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Latin Study Guide Instructions Monday, May 04, 2009 6:19 PM

The majority of this section is dedicated to making study tools for myself. The following pages will consist of tables, charts, or lists of vocabulary that could be beneficial to study later on in the unit.

How this works: This session will be done using live sharing meaning that your screen and section is synced with the rest of the room. Please code your answers as follows: Austin-- that's me...

Write in BLUE

Jesse

Write in GREEN

Rebecca :) hehe

Write in PINK (you are welcome!)

Alec(Facebook is for spelling!) Write in ORNAGE When you enter your answers, they will appear to the entire group. If you would like a copy of all of this for yourself to keep, feel free to ask!

Let's get started! I replaced this from the desktop!

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Latin Review Dates Thursday, June 04, 2009 7:08 PM

Monday June 8th 2:00 -- 5:00 (ish)

- Word studies - Vocabulary-- massive coverage

Wednesday June 10th 2:00 -- 5:00

- Stories from stage 20 - Culture presentations

Friday/Saturday June 12th/13th - Review game 5:30 -- 7:30 if on Friday - Finnish "about the language" 10:00 -- 2:00 - Start "practicing the language"

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Stage 13: Britania Friday, June 05, 2009 11:08 PM

This section of the book focuses on the basic flow of life in Britain Stage focus is on: - Infinitives - Que endings to form question words

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About the Language: Infinitives Tuesday, June 02, 2009 6:19 PM

- Found on page 11 of chapter 13

A. Study the following pairs of sentences

Loquax cantat. Loquax is singing

Loquax cantare vult. Loquax wants to sing.

Servi dominum vident The slaves see the master

Servi dominum videre nolunt The slaves do not want to see their master.

Pueri currunt The boys are running

Peuri celeriter currere possunt The boys are able to run quickly

Salbius Bregentem punit. Salvius punishes Bregans

Salbius Bregenteem puniere potest Salvius is able to punish Bregans.

*** The form of the verb in Blue is known as the infinitive. It usually ends in re*** B. Translate the following examples and write down the Latin infinitive in each sentence. 1. Anti-loquax currit. Anti-Loquax currere potest. i. Anti-Loquax runs.Anit loquax is able to run. 2. Bregans Laborat. Bregans laborare non vult. i. Bregans is working ii. Bregans does not want to work. 3. Gemini fabulam audire volunt. i. The twins want to hear stories 4. Pueri festinare non possunt. i. The boys are not able to hurry.

C. Verbs, like nouns belong to families. Verb families are called conjugations The Vowel that precedes the -re in the infinitive determines the conjugation to which the verb belongs. Conjugation Number Example Word First Conjugation

Cantare

Second Conjugation

Vidēre

Third Conjugation

Currere

Fourth Conjugation

Punire

To which conjugation do the following (infinitive) verbs belong? 1. Ducere i. Third 2. Dormire i. 4th 3. Postulare i. 1st 4. Habēre i. 2nd 5. Festinare i. First 6. Manēre i. Second 7. Audire 4 i. Fourth

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i. Fourth 8. Facere 3 i. Third

D. The verbs Volo, Nolo, and possum are often used with an infinitive. Each forms it's present tense as follows. Volo

Possum

Singular

Nolo

Singular

Singular

Number

Latin

English

Number

Latin

Ego

Volo

I want

Ego

Tu

Vis

You want

Tu

s/he wants

3rd person potest

3rd person Vult Plural

English

Number

Latin

English

Possum I want

Ego

Nolo

I want

Potes

You want

Tu

Non vis

You want

s/he wants

3rd person Non vult s/he wants

Plural

Number

Latin

Nos

Volumus We want

Vos

Vultis

3rd Person volunt

English

Plural

Number

Latin

English

Number

Latin

English

Nos

Possumus

We want

Nos

nolumus

We want

Vos

Non vultis You (pl.) want

Vos

potestis

You (pl.) want

You (pl.) want They want

3rd Person possunt

E. Possum, potes etc. can also be translated as "I can", "you can"

F. Further Examples

1. Ego pugnare possum i. I am able to fight. 2. Nos effugere non possumus i. We are not able to escape 3. Tu laborare non vis i. You don't want to work. 4. Caquus cenam optimam parare potest i. Caquus is able to prepare a very good dinner. 5. Celeriter currere potestis i. I am able to run quickly 6. In villa manere nolo i. I do not want to remain in the house 7. Laborare nolunt They all do not want to work. 8. Vinum bibere volumus i. We wanted to drink wine

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They want

3rd Person nolunt

They want


About the Language: -que Tuesday, June 02, 2009 6:45 PM

- On page 14 in chapter 13 A. In this stage you have learned a new way of saying "and" in Latin Pueri puellaeque boys and girls

Note that -que is added on to the end of the second word.

B. -Que can also be used to link sentences together.

Dominus ex equo descendit villamque intravit The master got off his horse and went into the house.

Further Examples: 1. Varica servos ancillasque inspexit a. Varica inspected the slaves and slave-girls. 2. Bergans canisque in ordine stabant a. Bregans and the dog stood in in the row 3. Salvius aream intravit Varicamque salutavit Salvius entered the arena and greated Varica

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Stage 13: Word Study Tuesday, June 02, 2009 1:58 AM

A. Give a derivative from the Vocabulary Checklist to match each definition. Use the underlined word as a clue A large building

Building--aedifica-- Edifice

Able to be wounded

Wounded-- vulneraro-- vulnerable

1. A person new to an activity New--novus-- novince To render of no value

No--nolus--nullify

To keep one's possession

To retain--reineo

B. Give derivatives of "dico" suggested in the phrases below To assert the opposite

_ _ _ _ _ _ dict contradict

To foretell

_ _ _ dict predict

An official proclamation

_ dict edict

Farewell speaker at a graduation _ _ _ _ dict _ _ _ _ _ Valedictorian A blessing

_ _ _ _ dict _ _ _ Benediction

Legal power to hear cases

_ _ _ _ _dict _ _ _ jurisdiction

1. Match the definitions to the derivatives of "canto" a. b. c. d. e. f. g. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Recant Incantation Disenchant Canticle Cantata Chanticleer Cantor

a. b. c. d. e. f. g.

