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The

Feb - March 2013

Park Gazette The Park Gazette is a free publication provided for enjoyment by your friends at Astoria Park

INSIDE THIS ISSUE: History of Valentine’s Day 2 -----------------------------------------------

Indoor Winter Fun Resident Art Gallery

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American Heart Month 4-5 -----------------------------------------------

What’s Cookin’

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Fight the Winter Blues Word Search

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by Astoria Park

The future of medical charting Electronic Health Records are the way of the future. Hospitals, nursing homes and other health care facilities around the country are already using or moving toward electronic health records. What is an electronic health record? An Electronic Health Record (EHR) is an electronic version of a patients medical history, that is maintained by the provider over time, and may include all of the key administrative clinical data relevant to that persons care, including demographics, progress notes, problems, medications, vital signs, past medical history, immunizations and laboratory data. The EHR automates access to information and has the potential to streamline the clinician’s workflow.

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Special Resident Events 8 -----------------------------------------------

There are numerous benefits to having an electronic health record; better legibility, more accurate charting which helps reduce medical errors, easily accessible information, increased efficiency, improved quality control, it is environmentally friendly because less paper is used and it allows the staff to have more time available for the residents. Over the next couple of months Astoria Park will be implementing kiosks for the certified nurses aides to do their electronic charting, and computers at each station for nurses to chart electronically. The aides enter information on the kiosks, it then populates the electronic health record immediately and is available real-time for the nurses to review.

725 Park Avenue Bridgeport, CT 06604 (203) 366-3653 www.astoriapark.com

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The History of

Valentine’s Day

E

very February we celebrate Valentine’s Day by giving flowers, candy and cards to those we love. We do this in honor of Saint Valentine. You may be wondering, “Who is St. Valentine”? Time to brush up on your Valentine’s history! Legend has it that Valentine was a priest who served during third century Rome. There was an Emperor at that time by the name of Claudius II. Emperor Claudius II decided that single men made better soldiers than those that were married. With this thought in mind he outlawed marriage for young men in hopes of building a stronger military base. Supposedly, Valentine, decided this decree just wasn’t fair and chose to marry young couples secretly. When Emperor Claudius II found out about Valentine’s actions he had him put to death. Another legend has it that Valentine was an imprisoned man who fell in love with his jailor’s daughter. Before he was put to death he sent the first ‘valentine’ himself when he wrote her a letter and signed it ‘Your Valentine’, words still used on cards today. Perhaps we’ll never know the true identity and story behind the man named St. Valentine, but this much is for sure...February has been the month to celebrate love for a long time, dating clear back to the Middle Ages. In fact, Valentines ranks second only to Christmas in number of greeting cards sent. Another valentine gentleman you may be wondering about is Cupid (Latin cupido, “desire”). In Roman mythology Cupid is the son of Venus, goddess of love. His counterpart in Greek mythology is Eros, god of love. Cupid is often said to be a mischievous boy who goes around wounding both gods and humans with his arrows, causing them to fall in love.

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Brrrrrrr...It’s cold outside. Too cold and dreary outside?

Here’s some cool ideas to entertain you till the sun shines again. • Learn to knit • Organize your closet, by color • Try some new recipes • • Clean out your closet, if you haven’t worn it in a year then donate it • • Find a new shade of lipstick • Make a new relaxing play list • Catch up on your tv shows • • Take a relaxing bubble bath • Clean out your spice rack • Alphabetize your bookshelf • • Give yourself a manicure and pedicure • Cook a meal with your new recipes and invite friends over • • Invite a friend over, have a movie marathon • Clean out your inbox, delete old e-mails • • Sleep in • Make a scrapbook • Start your Christmas list • Work on a jigsaw puzzle • • Rearrange your furniture • Plan a future vacation • Catch up on laundry • • Make a big batch of food like Chicken Soup or Chili, freeze for later on • • Make a budget for the coming year • Start a new book • Check out end of season online sales • • Start a hobbies such as; scrap booking, card making, painting, soap making, sewing, or jewelry making •

Resident Art Gallery

Painted by Residents of Astoria Park

Our therapeutic art program is designed to give residents an opportunity to be involved in a creative and visual activity which renews their sense of accomplishment while building self esteem. Residents also enjoy the natural therapeutic benefits of the creative painting experience. Our art therapy program is taught by Leonardo Franco, an art educator with a master’s in art education, an art therapy background, and experience in the health care setting. 2013 Calendars & Note Cards now available to purchase. Please see receptionist. Proceeds go towards art program.

