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LEADING THE SEARCH

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THE

'S UNIVERSITY:

TWIN TOWERS DEMOLITION:

KNOCK DOWN, DRAG OUT

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ONE HOWL OF AN EXPERIENCE

THE MAGAZINE OF ARKANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY’S ALUMNI ASSOCIATION ~ SPRING 2012

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THE MAGAZINE OF ARKANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY’S ALUMNI ASSOCIATION ~ SUMMER 2012

ISSUE

LIVING, LEARNING, LEADING One Hundred Years in the Making

THIS EDITION OF IS A MILESTONE. IT'S THE 25TH ISSUE, WHICH MAKES IT A GREAT TIME TO TAKE A FOND LOOK BACK! voices

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Voices The Magazine of Arkansas State University’s Alumni Association

EXECUTIVE EDITOR - BETH SMITH EDITOR - NANCY HENDRICKS DESIGN - ASU PUBLICATIONS AND CREATIVE SERVICES PRINTING - MASTER PRINTING COMPANY, INC.

16 ASU ALUMNI ASSOCIATION PRESIDENT - CHARLOTTE LUTES RAZER '86

FEATURES

VICE PRESIDENT - RICH CARVELL JR. '91

10 25 and Counting!

SECRETARY-TREASURER - CHARISSE QUARLES CHILDERS '88 MSE '91 SCCT '01

BOARD MEMBERS

The Speech and Hearing Center

20 TV or Not TV ASU-TV’s new HD studio PROFILES

MARGO TRAVIS AUFDERHEIDE '76

JOE MILES '74 MBA '77

ANGELA BARBER AUSTIN '00 MPA '03

RICK MILES '78

JOHN BAINE '97

DALE MORRIS '70

RUSTY CHAMBERS '89

JOY BAXTER MURPHY '92

BRANDI HINKLE '98

MELANIE BRYANT POSEY '00

LYNN SITZ HOWERTON '90

STEVEN SIGSBY '72

BILLY KEEDY '99

MARK WEBB '89

LEN KEMP '75

NONIE SHEFFIELD WIGGINS '83 EDD ‘11

BOB MCCUISTON '65 MSE '68

MIKE WILLIAMS '92

ASU-JONESBORO CHANCELLOR - DR. TIM HUDSON

4 Student Profile: Kelsie Hodges

OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS

Good sport EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR - BETH SMITH ’82, MA’03

6 Campus Profile: Dr. Shane Hunt High energy

DIRECTOR, ALUMNI COMMUNICATIONS - DR. NANCY HENDRICKS ’74

DIRECTOR, ANNUAL FUND - ELAINE POYNTER ’01

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT - CARISSA GRIFFIN

8 Alumni Profile: Tamela Tenpenny-Lewis ‘83 Cemetery Lady

3 My Voice: Dr. Susan Hanrahan Dean, College of Nursing and Health Professions

MY VOICE: DR. SUSAN HANRAHAN, D E A N , C O L L E G E O F N U R S I N G A N D H E A LT H P R O F E S S I O N S More unique are the specialty programs in the college which include the Speech and Hearing Center featured in this issue. Interprofessional education (where students from different programs work together) is a new “buzzword” in health education. We have developed programs in the college such as Healthy Ager, Diabetes Self-Management, Beck PRIDE Center for America’s Wounded Veterans and ASU CARE (Community Action Reinforcing Empowerment) to formalize this method of education. Since we don’t have a hospital on our campus, our students spend time together as Avatars in our virtual hospital, ASU Memorial, treating Hal Wolf, our African American stroke patient. Our Regional Center for Disaster Preparedness Education ensures that each of our students graduate with a certificate in Basic Disaster Life Support. The Title IV E program has made a tremendous impact on the Arkansas Child Welfare Workforce. You will find Hippotherapy (equine assisted therapy) and Scoliosis programs in the college also. We have adopted Harrisburg Middle School this year to assist with health and wellness efforts, and the list goes on. All of these venues provide service delivery, education and research opportunities for our students and faculty.

DIRECTOR, ALUMNI RELATIONS - LINDSAY HARMON BURNETT ’05

DIRECTOR, MEMBERSHIP - MARSHA MAYS CARWELL ’05

DEPARTMENTS

You have read about “pieces” of our college in various editions of VOICES. I wish there was an opportunity to highlight all aspects of the college because I think you would find it to be a very special place. We are most well known for our academic programming in common health workforce areas that are high demand occupations. This piece of our college has evolved and grown over time and can be easily viewed on the ASU website.

PAST PRESIDENT - PAUL ROWTON II ‘98

A look back at VOICES

16 High-Level Communications

This is a very special and reflective time for me. The College of Nursing and Health Professions turned 30 years old this year. The ironic thing is that I have been the dean for over half of the life of this college and what a great life it has been! The opportunity to work with alumni who are the foundation of the health care workforce, talented students, dedicated faculty and staff, and a supportive and dynamic community/state has certainly been a privilege.

Voices is published three times a year by the Arkansas State University Alumni Association. Subscriptions are available through membership in the ASU Alumni Association. Single issues are available for $6 each. Editorial offices are located in the Cooper Alumni Center, 2600 Alumni Boulevard, Jonesboro, Arkansas. Our telephone number is (870) 972-2586 and our FAX number is (870) 972-2039.

The College has certainly changed in size, complexity and appearance during my tenure here but so has the University. It has been so valuable to have cultural diversity right at our fingertips. The increased ability for students to live and learn together has made for lifelong friendships. The “modernization” of our campus is a work in progress but much has been accomplished over the last decade. Online degree programs keep our faculty pushing the envelope, and these have also provided access to those who may not have otherwise chosen higher education or advanced degrees. In the life of a university, a few decades is just the beginning. So for my college and this university, many challenges and opportunities are before us. What would we do for the next 30 years without them??

MAIL CONTRIBUTIONS, LETTERS AND ADDRESS CHANGES TO: VOICES ASU ALUMNI ASSOCIATION, INC. P.O. BOX 1990

24 The Last Word: Beth Smith '82 MA '03 Executive Director 2

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STATE UNIVERSITY, AR 72467

WEBSITE: http://alumni.astate.edu

EMAIL: alumni@astate.edu

Dr. Susan Hanrahan, Dean of the College of Nursing and Health Professions and ASU's most senior dean, was profiled in the Spring 2007 issue of VOICES, the magazine of the ASU Alumni Association. She oversees one of ASU's most popular degree areas, which has evolved from the Department of Nursing, Division of Nursing, College of Nursing, and in 1982, the College of Nursing and Health Professions.

