Page 1

n! o i t i d e d r a w e 2017 Art A

Th

NEWSLETTER: DECEMBER 2017 Artwork: Clinton Carter, Detail; Untitled, Acrylic on Canvas, 35 x 35cm, 2017.

NUMBER: 26 AS WE ARE

1


MARKS IN MOTION Jenette Scanes, Peter Dudding, Paul Williams and Damian Showyin, Underbelly (19), 2017, acrylic on canvas, 215x249cm. Pages 16 - 19

IN THIS ISSUE

Words from the Coordinator / page 3 Curator Review / page 4 The Awards / page 5 - 13 Alter Ego / page 14 Marks in Motion / pages 16 - 19 Create + Celebrate / page 20

EXHIBITION PROFILE Natasha Hill from WA regional arts organisation, Artzability in Margaret River reflects on the Alter Ego. Pages: 14 - 15 Image: Lorraine Frost

2

AS WE ARE


IT’S A WRAP What a year; what a show! Thank you all for contributing, supporting, attending, buying and being a part of the remarkable As We Are Art Awards. As my first time coordinating and attending I have been blown away by not only the incredible high calibre of diverse artistic works, but how welcomed I have been into the Arts & Disability family of Western Australia. Having met so many different artists, families and friends and having seen the brush-strokes, Above: Brian Livingstone with Birdhouse, highly commended in the 2017 AWAAA. Below: Mel Henderson and Hayley Bracknell with Hayley’s entry to AWAAA, Peacocks. Images: The Corner Shop At Chorus.

ink lines, fine details, layered acrylics and textured forms I am even more resolute in my passion to share your stories and art with the wider Western Australian and Australian arts community. In the second half of 2017 As We Are has hunkered down, focusing on internal program structure and planning for a bright 2018 and onwards. A highlight was attending Out of The Box – Supported Studios Forum, hosted at Arts Project Australia in Melbourne. With presentations from National Disability Services (NDS) and case studies from key organisations including

DADAA,

Arts

Access

Victoria

and TUTTI in Adelaide. It was an inspiring, challenging and thought provoking two days. A recent article on ArtsHub (www.artshub.com. au) outlining the importance of arts in NDIS

Melanie Henderson | Coordinator E coordinator@asweare.com.au M 0416 975 304 W www.asweare.com.au

‘Make Art A Priority in your NDIS Plan’ acts as a reminder on how we must all be advocates for art. If you’d like to read the article please email me. Until next year, that’s a wrap! Have a fun and fabulous holiday season. Mel. AS WE ARE

3


2017 AS WE ARE ART AWARDS Hayley Anschutz, Curator.

When As We Are first approached me to curate this exhibition I couldn’t think of a more fitting combination of my two professions. I work as the Assistant Curator for the Zig Zag Gallery in Kalamunda and, as a support worker for an organisation called One2One. It really was a perfect fit. I have been involved with many exhibitions over the years but this was by far the largest. To curate an exhibition with over 200 entries is a challenge. Considering the diversity in subject, medium, framing and scale, one must establish relationships and ensure each work communicates fluidly in a group. Art is so very important as both a means of positive creative expression and a tool to ignite conversation in the community. The works are exuberant, not a stagnant display but an ever evolving landscape of the artist’s experience, their life and their personality. This exhibition works to advance the public’s awareness of contemporary visual art alongside disability. The audience have the chance then, to consider the world around them and the lives of individuals who may experience it differently. I am thankful to As We Are, for this opportunity and I very much look forwards to next year’s exhibition. Hayley

4

AS WE ARE


THE AWARDS

AS WE ARE

5


Aimee Dickson, Emu, 54 x 43cm Mixed Media, 2017. Winner 2017 Jabula Farm Regional Art Award Proudly sponsored by

Anthony Stainisheff, Naked Boy Leading a Horse, 80 x 60cm, Chalk Pastel, 2017. Winner 2017 David Guhl Award for Artistic Excellence Proudly sponsored by

6

AS WE ARE


Martin Cahill, Birds, 100 x 70cm, Acrylic on Paper, 2017 Winner 2017 Rosalind Lewis Art Award Proudly sponsored by

Winner 2017 Victoria Park Centre for the Arts Peoples Choice Award Proudly sponsored by

AS WE ARE

7


Greg Barr, The Big Friendly Giant, 61 x 91cmm, Acrylic on Canvas, 2017. Winner 2017 Tunbridge Gallerly Contemporary Art Award