A rooster Singer of solos in a church /synagogue To withdraw beliefs previously held Hymn words taken directly from the bible To set free from illusion Singing a magical spell A musical composition sung, not acted

c f e d a b Latin Page 7


6. b 7. g

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Stage 13 Vocabulary Friday, June 05, 2009 11:39 PM

Advenio

Advenire Adveni Arrive

Aedificum

Building

Aeger

Sick/ill

Alter

The other

Canto

Cantare

Cantavi To sing

Ceteri

The rest

Coniuration

Plot

Custos

Guard (noun)

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Stage 14: Apud Salvium Friday, June 05, 2009 11:11 PM

Stage focuses on the normal happenings of a Roman household in Britain Content covered in chapter includes:

-

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About the Language: Adjectives Tuesday, June 02, 2009 6:49 PM

- Found on page 34 & 34 of chapter 14

A. Study the following sentences. Servus iratus non loborabat The angry slave was working Dominus servo fesso praemidum dedit The master gave a reward to the tired slave Agricola servum ignavum punibit The farmer punished the lazy slave - The words in Green are called adjectives. They are used to describe nouns - In each of the examples, the adjective is describing the slave,

B. Adjectives change their endings to match the case of the noun the describe. - In the sentence above iratus is nominative because servus is nominative - Fesso is dative because it describes servo, a dative noun - Ignavum is accusative because it describes servum, an accusative noun

C. Write down the Latin noun and adjective pair in each sentence and state whether it is nominative, dative, or accusative. 1. Ancilla perterrita ad culinam contendit i. The terrified slave girl hurried to the kitchen. ii. Ancilla perterrita-- nominative 2. Coquus ancillam perterritam sulutavit i. Coquus greeted the terrified slave-girl. ii. Ancilliam perterritam, accusative 3. Cives mercatorem fortem laudaverunt i. The citizens praise the brave merchants. 4. Cives mercatori forti praemium dederunt. i. The citizens give the money to the brave merchants ii. Mercatori forti-- dative 5. Senex filium bonum habebat i. The old man has a good son. ii. Filium bonum--accusative 6. Senex filio bono villam emit i. The old man kicked the good boy out of the house. D. Adjectives Also change their endings to match Number (i.e singular or plural) for the nouns they describe. Compare the following examples with what you found in section A

Servi irati non laborabant The angry slaves were not working Dominus servis fessis praemium dedit Latin Page 11


Dominus servis fessis praemium dedit The master gave a reward to the tired slaves Agricola servos ignavos punivit The farmer punished the lazy slaves

E. Translate the following examples. Write down the Latin noun and adjective pair in each sentence and tell whether the pair is singular or plural. 1. Feminae laetae per vias ambulabant i. The happy girls were walking through the streets ii. Feminae laete-- plural 2. Femina laeta per vias ambulabat i. The happy woman was walking though the street ii. Femina laeta--singular 3. Gladiator leones feroces necavit i. The gladiator killed the ferocious lions ii. Leonies feroces-- lions 4. Coquus servis aegris cibum paravit. i. The cook prepared food for the sick slave ii. Servis aegris-- singular 5. Pictura pulchra erat in atrio i. The beautiful picture was in the atruim 6. Volubilis ornatricem tristem conspexit. i. Volibus caught sight of the sad hairdresser ii. Ornatricem tristem-- accusative singular F. When an adjective changes it's ending in this way, it is said to agree, in case and number, with the noun it describes.

G. Adjectives like magnus, parvus, multi, which indicate size or quantity usually come before the noun they describe; other adjectives usually come after the noun. Translate the following: 1. Bergans magnum taurum ducebat i. Bregans led the large bull ii. Turum-- accusative, singular masculine 2. Coquus amicis paravam cenam paravit i. The cook prepared a small meal for the friend ii. Paravam-- singular accusative masculine 3. Multi Britanni erant servi i. Many brittions have servants ii. Multi-- nominative, plural, masculine 4. Fures ingentem serpentem timebant i. The thieves fear the large snake ii. Ingentem--singular, masculine, accusative-- BEFORE-- size related 5. Rufilla duas ancillas in cubiculo vidit. i. Rufilla sees two slave girls in the bedroom. ii. Duas-- feminine, plural, accusative--

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About the Language: Adjectives (continued) Tuesday, June 02, 2009 7:20 PM

-- found on page 38 of chapter 14 A. In the first language note in this chapter you met sentences like this: Civis servum bonum laudavit The citizen praised the good slave The adjective bonum arees with the noun servum in case (assusative) and number (singular) The endings for both of the words look the same.

B. Now study this sentence: Civis servum fortem laudavit The citizen praised the brave slave. The adjective fortem agrees with the noun servum in case (accusative) and number (singular) as in the previous example. The endings however, do not look the same. This is because they belong to different declensions and have different ways of forming their cases. Fortis belongs to the third declension, while servus belongs to the second declension.

C. Translate the following examples: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Quintus fabulam mirabilem narravit In villa habitabat senex stultus Gladiator bestias feroces agitabat Dominus amico fideli denarios tradidit Multi mercatores vinum bibebant Agricola omnibus pueris pecuniam dedit Write down the Latin noun and adjective pair for each sentence and state whether they are nominative, dative, accusative; and singular or plural.

