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THE BIGGEST ISLAND IN THE INDONESIAN ARCHIPELAGO, THIS ENCHANTED LAND WELCOMES ELEGANT RESORTS AND RICH COFFEE PLANTATIONS BY

LAURA CAPARROTTI

Java

Portrait of a Dream Island Amanjiwo (Peace of the soul) The immense outdoor swimming pool of one of the hotels of the Aman Resort chain.

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85 ocated just south of Sumatra, the island of Java has been known to the world for a long time; in fact, it appeared on geographic maps dating back to 1400 B.C. Java is a very special destination for tourists: untouched nature, colorful tradition and ancient culture are combined with a deep human presence that makes this paradise comfortable and peaceful even to the most demanding travelers. Java is the biggest and most populated island of the Indonesian Archipelago. Its inhabitants inhabit both the main towns and remote paddy fields located here and there among settlements of palm trees. The island’s major administrative center and main city is Jakarta, a place where Eastern and Western cultures meet beautifully. On the streets, Japanese cars run close to the risciò, the little threewheel carts, trained by a man on a bike or on foot. These are the most common means of public transportation, even using their own reserved

pathways. On the rooftops, a multitude of modern antennas share the blue sky with architectures typical of the Orient. Yet, the Indonesian cities have a mark that really makes them unique and similar to themselves: the mosques. It’s uncommon to find such beautiful buildings in these latitudes. Usually small and not so rich in ornaments, without minarets surrounding them, their silver cupolas shine in the middle of nature. Java’s heaven is a neverending, fabulous, impressive, and breathtaking sight. It gives perfumes to collect, colors to enjoy and experiences for a lifetime. From the volcanoes to the sulfur pools and geysers, from the pagodas to the temples, the family altars, and the ongoing rituals, these sites leave an indelible memory on every visitor.

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Tropical sunset on the oriental-style pagodas lining the resort.

The fascination of the Orient explodes in Java, land of uncontaminated nature. .

Coffee Cultivation Originated in Ethiopia, the coffee plant has been introduced in Yemen, Ceylon and Java by the Company of Indies, the Dutch business active in 1600 B.C.

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of the accommodations at the resort. The style has been inspired by ancient Buddhist temples.

Thanks to the tropical climate, coffee plantations find the best soils in Java, producing excellent blends such as Robusta and Liberica. Coffee, as much as tea, is one of the principal assets of the area. In 1965, a business woman from Italy landed here, establishing a coffee plantation and a resort which soon became some of the island’s gems. Gabriella Teggia has been the mind, heart and strength behind the new glory of the old plantation of Losari coffee, created in the early 1900s. “I wanted to create something unique – said Gabriella - I have been conquered by this coffee plantation, walled by seven volcanoes, by the tropical jungle, and by such various shapes.” The villa was originally built by the Dutch Menier Van der Swaan, and its architecture is dated 1828. The Losari Coffee plantation is situated at the center of the island; it overlooks the valley and is located at the top of a hill on top of which rice is cultivated. Dark red from the volcanoes, deep green from the trees, and black from the

Amanjiwo at the resort a sense of inner peace and health prevail.

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A suggestive interior


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Useful information he best period to visit the island of Java is between March and November. May-June and September-October are the best months. The average temperature is of about 28 degrees Celsius and the climate is very dry. International tourists can obtain a visa just by paying upon their arrival at the Indonesian airport.

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For further information, please visit the following websites: www.indonesia.it www.indonesiaembassy.com www.italmbjkt.id There is also an Italian Cultural Institute in Jakarta: www.itacultjkt.or.id For information on the Losario Plantation: www.losariocoffeeplantation.com info@losariocoffeeplantation.com

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plantations produce coffee of the Robust and Free varietals.

Java

bamboos are the colors of the Losari plantation. Not so distant are the three main airports, Semerang, Yogykarta, and Solo. These towns are full of local craftsmanship and traditions. Ms. Treggia has also restored the Queens of the Mountains, a choo-choo train, blessed by the Queen of Holland several decades age. The train gives the visitors the opportunity to travel around the island. Nowadays, Gabriella Treggia’s dreamy estate is open for business. Thanks to its collaboration with architect Andrea Magnaghi, twenty-six villas have been built using teak, according to local use. Lately, a Spa has been added to cure the body, not only the soul. ★

tourism

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The aroma and allure of Indonesia in a cup Harmony of aromas istinctive cocoa notes and a subtle aftertaste of cereals contained in a soft, dark and velvety cream; an intense body accompanied by strong, roasted aromas: this is Senang, the blend Made in Indonesia, that Nespresso defined at the end of 2005. A Grand Cru born from the combination of the traditional Arabica and Java and cultivated in four plantations – Jampit, Blawan, Kayumas adn GN Blau (Pancoer) – with a Robusta coming from the Pawon Satak area. A unique and delicate character that allowed savoring the scent typical of a far away land, full of charm and coffee history.

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THE ARABICA APOTHEOSIS, THE DESTRUCTION OF LARGE PLANTATIONS BECAUSE OF THE COFFEE’S RUST, THE COMEBACK THANKS TO THE RESISTANT ROBUSTA VARIETY, BUT MOST OF ALL TO THE DARING AND STUBBORN IDEA OF RESTORING THE OLD PLANTATIONS. THE COMPLEX STORY OF A LAND THAT HAS ITS STRENGTH IN COFFEE. IN THE CUP ITS AROMA IS LIGHT AND WELL EQUILIBRATED, WITH A PLEASANT AFTERTASTE OF CHOCOLATE.

offee is present in the entire Indonesia archipelago (today the third world producer) and Java is one of the most important names in the history of the drink. Coffee trees were introduced in Indonesia around the half of the XVII century by the Dutch. Although some sources date its arrival to previous times, there is a assured date that marks the first Java beans’ sales in Amsterdam in 1712. The new cultivation had an immediate success, so great that the island became in a short period of time the first world producer: the equatorial climate and the volcanic soil helped its development. Nevertheless, in 1877 the plantations were almost entirely destroyed by the coffee’s rust, a terrible disease caused by the hemileia vaastratrix fungus. In order to substitute the old bushes, more resistant robust trees from Africa were imported: Java coffee, till then world famous, disappeared from the market. Only in 1950 the Indonesian country decided to restore the old Arabica plantations. The farmers in fact had decided to save some of the legendary plants, in order to protect the typical aroma that gave Java coffee its taste, loved throughout the world, characterized by a light fragrance that, for its relatively low acidity, is homogeneous and well equilibrated, with a pleasant chocolate aftertaste. Small firms contribute to the 90% of the entire harvest. A typical day in a Jampit plantation consists in the harvest of the coffee’s red berries, performed by hands by

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women who start working before the tropical sun begins delivering all its heat. This happens during the dry season, between May and October. The same day the fruits are skinned, then fermented and washed. Then they are dried for three weeks. Here are preserved old plants of

the Typica variety that now survive only in few countries. At the beginning of the harvest the beans, extracted from the cherries, are lightly sour, but during the seasoning bursts out a soft chocolate aroma, that contains the same harmony of the local people.

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