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UPON RECEIVING THE NEWS THIS YEAR THAT ASU SENIOR KELSIE HODGES OF JONESBORO HAD RECEIVED THE 2012 SUN BELT CONFERENCE FEMALE SPORTING BEHAVIOR AWARD, THERE WERE MANY KNOWING SMILES. ONE OF THE BIGGEST CAME FROM HER COACH. David Rehr, ASU's head volleyball coach, said, "It is an honor to have Kelsie Hodges represent Arkansas State University as a student athlete. Kelsie is all about the right things in life. On the court she works hard competing every day to help the team be successful. In the classroom she is an outstanding student with a GPA of 3.944. She strives to be an all-around student. In life she gives even more, volunteering with a local volleyball club, an ASU community outreach group, the March of Dimes as well as a local church." Outstanding athlete, top scholar, community volunteer and all-around good sport? How does she pack it all in? "During the season, it is definitely more difficult to maintain grades because we miss a lot of class," says Kelsie, though she adds, "Our athletics department is very dedicated and supportive in helping athletes succeed in academics. We not only have a place that we can go to for tutors, computers, or advisors, but a very good tasks system that keeps us on track to stay organized. I love my major, Exercise Science, and what I’m studying. It’s a lot easier to study and want to learn things when you like the subject." She learned both skill and discipline early in life, citing her parents Kevin Hodges '87 MBA '03 and Dametra Proffitt Hodges '88 as influences. "My dad coached me through every sport growing up including

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softball, basketball, and even soccer. The first year I played in my volleyball club, our team won one of the biggest tournaments in New Orleans." But it wasn't a breeze. "I have had to overcome some challenges. One was trying to obtain a volleyball scholarship. Being recruited is a very time-consuming process. When I first started that journey I was told by some that I was not good enough to be a Division I athlete. It had been my dream since junior high to want to play in college. Being told that I couldn’t do something kind of motivates me more to obtain that goal. I worked hard for several years in becoming a better volleyball athlete. Proving them wrong was not my main goal, but it definitely gave me more mental toughness, and to know how to be confident in my abilities and not with what others said." She and ASU were fortunate to find each other. "My main reason to come to ASU was of course to play volleyball. But as a student, ASU provides a lot of opportunities for success. I enjoy how much student diversity there is on campus. My family lives here in Jonesboro so I appreciate being close to them. I also love to participate in all of the activities that occur during school such as the BCM, Campus Outreach, Homecoming, and all of the activities the student organizations put on throughout the year. At ASU there is always something to

be a part of whether it is going to watch ball games, being a leader in an organization, or getting to be a part of campus life." She also has high praise for those who are no longer on campus: "Alumni make A-State what it is today, full of rich traditions and heritage that expand every year. They have provided us with many opportunities not only in the athletic department but throughout the whole campus. I really appreciate all of the support we have." After her own graduation, she plans to apply to physical therapy school at ASU and receive a doctorate. "I have always had a passion to help others with their needs and would love to work with disabled children in physical therapy." On the court, she is known for her kills, or spiking attacks with the ball that are unreturnable by the other team. Even in the zone, however, her sporting behavior can be seen on the court as she tries to encourage her teammates and lead by attitude. She is eager to make connections that can bring A-State volleyball and the Jonesboro community together, setting up volunteer opportunities for her out-of-town teammates to experience. "We have been able to read to kids, help serve the Miracle Rodeo organization, and help the Junior Olympic volleyball team as well as other school volleyball programs during our summer camps, she says. "I think it’s important for the volleyball team and the community to have a good relationship, not only for our program to grow but so we can serve Jonesboro and help it grow as well." Now, that's a good sport!

"BEING TOLD THAT I COULDN’T DO SOMETHING KIND OF MOTIVATES ME MORE TO OBTAIN THAT GOAL."

Photo by Nancy Hendricks

STUDENT PROFILE: KELSIE HODGES


WHEN THE JONESBORO REGIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE HELD A RECENT POWER BREAKFAST AT THE COOPER ALUMNI CENTER, IT WAS STANDING-ROOM-ONLY FOR THE PRESENTATION BY THE GUEST SPEAKER. The speaker was Dr. Shane Hunt, associate professor of marketing in the College of Business, and no one complained about standing. Most didn’t even remember they were on their feet. Hunt's upbeat, highenergy presentations work like that. And that morning was no exception. He's been at ASU for five years. Born and raised in Oklahoma, he went to work in a private sector marketing division before returning to school for his doctorate. He notes, "There are always obstacles in life. When I worked for a Fortune 500 company, we lived through a severe economic recession and I saw hundreds of my friends and co-workers lose their jobs. Getting a Ph.D. is a remarkably stressful pursuit that comes with a host of challenges and obstacles. All of us have these types of personal or professional challenges that we must deal with." Part of his personal plan for overcoming such challenges is, "to figure out what I am doing wrong. So many people are so quick to blame others, and I have found success by focusing on ways that I can improve myself." He adds, "Most major things in my life (whether that has been writing a book or being a dad) require investing time and making a day-to-day commitment that ultimately pays off in terrific ways."

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He calls the A-State community "an amazing place to live, work, and raise a family. I chose ASU over a number of 'bigger' universities because I wanted to be part of building something special. I remember coming to ASU for the first time on my recruiting visit and I was so impressed with the campus, the dean and department chair, and the entire community. There is a genuineness here that is difficult to find most places. Plus, many of the students are first generation college students like I was and I wanted the opportunity to help them the way my professors helped me." He has an interesting insight from a unique perspective. "The thing I would want to share with alumni is the terrific way that ASU encourages its professors to balance teaching, research and service. We have hired a number of amazing Ph.D's at A-State from some of the best research universities in the world who are publishing articles and books that are at the leading edge of business, engineering, nursing and a host of other disciplines. The amazing part is that we have done this while still putting the top priority on the student learning experience. When I completed my Ph.D., I interviewed with a number of schools throughout the country and in this state, and I was disappointed with the fact that teaching was