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About the Language: Prepositional Phrases Wednesday, June 03, 2009 12:27 AM

- Found on page 40 of chapter 14

A. Study the following exambles: Salvius e villa contendit Salvius hurried out of the house In tablino est armarium elgantissimum In the study is a very elegant cupboard

Haec villa ab urbe longe abest This house is far from the city Bregens pro amphoris stat Bregans is standing in front of the amprphorae

Non decorum est sine amicis habitare It is not proper to live without friends De mercatroibus audire nolo I do not want to hear about the merchants

The words in blue are in the Ablative Case B. The above case is used with certain prpeositions in Latin These include a/ab, cum, de ,e/ex, in, pro, sine, and sub. However you only need to know "with", "by" , and "from" Cum, de e/ex

C. Here is a full list of the cases you have met The ablative case is in bold First Declension Second Declension Third Declension Singular Nominative Puella

servus

leo

Dative

Peullae

Servo

Leoni

Accusative

Puellam

Servum

Leonem

Ablative

Puella

Servo

Leone

Nominative Puellae

Servi

Leones

Dative

Servis

Leonibus

Plural Peullis

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Accusative

Puellas

Servos

Leones

Ablative

Peullis

Servis

leonibus

D. Study the following examples: Quintus ad vlam advenit Quintus arrived at the house Ego prope urbem habitare volebam I wanted to live near the city Vilicus per ordines ambulabat The Manager was walking through the rows Salvius Quintum in tablinum duxit. Salvius led Quintus into the study. The words in blue are in the Accusative Case . The accusative case is also used with certain prepositions in Latin. These include ad, apud, in, per, prope

What deduction can you make about the Latin preposition "in" when use in latin?

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Stage 14: Word Study Tuesday, June 02, 2009 2:06 AM

A. Give the Latin word in the Vocabulary Checklist from which each of these words are derived. Then give a definition of the English derivative. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Lavatory Deleterious Quotidian Donation Indecorous Infidelity Deify Marital

Lavo

To wash

Deleo

To destroy

Harmful or damaging

Donum

Gift

To give as to charity

Decorus Right/proper Incorrect Fidelis

Faithful

Unfaithfullness

Deus

God

To make into a god

Maritus Husband

Of hubands

B. Give the Latin Root found in the Vocabulary Checklist for the following English words; then match the definition to the English word. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h.

Astound Regal Diligence Deity Ennoble Necessitate Familiar Indelible

Friendly, intimate, close To imply as a logical outcome Characteristic of a King To amaze or astonish greatly To dignify Unable to be erased A god Constant careful effort

1.

C. Match the definition to the derivative of "Domina" 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Belladonna Madam Damsel Dominate Dame

a. b. c. d. e.

A lady; and elderly woman T o rule by superior power, authority A girl, a maiden A woman, lady of the house A drug, originally used as a cosmetic,

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Stage 15: Rex Cogidubnus Friday, June 05, 2009 11:21 PM

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About the Language: Relative Clauses Wednesday, June 03, 2009 12:43 AM

- Found on page 58 in stage 15

A. Study the following pair of sentences Ancilla urnam portabat The slave girl was carrying the jug Ancilla, quod post Salvium ambulabat, urnam portabat. The Slave girl, who was walking behind salvius, was caring the jug The group of words in Blue are known as a relative clause which is introduced by a relative pronoun

B. A Relative clause is used to describe a noun. For example: Vilicus, qui cum praecursoribus equitabat, ad Salvium rediit. The farm manager, who was riding with the forerunners, returned to Salvius

Prope iunvenes erat palaustrum, quod totam viam claudebat. Near the young men was a wagon, which was blocking the whole road. In the first example, the relative clause is used to describe the field manager (vilicus) In the second example the relative clause is used to describe the wagon (plaustrum)

C. Translate the following examples: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Rex, qui sceptrum tenebat, in atrio sedebat. Vinum, quod Salvius bibebat, erat optimum Ancillae, quae dominum timebant, e villa festinaverunt Canis, quem Bregans ducebat, ferocissimus erat. In vila erant multi Britanni, qui Romanos impediebant. Cena, qua Volubilis parabat, erat splendida.

For each example write the relative clause and the latin noun it describes.

***NOTE: A complete char t of the relative pronoun qui can be found on page 199 of the book, or the next page of this review packet‌ Take you pick!****

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Pronouns: The Relative Pronoun Qui Wednesday, June 03, 2009 8:36 PM

A. Study the various forms of the relative pronoun "qui", which h is placed at the start of a relative clause and means "who" , "which", etc.

Singular

Plural

Masculine Feminine Neuter

Masculine Feminine Neuter

Nominative Qui

Quae

Quod

Nominative Qui

Quae

Quae

Genitive

Cuius

Cuius

Cuius

Genitive

Quorum

Quarum

Quorum

Dative

Cui

Cui

Cui

Dative

Quibus

Quibus

Quibus

Accusative

Quem

Quam

Quod

Accusative

Quos

Quas

Quae

Ablative

Quo

Qua

Quo

Ablative

Quibus

Quibus

Quibus

Ursa, quam Quintus vulneravit, numc mourta est. The bear, which quintus wounded, is now dead.

Ubi est templm, quod Augustus Caesar aedificavit Were is the temple, which Augustus Caesar built? In medio atrio stabant milites, qui regem custodiebant. In the middle of the hall stood the soldiers, who were guarding the king. The noun described by a relative clause is known as the antecedent of the relative pronoun. For example, in the sentence above ursa is the antecedent of quam.

B. Translate the following sentences

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Flores, qui in horto erant, qegem delectaverunt. Puer, quem Aegyptii interfecerunt, Quintum fortier defendebat. Fabri, quos rex ex italia arcessiverat, effigiem Claudii fecerunt. Cibiculum, quod Quintus intravitm elegantissimum erat. Aula, in qua cogidubnus habitabat, erat prope mare.

In each sentence pick out the antecedent and relative pronoun and color code them as above.

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About the Language: Gender Wednesday, June 03, 2009 8:58 PM

- Found on page 59 of stage 15

A. All of Latin nouns belong to one of these three genders: 1. Masculine 2. Feminine 3. Neuter - But you already know that!

B. Study the following examples: Aquila est animus, qui ad decos ascendid. The eagle is a soul, which is ascending to the Gods. Turba, quae prope ianuam stabat, ad terram procubuit. The crowd, which was standing near the door, fell to the ground Plaustrum, quod vides, rotam fractam habet. The cart, which you see, has a broken wheel.

