decoration and is even set with two small emeralds, part of the collar.

The small circular pendant is mounted with a micro mosaic EY, ancient Greek for good health. The fine quality is immediately evident but the reverse explains all, showing the applied mark of Castellani.

How appropriate for the fast approaching Valentine’s Day. The cased aquamarine heart pendant is estimated to sell for £200 - 300, the diamond heart brooch for £1,000 - 1,500. The two seed pearl hearts for £300 - 400 (with key hole) and £100 - 150 for the locket with diamond centre.

3

This very smart Victorian bracelet is remarkably well preserved. Despite being made around one hundred and fifty years ago, the turquoise cabochons do not appear to have dis-coloured at all and the bloom gilding is close to the original condition. The lining in the fitted box tells us that it was manufactured when Garrard were in the Haymarket, from 1843 to 1909.

4

5

Two fine examples of post Art Deco 1930s jewellery.

6

The current owner’s grandmother received the brooch in 1930 from her husband to celebrate Amy Johnsons 11,000 mile flight from London to Australia in the same year. The brooch is said to have been modelled on Amy’s plane, a de Haviland Gypsy Moth.

Jewellery | 9


tribal art 11th February 2014

An Australian Aboriginal parrying shield, used to deflect spears and clubs in close combat, of a subtle curved form with incised horizontal lines

10 | Woolley & Wallis


Specialist: Will Hobbs +44 (0) 1722 339 752 willhobbs@woolleyandwallis.co.uk

1

Opposite & 1. An

2. Various African figures

3. Two Asmat shell

4. Isle of Pines; a bag,

aboriginal parrying shield, 75cm high. Estimate: £3,000 - 5,000

and a head rest included in the sale.

necklaces from Indonesia. Estimate: £300 - 500

comb, basket and arm ornament. Collected in October 1858. Varying estimates.

2

3

4

We are delighted to announce dedicated sales for Tribal Art, with our first to take place on 11th February. After a successful advertising campaign, we have single items and collections from across the UK and Europe. A small collection of labelled items from the South Seas include a shell bag, comb and an arm ornament, made from grass, bamboo and flying fox hair and shells respectively, all having hand written records on them dated October 1858 from the Isle of Pines (fig.4). This tiny island is part the archipelago of New Caledonia, in the Pacific Ocean, discovered by Captain Cook in 1774 on his second voyage to New Zealand, and given its name because of the tall native pines.

A carved bone tiki with abalone inset eyes has all the characteristics of a Maori carver, but is likely to be the work of James Frank Robieson, who was born in New Zealand in 1880 and spent his childhood among Maori playmates (back cover illustration). His closeness to their culture drew him to learning carving techniques and collecting Maori artefacts. His work is in various museums and collections.

red pigment, 29½in (75cm) high. A number of African masks, figures and clubs will add variety to the sale (fig.2). The sale also includes a collection of Aboriginal implements collected by H R Balfour, a missionary whose photography and films recorded the Worora people of northwest Australia, and a collection of North American Inuit pieces include whalebone masks, tools and soapstone sculpture.

The image opposite and figure 1 is an Australian Aboriginal parrying shield, used to deflect spears and clubs in close combat, of a subtle curved form with incised horizontal lines filled with white clay and with faded Tribal Art | 11


This clock is of small size and it will fit very nicely into many houses

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Specialist: richard price +44 (0) 7741 242 421 richardprice@woolleyandwallis.co.uk

1. A black lacquered tavern

2. (a) An early Victorian

timepiece of small size, by Joseph Barber, London. Estimate: £4,000 - 6,000

gothic revival mantel clock. Estimate: £1,500 - 2,000 (b) An impressive calendar carriage clock. Estimate: £1,500 - 2,000

clocks, watches, barometers & scientific instruments

(c) A quarter repeating miniature carriage timepiece by Le Roy, Paris. Estimate: £600 - 900

3. A matched pair of gold and enamel gentleman’s and lady’s watches, cased together, sold separately. Estimate: Gentleman’s £2,000 - 3,000 Lady’s £1,500 - 2,000

2a

19th February 2014

2b

1

2c

3

The £11,000 bid for the red Lacquer tavern clock in the October sale has encouraged other vendors to offer similar clocks for our next sale in February. A good example by Joseph Barber, London (illustrated main page and fig.1) is of small size and will fit very nicely into many houses whereas the red one was very large and rather more difficult to accommodate.

