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ASUN cabinet Dr. Martha Shull

Interim Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs

Mr. Adam Adair

Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administration

Ms. Jacqueline Faulkner Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs

Dr. Sandra Massey Chancellor

Board of Trustees Charles Luter, Chair Howard L. Slinkard, Vice Chair Ron Rhodes, Secretary Dr. Tim Langford, Member Niel Crowson, Member

ASU System

Dr. Charles L. Welch, President

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Mr. Charles Appleby Vice Chancellor for Economic and Workforce Development

Mr. Jeff Bookout Vice Chancellor for Strategic Initiatives

Mr. Ike Wheeler

Dean for Institutional Advancement

Dr. Holly Ayers

Director of Institutional Effectiveness


3 Chancellor’s Letter........................ 4 Introduction.................................... 5 Timeline ........................................... 6 Executive Summary....................

contents

8 Committee Members .................. 12 Mission, Vision, Values ................ 14 ASUN Region ................................ 16 Process .............................................

17 SWOT ............................................... 18 Strategic Priorities......................... 19 Key Performance Indicators ...... 22 Key Data ..........................................

summary

“No one ever achieved greatness by playing it safe.” - Harry Gray

At Arkansas State University-Newport, it is our calling to help our students achieve success. We guide, instruct and give them the tools they need to earn family-supporting wages in a high-demand career field. With this as our charge, we have to continually evolve and aggressively strive for excellence in all that we do. The Strategic Plan process was designed to question who we are and why we are here. This six-month process has provided the foundation that will guide our actions for the next five years. As a community-engaged institution, we actively sought the opinions of several stakeholders to help shape our future. Through careful research and candid conversations, we created the foundation for the institution as we developed our Mission, Vision and Values. From the Mission, Vision and Values, we further developed active goals to continually hold ourselves accountable to our students and communities. But goals without action are just dreams. The finalized strategic plan will allow us to aggressively drive the institution forward in carrying out its mission.

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A LETTER FROM the chancellor As we reflect on the past and look at where we are now, it is clear that the American Dream is in jeopardy. The United States cannot continue to lead without a trained workforce. Our nation and our higher education system are at a critical point in history. The era when a person lacking a credential could garner family-supporting wages has nearly faded away. Educational attainment is the key to a thriving middle class. Like more than 1,100 community colleges across the nation, ASU-Newport is uniquely positioned to lead the way in the reclamation of the American Dream. Since its formation, the institution has experienced an unprecedented level of growth and success. With its 2014-2019 Strategic Plan, ASU-Newport embraces a new vision. ASU-Newport will be the driving force that revitalizes the Delta and restores the American Dream in the communities we serve. The plan prioritizes student success, institutional excellence and community engagement all while demonstrating the values of community, diversity, innovation, integrity, student-centeredness and trust. This Strategic Plan provides a clear pathway to achieve our mission. Thanks to the work of a number of dedicated faculty and staff, ASUN created an integrated, collaborative process that provided engagement opportunities for all internal and external stakeholders. Through respectful candor, our stakeholders worked with the Strategic Planning Steering Committee who guided the planning process with open, honest conversation in developing a cohesive plan.

Sandra Massey, Ed.D. Chancellor Arkansas State University - Newport

“ ASUN employees “All will support these priorities through their individual and collaborative goals.� 4 4

- Dr. Sandra Massey

The plan organizes months of open dialogue and environmental scanning activities under the three strategic priorities. All ASUN employees will support these priorities through their individual and collaborative goals. Throughout the process, we jointly created measurements that allow us to hold each other accountable for results. Departmental objectives and activities will support the institutional effectiveness indicators to align directly to budget and resource allocation. Through the use of technology feedback loops, the process will continue to be transparent, thus connecting the plan to execution. On-going management of the plan will create opportunity for agility and resiliency to respond quickly to the changing demands and complexities of our industries and communities. Through a strong commitment to its vision, ASU-Newport is poised to create new and exciting opportunities throughout its communities. Dedicated to its mission, the college will provide the leadership needed to transform the lives of its students, enrich its communities, and strengthen the regional economy. Together, we can help every student realize the American Dream.