not emphasized at all at many of them. I think this is not in line with our mission as public universities. Many of the other schools told me they would 'protect' me from having to help with the business community and other types of service. I did not want them to protect me. ASU encouraged me to use my skills and abilities to help make Northeast Arkansas a better place. ASU has supported my research and I have been able to publish numerous articles and will soon complete authoring my first book, but more importantly they have supported, encouraged and emphasized that all of us as professors should work every day to be great teachers and to serve our community. This mindset has led us to hire truly great professors who share these same passions which is making ASU a better place each day." Sometimes that passion is spread one person at a time. "I tell my students that I cannot think of one thing that will be more helpful in achieving their goals in life, regardless of major or background, than choosing to have a positive attitude and making the most of every single day." And he has a vision for the institution: "Every alumnus and supporter plays a role, whether it means hiring an ASU graduate, attending a sporting event, wearing ASU shirts to the office, or giving financial support to the area that means the most to you. I truly believe if we all choose to be great and do our part, that ASU has a brighter future than any school in this state." That's worth standing for!

"I TRULY BELIEVE IF WE ALL CHOOSE TO BE GREAT AND DO OUR PART, THAT ASU HAS A BRIGHTER FUTURE THAN ANY SCHOOL IN THIS STATE."

Photo by Nancy Hendricks

CAMPUS PROFILE: DR. SHANE HUNT, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF MARKETING


IN HIGH SCHOOL ENGLISH CLASS, LINES FROM ANDREW MARVELL'S POEM ARE OFTEN QUOTED: "THE GRAVE'S A FINE AND PRIVATE PLACE, BUT NONE I THINK DO THERE EMBRACE." Alumna Tamela Tenpenny-Lewis '83 of Little Rock is out to change that, at least in removing some of the isolation which has often led to neglect in traditionally AfricanAmerican cemeteries. She has led the drive to spotlight little-known resting places, bringing school groups and individuals to help identify those buried there and replace ghostly spirits with a sunny good nature. In visiting schools, she proudly sports a T-shirt emblazoned with the words, "Cemetery Lady." She serves as president of Arkansas' PAAC, Inc., or Preservation of African American Cemeteries. She is also the current national president of the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society based in Washington, D. C. That organization holds its 33rd annual national genealogy conference this fall with Tamela at the helm. In describing the importance of this work, she has said, "Many African American cemeteries have never been registered, are rarely documented, infrequently appear on maps, and are almost never shown on historic plats. African American cemeteries, many of which are considered 'slave burial grounds,' have been used for generations by tradition and are rarely described by deeds or other legal instruments. It is not until the misfortune of development that many realize the cemetery has never been in the possession of the community. Vital information is being lost because many cemetery caretakers are not well versed in preservation issues; they may burn off areas of the cemetery, destroying funeral home markers that contain vital information of

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the deceased, or they may haul away broken or obliterated stones, leaving graves unmarked and resulting in the loss of valuable historical and genealogical information." Her work has been the subject of a powerful documentary on the Arkansas Educational Television Network titled Silent Storytellers. One of the highlights of the film is her cemetery field trip with an elementary school group, inviting enthusiastic third, fourth and fifth grade students to each select a headstone to research. Tamela was a member of the Homecoming Court and a former ASU cheerleader, which may explain the positive energy she brings to the project. It may also be her attitude toward the departed. "The only real challenges I've had in my life have been my inability to accept the loss of loved ones. Instead of letting go, I've completely surrounded myself with their presence. I talk to them, ask for guidance, am surrounded by their photographs, and call on my ancestors frequently. 'Rest In Peace?' Not for them, as I am constantly calling on them to help me find things I've misplaced, to guide me in my research, to remind me of things I've forgotten. With the exception of sending me lottery numbers, they always answer." She is in demand as a speaker and presenter across the United States, citing her student days at ASU as forming a firm foundation. "I'm sure each of us, decades later, cherishes the education afforded us from Arkansas State. The friendships we developed are a mainstay in our current lives. Faculty

and staff made a lasting impact. I would be remiss not to mention Dr. C. Calvin Smith '71, the first African American faculty member at ASU in 1970, merely ten years before I arrived on the campus. Dr. Smith was the first Presidential Distinguished Professor of Heritage Studies at ASU and a charter member, scholar and advisor of PAAC." She earned a criminology degree, and is currently in her 29th year as an international flight attendant for American Airlines. She is married to Judious Lewis '84 MPA '91, former wide receiver for the NFL's Seattle Seahawks and currently commercial loan officer at Chambers Bank in Little Rock. Between their professional lives and busy family, there is rarely a dull moment. But even in the midst of her hectic life, whether cheering for student-athlete daughter Taylor or jetting off to Rio, she takes time to reflect. "Always pay homage to the memory of those departed," she says. "Speak their names, tell their stories, write their histories, emulate their virtues and practice their deeds of charity. Honor the past, the resting places of our ancestors, and remember the struggles of those who came before you." PAAC's mission statement is, "Reclaiming the past to preserve our future." It's not just a slogan with Tamela Tenpenny-Lewis, proudly known as the Cemetery Lady. She speaks for those who have gone before, bringing their last resting place back into the light.

"PAY HOMAGE TO THE MEMORY OF THOSE DEPARTED. HONOR THE PAST, THE RESTING PLACES OF OUR ANCESTORS, AND REMEMBER THE STRUGGLES OF THOSE WHO CAME BEFORE YOU."

To see Tamela's work spotlighted in the AETN documentary Silent Storytellers, visit http://www.paacarcemeteries.com/SilentStoryTeller .aspx and click Resources & Links.

Photo courtesy of Tamela Tenpenny-Lewis

ALUMNI PROFILE: TAMELA TENPENNY-LEWIS '83


COVERING THEM ALL Each issue is carefully planned. We've tried to share the good news about ASU by spotlighting the exciting people, places and programs that are the hallmark of the University's growth. To do that, we've kept in mind the dazzling array of diversity that comes together to make up our dynamic campus. We've made sure all of our academic units have been covered: the Colleges of Agriculture, Business, Communications, Education, Engineering, Fine Arts, Humanities & Social Science, Nursing & Health Professions, Sciences & Mathematics, and University College along with the Graduate School and Department of Military Science. Within those colleges, just about every department has been represented, from Accounting to Zoology.