Better quality carriage clocks continue to attract good bidding and we have already received a nice calendar example and also a quarter repeating miniature clock for February (fig.2b & 2c).

Wristwatches also are in great demand particularly for the well-known brand names, the two gold Rolexes offered recently proving the point.

The watch section also remains strong. A fine matched pair of gold and enamel gentlemen’s and lady’s watches, cased together, are a very fine looking lot (fig.3).

Clocks, Watches, Barometers & Scientific Instruments | 13


fine porcel ain & pottery 25th February 2014

19th century examples of these Continent figures are relatively common in Meissen porcelain but tend to be decorated in brighter colours and often with more elaborate bases. These 18th century examples are far less commonly seen

14 | Woolley & Wallis


Specialist: clare durham +44 (0) 1722 424 507 claredurham@woolleyandwallis.co.uk

Opposite. A pair of

1. A fine Coalport dessert

2. A Castel Durante

3. A rare pair of Meissen

Meissen ‘Continent’ figures of Europe and Africa, c.1745. Estimate: £3,000 - 5,000

service, of Union shape, painted with birds and nests within bright floral arrangements, c.1820-30. Estimate: £1,500 - 2,000

maiolica albarello or pharmacy jar, mid 16th century. Estimate: £1,000 - 1,500

plates from the Japanese Hunting Service, c.1733. Estimate: £10,000 - 15,000

4. A good Yorkshire Pratt ware cow group, c.1810. Estimate: £600 - 800

1

Following on from the success of our first Fine Porcelain and Pottery sale last February, we are delighted to be holding another at the same time this year and, indeed, a further offering in September. This brings the number of Ceramics sales back up to four in a year, for the first time in six years. Hopefully this will be the case for some time to come. Included in the February sale are a number of wares from the Meissen factory, ranging 3

from the early years of production in the 18th century, through to the modern day. The pair of plates (fig.3) bear incised Johanneum numbers relating them to the collection of Augustus the Strong, to whom the service was delivered c.1733-34. It is the only Meissen dinner service of the time with a coloured ground, the yellow of which was derived from the livery of the Electoral Huntsmen – hence the service becoming known variously as the Japanese Hunting Service or the Saxon Court Hunting Service.

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Thirty nine plates were listed in the original order, one of which is recorded as having been broken in two in 1777 at a dinner held for the King of Prussia. A number of pieces from this service are included in national collections, including the Royal Collection in Dresden, and do not come onto the market very often. 4

Fine Porcelain & Pottery | 15


the raymond dennis collection 25th February 2014

16 | Woolley & Wallis


Specialist: clare durham +44 (0) 1722 424 507 claredurham@woolleyandwallis.co.uk

1. A fine and very rare

2. A Worcester teapot and

3. A rare Christian’s

4. An early Worcester

early Worcester ‘Scratch Cross’ mug, c.1754-55, painted in blue with the Cormorant pattern. Estimate: £10,000 - 15,000. Purchased from Tilley & Co., London in 1971

cover, c.1755-57, pencilled in black with the Boy on a Buffalo pattern. Estimate: £1,000 - 1,500

Liverpool teacup, c.1770-75, with unusual blue-scale enamelling in the Worcester manner. Estimate: £100 - 200

hexagonal vase, c.1752-54, decorated in the famille vert palette. Estimate: £500 - 800

The Raymond Dennis Collection of English Porcelain We are delighted to be selling the collection of the late Raymond Dennis, whose name may well be familiar to members of the English Ceramic Circle, and to fellow collectors. Mr Dennis began collecting in earnest during the 1950s and many pieces of this attractive and varied collection were purchased several decades ago from dealers whose names have long since been added to the annals of collecting history.

5. A good pair of Chamberlain’s Worcester spill vases, c.1805-10, 8cm high. Estimate: £800 - 1,200

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1 3 The Worcester porcelain factory of the Dr Wall period is particularly well represented with some early blue and white pieces, such as this extremely rare and fine round-bodied mug (fig.1), sitting unusually well with later coloured pieces. Included in the latter selection are good examples of some of the more usual Japan-influenced patterns, e.g. the Kempthorne and Sir Joshua Reynolds patterns, but also some rarer pieces decorated both at the factory and also at the London atelier of James Giles. Mr Dennis took as much of an academic interest in his collection as an aesthetic enjoyment and his records include a number of letters relating to unusual attributes of some of the objects in his collection as well as reference to similar pieces kept in museum collections, such as this Christian’s

Liverpool teacup (fig.3) with unusual bluescale enamelling. When the chance arose Mr Dennis also welcomed the opportunity to acquire items from other well-established collections, including more recent offerings such as the Watney and Zorensky Collections, which many will welcome back on to the market. Other porcelains represented in the collection include Chelsea, Derby, Bristol, Bow and several of the Liverpool factories.