THE NEED for a strategic plan As Arkansas State University-Newport begins its second decade, the college is at a critical juncture in its path for the future. Recent claims have called into question the true value of a college degree. This concept is shaking the foundation of higher education, putting ASU-Newport and all institutions at perhaps the most critical point in history. As critics claim the American Dream is no longer a reality for most individuals, they also exclaim that colleges are too costly and students are not reaching completion and achieving their educational goals. Community colleges must be able to focus on promoting student success, now more than ever. It is essential that ASU-Newport ensures all of our strategies increase college completion. ASUN must reach college-bound students earlier to assist our secondary school partners preparing students to verify they are college ready and do not need remediation when they reach our campuses. It is ASUN’s obligation to address the lack of appropriate skills training in today’s workforce. This skills gap forces employers to leave positions unfilled and too many Americans unable to hold careers that provide family-supporting wages. ASUN must attack these critical tasks in an economic climate that has continued to see a decline in state support for higher education. Facing these challenges head on, ASU-Newport began in Spring 2014 the vigilant process of creating its strategic plan. What emerged through the engaged process was a new vision, mission and values that will guide ASUN, creating higher levels of value for its stakeholders. Specific strategic priorities will guide the operations of the college and will ensure all efforts are extremely focused on its mission. The end result is a strategic roadmap to realize the vision of restoring the American dream in the communities we serve and, in turn, revitalize the Delta.

“A dream is just a dream. A goal is a dream with a plan and a deadline.” - Harvey Mackay

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HISTORY OF the plan march 2014 3/5

Committee Approved

3/21

Kickoff ff Me Meeting Surveys Distributed

april 2014 Hall Meetings 4/1 TTown C Community/Open

Town Hall Meetings Students

Town Hall Meetings T Faculty/Staff

5/12

4/8

Monthly ontthly U Update pddat a Meeting

4/15

4/21

Round und Tab Tables bles with Advisors

3/24 - 5/26 Environmental E Scan

6

5/5

u Returned 4/3 SSurveys

Monthly M onthhly Update Meeting

6

may 2014


june 2014 6/9

Monthly onthhly U Update pda Meeting

july 2014 7/1

F Draft of First SStrategic Plan

7/8 7/14

Monthly onthly Update Updaatt Meeting

5 5/26 - 6/20 Da Data Analysis

august 2014 8/10 Approval

FFeedback Deadline

7/23

Feedbback Feedback Deadline

7/18

7/31

Second cond Draft f oof Strategic Plan

Final Final nal D Draft raft of Strategic Plan

8/11 Monthly onthhly Updat Update a Meetingg

88/15 /15

Strat Strategic ategic PPlan lan Complete

6/26 - 6/30 Strategic Planning Retreat

“Effo “E “Eff Eff E for forts or orttts an and nd co cou ou urag ura uragge ge a are ar ree n not not en enou no ou ugh ug wi w without tho hout pu urrpo pose and an direction.” directi dir tion.””

- JJohn hn n F. Ken Kennedy nnedy 7 7


PLANNING process OVERVIEW The purpose of the strategic plan is to assist the institution in serving the needs of its stakeholders. The strategic planning process is broken into three distinct parts, as seen below. The first phase is gathering requirements from all parties that have a vested interest in the direction and success of the institution. This is known as the “research phase.” The information received during this phase sets the stage for pulling the strategic plan together. The information is then p pplan”. used to define actions within the “implementation

1 2 3

PHASE

Conduct Research

PHASE

Develop Strategic Plan

PHASE

Develop Implementation Plan

• • • • •

Create Strategic Planning Committee Administer Pre-Survey for Strategic Planning Committee Identify Internal and External Stakeholders Facilitate Planning Meetings Conduct Environmental Scan/SWOT Analysis

• Review and revise current mission and vision for the institution, guiding values for the future, and the direction desired by stakeholders • Develop the strategic plan to serve the broad direction for the institution. The strategic plan will include the following: • Mission, Vision, and Guiding Values • Research Findings • Strategic Initiatives • Goals • Objectives • Measures • Facilitate department planning meetings • Develop departmental plans to create the following: • Goals • Objectives • Actions • Measures • Develop and Deploy mechanisms to monitor progress towards goals Strategic Planning Process

Thee final strategic plan takes the inputs from the research phase and provides the deliverables of the plan, as shown above. Each component of the strategic plan, starting with the mission, is an input fed to the next component. This helps ensure that the identity of the institution is reflected in its defined goals. 8


PHASE I: CONDUCT RESEARCH IDENTIFY INTERNAL/EXTERNAL STAKEHOLDERS Stakeholders are any person, group, or organization that can place a claim on the organization’s resources, attention, output or is affected by its output. Stakeholder theory suggests that businesses need to pay attention to stakeholders by focusing on those who affect or are affected by its products or services. Stakeholder analysis creates a framework within which businesses identify, evaluate and incorporate interests into decision-making processes. Below is an illustration of ASUN's stakeholders based on the supported qualitative survey that the Strategic Planning Steering Committee completed.