In the first example, animus is masculine, and therefore qui is used to introduce the relative clause In the second example, truba is feminine, and therefore quae is used to introduce the relative clause In the third example, plaustrum is neuter, and therefore quod is used to introduce the relative clause

C. Adjectives in Latin must agree in gender, case and number (we will only focus on gender at the moment) For example:

Multos principes vidi I saw many chiefs Multas feminas vidi I saw many women In the first sentence, multos is accusative, plural, and masculine to agree with principes In the second sentence, multas is accusative, plural and feminine to agree with feminas.

D. Further Examples: From each sentence, select the adjective noun pair and indicate it's case number and gender. 1. Sacerdotes effigiem ceratam portabant 2. Rex fabros callidos laudavit Latin Page 20


2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Rex fabros callidos laudavit Ancilla ignava laborare nolebat Quintus regi Britannico donum elegit. Varica contentionem cum praecursoribus iratis habebat Taurus horreum novum delevit

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Stage 15: Word Study Tuesday, June 02, 2009 3:28 PM

A. Give a derivative from the Vocabulary checklist to match each definition. Use the underlined word as a clue 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Fear of being shut in A pipe bringing water from a distant source. Conveniently roomy Something owed to another To overflow or overhlem like a wave One who rides a horse The chief person in a school

B. Match the definition to the derivative. Give the Latin root and it’s meaning. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Principle Fracture Debenture Tenacious Alias Include Sacerdotal Equine Impede undulate

a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h. i. j.

To enclose To obstruct A rule of conduct Priestly A break Another, often false, name Like a horse Persistent, stubborn To billow A certificate indicating something is owed

C. Explain why the name saxifrage is so appropriate for this plant

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Stage 16: In Aula Friday, June 05, 2009 11:23 PM

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About the Language: Pluperfect Tense Wednesday, June 03, 2009 9:14 PM

- Found on page 78 of chapter 16 A. In this stage you have found examples of the pluperfect tense. They looked like this: In aula etat ursa ingens, quam rex ex italia importaverant. In the palace was a huge bear, which the king had imported from Italy. Sacerdotes, qui ad aram processerant, victimas sacrificaverunt. The priests, which had advanced to the alter, sacrificed the victims.

B. The complete pluperfect tense is as follows (for portat) Endings are in Green Portaveram Portaveras Protaverat Portaveramus Portaveratis Portaverant

C. Further examples: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Rufilla ancillas, quae cubiculum paraverant, laudavit. In atrio sedebant hospites, quos rex ad aulam invitaerat Agricola nos laudavit, quod per totum diem laboraveramus Belimicus, qui navem amiseratm iratissimus erat Salvius me punivit, quod e villa fugeram

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About the Language: Questions Wednesday, June 03, 2009 9:29 PM

- Found on page 80 of chapter 16

A. In Unit 1, you met the question word "num" which is sued to suggest that the anticipated answer to the question will be no. Notice again the different ways of translating it Num tu servus est? Surely you are not a slave? You are not a slave, are you? Num tu sellam extraxisti Surely you didn't take away the chair? You didn't take away the chair, did you?

B. In book 1 you also met the ending -ne , which is used to elect a yes or no answer to a question. Really, it just asks a normal question. Paterne et mater superfuerunt? Did your father and mother survive? C. You have now met the question word "nonne" which is used to suggest that the anticipated answer will be yes. Notice the difference in the translations: Nonne tu hospitibus spectavulum dare vis? Surely you want to give a show to the guests? You want to give a show to the guests, don't you?

Nonne haec villa est elegans Surely this house is elegant? This house is elegant, isn't it?

D. Further Examples 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

None haec pictura est pulchra Num meterritus es? Tune effugere poteras Num Bregans laborat Nonne rex tibi illum canem dedit?

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Stage 16: Word Study Tuesday, June 02, 2009 3:37 PM

A. What do the following derivatives of pono, ponere, ponsui mean?

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Compositions Indisposed Opponent Juxtaposition Deposit Exponent Impose Proposition Appositive Repository

B. Use the derivates from the Latin words below (listed in order of appearance) to fill in the blanks of the following sentences. --word bank-- Consilium - Flos - Delectare - Paratus - Aedificare - Vertere - Tollere - Vertere - Deridere - Punire

Cogidubnus' social ______ put forth his suggestions for a banquet. He would create a wonderful _____ display for the triclinium from the garden. The chief would concoct a thoroughly ____ repast of meat, fruit, and wine. After intense _____ and for the ______ of guests, Etruscian dances would present their ____ of Romulus and Remus story to _____ the heroes of old Rome. Should anyone ____ to barbaric behavior durring the entertainment and react to the presentation with _____, severe _______ measures would be taken. C. Copy the following words and put parenthesis around the Latin root. Then write the Latin root word and its meaning for each derivative. E.g. conversation --- con(serva)tion --- servare:save 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Consensual Incontrovertible Consummate (adjective) Intolerable Ameliorate Navigable Intervention Auxiliary Latin Page 26


8. Auxiliary 9. Fabricate 10. impunity

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Stage 17: Alexandria Friday, June 05, 2009 11:24 PM

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About the Language: Genitive Case Wednesday, June 03, 2009 9:48 PM

- Found on page 97 of stage 17

A. Study the following sentences: Ad portum Alexandriae mox pervenimus We soon arrived at the harbor of Alexandria. In villa Barbilli erant multi servi. In the house of Barbullius were many slaves. Milites Romani per vias urbis incedebant Roman soldiers were marching through the streets of the city. In multitudine Aegyptiorum erat senex. In the crowd of Egyptians, was an old man Agmen militum per urbem incedit A column of soldiers is marching through the city The words in blue are in the Genitive Case The genitive case is used to denote possession of an object, and is often used in conjunction with "of"

B. Here is a list of the cases you have met. The new genitive case is in green.

Singular

First Declension Genitiv Puellae e

Plural

Second Declension

Third Declension

Servi

Leonis

First Declension Genitive Puellarum

Second Declension

Third Declension

Servorum

leonum

C. Typically, the genitive singular of a noun is listed after it's dictionary entry. The genitive indicates the noun's declension and shows the stem of the noun

D. Further examples: Translate

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Quintus per multitududinem servorum contendit Aegyptii in casam fabri ruerunt Nulli Graeci in illa parte urbis habitabant Multi Aegyptii in fundo feminae laborabant Puer Quintum per trubam multitum duixt Iuvenes et pueri ad tabernam mercatoris contenderunt

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Stage 17: Word Study Tuesday, June 02, 2009 3:46 PM

A. Match each word to it's definition

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

A manner to which one is not accustomed Scarcity A land formation which is almost an island Spiritless or inert Grouped in clusters A shore or costal region A position which requires little effort but draws good pay

a. b. c. d. e. f. g.