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The Raymond Dennis Collection | 17


cl arice cliff, art deco & 20th century design 5th March 2014

18 | Woolley & Wallis


Specialist: michael jeffery +44 (0) 1722 424 505 michaeljeffery@woolleyandwallis.co.uk

Opposite & 1. A collection of Daum enamelled glass vases, including;

(a) A large enamelled glass winter landscape vase. Estimate: £2,000 - 2,500

(b) An enamelled glass vase decorated with berried foliage. Estimate: £1,600 - 2,000

(c) An enamelled glass vase decorated with silver birch trees. Estimate: £1,000 - 1,500

(d) An enamelled glass vase decorated with a palm tree landscape. Estimate: £700 - 1,000

2. ‘Dahlia’ model no.938,

3. A patinated bronze

a Lalique clear and frosted glass vase designed by Rene Lalique, designed 1923, with black enamel decoration. Estimate: £2,000 - 2,500

model of a Scarf dancer cast from a model by Josef Lorenzl. Estimate: £1,500 - 2,000

4. An original art work by Dodo Burgner. Estimate: £500 - 1,000

(e) A beaker vase enamelled with sweet-pea flowers. Estimate: £2,000 - 2,500

2 All aspects of design from the twenties and thirties are incorporated in the Clarice Cliff & Art Deco March sale.

artwork by Dodo Burgner, ceramics, glass, furniture, metalware and works on paper.

There is a good selection of Lalique, glass, including plates, vases, bowls and mascots, together with original

The 20th Century sale includes a good selection of enamelled glass by Daum.

3

1a

1b 1e

1c 4 1d

FREE AUCTION VALUATIONS Every first Friday in the month the specialist will be providing free auction valuations at our Castle Street salerooms. 10am - 1pm. Please contact Michael Jeffery 01722 424 505 for information.

Clarice Cliff, Art Deco & 20th Century Design | 19


paintings 19th March 2014

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Specialists: victor fauvelle +44 (0) 1722 424 503 victorfauvelle@woolleyandwallis.co.uk

jo butler +44 (0) 1722 424 592 jobutler@woolleyandwallis.co.uk

Opposite. Marcel Dyf (French 1899-1985) (detail). Pecheurs de grande marée Bretagne, signed, oil on canvas, 47 x 56cm. Estimate: £6,000 - 8,000

2. Thomas Francis Dicksee

4. Edward Seago R.W.S.

5. Roger Marcel Limouse

(1819-1895). Self portrait, oil on canvas, 61 x 51cm. Estimate: £600 - 800

(1910-1974). The IJ at Amsterdam, signed, oil on canvas, 40.5 x 61cm. Estimate: £5,000 - 7,000

(French 1894-1990). Still life, signed, also signed and dated 1945 verso, oil on canvas, 85 x 73.5cm. Estimate: £1,500 - 2,000

3. One of a large collection of unframed etchings by Herbert Thomas Dicksee.

Following the success of the Modern British sale and the Old Master sale recently we will be holding several specialised picture sales in 2014. Our 4th June sale will be devoted to Modern and Contemporary Art 2

March Sale

The March sale, which is open for entries until early February, already has some interesting consignments. The Brittany view by Marcel Dyf (detail opposite), is a lovely 4

June Sale

The June Sale is taking shape with this atmospheric oil by Edward Seago of the IJ in Amsterdam (fig.4), an unusual subject for Seago and one that was possibly painted

We will also be repeating our two specialist sales at the end of the year with a Modern British sale in November and Fine Old Masters and 19th Century Pictures in early December.

and Sculpture and will include work by British and European artists. Our sales on the 19th March and in September will be broader based, with a wide variety of pictures. 3

example of his coastal scenes which continue to be popular. We also have a collection of works by several of the Dicksee family of late 19th century artists, including this wonderfully observed self portrait (fig.2) by

Thomas Francis Dicksee. In addition there are three works by Sir Frank Dicksee and a large collection of delightful etchings by Herbert Thomas Dicksee (fig.3).