Local Businesses

County Tax Payers

Administrators

Faculty

STATE UNI AS VE S N

•N

Employers

ITY RS

Community Partners

ARK A

Parents

E W P O RT

Family Supporters

Staff

Students Alumni

ASUN’s stakeholders

PLANNING NN NG process

Government Agencies

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PHASE I: CONDUCT RESEARCH SURVEY THE STRATEGIC PLANNING STEERING COMMITTEE Members of the Strategic Planning Steering Committee completed a qualitative survey to measure the extent to which the goals of the institution currently align with the identified disparities or opportunities. ENVIRONMENTAL SCAN Environmental scanning is a critical piece of the strategic planning process. The information collected during this stage was general in nature and consists of both external and internal environments. The information was used to guide the organization’s vision and help determine the strategic goals which will become the basis for the strategic plan. In order to efficiently conduct this activity, subcommittees were formed to more efficiently assess the major functional areas of the institution including: Student Affairs & Services Economic Workforce/Community Outreach Academic & Programs • Funding & Resource • Technology STRENGTHS, GAPS, TRENDS ANALYSIS Upon completion of the environmental scan, the subcommittees were asked to publish the top ten strengths, gaps and trends based on their findings. These were articulated and distributed via survey. Individuals were asked to rank each finding. SWOT ANALYSIS Along with the information collected in the research phase, a SWOT analysis served as an effective process in distinguishing gaps in current practice, allowed the institution to focus on building on identified strengths and directed actions to help minimize weaknesses. The exercise required an analysis of both internal and external practices.

PHASE 2: STRATEGIC PLANNING The second phase had the clear goal of developing a foundation for establishing the core components of the strategic plan. These components, referred to as strategic priorities, were established to guide the development of both short and long-term departmental outcomes, key performance indicators and annual budget priorities.

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The three primary guiding principles, referred to as the Mission, Vision and Values, were carefully developed, reflecting on research that was collected in Phase 1. Each statement was created with unanimous support from the SPSC. Upon completion of these guiding documents, strategic priorities were developed to allow the institution to define guiding principles, as well as clear and assessable priorities.


PHASE 3: IMPLEMENTATION The Chancellor is the champion for distributing and continually driving focus to our strategic plan. Upon completion, the strategic plan document was presented to all staff and faculty as well as to external stakeholders. Throughout the implementation phase, the core planning groups are engaged in strategic initiative mapping to identify current and future initiatives and connections to the strategic priorities. The goals of initiative mapping include: • Categorizing the strategic priorities and determining the means by which they are currently addressed. • Initiating conversations with departmental faculty and staff regarding strategic mapping. • Identifying assessment measures for strategic priorities. • Analyzing existing baseline indicators. • Developing initiative timelines to define and clarify institutional priorities, resources and needs. • Aligning budget requests and expenditures with the strategic priorities. • Focusing on communication through the development of a strategic outcomes guide for communication with internal and external stakeholders. In addition, the Chancellor’s Executive Cabinet is tasked with ensuring departmental initiatives and resources align succinctly with the mission, vision and values through measurable and focused departmental outcomes and initiatives. The institution will continue to communicate the mission, vision and values through digital signage, environmental graphics and through purposeful institutional advancement efforts.

PLANNING P PL LA LA AN N NNI N I IN N NG G pro process occes es s

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STRATEGIC planning THE CHARACTERISTICS The strategic planning steering committee was responsible for administering the strategic planning process under the counsel of ASUN’s executive leadership team. The strategic planning steering committee reviewed input from the range of stakeholders and disseminated data collected during the research phase to help shape the outcomes for the institution. The planning committee met regularly during the research phase to review pertinent information, provide feedback and make recommendations based on research. Upon completion of the initial drafts of the strategic plan, the planning committee was tasked to refine the plan. The committee worked to assure the plan stayed within the mission and the core values of the institution. Committee membership was comprised of individuals from all areas of the institution. This included faculty, staff, students and administrators. The committee also included community and industry leaders from the institution’s extended service area.