JUST ABOUT EVERY DEPARTMENT HAS BEEN REPRESENTED, FROM ACCOUNTING TO ZOOLOGY. Of course we've spotlighted Athletics. We've also covered the Dean B. Ellis Library, Delta Heritage Sites, Judd Hill Plantation, University organizations, and ASU history. We left campus to follow ASU students, faculty and staff as they volunteered over Spring Break at a Navajo reservation in Arizona (Summer 2007), and to travel

halfway around the world to visit Kuwait (Spring 2005). We did some time travel, stepping back a few hundred years with alumnus Rich HoleyďŹ eld '69 who owns the Renaissance-themed Scarborough Faire in Texas. And for those who like barbeque with their giant turkey legs, we smacked our lips over alumnus Terry Black '83 turning the Super Smokers favorite developed at ASU fraternity cookouts into a tasty world-class treat.

PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURISTIC We gave readers a bird's eye view of the implosion when the Twin Towers residence hall came down as a "knock-down, drag out" event (Fall 2008). In the same issue, we were on the spot when new campus construction arose, including the Cooper Alumni Center, Delta Center for Economic Development, Honors Living-Learning residence hall, Reynolds Center for Health Sciences, the Quads, Westside Overpass (to be named for U. S. Congressman Marion Berry) and the student recreation center (to be named the Red W. O. L. F. Center, which we toured with a group of students in Spring 2010.) We took readers inside the high security Arkansas Biosciences Institute soon after it opened in Fall 2004. The new Reng Student Services Center (Fall 2006) was our feature while still in the construction phase. We've honored the past by highlighting ASU's role during World War II (Fall 2004), and we've also been responsive to current events. There were the personal stories of Hurricane Katrina evacuees being able to continue their education at ASU (Spring 2006). And in the Spring 2002 issue, an

THIS EDITION OF VOICES, THE MAGAZINE OF THE ASU ALUMNI ASSOCIATION, IS A MILESTONE. IT'S THE

25TH ISSUE SINCE WE BEGAN PUBLISHING VOICES IN THE YEAR 2000.

WHICH MAKES IT A GREAT TIME TO TAKE A FOND LOOK BACK AT WHERE WE'VE BEEN!

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alumnus shared his experience on the 61st floor of the World Trade Center on that fateful day of September 11th. We celebrated ASU's 100th birthday in the Fall 2010 issue by covering the exciting activities surrounding our Centennial. And in Fall 2000's exciting combination of past, present and future, we followed our radiologic sciences program to an archaeological investigation of Peru's "Lost Warriors of the Clouds."

UP-AND-COMERS In the Spring 2001 issue we spotlighted up-and-comers such as the alumnus who was serving as President Pro-Tem of the Arkansas Senate at the time of the article. He later went on to become our 45th Governor, Mike Beebe '68. His counterpart in the Arkansas House of Representatives, Shane Broadway '94, was also spotlighted in that Spring 2001 article as the youngest elected Speaker of the House. He has gone on to become the interim director of the Arkansas Department of Higher Education, overseeing all institutions of higher learning in the state. In the Summer 2006 issue, Dr. Len Frey '84 MBA '90 was profiled as the new dean of the College of Business. This summer, he was named ASU's Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administration, responsible for all financial and administrative operations of the university.

ONWARD AND UPWARD Some of our subjects continue to dazzle. Dr. Joe Johnson '70 (Summer 2008), the Rock Doc of Las Vegas, keeps on rockin.' While he is bound by doctor-patient confidentiality from revealing the names of the celebrities he treats when they

are playing the Strip, social events are fair game for reporters and paparazzi, such as this item from Norm Clarke in the May 24 Las Vegas Review-Journal: "A tender moment after the Billboard Awards show Sunday: As Gladys Knight was leaving the MGM Grand Garden, she saw Stevie Wonder. She approached him, leaned in and said, 'Stevie, it's Gladys.' They embraced like long-lost friends. Knight, who was walking with celebrity physician Joe Johnson, introduced him to Wonder. Johnson told Wonder they met 40-plus years ago at Arkansas State University, when Johnson booked him to play at the school." The Rock Doc not only rocks on, he plugs his alma mater! ASU's Olympic medalist in the pole vault, Earl Bell '86, was profiled in the Fall 2008 issue. Today a world-renowned athletic trainer, he continues to produce Olympians at his facility in Jonesboro, with three - Becky Holliday, Derek Miles and Jeremy Scott - on the U. S. team in London for this summer's Olympic games. Another Bell Athletics Olympian in London, Jillian Schwartz, competes on the Israeli team but continues to train with Bell, who himself crossed the pond as a coach for the 2012 Olympics. Bill Carter '61 has solidified his connection to ASU after his feature appeared in Fall 2006. He has rounded up buddies like Kris Kristofferson and given generously of his time to produce ASU's Johnny Cash Music Festival, benefitting the University's partnership in the restoration of Cash's boyhood home in Dyess and the town's historic Administration Building. We spotlighted Arkansas' premier wine expert Bruce Cochran '80 of Little Rock in the Spring 2007 issue. This year, he has added a regular series of wine appreciation classes at the Cooper Alumni Center to his busy schedule through ASU's Continuing

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THE MAGAZINE OF ARKANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY’S ALUMNI ASSOCIATION ~ FALL 2005

Education and Community Outreach. And the ASU Rugby club (Fall 2010) has risen to the national championship level, falling only to Brigham Young last May in the USA Rugby Men’s College Rugby National Championship. Head coach Matt Huckaby '02 MPA '05 and a number of his players were named to the USA Rugby Men’s Collegiate All-America team for 2012 as well as USA Rugby Men’s Collegiate All-American traveling squad.

WHERE ARE THEY NOW? Over the years, we profiled outstanding students as they looked to graduation from ASU and starting life in the 'real world.' Let's see what they are doing now that they are young alumni: Angela Austin '00 MPA '03 was profiled in the Winter 2003 issue just before receiving her master's degree in public administration. Today, she says, "I am employed with the Department of Veterans Affairs at the Little Rock Regional Office as a Rating Veterans Service Rep. I enjoy being able to travel and spend quality time with my family, and also take pleasure in performing community service in my local area. Arkansas State University gave me the educational foundation I needed to excel in my current career, which has afforded me the means to make a comfortable living. My college experience helped shape my leadership and organizational skills. While at ASU, I took advantage of the opportunities to intern and study abroad to expand my knowledge in the field of government. My public administration degree has provided unlimited possibilities in both the non-profit and public sector. I am so proud to be an ASU alumna and happily serve on the ASU Alumni Association Board."