Proudly sponsored by

Rebecca Johnston, Untitled, 14 x 28 x 25cm, Clay, fired and glazed 2017. Winner 2017 Stephen Delower Memorial 3D Award Proudly sponsored by

8

AS WE ARE


Gloria Kelly, Untitled, 91.5 x 91.5cm, Acrylic on Canvas, 2017. Winner 2017 Merenda Gallery Aborignal & Torres Strait Islander Art Award Proudly sponsored by

Behind The Brush. Born in Jigalong in 1975, Gloria is a Martu woman now working out of Spinifex Hill Studios in South Hedland. As an artist with limited eyesight, Gloria is an acrylic painter within a powerful matriarchal tradition that emerged in the Western Desert in the early 2000s. Her loose brushwork and pastel palettes have attracted critical attention for their highly affecting presence, and these artworks announce Gloria as a truly exciting contemporary abstract artist of Western Australia. Since the AWA Art Award, Gloria won a major prize at the Hedland Art Award and has been picked up by Suzanne O’Connell for a group show this month and rumours of a solo show in Perth next year. An artist to keep your eye out for! Jigalong Community is in the Pilbara region of Western Australia, approximately 165 kilometres east of the town of Newman in the Shire of East Pilbara local government area.

Gloria painting at the Spinifex Hill Studios, November 2017. Image: Spinifex Hill Studios.

AS WE ARE

9


HIGHLY COMMENDED

Top: Across the Bay at Point Peron, Paul Mitchell, Acrylic on Canvas, 100 x 76cm, 2017. Above Left: Untitled, Geoff Taylor-Vernon, Pen and Watercolour Pencil, 30 x 23cm, 2017. Right: Abstract Fish, Carol Myers, Fabric and Cotton, 38 x 38cm, 2017. 10

AS WE ARE


Top: Beach Walk, Gavin McNamara, Acrylic on Canvas, 45 x 41cm, 2017. Left: Maku and Camel, Aaron Pei Pei, Acrylic on Canvas, 40 x 56cm, 2017. Below: Rainbow Tree Brent Stanley, Acrylic on Canvas, 61 x 60cm, 2017.

AS WE ARE

11


Birdhouse, Brian Livingstone, Fired Clay, 15 x 40cm, 2017.

Left: 7 Cape Court, Perth Australia, Clive Collender, Pen and Crayon on Canvas, 50 x 40cm, 2017. Below: Happy, Sam Hunstman, Digital Watercolour (Printmaking Watercolour) 30 x 21cm, 2017.

12

AS WE ARE


Right; Araluen - Twisting pathways, vibrant flowers and waterfalls, David Guhl, Acrylic on Canvas, 96 x 64cm, 2017. Not Pictured: The Mysterious Stream (Midland 2016), Tom Linden-Wood, Photographic Print, 40 x 50cm.

The question burning on your lips; What about the 2018 As We Are Art Awards? With building renovations scheduled in the second half of 2018 at Central Park, we are on the hunt for a new home. We’ll keep you posted on our journey, in the meantime, keep on making your bold and distinctive Western Australian Art!

2017 AWAAA Sponsors

AS WE ARE

13


ALTER EGO

Down the coast we travel to Margaret River exploring regional art. A picture tells a thousand words.

self managed and supported

complex creative interpretations

A costume, a prop, a painted face

generously

using the simplest materials. As

can express more of the Self

Augusta-Margaret River.

by

the

shire

of

photographer, I was privileged to witness these artists in their

when words can’t or don’t come. Participants travel from up to

costumes and help them realise

Margaret River’s dynamic group

100km away (including Busselton

and frame their characters, as

Artzability staged an impressive

and Bunbury) to attend weekly

we captured them in the lens.

exhibition

River

sessions. This gives Artzability a

Gallery from Sept 25-Oct 5.

unique placement as a regional

Nearly ten years ago the vision

Their

photographic

program, given that people from

of several local parents was to

portraits were the final stage of

small communities in WA, as a

create a “post-school” meeting

a month long multi-arts project

rule, travel to larger regional

place for people living with a

with Busselton artist, Lorraine

centres to access services and

disability, which would foster

Frost.

programs.

friendships,

at

Margaret

stunning

and

skill

development

community

integration

Artzability is a regional art group

Lorraine Frost challenged the

centered

around

the

Arts.

for adult members living with a

artists with the task of creating

Alter Ego draws from all these

disability. The organisation is

body extensions, resulting in

aspects of the ‘vision’ and brings

parent-run and not for profit,

Alter Ego costumes, born from

together elements of all the skills

“In a small town their faces and personalities are part of the fabric of the everyday; to have been embraced for the first time by a professional Gallery now sets a new precedent and has had a reciprocal benefit in raising the bar still further for all involved.”