Alginate Exanimate Insolence Littoral Paucity Sinecure Peninsula

B. For each of the following words, find the Latin root from the vocabulary checklist. Then give the definition for each English word. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Beneficent Benevolent Inherent Coherent Adherent Recipient Unanimity Equanimity Magnanimity

C. Give an English derivative from the following Latin words for the following definitions.

-

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

---Word List--Benignus Faber Facilis Graviter Impetus ---Definitions--Kind Rash, impulsive A woven cloth Seriousness To make easy, assist or help

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Stage 18: Eutychus et Clemens Friday, June 05, 2009 11:25 PM

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About the Language: Neuter Nouns Wednesday, June 03, 2009 10:07 PM

- Found on page 118 of stage 18 A. Study the following examples: Plaustrum viam claudebat A cart was blocking the road Plaustra viam claudebant. Carts were blocking the road. Varica plaustrum emovit. Varica removed the cart. Varica plaustra emovit. Varica removed the carts. B. "plaustrum" is a good example of a neuter noun. The accusative singular of the neuter is always the same as the nominative singular. The nominative and the accusative plural of neuter nouns are also identical to each other, and they always end in -a

C. Compare the following forms ***NOTE: the neuter most often appears in the second and third declensions, and we will only be tested on these two***

Second Declension

Third Declension

Masculine Neuter

Masculine Neuter

Singular Nom. Servus

Templum

Singular Nom. Leo

Nomen

Singular Acc.

Servum

Templum

Singular Acc.

Leonem

Nomen

Plural Nom.

Servi

Templa

Plural Nom.

Leones

Nomina

Plural Acc.

Servos

Templa

Plural Acc.

Leones

Nomina

D. Further examples: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Salvius horrea nova inspexit. Cogidubnus pompom ad litus duxit Principes dona ad aulam tulerunt Nomenne senis mortui scis Plancus monumenta urbis demonstravit Animalia hospeites terruerunt. Latin Page 32


6. Animalia hospeites terruerunt.

Latin Page 33


About the Language: 4th and 5th Declensions Wednesday, June 03, 2009 10:21 PM

- Found on page 122 of stage 18 A. While most nouns in Latin belong to the first, second, or third declension, there are two other, less often used declensions as illustrated in the following charts:

Fourth Declension

Fifth Declension

Singular Plural Nominativ Portus e

Portus

Genitive

Portus

Portuum

Dative

Portui

Poribus

Accusative Portum Portus

Ablative

Portu

Singular Plural Nominative Res

Res

Genitive

Rei

Rerum

Dative

Rei

Rebus

Accusative

Rem

Res

Ablative

Re

rebus

portibus

B. The genitive case of a noun indicates the declension to which it belongs. In the following the endings representative of the declension are in blue. a. First Declension: Puellae b. Second Declension: servi c. Third Declension: leonis d. Fourth Declension: portus e. Fifth Declension: rei

C. Translate the following sentences 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

In portu Alexandriae erant multae naves. Sacerdotes efffigiem in rogum posuerunt. Tumultusne in hac urbe cotidie vides Servi fustes in manibus tenebant Pueri nomina dierum recitant Tabernarii Clementi de impetibus narrabant

Latin Page 34


Stage 18: Word Study Tuesday, June 02, 2009 3:52 PM

A. For each definition below, give an English word derived fro one of the following Latin words. --- Word Bank--- Audeo - Caput - Consistere - Fragere - Nox - Pars - Petere

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

---definitions--Periods of equal day and night on all parts of the earth. A solemn, formal request Affecting only a part A piece which is broken away Punishable by death Daring Standing firm in all types of circumstances

B. Match the following definitions to the derivatives of "manus" 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Manumission Manicure Manipulate Manacles Manufacture Amanuensis Manifest Maintain

a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h.

Handcuffs Evident, clear, plain Freeing of a slave To make by hand To keep up, carry on Care of one's hands and nails To control, often by unfair means Secretary, one who copies what is already written.

C. Write a defintion for each of the following words, including in your definition some referenece to the meaning of the Latin root (which appears in the Vocabulary Checklist for this stage) Example: president: a person who acts as a protector for a group of people

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Goginizance Demonstrable Militant Obstacle Sacrilege

Latin Page 35


Stage 19:Isis Friday, June 05, 2009 11:27 PM

Latin Page 36


About the Language: Hic and Ille Wednesday, June 03, 2009 10:46 PM

- Found on page 144 of stage 19

A. You have now met the latin word for "this" Singular

Plural

Case

Masculine Feminine Neuter

Case

Masculine Feminine Neuter

Nom

Hic

Haec

Hoc

Nom

Hi

Hae

Haec

Acc

Hunc

Hanc

Hoc

Acc

Hos

Has

Haec

His vir est Barbillus This man is Barbillus Hanc pompom vidi. I saw this procession. Hae stolae sunt sordidae. These dresses are dirty! Tibi hos flores trado I give these flowers to you

--- Complete Charts for Hic, Haec, Hoc---

Singular

Plural

Case

Masculine Feminine Neuter

Case

Masculine Feminine Neuter

Nom

Hic

Haec

Hoc

Nom

Hi

Hae

Haec

Gen

Huius

Huius

Huius

Gen

Horum

Harum

Horum

Dat

Hic

Hic

Hic

Dat

His

His

His

Acc

Hunc

Hanc

Hoc

Acc

Hos

Has

Haec

Abl

Hoc

Hac

Hoc

Abl

His

His

His

B. You have also met the latin word for "that"

Latin Page 37


Singular

Plural

Case

Masculine Feminine Neuter

Case

Masculine Feminine Neuter

Nom

Ille

Illa

Illud

Nom

Illi

Illae

Illa

Acc

Illum

Illam

Illud

Acc

Illos

Illas

illa

Illa femina est Galetea That woman is Galetea Clemens illos sacerdotes saepe adiuvavbat Clemens often used to help those priests. Illae viae sunt periculosae Those roads are dangerous Multi Aegyptii illus templum visitabant Many Egyptians used to visit that temple.