THE MAGAZINE OF ARKANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY’S ALUMNI ASSOCIATION ~ SPRING 2006

LEADING THE SEARCH

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THE MAGAZINE OF ARKANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY’S ALUMNI ASSOCIATION ~ SUMMER 2006

Edmond Hampton '07 was our Spring 2007 student profile. Many readers found his story remarkable for his combination of both football and music as a student, with the indelible image of his running into the stands in his A-State football uniform to conduct the band. Today, Edmond is choir and band director for J.A. Fair High School in Little Rock after serving at Pine Bluff High School for more than four years. His wife Rachel Warnick Hampton '06 is an attorney. Edmond retains ties to his alma mater, returning for A-State's Choir Camp this summer. "Being a student at ASU gave me the life experiences that I need to be a positive contributor in today's changing society," he says. "The faculty were firm but helpful, the environment was comfortable but realistic, and the student life was just what I needed to grow as an individual and adult. I am thankful to have been a part of the institution and I look forward to what the future holds." Vithiea Peang '11, originally from Cambodia, was our student profile in the Spring 2010 issue. He went on from ASU to be accepted into the highly competitive graduate engineering program at the University of Dundee in Scotland. He says, "I am currently enrolled in a master's degree program in Earthquake and Offshore Geotechnical Engineering. I have come to the final stage of the course, which is finishing up my dissertation (titled Estimation of Collapse Load of Shallow Skirted Foundation Subjected to Combined Loading) before starting my career as an engineer with Subsea 7 based in Aberdeen, Scotland. I have traveled all around Scotland as well as the southern part of England. To prepare for all this, ASU helped me enormously. Everything I did as an undergraduate helped me to be ready for this course as well as the European job

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THE MAGAZINE OF ARKANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY’S ALUMNI ASSOCIATION ~ SPRING 2007

THE MAGAZINE OF ARKANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY’S ALUMNI ASSOCIATION ~ SUMMER 2007


market. I would not have gotten this far without ASU and the people there." Randy Phillips '02 MPT '04 was profiled in Fall 2004 as he was finishing his physical therapy degree at ASU. After graduation, he worked as a director of physical therapy both in Arkansas and later in North Carolina before purchasing an outpatient clinic in Franklin, North Carolina, in April 2008. He and his wife Molly Mayer Phillips '95 re-named the thriving business for the local Nantahala Mountains. Maintaining connections with his alma mater, today Randy's practice is an out-of-state clinical instruction site for current physical therapy students at Arkansas State. If readers of our Fall 2001 issue thought they were seeing double, they were. We featured several sets of twins in the Student Government Association that year, including Andrea Smalec '02. After establishing a firm career in public relations, she is currently director of communications and public relations for Shedd Aquarium in Chicago, one of the leading global conservation organizations worldwide and most-visited aquariums in the world. She keeps busy leading the aquarium’s public relations program, supporting the aquarium's global conservation efforts, animal collections, exhibits, education efforts and events, national media relations, crisis communications, social media strategies and annual planning. What does she most enjoy about her life now? "I just enjoy EVERYTHING!" she says. "The job, the Aquarium itself, the city of Chicago, all the cultural choices. I just love it all." But she has not lost her loyalty to A-State. "I know a lot of people say they love their alma mater and how much it helped them, but honestly, ASU was wonderful for me. Just about everything

THE MAGAZINE OF ARKANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY’S ALUMNI ASSOCIATION ~ SPRING 2008

THE MAGAZINE OF ARKANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY’S ALUMNI ASSOCIATION ~ SUMMER 2008

It's not often a publication has the chance for an exclusive, but sometimes VOICES has uncovered hidden gems for our readers. One surprise that delighted many people was the Fall 2006 item about the general superintendent for the company overseeing the renovation of the Reng Student Center. He was none other than Philip Alford who, as a child actor, portrayed the character of Jem in 1962's classic film, To Kill a Mockingbird. The unassuming Alford said he went years without talking about his life as a child star. He appreciates that the movie means so much to so many; especially now, in the film's 50th anniversary year, he brings a first-hand glimpse into its creation. But Alford now has a legacy that is part of ASU, and his contribution to the Student Center, at the heart of campus, will no doubt also stand the test of time. The Spring 2007 issue revealed the little-known but highlyproductive friendship between A-State's President V. C. Kays and Sen. Hattie Caraway of Jonesboro, the first woman elected to the United States Senate. Many people commented that they had no idea of the contributions Caraway made to ASU, including the construction of an astounding nine buildings on campus during the Great Depression, including four that are still used today. And a mystery was solved in the same article when the naming of Jonesboro thoroughfare Caraway Road was definitively answered by President Kays' son V. H. 'Buddy' Kays, who said it was named both for Sen. Hattie Caraway and her husband Thad ("I know it was named for both of them because I named it!" said Kays.) To those who love the Andy Griffith Show, a significant piece

THOSE WE'VE LOST Looking through past issues of any magazine, we are often struck by the loss of people we loved. VOICES is no exception. Take for example, Dr. Mildred Vance '46, who passed away in 2008. She was profiled in the Spring 2001 issue, and at that point, had spent more than a half century training teachers. At the time of her retirement in 2002, Vance's 54-year tenure at ASU stood as the longest career of any professor in the institution's history. One of our most popular features was the Fall 2006 commemoration of the 50th anniversary of filming the classic movie A Face in the Crowd in northeast Arkansas. Quite a few ASU alumni had their "15 minutes of fame" by participating in the 1956 production. They shared their recollections of working in the landmark film alongside stars Andy Griffith and Patricia Neal, both of whom passed away after the article in VOICES was published. The feature was especially memorable through the unique location photos of the young Griffith and Neal from personal collections of our alumni who were there.

VOLUME 12, ISSUE 2 ~ $6.00

VOLUME 12, ISSUE 1 ~ $6.00

VOLUME 11, ISSUE 1 ~ $6.00

VOLUME 10, ISSUE 2 ~ $6.00

VOLUME 10, ISSUE 1 ~ $6.00

EXCLUSIVES

I have done since graduation, I owe to ASU - not only the classes and professors (who were great, by the way) but also the leadership opportunities like SGA. I loved ASU and am so grateful. I made lifelong friends and mentors. Just last week I saw Dr. Gil Fowler '71 of A-State's Journalism department at a conference in Chicago. He took a picture of the ASU mug on my desk!"