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on one of his trips across the channel on his yacht Capricorn. His fluid brushwork which lent itself especially to depicting water continues to captivate collectors.

Paintings | 21


asian art 21st & 22nd May 2014

http://weibo.com/johnaxford

22 | Woolley & Wallis


Specialist: john axford +44 (0) 1722 424 506 johnaxford@woolleyandwallis.co.uk

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Opposite. A rare Chinese Imperial jadeite hat stand, mounted with zitan, 19th century with a fitted zitan box, 28.5cm. Provenance: formerly the property of Dr Little, surgeon and physician in Shanghai from 1869-1901. Admiral Sir Charles Little and thence by descent. Estimate: £10,000 - 20,000

2. A Chinese russet jade

4. A small rare Chinese

5. A fine Chinese

cong, the stone with cream striations, Shang dynasty, 14.2cm. Estimate: £2,000 - 3,000

Longquan celadon wine ewer, 15th century, 17cm. Provenance: an English private collection. Purchased from Cyril Andrade, 5th May 1945, for £65. Estimate: £1,500 - 2,500

white jade carving of a parakeet, Qianlong period or earlier, 6cm. Provenance: formerly in the collection of Dr Isaac Newton; published by Bluett & Sons Ltd in 1981. Estimate: £8,000 - 12,000

3. A rare photographic portrait of the 19th Bakula Rinpoche in Ladakh (India), taken c.1940-50, 36.6cm x 28.5cm.

3

4

Dr Isaac Newton first began collecting in 1947. In his introduction to the Bluett’s 1981 catalogue ‘Dr Newton’s Zoo’, Brian Morgan notes that Newton was the fifth of that name in direct descent of an ancestor who was a near-contemporary of his namesake, Sir Isaac. ‘Our’ Dr Newton however, was said to have a ‘healthy disbelief’ in this story. This charmingly conceived bird (fig.5) was illustrated as part of the catalogue (p.19, no.21), where it is dated to the Tang Dynasty. The Chinese jun yao U-shaped bowl (illustrated on the front cover) was purchased from John Sparks Ltd. on the 1st January 1946 for £275, and is to be sold with its original receipt. Previously it had been in the collection of the late Dowager Viscountess Harcourt. Lady Harcourt, Viscountess Harcourt, heiress to the famous ‘Harcourt Emeralds’, was wife to Lewis

Vernon Harcourt, 1st Viscount Harcourt PC (1863-1922). Harcourt was Secretary of State for the Colonies between 1910-15, and was also a trustee for The British Museum, the Wallace Collection, The London Museum and The National Portrait Gallery, where his portrait now hangs.

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The Venerable Kushok Bakula Rinpoche (1917-2003)

This rare photographic portrait depicts the 19th Bakula Rinpoche in Ladakh (India) (fig.4), taken in the 1940s or early ‘50s. Born Thupstan Chonjor, a prince in Ladakh’s royal family, he was recognised by the 13th Dalai Lama as the reincarnation of Arhat Bakula, a disciple of the Shakyamuni Buddha. An influential spiritual leader, Bakula Rinpoche also became a politician and diplomat, serving as Minister for Ladakh Affairs. He was a member in the

lower house of the Parliament of India and the National Human Rights Commission, and served as India’s Ambassador in Mongolia.

Asian Art | 23


sales re view Furniture

An exciting September sale for Furniture & Works of Art had a varied assortment of 882 lots. An eclectic mix ensured a busy view and garnered considerable interest across the sale. This fine pair of George III mahogany serpentine commodes (fig.1) were consigned from a West Country house having been in the family for at least three generations. Unusual to find a pair, the fine figuring to the drawer fronts and the Hepplewhite style, combined with being in good condition made these the highlight of the sale, selling to an English private buyer for £24,000.

1

Memorabilia of one of Britain’s most heroic figures, Lord Horatio Nelson has always triggered wide international interest. Bought by Mrs Emanuel, aged 18, a Nelson glass picture started what was to be a life-long passion shared by her husband Dr Emanuel. Scouring antique markets, junk shops and frequent trips to Portobello Road, their sixty year marriage resulted in a comprehensive collection of Lord Nelson artefacts along with various other collections.