C. Please note, hic and Ille agree in case, number and gender with the nouns they modify

D. Further Examples: 1. Haec cena est optima i. This dinner is the best 2. Latrones illum mercatorem vituperant i. The robbers curs out that merchant 3. Haec templa laudabamus; illa aedificia videre non poteramus i. We are praising this temple, that building we are not able to see. 4. Hi servi sunt Aegyptii i. These servants are Egyptians 5. Plancus illud monumentum demonstravit i. Plancus points out that monument. 6. Galatea hunc iuvenem emovere volunt Galeta wants to remove this young man. 7. Ille poeta Aristonem vexat. i. That poet annoys Aristo.

Latin Page 38


Hic, Haec, Hoc Monday, May 04, 2009 6:20 PM

Singular

Plural

Case

Masculine Feminine Neuter

Case

Masculine Feminine Neuter

Nom

Hic

Haec

Hoc

Nom

Hi

Hae

Haec

Gen

Huius

Huius

Huius

Gen

Horum

Harum

Horum

Dat

Hic

Hic

Hic

Dat

His

His

His

Acc

Hunc

Hanc

Hoc

Acc

Hos

Has

Haec

Abl

Hoc

Hac

Hoc

Abl

His

His

His

Singular

Plural

Case

Masculine Feminine Neuter

Case

Masculine Feminine Neuter

Nom

Hic

Haec

Hoc

Nom

Hi

Hae

Haec

Gen

Huius

Huius

Huius

Gen

Horum

Harum

Horum

Dat

Hic

Hic

Hic

Dat

His

His

His

Acc

Hunc

Hanc

Hoc

Acc

Hos

Has

haec

Abl

Hoc

Hac

Hoc

Abl

His

His

His

Singular

Plural

Case

Masculine Feminine Neuter

Case

Masculine Feminine Neuter

Nom

Hic

Haec

Hoc

Nom

Hi

Hae

Haec

Gen

Huius

Huius

Huius

Gen

Horum

Harum

Horum

Dat

Hic

Hic

Hic

Dat

His

His

His

Acc

Hunc

Hanc

Hoc

Acc

Hos

Has

haec

Abl

Hoc

Hac

Hoc

Abl

His

His

His

Singular Case

Plural Masculine Feminine Neuter

Case

Nom

Nom

Gen

Gen

Dat

Dat

Acc

Acc

Abl

Abl

Latin Page 39

Masculine Feminine Neuter


--Radom page holder--

Latin Page 40


About the Language: Imperatives Wednesday, June 03, 2009 11:02 PM

- Found on page 147 of stage 19 A. The following people are told to do something. Mater! Specta hoc! Mother! Look at this! Helena! Veni ad me! Helena! Come to me! Amici! Spectate hoc! Friends! Look at this!

Servi! Venite ad me! Slaves! Come to Me!

The form of the verb show in in blue is known as the imperative. It can be singular or plural, depending on who is being ordered.

B. Compare the imperative forms with the infinitive.

First Conjugation

Singular Plural

Infinitives

Porta!

Portate

Portare

Carry!

Carry!

To carry

Cocete

Docere

Teach!

Teach

To teach

Trahe!

Trahite

Trahere

Drag!

Drag!

To drag

Audite

Audire

Listen!

To listen

Second Conjugation Doce Third Conjugation

Fourth Conjugation Audi Listen!

Rule: for forming the singular case, remove the "re" from the infinitive case For forming the plural version add "te" to the end of the singluar C. Study the way in which people are ordered NOT to do things. Singular

Plural

Noli currere!

Nolite festinare! Latin Page 41


Noli currere! Don't Run!

Nolite festinare! Don't hurry

Noli cantare! Don't Sing

Nolite trudere! Don't push!

Noli and nolite, the imperative forms of nolo, are used with the infinitive form of a verb. Noli currere literally means, "be unwilling to run"

D. Further Examples:

1. Iuvenes! Tacete! i. Young men! Quiet! 2. Diligenter labora! i. Work Carefully! 3. Date mihi pecuniam! i. Give the money to me! 4. Me adiuva! i. Listen to me! 5. Noli dormire! i. Don't sleep! 6. Nolite discedere! i. Do not leave! 7. Nolite Romanos interficere! i. Do not kill the romans 8. Noli me punire! i. Do not punish me

Latin Page 42


About the Language: Vocative Case Wednesday, June 03, 2009 11:28 PM

- Found on page 151 of stage 19

A. In each of the following sentences, someone is being spoken to Aristo! Quam stultes es! Aristo! How stupid you are! Quid accidit, Barbille? What happened, Barbillus? Contendite, amici Hurry, friends! Cur ridetis cives? Why are you laughing, Citizen? The words in blue are in the vocative case If only one person is spoken to, the vocative singular is used, if more than one person, the plural.

B. The Vocative has the same form as the nominative with the exception of the vocative singular of the words in the second declension.

C. Compare the nominative singular and vocative singular of second declension nouns like servus and Salvius Nominative

Vocative

Servus laborat The servants work Amicus glagium habet The friend has a sword Eutychys est in via Eutichus is in the street

Cur laboras, serve? Why do you work, slave? Da mihi gladium, amice! Friend, give the sword to me Ubi sunt latrones, Eutyche? Eutichys, were are your slaves?

Salvius est iratus Salvius is angry Filius currit The son hurries Holconius in lectio recumbit Holicus reclines in the couch

Quid accidit, Salvi? Slave, what happened? Cur currins, fili? Were do you hurry, son? Holconi! Surge! Holocinius! Stand up!