THE MAGAZINE OF ARKANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY’S ALUMNI ASSOCIATION ~ FALL 2008

THE MAGAZINE OF ARKANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY’S ALUMNI ASSOCIATION ~ SPRING 2010

THE

THE MAGAZINE OF ARKANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY’S ALUMNI ASSOCIATION ~ SPRING 2011

'S UNIVERSITY:

TWIN TOWERS DEMOLITION:

KNOCK DOWN, DRAG OUT

ONE HOWL OF AN EXPERIENCE

LIVING, LEARNING, LEADING One Hundred Years in the Making

IT’ S NOT OFTEN A PUBLICATION HAS THE CHANCE FOR AN EXCLUSIVE, BUT SOMETIMES VOICES UNCOVERED HIDDEN GEMS FOR OUR READERS. Was this iconic character born during the filming in northeast Arkansas? Members of the ASU family who joined America in mourning the death of Andy Griffith this summer might have enjoyed a special moment of nostalgia courtesy of their alumni magazine. Where will our next 25 issues of VOICES take us? Your ideas and suggestions are always welcome. It is, after all, YOUR alumni magazine! If you missed any of these stories and would like back issues of VOICES, please contact Alumni Relations at alumni@astate.edu or 870-972-2586.

VOLUME 13, ISSUE 2 ~ $6.00

VOLUME 13, ISSUE 1 ~ $6.00

VOLUME 12, ISSUE 3 ~ $6.00

THE MAGAZINE OF ARKANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY’S ALUMNI ASSOCIATION ~ FALL 2010

of Mayberry lore was revealed in our Fall 2006 Face in the Crowd article. Former Clay County Sheriff Leon Beaton told us that his family welcomed Griffith into their home between takes, chatting with the actor about things such as colorful characters around town. Sheriff Beaton recalled mentioning a local resident at the time: "He had a problem with alcohol. He was a real nice fellow, wouldn't hurt a soul. We had a special cell for him. He'd let himself in and then later he would just pay his fine and go. Years later, when we watched the Andy Griffith show on TV, they had this town drunk in Mayberry named Otis who'd let himself in and out of his own special jail cell. Well, it was exactly like that!"

THE MAGAZINE OF ARKANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY’S ALUMNI ASSOCIATION ~ SPRING 2012

THE MAGAZINE OF ARKANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY’S ALUMNI ASSOCIATION ~ SUMMER 2012


HIGH-LEVEL communications

AMONG THE AMERICAN FILM INSTITUTE'S TOP DOZEN MOVIE LINES IS,

"What we’ve got here is failure to communicate" FROM THE CLASSIC PAUL NEWMAN FILM COOL HAND LUKE. THAT IS NOT SOMETHING THAT CAN BE SAID OF THE DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATION DISORDERS AT ARKANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY.

They're about as far from failure as you can get and are doing their best to make sure people of all ages can communicate with others at their highest potential. And they've got an outstanding space to make it happen! It's hard not to be awed with at ASU's Speech and Hearing Center in the Donald W. Reynolds Center for Health Sciences. Patients and guests are greeted by a pleasant, welcoming lobby which contains cheerful artwork made possible by a grant from the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation. If anything in the field can be called 'state of the art,' it can be found here. When the facility opened in 2009, the department chair, Dr. Richard A. Neeley '76 MSP '77, said: "Our relocation to the new Donald W. Reynolds Center for Health Sciences has afforded new and innovative clinical and service-learning opportunities for students and faculty in a facility that is extremely 'family friendly.'" In addition to clinical spaces, there are classrooms, offices, conference/study rooms, and computer labs affording students with a top-notch learning environment. The graduate program in Communication Disorders includes supervised clinical practicum which takes place in the Center. More than 50 patients are treated each week, and since the Speech and Hearing Center is a hands-on teaching facility, services are free to both the campus and the general public.

STAYING POWER The program trains undergraduate and graduate students in prevention, evaluation, and intervention services to people of all ages. Clients may have speech, language, and/or swallowing disorders due to conditions such as hearing impairment as well as those resulting from stroke or brain injury. After graduation and licensing, students ultimately find jobs in settings such as schools or preschools, hospitals, home health, long-term care, rehabilitation centers and private 16

practice. They may work with children who have language delays and speech problems, provide treatment to people who stutter, or help individuals who have had a stroke. And their students are in for the long term. Each year, the department sponsors the Jane H. LeBlanc Conference in Communication Disorders, named in honor of Jane Hailey LeBlanc '82 who retired as an audiologist in 2007 at age 92 and is currently emeritus audiologist for a medical clinic in Jonesboro. That communicates staying power! Dr. Susan Hanrahan, dean of the College of Nursing and Health Professions, is a fan of the program even pre-dating their new facility. "The Speech and Hearing Clinic has served innumerable clients in our service area for many years. It is a perfect place for student learning, service delivery and scholarship." But the move has helped. "Our state-of-the-art facility enhances the experience for all participating groups," she says. "The Center is another excellent example of our work with the community and the positive impact it is having on our participants."

WANTED ADVISOR'S JOB Arianne Fisher Pait '95 directs the Speech and Language Center, with an official title of assistant professor/director of clinical services in communication disorders. Born and raised in Jonesboro, she says: "I remember being a naĂŻve

"I TOLD HER THAT I WANTED TO HAVE HER JOB ONE DAY! I REALLY NEVER DREAMED THAT TEN YEARS LATER I WOULD BECOME THE DIRECTOR!" voices

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She is proud of her field. "The Department of Communication Disorders has always emphasized the application of theory in the clinical setting. My experience as an undergraduate gave me a unique advantage over other graduate students who did not have the opportunity for an undergraduate clinical education. I love working with students as they gain experience in unique and unpredictable clinical moments."