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3

20th Century Design

A masterpiece of English Art Nouveau provided the top price in the October 20th Century Design auction, selling for £30,500. This rare Liberty mantel clock (fig.3) known to be one of only three or four examples was designed by Archibald Knox (1864 – 1933) and produced for retail at Liberty, London, circa 1905. It is thought the architectural form, inlaid with mother of pearl is reminiscent of the Celtic crosses and tomb stones which so inspired Knox. Woolley & Wallis are fortunate enough to be selling items from the Leslie Gooday Collection. Leslie Gooday OBE (1921 – 2013) was an architect, and from his love

24 | Woolley & Wallis

Twenty two lots relating to Nelson were presented in the sale, selling collectively for over £25,000. The reverse glass pictures (fig.2) commemorating Nelson produced a flurry of phone bidders and a busy saleroom, all vying to purchase these fresh to the market pieces. Five main buyers took the bidding to over £21,800 for the first eleven lots of the sale, the collection achieving a 98% sold rate overall.

of paintings and the arts he became a successful painter and collector in his own right. Part of his collection formed 75 lots of the sale, including some of his own works. An interesting piece which sold for £8,660 was a rare Bugatti copper and vellum hall chair designed by Carlo Bugatti, of the famous Bugatti family of designers.


Paintings

A successful Paintings sale in September had especially strong performances for early 20th century pictures; this was endorsed by the Frederick Appleyard (fig.4), a pretty oil thought to be of the artist’s children, which sold to a London gallery for £22,000. The December Fine Old Masters & 19th Century paintings sale yielded a rare pastel by Benedetto Luti (fig.5) which attracted a

great deal of international attention, whilst not in perfect condition, her captivating sideways glance seemed to entice the bidders and it sold for £42,700.

European Ceramics

A private collection of Russian porcelain figures in the October Ceramics sale caught the attention of collectors far and wide. Buyers came from Russia, Eastern Europe, London and America, with plenty

4

of underbidding on the internet and the telephones. This figure of a Jewish man (fig.6) was the top lot at £5,600 being in the best condition. The sale also included good items of Regency porcelain from Crichel House in Dorset. Despite a number of strong offerings in this line throughout the summer months the near perfect Barr, Flight and Barr Worcester cabaret set (featured in the last Sales News) still drew competition from near-sated buyers to sell for £9,150.

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6

Silver

The Silver department have continuously produced well received sales throughout the year. Rarer items always perform well and the October sale proved no exception, with the sale of a George II Channel Islands silver coffee pot by Jean Gavey (fig.8). One of Jersey’s most respected and well known silversmiths, Jean Gavey produced his works between 1715 – 1775. A prolific worker of excellent quality, he manufactured a variety of items from his workshop in King Street, St Helier. The lot was bought by Mr Stodel of the London Silver Vaults for £18,300.

Mint during the war to test the metal for probably India or South Africa. One was thrown back into the furnace; the other was retained by Harry Brown, the engineer and given to F. E. Brown. The story made international coin publications and generated considerable interest, the lot finally selling for £7,600.

7

8

Woolley & Wallis have had an excellent year with regard to coins. Starting in January with the American Half-Cent, 1796, mentioned in the Chairman’s Introduction. The October sale included a George V Penny, 1919 KN (fig.7), once owned by the Brown family who owned Aston Martin. The coin, confirmed to be unique has the story that following the Great War, the Royal Mint in London did not have the capacity to strike bronze pennies and for the two years, 1918 and 1919, they subcontracted the work to the King’s Norton Metal Company, near Birmingham. Two pennies were coined at the Birmingham

Sales Review | 25


Jewellery:

The October Jewellery sale once again demonstrated that beauty and rarity are still prized above all. Two very different examples of the high prices achieved are the pearl necklace and the Kashmir sapphire, spurred on again by international bidding and a market demand, both realised the same figure. A single row pearl necklace (fig.9) consisting of seventy five pearls (4.0 – 7.7mm) illustrated the ideal characteristics of a natural pearl - a cream/pink hue, high lustre, clean skins, well matched and round. Despite the largest pearl being only 7.7mm

they commanded a price of £68,000. As a finite entity pearls of this quality are highly sought after. The rarity of Kashmir sapphires is due to the mines having only been accessed for a short period of time in the late 19th century. The cushion shaped sapphire (fig.10) weighed 3.54 and despite some external flaws, a small chip and abraded facet edges, still exhibited the rich blue velvet colour known only to Kashmir sapphires. With an estimate of £40,000 – 60,000 it also reached £68,000 on the day of the sale.