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American Heart Month Healthy tips to save your heart! Know the signs: Some heart attacks are sudden and intense — the “movie heart attack,” where no one doubts what’s happening. But most heart attacks start slowly, with mild pain or discomfort. Often people affected aren’t sure what’s wrong and wait too long before getting help. Here are signs that can mean a heart attack is happening: • Chest discomfort: Most heart attacks involve discomfort in the center of the chest that lasts more than a few minutes, or that goes away and comes back. It can feel like uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain. • Discomfort in other areas of the upper body: Symptoms can include pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw or stomach. • Shortness of breath with or without chest discomfort. • Other signs may include breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea or light-headedness. As with men, women’s most common heart attack symptom is chest pain or discomfort. But women are somewhat more likely than men to experience some of the other common symptoms, particularly shortness of breath, nausea/ vomiting, and back or jaw pain. Even if you’re not sure it’s a heart attack, have it checked out (tell a doctor about your symptoms). Fast action can save lives. Don’t wait more than five minutes to call 911. Calling 911 is almost always the fastest way to get lifesaving treatment. Emergency medical services (EMS) staff can begin treatment when they arrive — up to an hour sooner than if someone gets to the hospital by car. They are also trained to revive someone whose heart has stopped. Patients with chest pain who arrive by ambulance usually receive faster treatment at the hospital, too.

Fat Facts: • Both saturated fat and trans fat are “bad” fats because they raise your bad cholesterol. That means they can both increase your risk for heart disease. • Saturated and trans fats can often be replaced with better alternatives, like monounsaturated and polyunsatu rated fats. Those that offer the highest monounsaturated fatty acid content include high-oleic sunflower or saf flower oil, hazelnut, olive, canola, avocado, almond, peanut, sesame, rice bran, soybean, cod liver oils, macada mia nuts, pecans, almonds, pistachios and cashews. Most fish are high in polyunsaturated fats. • All fats are equally high in calories, 9 calories per gram. That’s more than twice the calories of carbohydrates and protein which are both 4 calories per gram. Your body needs some fat but eat all fats in moderation. • Just because a label says “trans fat-free” doesn’t mean the food is healthy. It can be high in other saturated fats and/or have lots of empty calories. Page 4


Keep moving:

The Consequences of Physical Inactivity are Staggering

• More of us are overweight. -Adult and childhood obesity/overweight level continues to increase: 65% of all adults are obese or over weight. • It is more difficult today to create an active lifestyle. -People are less active due to technology and better mass transportation. -Sedentary jobs have increased 83% since 1950; Physically active jobs now make up only about 25% of our workforce. That is 50% less than 1950. -Our average work week is longer. We work 47 hours a week - 164 more hours a year than 20 years ago. • Extra weight costs us physically and financially. -Obesity costs American companies $225.8B per year in health-related productivity losses. -The average health care cost exceeds $3,000 per person annually. An obese employee costs employer additional $460 to $2,500 in medical costs and sick days per year The American Heart Association recommends 30-minutes of moderate activity, but three 10-minute periods of activity are almost as beneficial to your overall fitness as one 30-minute session.

Eat Well: A Personal Approach to a Healthful Weight • Set personal weight-loss goals, write it down. Start with a goal of losing 10 % of your current body weight. • Keep a food diary for one week. Write down everything you eat and drink. • Pay attention to what you are eating now and why. Identify the sources of your personal “hidden” calories, such as eating your child’s leftovers. • Substitute fat-free or low-fat milk for whole milk, and save about 65 calories for each 8-ounce serving. • Watch nutrition labels: Products labeled “low-fat” can be high in calories. For example, low-fat yogurt can be high in calories. Enjoy fat-free, no-sugar-added yogurt instead for a fraction of the calories. • Include high-fiber foods, such as whole grains, fruits, and vegetables, in your diet. They take longer to digest, so they make you feel full longer. In addition, many fruits and vegetables contain water, which provides volume but not calories. • Cut your favorite candy bar into bite-size pieces. Wrap each piece in plastic wrap, and store the pieces in the freezer. When a sugar craving hits, unwrap and eat one piece. By the time the candy thaws in your mouth, your craving may be satisfied. • Identify the nonessential, high-calorie foods you buy out of habit. Stop buying them! If they’re not in your pan try, you won’t eat them. • Make extra amounts of your favorite low-calorie foods and freeze individual portions. It’s an easy way to control portion size and have handy options available for last-minute meals and snacks. • When eating out, consider having two low-calorie appetizers instead of an entrée. It will help you feel satisfied and full without splurging on calories. Information provided by the American Heart Association

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What’s Cookin’ Healthy and delicious recipes.