14

AS WE ARE


that these artists have developed

has had a reciprocal benefit in

throughout their journey with

raising the bar still further for

Artzability.

all involved.

These

dramatic

photographs speak to the local community,

as citizen becomes

The parents’ vision is real. Can’t

‘celebrity’. In a small town their

wait to experience what the

faces and personalities are part

unstoppable Artzability family do

of the fabric of the everyday; to

in their tenth year.

Natasha Hill Facilitator, Artzability Margaret River Lorraine Frost

have been embraced for the first time by a professional Gallery

Alter Ego Exhibition, Margaret

now sets a new precedent and

River Gallery 25 September 5 October 2017.

AS WE ARE

15


MARKS IN MOTION As We Are heads out of state again, this time to be inspired by the large scale artworks of Studio A artists in Sydney, NSW.

This year, artists from Studio

disability, the success highlights

closely with artists, they tackle

A in Sydney saw major success

something much bigger, much

the barriers faced in accessing

in their part of the Underbelly

more

artists

conventional

education,

Contemporary Arts Festival with

with intellectual disabilities and

professional

development

their work, Marks in Motion. The

the work they produce can and

pathways

success is a formidable feat for

is successful when exposed to a

needed to be a successful visual

any artist navigating their way

mainstream audience.

artist.

times fickle art world. But for

Having operated for four years,

Studio

Studio A artists, all of which

Studio A works with artists with

Director,

Gabrielle

are artists with an intellectual

a range of disabilities. In working

explains

the

profound;

That

and

opportunities

through the complicated and at

16

AS WE ARE

A

CEO

and

Artistic Mordy

difficulties


with

a force to be reckoned with.

Peter Dudding is a Studio A

intellectual disabilities can range

The unique model in which they

artist working largely with bold,

from literacy to the complex and

work with is bespoke to each

brave and beautiful colours that

somewhat subtle market analysis

artist and allows a layered and

seem to dance before you. He is

of an intricate industry that has

meaningful relationship to be

a painter, drawer, master mark

its own language.

fostered. With inspiration drawn

maker and a ceramicist.

confronted

by

artists

from

other models

nationally

the

and internationally, Studio A’s

Gabrielle describes his style as

opportunities that are out there

approach is sophisticated and

“expressionist

can be difficult,” she said.

multi

abstract” and speaks with an

“The critical element (of Studio

finding the right platforms as well

undeniable

A) is to provide that bridge

as linking artists with mentors or

mentions he has work held in

between the artwork and the

collaborators.

various

“Just

knowing

about

faceted,

focussing

on

and

pride

somewhat when

collections

she

including

Artbank.

art world. That is the service we provide”.

And in fact, it’s this ability to

But there is much more beyond

think big and outside the square

Three years ago, Peter was

the navigation of industry that

that began the ball rolling for this

linked up with a likeminded arts

allows Studio A to be seen as

year’s Marks in Motion project.

practitioner, Paul Williams who works in a similar style. Working

Left; Mathew Clark in his Perth home. A bright, welcoming family home, where walls are adorned with Mathew’s vibrant artworks. Diptych Seven Tribes of Flying Islands, Acrylic on Canvas. This detailed artwork hangs alongside Roman Head, a sculpture completed at Leederville Tafe.

alongside each other, the pair

Right; Detail, Bower Snow, 2016, Acrylic on Canvas.

Draft Gallery, a leading platform

developed a working relationship and began to learn from one another,

building

on

individual

practices.

their

Through

this partnership, Paul curated a show of Peter’s work at the First for emerging artists in Sydney, notorious

for

its

competitive

nature. “It was the first show at First Draft (which has been operating for thirty years) of an artist with an intellectual disability,” Gabrielle said. The

show

success

was

beyond

a

significant

the

amount

Image details: Left: Artist, Damian Showyin, and Studio A CEO, Gabrielle Mordy, during the Marks In Motion workshop at the Underbelly Arts Festival, 2017. Photograph by Tim da-Rin. Right: Jenette Scanes, Peter Dudding, Paul Williams and Damian Showyin, Underbelly (20) – Installation shot, 2017, acrylic on canvas, 215x249cm. Photograph by Tim da-Rin AS WE ARE

17


of work that sold, which was impressively triumph

half!

was

opportunity

The the

that

real

further

began

There

to

was a playful comradery that developed between the artists and a stunning body of work was made through the residency

stick itself to the ball that was now rolling with an increased momentum. Paul and Peter continued to work together, adding another two Studio A artists, Jenette Scanes and Damian Showyin to the mix. Gabrielle explained that despite the limited space Studio A has to offer, Paul would continue to work alongside the artists. All the while, the Studio A staff were thinking of where this could go, how it could grow. “We an

were opportunity

looking for

for some

experimenting and working in a focused space,” she said.