BUILDING the team Ability to think strategically

Creative, practical and pragmatic

Highly engaged and involved with ASUN and willing to provide constructive feedback

Knowledge of the history and culture of ASUN

In considering committee members, individuals were appointed in consideration of these characteristics: 12

Ability to think across personal and professional boundaries

Influential and respected within the community

Willing to commit to the strategic planning process


ccommittee ommittee THE COMMITTEE Dr. Sandra Massey Steven Furst Charles Appleby Ike Wheeler Robert Summers Joe Campbell Jeff Bookout Dr. Allen Mooneyhan Dr. Martha Shull

CAMPUS

Adam Adair Chris Nelson Betsy Ashcraft Amber Hendricks Jacque Faulkner Candace Gross Kimberly Long Seth Thompson Dr. Ashley Buchman

Larissa Clark Tina Fuentes Janna Ellis Jack Osier David Lynn Christopher Madden Daphene Heern Clay Fulton Tamya Stallings

Brian West Sara Michael Van Provence David Winston Mary Houchin Laura King Tristen Davis Kaitlyn Riggin Dr. Duane Doyle

COMMUNITY Curtis Christenberry Jon Chadwell Julie Allen Mark Young Mary Ann Arnold Tad Inami Thomas Crosslin Rhonda Quenzer Betty Shaw Jason Welch Vince Caligiuri Allan Bounds

Chris Glenn Radius Baker Charlott Jones Doug Imrie Stephen Hollingsworth Marilyn Hummelstein Sonya Sanders Tony Supine Bruce Weinberg Brenda Million Patty Lee Linda Hinton

Soozi Williams Bill Stanley Mary Stanley Chris Lehman Johnny Rye, Jr. Randy Mills Ritter Arnold Marvin Thaxton Tommy Young Frank Plegge Mike Turner Dee Dee Dupree

Linda Black Pat Brown Pat Jackson Retha Dudley Phil McDonald Patti Mullins Louise Runyan Rob Penix Jim Gowen, Sr. Kaneaster Hodges

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mission

ASU-Newport provides an accessible, affordable, quality education that transforms the lives of our students, enriches our communities and strengthens the regional economy.

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values


vision

ASU-Newport will be the driving force that revitalizes the Delta and restores the American Dream in the communities we serve.

COMMUNITY • DIVERSITY INNOVATION • INTEGRITY STUDENT-CENTEREDNESS • TRUST

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SERVING S the region NORTHEAST ARKANSAS “Greatness is not

where we stand, but in what direction we are moving…”

Greene

-Oliver Wendell Holmes

Lawrence

2

Independence

1

Newport Campus 7648 Victory Blvd. Newport, Arkansas 72112

Clay

Randolph

Craighead

Poinsett

Jackson

Cross

White

Mississippi

3 Crittenden

Woodruff St. Francis

Jonesboro Campus 5504 Krueger Drive Jonesboro, Arkansas 72401

Marked Tree Campus 33500 Hwy. 63 East Marked Tree, Arkansas 72365

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Online www.asun.edu

800.976.1676


KEY data SECOND HIGHEST WORKFORCE TRAINING: GRADUATION 5-YEAR SECOND RATE SUSTAINED AMONG RANKING US

AMONG ALL

ARKANSAS

TWO-YEAR CO LLEG E S

INCREASE OF 2-YEAR

33.9% IN 2014

COLLEGES

E N RO L L M E N T 5-YEAR INCREASE OF

18.8%

G ROW T H FALL 2014 SPRING 2015 INCREASE OF INCREASE OF

22.3% 12.9%

ASSOCIATE DEGREES

ONE OF ONLY SIX ARKANSAS

5-YEAR INCREASE OF

TO EXPERIENCE

AWARDED: TWO-YEAR COLLEGES

66% 17:1 STUDENT TO

FACULTY RATIO

GROWTH IN 2014

DEMONSTRATING OUR

COMMITMENT

TO STUDENT SUCCESS 17


SWOT analysis

The Big Ten: Analysis of Discussion within Two Focus Groups

STRENGTHS • Locations are convenient to students

• Lack of academic support for adult and older students

• Great Value/Affordability

• Too many online courses (lack of in class options) without skill development for student success