Balsamic Chicken with Apple, Lentil and Spinach Salad Ingredients • 3 tablespoons olive oil • 4 6-oz boneless, skinless chicken breasts • Kosher salt and pepper • 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar • 2 scallions, thinly sliced • 1 green apple, cut into small pieces

• 1 stalk celery, thinly sliced • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice • 1 15-oz can lentils, rinsed • 2 cups baby spinach, chopped • 1/2 cup fresh flat-leaf parsley, (optional)

Directions 1. Heat 1 Tbsp oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Season the chicken with ½ tsp each salt and pepper and cook until golden brown and cooked through, 8 to 10 minutes per side. Remove from heat and add the vinegar. Turn the chicken to coat. 2. Meanwhile, in a large bowl, toss the scallions, apple, celery, lemon juice, remaining 2 Tbsp oil, ½ tsp salt and ¼ tsp pepper. Fold in the lentils, spinach and parsley (if using). Serve with the chicken.

Chocolate Almond Cherry Crisps Ingredients • 1 cup semisweet chocolate chips • 3/4 cup white chocolate chips • 1 1/2 cups oven-toasted rice cereal (such as Rice Krispies) • 3/4 cup dried cherries • 1/3 cup slivered almonds • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla

Preparation Cover a large baking sheet with wax paper. Place semisweet and white chocolate chips in a medium glass bowl; microwave on high for 45 seconds. Stir, and microwave an additional 45 seconds or until almost melted. Stir until smooth. Add cereal and remaining ingredients; stir quickly to combine. Drop mixture by tablespoonfuls onto prepared baking sheet; chill 1 hour or until firm. Page 6


Fight the Winter Blues 1. Use light therapy. Exposure to bright light helps to energize you and stimulates the same neurotransmitters as antidepressant medicines. A light therapy box that mimics natural outdoor light can be used for this purpose. 2. Get social. Social support can help you feel happy and is key in lessening depression. Even if you don’t feel like going out once the sun sets, make commitments and stick to them. Chances are you’ll come home feeling so much better than when you left. 3. Exercise. The cure for everything, from insomnia to achy joints but the biggest boost will be to your mood. In addition to the mood boost, it forces you to get out of the house and helps you get social. 4. Be hands-on. A massage can be an effective tool for treating depression. Hugs, cuddling with your pet, holding hands with your honey, can also be great mood-boosters too. 5. Drink coffee. An association has been found between mood and coffee drinking in a recent Nurses’ Health Study. If you like coffee, it’s worth a try, especially if having a cup means getting in the car, getting out into the sunlight and socializing with other coffee drinkers!

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Word Search Early Spring

Heart Green Palms Cupid Presidents Bunny Spring Shamrock March Ides Rainbow Cards Bud

Groundhog Easter Love Bloom Lucky Egg Lincoln Mardigras Gold Kiss Frost Ash Cross Page 7


hhMarch hhhh Astoria Park yyy yyy yyy Resident Special Events yyyyyyyyy yyyyyyyyy yyyyyyyyy yyyyyyyyy yyyyyyyyy yyyyyyyyy yyyyyyyyy March 13th at 2:30 p.m. - Musical Entertainment with George Gall

March 25th at 2:30 p.m. - “March Madness” Mens’ Basketball Tournament March 20th at 2:30 p.m. - Spring Fling Social

March 30th at 2:30 p.m. - Messiah Baptist Mens’ Choir ** Painting with Leonardo ** Tuesdays at 10:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m.

Pet Visits with Taylor and Christine Wednesdays at 1:00 p.m. Melodies with Melissa Thursdays at 2:15 p.m.

See activities calendar for all March activities.

hhhhhh Astoria Park

Nursing and Rehabilitation Center

Visit our website at:

www.astoriapark.com

The Park Gazette is designed and published by Astoria Park. The content in this newsletter is for informational purposes only and is not to be construed as medical advice © PARCC, Inc., dba Astoria Park. All rights reserved.

Astoria Park Feb - March Newsletter  

Astoria Park Feb - March Newsletter

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