This spurred the application for

crazy’, Marks in Motion began.

this year’s Underbelly Festival, a bi annual contemporary arts

The artists were pushed from

festival held in Sydney.

their comfort zone, like all good

“It’s

a

real

experimental

for

artists need to be, and the

contemporary

outcome was beyond what was

platform

artwork,” Gabrielle said.

expected. While Studio A artists

“It’s where curators look for the

would

next up and coming artists”.

worked consecutively for ten

have

never

previously

days, here they were. And while And thus, with a successful

the experience may have been

proposal for artists to take over a

daunting for not only the artists

space at the National Art School

but their families as well, the

with the aim of going ‘painting

proof was in the pudding- as the saying goes. Playing with process, the artists began painting in different ways, with brushes that were several metres long and in an enlarged, physical way. Gabrielle explained the artists flourished in the opportunity and became more immersed in the work, while also becoming more willing to take creative risks. “There was a playful comradery that

developed

between

the

artists and a stunning body of work was made through the residency,” she said. This included some very exciting large scale works as well as 18

AS WE ARE


collaborative

paintings-

an

element that wasn’t expected and completely organic. Marks in Motion was shown in the Underbelly Festival, receiving fantastic feedback and is now being pitched to galleries for shows in 2018. This is the second time Studio A artists have been shown in the Underbelly Festival, the first of which marked the first occasion artists with intellectual disabilities were represented. These

continual

positive

experiences

build

energy

encourage

and

drive

and more

opportunities to open for Studio A

artists

on

a

mainstream

platform. Further for the artists, a well deserved boost in confidence and a sense of pride that can be shared. Artist, Damien Showyin was

apparently

glowing

at

the opening, proud to see his family there enjoying the art he produced. When asked if anyone had said anything to him at the opening, Damien replied, “Yes, they said the paintings looked nice and

Image details: Left: Artist’s working in the Underbelly Lab, 2017. Photograph by Paul Williams. Above: The Underbelly Arts in front of their installation, Marks in Motion, at the Underbelly Arts Festival, 2017. Photograph by Gabrielle Mordy

that I’m a good painter”. According

the

“A lot of people had most likely

profound sense of pride was

never imagined their children

shared amongst the families, all

would be so applauded for a

of which attended the opening.

genuine skill”.

“The

to

families

Gabrielle,

seemed

quite

overwhelmed with what their

As for the artists, they keep

children had produced and the

asking when they can work with

interest it had generated,” she

Paul again. There’s no doubt the

said.

next Studio A project will be one

Hannah Muir hannahjmuir@hotmail.com

Copyright: Studio A

to watch with great expectation. AS WE ARE

19


CREATE + CELEBRATE

The As We Are creative artists workshop series has popped-up with a pop-up in Victoria Park Central, wrapping up the Create + Celebrate project for 2017. The Create + Celebrate project has sought to provide inspired opportunities for people with an intellectual disability during the project through a two-sided approach. ‘Create’, a series of 3 different art skill development workshops; photography, animation and relief-printmaking and ‘Celebrate’, a public exhibition and event that showcases new skills and work to the wider community. The result, a contemporary exhibition accessible to new audiences and artists walking away confident in their new skillsets and ready to learn more!

Top, Photography: Image by Rian Hronsky. Left, Print-Making: Artist John Verjans in the Create + Celebrate Pop-Up Exhibition with his relief-prints on paper. Right, Animation: Facilitator, Steven Aiton, Artist Grace Panaia and Giovina D’Alessandro from Ability Centre, all smiles as they animate Grace’s Cat. Create + Celebrate is a Community Arts Network Catalyst Arts Funded Project. Thank you to our sponsors and in-kind supporters. And finally, a big thank you to all our contributors for this newsletter edition! 20

AS WE ARE

As We Are Newsletter  

The Art Award Edition! December 2017

As We Are Newsletter  

The Art Award Edition! December 2017

Advertisement