AGES 2 TO 92 She emphasizes the program's inclusiveness. "We evaluate and treat individuals from ages 2-92 and beyond. The disorders that we see include hearing, voice, fluency, articulation, language, aphasia, apraxia and traumatic brain injury." She also notes

its value in the world. "The Communication Disorders Department has a long history of producing well-prepared SLPs who often treat an underserved population in the Delta. I want our students to positively impact the lives of those they treat. The ASU Speech and Hearing Center provides the training necessary for them to work in the community to enhance the communication abilities of those in our state." She finds a mutually beneficial relationship with the University. "Every nationally accredited program in communication disorders must provide their students with real-life clinical experience. All students in communication disorders must complete a clinical practicum semester at the ASUSHC where they are assigned to several clients. Faculty members supervise the therapy sessions and collaborate with the student clinicians as they carry out their treatment plans. Our program has experienced a tremendous amount of growth for many reasons. One reason that cannot be overlooked is the new facility that houses the Department of Communication Disorders as well as the ASUSHC. The Reynolds Center has provided us with the space and technology necessary to operate a state-of-the-art speech and hearing center."

Photos by Nancy Hendricks

undergraduate. My advisor, Mary Marche, who was at that time the director of the ASU Speech and Hearing Center, asked me what I wanted to do as an Speech-Language Pathologist, or SLP. I told her that I wanted to have her job one day! I really never dreamed that ten years later I would become the director!"

chair of the Department of Communication Disorders. Like Pait, his relationship with ASU goes back to his student days. "I grew up on a small family farm in Clay County where I learned the value of hard work and a good education. As a high school student in Corning, I never considered attending any other university. ASU was always my first and only choice. Speech Pathology was a relatively new program at ASU in 1972 when I enrolled as a freshman. Because of its novelty as a career choice and that fact that it represented a profession dedicated to assisting others, I was drawn to the degree. Dr. George Herndon was my mentor and had a great deal to do with encouraging me to continue my education beyond the bachelor’s degree." He says he was taught to consider and analyze the complex nature of all types of communication and all types of communication disorders. "Speech-Language Pathology doesn’t possess 'sure-fire' cures for many of the disorders we treat," he says, "but with careful planning and consideration, we can often improve the communication skills of the majority of clients we treat." Neeley adds, "Though the ASU Speech and Hearing Center currently treats clients of all age groups and with a variety of diagnoses, I would hope that in the future the client populations could expand to include many more clients with medical conditions that precipitated their communication disorders. Our graduate students could then experience many aspects of clinical service delivery that mirror the activities of the acute care and long-term care hospital environments."

MANY NEEDS, MANY SERVICES Clinical services including speech-language testing, evaluation and treatment are available through the ASU Speech and Hearing Center at no charge. By calling 870972-3301, those wishing to be considered for enrollment may request a referral form for themselves or others, with appointments scheduled on a space-available basis. ASU's Speech and Hearing Center also provides an Assistive Listening Device (ALD) Trial Center. ALDs can improve the ability to hear in specific listening situations by making the targeted sound easier to distinguish from surrounding noise. ALDs include categories such as alert/warning, telephone/telecommunications, radio/television, and personal communications (individual and group). Although the devices are not for sale from the ASU Speech and Hearing Center, staff can assist in obtaining an ALD if recommended. The ASU Speech and Hearing Center: What we've got here is SUCCESS in communicating! For a virtual tour of the ASU Speech and Hearing Center, visit http://www.astate.edu/dotAsset/268736.wmv

NOVEL CAREER CHOICE That feeling is shared by Dr. Neeley, who is professor and

"WITH CAREFUL PLANNING AND CONSIDERATION, WE CAN OFTEN IMPROVE THE COMMUNICATION SKILLS OF THE MAJORITY OF CLIENTS WE TREAT." 18

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In the past, you'd have to make such decisions as how big a screen you wanted and how much money to spend. Now, when you hear numbers like 1280/720 or 1920/1080, we're not talking dollars. And you'd better know your pixels from megapixels. You're in the world of high-res, and ASU is ready for its close-up on HDTV. High-definition television (HDTV) provides resolution that is significantly higher than that of standard definition television. Resolution essentially describes the detail in a televised image, and higher resolution means more image detail. Over the course of a summer, ASU's Department of Radio-Television undertook a major project, the conversion of its TV studio to the world of HD. ASU-TV is a student-run cable channel on the Suddenlink cable system serving the Jonesboro area on Channel 18. It broadcasts 24 hours a day, 365 days per year providing live and taped newscasts, ASU sporting events, academic lectures, and public affairs shows as well as cultural, international and arts programs. Radio-television classes provide program production support for ASU-TV, and students may also apply to serve on the station's management team and receive scholarship stipends. The department provides both practical and theoretical knowledge for students to pursue careers in the radio-television industry. It is housed in the Communications/Education Building, which most

SAY HI TO HI-RES IF YOU'VE BOUGHT A NEW TELEVISION LATELY, YOU KNOW YOU'RE NOT IN A PLUG-AND-PLAY WORLD ANYMORE‌

people identify by the satellite dishes on its roof. Facilities include the television studios and control rooms for ASU-TV, audio and video production facilities, computer labs, and multimedia and Web-production spaces. The TV studios have traditionally been equipped with modern professional equipment. And now they're even better.

IMMENSE TRANSFORMATIONS The chair of the RTV Department is Dr. Osabuohien Amienyi, generally known on campus simply as "Osa." Originally from Benin City, Nigeria, he holds a Ph.D. in mass communications from Bowling Green State University and has been at ASU for more than 20 years. During those two decades, Osa says. "My favorite memories are of immense transformations I’ve seen in students who came with little preparation for college and who have gone on to make wonderful lives for themselves. I also have memories of the transformation that technology has had on our department. I remember when we transitioned from typewriters to our first generation of Apple computers. Then we bought Apple 2Es and thought those were a marvel. The technology we have today for educating our students simply blows the mind."