D. The vocative plural always has the same form as the nominative plural.

Latin Page 43


Latin Page 44


Stage 19: Word Study Tuesday, June 02, 2009 4:01 PM

A. Based on your knowledge of the Stage 19 Vocabulary Checklist, give an English word to match each of the following definitions. Used the underlined words as help. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

One who does something for the love of it Extreme danger One who looks after a museum or house, for example Using the voice A plan or outline of a journey Occurring by chance Flowing like honey

B. Based on our knowledge of the previous Checkists, and the verb caedo, caedere, suggest meanings for the following words. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Infanticide Homicide Matricide Deicide Pesticide Fratricide Regicide Suicide Parricide Uxoricide

C. Match the definitions to the following -ate words. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Affiliate Castigate Cogitate Curate Equivocate Hastate Ingratiate locate

a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h.

To bring into another's favor To think seriously, to ponder To avoid committing oneself To rebuke or punish An assistant clergyman Spear-shaped To find And associate

Latin Page 45


Latin Page 46


Stage 20: Medicus Tuesday, June 02, 2009 1:56 AM

Medicus --- this stage covers the workings of a doctor in ancient Rome---

Latin Page 47


Astrologus Vicor I Wednesday, May 27, 2009 9:47 PM

The astrologer, who was living in the house of Barbillus, was a man of evil character

1

The Astrologer and Petro were enemies . The astrologer was Syrian,

2

The Doctor Greek. Petro exercised the art of medicine in the city for a log time.

3

Many Alexandrians, who Petro cured, praise his skill.

4

The astrologer however, lived in the house of Barbillus, Petro in the city of Alexandria.

5

Therefore it was easy for the astrologer to visit Barbillus.

6

He often came to the bedroom were his master lay sick.

7

When Petro was out, the astrologer would say into the master's ear:

8

"You are in very great danger, master. Petro is the worst doctor.

9

He heals few. He sends many sick to death.

10

Surely you don't trust Petro. Petro is a miserly man, nobody is more miserly than he.

11

He wants your money. It is necessary for you to throw him out of your house"

12

Barbillus heard the anxious astrologer. But, although the pain

13

Grew worse every day, he had faith in the doctor even now.

14

When Barbillus did not want to throw out the Doctor, the astrologer made a plan.

15

Latin Page 48


Astrologus Vicor II Wednesday, May 27, 2009 10:07 PM

On the next day, the astrologer bursts into the bedroom of the master shouting: " Master! The messenger brings you the best news! You can be healed!

1 2

The goodness of Isis, who always listens to my prayers, sent me a dream at night

3

In the dream I was walking down the streets of Alexandria.

4

Suddenly I see a boy standing in the street. The boy is your slave,

5

Who the Egyptians killed in the riot. He could tell me

6

about my special ointment.

7

Barbillus, when he heard this, handed himself over to the astrologer.

8

And so, after he put together the ointment, he opened and anointed the shoulder

9

Of the master. But the astrologers ointment was very bad.

10

Barbillus' wound grew worse.

11

The Astrologer, when he sensed this, fled from the house, terrified.

12

Barbillus, despairing for his life, summoned me to his bedroom.

13

" My Quintus", he said whispering in my ear. "do not cry!

14

I am going to die. I understand it clearly. It is necessary for all to meet death.

15

I demand this one thing from you. Search for my son in Britain.

16

Carry this letter to him. When I threw Rufus out I was angry, to him

17

I have done a great injustice.

18

When I heard this, I wanted to send for Petro, but Barbillus

19

stubbornly refused. However he sent for that. But when it arrived

20

Barbillus was now dead.

21

Latin Page 49


Personal Pronouns Tuesday, May 26, 2009 9:18 AM

Singular

Plural

Masculine Feminine Neuter

Masculine Feminine Neuter

Nominative Is

Ea

Id

Nominative Ei

Eae

Ea

Genitive

Eius

Eius

Eius

Genitive

Eorum

Earum

Eorum

Dative

Ei

Ei

Ei

Dative

Eis

Eis

Eis

Accusative

Eum

Eam

Id

Accusative

Eos

Eas

Ea

Ablative

Eo

Ea

Eo

Ablative

Eis

Eis

Eis

Singular

Plural

Masculine Feminine Neuter

Masculine Feminine Neuter

Nominative Is

Ea

Id

Nominative Ei

Eae

Ea

Genitive

Eius

Eius

Eius

Genitive

Eorum

Earum

Eorum

Dative

Ei

Ei

Ei

Dative

Eis

Eis

Eis

Accusative

Eum

Eam

Id

Accusative

Eos

Eas

Ea

Ablative

Eo

Ea

eo

Ablative

Eis

Eis

eis

Singular

Plural

Masculine Feminine Neuter

Masculine Feminine Neuter

Nominative

Nominative

Genitive

Genitive

Dative

Dative

Accusative

Accusative

Ablative

Ablative

Latin Page 50


Fortuna Crudelis Translation Sunday, May 31, 2009 10:20 PM

Barbillus, his son, and his faithful wife had the very best life. Plotina,

1

The wife of Barbillus, was a very peaceful woman, who, satisfied, stayed at home.

2

Rufus, his son, was a lively young man. He would often go to the paliestra

3

With his friends; who were accustomed to fighting wild beasts in the dessert.

4

Sometimes, like other young men, he would have arguments

5

With his parents. But, the parents of Rufus loved him very much,

6

And he them.

7

Among the friends of Rufus is an Athenian young man, named Eupor.

8

This Eupor came to the city of Alexandria and studied medicine.

9

He often visited Barbillus' house. At last her returned to the city of Athens

10

Where he practiced the art of medicine. Eupor soon wrote a letter to Rufus

11

And his parents inviting them to his wedding.

12

Rufus wanted to go to greece very much, but was afraid to sail, because the

13

The winter was now approaching. He therefore sent for his astrologer, and asked

14

For his opinion. The astrologer, after he thought for a long time, gave Rufus'

15

Parents a response.

16

It is a dangerous thing to take on. The moon now enters scorpio

17

It would be best to remain home.