• Availability of scholarships and tuition assistance • Low Student:Teacher ratio • Small enough that you don’t get lost • Adaptability and innovation in responding quickly to the changing needs of the community and workforce • Approachability (Open Door Policy) • Strong connections to the community • Recent changes include a willingness to hear the student‘s voice • Instructors are involved inside/outside class

OPPORTUNITIES

• Some past problems with Financial Aid • Problems with the portal/lack of knowledge to assist • Poor information dissemination of changes, policies, and deadlines • Campus not aesthetically friendly to students • Not teaching more courses for transfer at lower levels • Lack of basic needs (i.e. food, space) at MT and JB • Not poised for space or human capital for the growth happening at Jonesboro • Lack of staff to recruit/retain students effectively

THREATS

• Online Tutoring and required class for online students

• Competition from online programs

• Offering baccalaureate degrees in partnership with colleges on ASUN campus

• Staying relevant as technology evolves

• Identify new academic programs and look strategically at those underperforming

• Remaining competitive in cost while raising tuition

• Growth in more short term programs

• Brand recognition of institution throughout our region

• Possible Honors College to promote academic rigor

• Losing existing partnerships with four year colleges and local high schools

• Better branding and identity to help alleviate confusion • Consideration to bus students to campus • Innovation in technology development • Strategic community alliances • Better 2 + 2 articulation agreements

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WEAKNESSES

• Market and recruit for our three distinct communities • Providing relevant and quality programs that our local workforce demands


STRATEGIC priorities STRATEGIC PRIORITY 1

STUDENT success

Goal Statement:

Arkansas State University-Newport will aggressively demonstrate a strong commitment to student success in all areas of the organization. 1. We will create an integrated, intensive and ongoing student-centered experience which leads to increased enrollment, retention, completion, transfer and employment rates. 2. We will ensure the highest level of excellence of faculty and staff through an emphasis on recruitment, employee retention and professional development. 3. We will provide high-quality general education and training pathways which lead to family-supporting wages in high-demand occupations.

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STRATEGIC PRIORITY 2

INSTITUTIONAL excellence Goal Statement:

Arkansas State University-Newport will actively demonstrate its commitment to excellence by creating a culture of accountability and promoting an entrepreneurial spirit. 1. We will effectively communicate with stakeholders both internally and externally. 2. We will create a brand that promotes the institution as a catalyst for positive change. 3. We will ensure continuous improvement in all institutional operations, guided by rigorous assessment and strengthened by accountability. 4. We will promote a culture of trust and transparency through accountability, emphasizing efficiency, stewardship and integrity. 5. We will ensure the appropriate resources to retain high-quality employees.

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STRATEGIC PRIORITY 3

COMMUNITY engagement

Goal Statement:

Arkansas State University-Newport will assume a leading role in creating economic and cultural advancement for the communities we serve. 1. We will serve as a catalyst for economic development by anticipating and responding to industry needs. 2. We will actively engage external parties to obtain support that will strengthen the college and provide additional resources to enhance the student learning experience. 3. We will ensure engagement and visibility in our communities to influence positive change and bring enhanced cultural opportunities that increase global awareness in our region. 21


KEY PERFORMANCE indicators ASSOCIATE DEGREES AWARDED

CERTIFICATES AWARDED

FIRST-YEAR RETENTION RATE STUDENT SATISFACTION INDICATOR (CCSSEE)

THREE-YEAR GRADUATION RATE

PERFORMANCE FUNDING SCORE

TOTAL HEADCOUNT

TOTAL FTE

TOTAL ANNUAL GIVING

WORKING CAPITAL RESERVES

EMPLOYEE PERSONAL ASSESSMENT OF THE COLLEGE ENVIRONMENT (PACE)

ENDOWMENT

WEB SITE (PAGE VIEWS /VISITORS)

ASSESSING our success 22


“Times and conditions

change

so rapidly that we must

keep our aim constantly focused on

the future.�

- Walt Disney

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ASUN - Rebuilding the American Dream  

2014 - 2019 Strategic Plan

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