CNN, ESPN, ASU They must be doing something right, because Osa says the job placement rate for their students is at or

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Photos by Nancy Hendricks

"THE JOB PLACEMENT RATE FOR STUDENTS IS AT OR NEAR 100%"

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"THE EQUIPMENT IS SIMILAR AND, IN SOME CASES, BETTER THAN WHAT THEY WILL HAVE AT SMALLER STATIONS." No one would call CNN a small station, but ASU students also have the opportunity to gain familiarity with the media giant. "We are one of five programs in the U.S. that has a close relationship with CNN," says Osa. "CNN gives our students direct access to all content they produce 24 hours a day. Our students use these as a learning tool. Also, when ESPN is in

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this area, and even when they are covering the games of 'that other university across the state,' they call us for student help. Our alumni have high-ranking positions at CNN and in various media throughout the state. RTV and ASU should be the destination for any student who wishes the best quality education from the most dedicated faculty and staff. Our RTV program is unrivalled in this part of the world."

stuff. There's even an iPad app that allows you to switch from somewhere else in the net, pretty cool! We also have new LED lights, audio board and everything we need to have the best quality programs. HD is now the industry standard, so being involved and immersed in a school environment that is HD will help our students to be able to go into the job market with the security of knowing how to use the latest technology." She's proud of the programs that ASU students are able to produce. "We work very hard to create original programming made by students for students. We also love covering breaking news when possible, as well as sporting events. We love students to get involved, not only RTV students, but students from other majors. We love to teach them how to use the new equipment and let them use it on their own, to be on camera, or produce a show. So if anyone is interested they can stop by and we'd love to have them as part of our crew."

THE STUDENTS SPEAK RTV students have similar feelings about ASU's Radio-TV department. Justin Rucker, a junior from Bono, says, "It's a great school with, I think, the best RTV program in the state. The HD studio has top-of-the-line equipment. On top of that, the new LED lights are way more energy efficient. The entire conversion was made over the course of the summer. While the old equipment was okay, it was outdated in relation to what we as students would be using after graduation. Having a full HD studio is going to help students be familiar with the types of equipment used in top-of-the-line TV production today. In my opinion, this gives our students an edge in the job community." Touring the facility, he proudly points to a server rack and says, "What fits into this rack used to occupy the entire room." A-State's RTV program not only attracts students from around the state but also from many other countries. Marcela Tapia, a senior from Mexico City, says, "It's the best program in the state. We have our brand-new HD studio, most of the equipment is brand new, we have an amazing switcher that allows us to get creative and do crazy

BOTH SIDES NOW

Photos by Nancy Hendricks

near 100%. Part of their attractiveness to employers must be familiarity with current technology. "We adopted the digital platform as early as 1993 and converted all our field equipment to digital," says Osa. "What happened last year is that our physical studio caught up with our field equipment. But we went one step better. We converted everything to HD (high definition) 16:9 aspect ratio, which is the digital platform we have adopted. This allows us to transmit a better quality to our audience and thereby enhance the university’s external reputation. Our new broadcast education center in the HD studio and control room gives us the capability to train students in a real-life contemporary digital environment. The principles and practices will be the same they will confront in broadcast media. The equipment is similar and, in some cases, better than what they will have at smaller stations."

Galen Perkins '09 MSC '11 of Jonesboro has seen ASU's radio-TV program from both sides, first as a student and currently as a staff member, serving as the HEI (Higher Education Initiatives) program coordinator. Regarding his choice to attend ASU from his then-home in Memphis, he says simply, "Best decision I ever made." He also sings the praises of the new studio. "I think it's key when describing the HD Studio to refer to it as the NEW HD Studio," he adds. "Nothing has been transferred over from the old setup, and the current system has been designed from the ground up. The most interesting part about being here as

a student during the conversion was seeing how the equipment was reduced from covering two full rooms to now being housed in a control area and one rack with a footprint of less than 25 square feet. Also, being able to see the sheer amount of cabling and equipment that was hidden under the floors, which is no longer needed."

"WHAT FITS INTO THIS RACK USED TO OCCUPY THE ENTIRE ROOM." Galen agrees that it gives students the opportunity to work on the same equipment that professionals in the field are using. "Upon graduation, they are ready to walk into various positions. From an artistic standpoint, it's much easier to craft excellent productions if you have the best tools available. I also think it allows faculty and staff to learn new ways to teach, maintain, and improve functionality of the equipment in a much smaller and manageable format. It saves the University an untold amount of money in energy savings through the use of more efficient 'Green Technology' like our new LED lighting system. It also enriches the community by providing the largest and most technologically advanced studio in Northeast Arkansas. I know it's probably a clichĂŠ, but I do feel that ASU prepared me in both my undergraduate and graduate career to strive to be the best at what I do. Being given the privilege to learn and work in an environment that encourages the pursuit of knowledge with students, faculty, and staff on a daily basis is something I am truly thankful for." For more information on the Radio-TV Department at ASU, visit their website www.astate.edu/a/communications/radio-tv

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Dear Friends, I love celebrations of all kinds. Life is full of reasons to rejoice and this distribution of VOICES is a big one for the ASU Alumni Association as this is our 25th issue! Since VOICES was first published in 2000, we have shared stories about ASU’s people, places and programs. So many of you have let us know how much you enjoy seeing all of the growth and we are honored to be able to provide this information for you. This magazine’s journey through Arkansas State has been amazing and I can’t wait to see what the next generation has in store. ASU has raised its admissions standards and this freshman class is considered the strongest academic class we have ever admitted. It will be interesting to see how their stories develop first as students and then as graduates.

THE LAST WORD: FROM THE EXECUTIVE EDITOR This is also an opportunity to say thank you for your membership in the Association. Our mission is to strengthen ASU and that would not be possible without our members. Alumni are the only permanent constituency for any university and having a growing population means that we must strive for ways to improve our services whether you graduated in 1962 or 2002. In order to do that, our office will debut a new website later this fall that focuses on alumni activities. This web site will be connected to our database and enable you to review and update contact information, areas of interest, employment, announce the birth of a child or wedding plans. With more than 67,000 graduates, we need to efficiently track all of this information and the MyASTATE community is designed specifically for this purpose. It will also have enhanced features and communication tools that will make it easier to let us know what information you would like to receive – from academics to athletics as well as the special interest groups that you are affiliated with such as the Marching Band, Greek organizations or the Debate team. Another important celebration for us is the fourth anniversary of the opening of the Cooper Alumni Center in October. What a fantastic resource this facility has been for the campus and the community. Thank you to Darrell and Charlotte Cooper for making the lead gift to get us started and to the other major donors and 1924 Sustaining Life members who continue to make it possible for this to be your home on campus. That is certainly a reason to celebrate! Sharing your pride in ASU,

Beth Smith Executive Editor

Let’s get social: Follow us on Facebook (ASU Alumni Association) and Twitter @astatealumni

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VOICES Fall 2012