Clocks, Watches & Scientific Instruments

The last sale reaffirmed that good and unusual objects are selling very well but that there is little demand for low grade items. We now on high quality longcase clocks which proved a wise decision. The three walnut longcase clocks performed well, the top lot achieving a hammer price of £23,200 for the small longcase clock by Martin of London. Both longcase regulators also sold well, the unique domestic regulator by John Roger Arnold made £4,800.

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9

Asian Art

According to the Records of the Chinese Grand Historian, the first emperor Qin Shi Huangdi unified China in 221 BC; and his chancellor Li Si suggested that all books except those written by the Qin historians should be burnt to unify political opinion. Although not the highest price for the two day sale, this boulder features the dissidents attempt to hide forbidden books from the government by storing them in mountain caves. It sold for £103,700 to a Hong Kong collector. 12

26 | Sales Review

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Our exhibition of the highlights from our sale in St. James, International advertising, and the established reputation of the Asian Department, led to a packed saleroom, a vast number of commission bids, furious phone bidding, and a plethora of internet bids. This generated a sale total just shy of £3million with an 80% sold rate.

Modern British Art

Whistler featured in the last sale news. Returned from loan to the Salisbury Museum as part of the ‘Rex Whistler – A Talent Cut Short’ exhibition this quirky painting of Miss Muffet with articulated eyes moved by means of a pulley system at the back. Rousing considerable interest, the painting doubled the lower estimate, finally selling to the London trade for £9,760.

The inaugural Modern British Art sale saw the much anticipated sale of the Rex

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Specialist Depart ments Chairman

Deputy Chairman

Managing Director

Paul Viney ASFAV T: +44 (0) 1722 424 502 paulviney@woolleyandwallis.co.uk

John Axford MRICS ASFAV

Clive Stewart-Lockhart FRICS FRSA

T: +44 (0) 1722 424 506 johnaxford@woolleyandwallis.co.uk

T: +44 (0) 1722 424 598 csl@woolleyandwallis.co.uk

Paintings Modern British Art

Paintings

Asian Art

Victor Fauvelle

Jo Butler

Sophie Lister

T: +44 (0) 1722 424 503 victorfauvelle@woolleyandwallis.co.uk

T: +44 (0) 1722 424 592 jobutler@woolleyandwallis.co.uk

T: +44 (0) 1722 424 591 sophielister@woolleyandwallis.co.uk

English & European Ceramics & Glass

20th Century Design Modern British Art

Asian Art

Clare Durham

Michael Jeffery

Alexandra Domeracki

T: +44 (0) 1722 424 507 claredurham@woolleyandwallis.co.uk

T: +44 (0) 1722 424 505 michaeljeffery@woolleyandwallis.co.uk

T: +44 (0) 1722 424 506 alexdomeracki@woolleyandwallis.co.uk

Jewellery

Jewellery

Asian Art

Jonathan Edwards FGAA

Marielle Whiting FGA

Freya Yuan

T: +44 (0) 1722 424 504 jonathanedwards@woolleyandwallis.co.uk

T: +44 (0) 1722 424 595 mariellewhiting@woolleyandwallis.co.uk

T: +44 (0) 1722 424 506 freyayuan@woolleyandwallis.co.uk

Silver

Silver

Furniture, Works of Art & Tribal

Rupert Slingsby

Lucy Chalmers

Will Hobbs

T: +44 (0) 1722 424 501 rupertslingsby@woolleyandwallis.co.uk

T: +44 (0) 1722 424 594 lucychalmers@woolleyandwallis.co.uk

T: +44 (0) 1722 339 752 willhobbs@woolleyandwallis.co.uk

Furniture & Works of Art

Clocks, Watches & Scientific

Marketing

Richard Price (Consultant)

Tamzin Corbett

T: +44 (0) 7741 242 421 richardprice@woolleyandwallis.co.uk

T: +44 (0) 1722 424 590 tamzincorbett@woolleyandwallis.co.uk

Insurance & Probate Valuations

Mark Richards T: +44 (0) 1722 411 854 markrichards@woolleyandwallis.co.uk

Asian Art

Specialist Department | 27


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Woolley & Wallis Sale News 2014  

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