18

Barbillus and his wife gladly believe the astrologer, who is a learned man,

19

However Rufus took the thing badly. When Barbillus is out,

20

Rufus often goes to his mother, complaining about his father.

21

"father is a very stupid man, because he trusts an astrologer.

22

An astrologer is not a sailor. They know nothing of the art of sailing."

23

And so, Rufus persuaded Plotinae, but was not able to persuade his father.

24

Barbillus stubbornly did not want to sail. Therefore Rufus and

25

Latin Page 51


Barbillus stubbornly did not want to sail. Therefore Rufus and

25

Plotina left Barbillus at home, and sailed to Greece.

26

However when the ship, Which was carrying them, approached Greece,

27

a huge storm overwhelmed her. Rufus was able to swim to shore, however

28

Plotina, who Barbillus loved very much, died in a large wave.

29

When Barbillus heard of the shipwreck, which his wife had died in,

30

He became very upset. He did not want to see his son again. Rufus,

31

Although he wanted to return home, obeyed his father.

32

He remained in Greece for a long time, but at last he made the journey to

33

Britain, when he was in the Roman Army.

34

Latin Page 52


Fortuna Crudelis Questions Sunday, May 31, 2009 10:53 PM

1. Give three details you were told about Plotina's character. a. She was calm. b. She was happy at home. c. She loved Rufus very much.

2. Give two reasons Rufus would be called "iubenis impiger" a. Rufus was often out hunting with his friends. b. He wanted to travel to Greece, even though he was advised against it. 3. What kind of relationship did Rufus have with his parents? a. Although they sometimes argued, they loved each other. 4. What was Euphor doing in Alexandria. a. Euphor came to the city to study medicine. 5. When did Euphor write his letter? What did the letter contain? a. The letter, actually a wedding invitation, was sent as winter was approaching. 6. Why did Barbillus ask for the opinion of the astrologer? a. Barbuillus trusted the astrologer, and was worried about sailing. 7. What was the Astrologer's reply? a. The astrologer advised the family to remain home. 8. "Rufus rem graviter ferebat"-- why do you think Rufus was upset? a. Rufus really wanted to go to Greece, and was told no by an astrologer. 9. What happened when the ship was approaching Greece? What then happened to Rufus and Plotina? a. As the ship was approaching, it was overwhelmed by a large storm. b. Rufus was able to swim to shore, however Plotina was not, and drowned. 10. Why did Rufus not return home? What did he do after leaving Greece? a. Barbillus did not want to see his son again after the death of his wife. b. Rufus eventually enlisted in the roman army, and went to Britain. 11. Rufis said "pater stultissimus est, quod astrologo credit." From what has happened to Barbillus and his family since that comment was made, do you think Rufus was right? Give a reason for your answer. a. Although in the two incidents were Barbillus was warned of danger a tragedy did end up occurring, the happenings were purely coincidental. Astrologers can not really see the course of earthy events reflected in the stars.

Latin Page 53


About the Language: Present Participles Thursday, June 04, 2009 4:47 PM

- Found on page 166 of stage 20 A. Study the following sentences: Medicus, per forum ambulans, Phormionem conspexit. The doctor, walking through the forum, caught sight o f Phormio Clemens Eutychum in media via stantem invenit Clemens found Eutychus standing in the middle of the road Servi, Barbillum portantes, villam intraverumt. The slaves, carrying Barbillus, entered the house. Phormio ancillas in cubiculo lavrimantes audivit. Phormio heard the slave girls crying in the bedroom

The words in Blue are in the present active participe a participle is part verb, and part

Latin Page 54


Translation of "Remedium Astrologi" Thursday, June 11, 2009 2:51 PM

The servants and I quickly returned to the house with Barbillus.

1

Much blood flows from the would of Barbillus. Phormio, who was

2

accustomed to healing wounded servants, had torn his tunic, wrapped

3

This part of the tunic around the arm of Barbillus. However much blood

4

still flowed. The slaves who were carrying Barbillus, when the entered

5

the bedroom, gently put him on the couch. Two slave girls stood near

6

The couch, crying. Phormio sent out the slave girls from the bedroom

7

And called us to him.

8

"It is necessary for you all" he said, "to search for a large number of

9

spider webs. When blood flows, nothing is better than spider webs.

10

The servants hurried though the whole house, searching for spiderwebs,

11

And were raising a huge noise. Phormio, after many servants brought

12

Spider webs to the bedroom, placed then in the shoulder of the master.

13

The astrologer saw the crying slave girls, and heard the shouts of the

14

Slaves, hurried to the bedroom. At one he burst in to the bedroom of

15

Barbillus shouting:

16

"Surely I foresaw this, oh dreadful day, oh unlucky master"

17

Do you have a cure I asked

18

I have a certain cure, said the astrologer. It is easy for me to heal Barbillus,

19

Because we astrologers are true doctors.

20

Therefore I am able to prepare a cure for Barbillus. This cure, which was

21

Given to us by the Chaldaei. First, it is necessary for me to capture a black

22

Mouse. Then I want to cut up the captured black mouse. Finally I want to

23

Place this in the shoulder of Barbillus . This alone is the cure.

24

Suddenly, Barbillus, who heard the astrologer, opened his eyes.

25

After he gave me a weak sign, he whispered in my hear.

26

Search for Petro. He is a good doctor. Latin Page 55

27


Search for Petro. He is a good doctor.

27

At once I sent Phormio from the house, who knew Petro well.

28

And so, the manager searched for the doctor, the astrologer the mouse.

29 30 31 32

Latin Page 56


Translation of "Petro" Thursday, June 11, 2009 3:29 PM

Petro, after the heard of the wound of Barbillus, hurried to his house at

1

Once. When he arrived at the house, he saw the astrologer, who was

2

Trying to cure Barbillus. The astrologer, was placing the cut up mouse

3

In the wound of Barbillus, and reciting magic spells. Petro, as soon as he

4

Saw this mouse, became the most angry. He cursed the astrologer

5

And sent him out of the bedroom.

6

Then Petro, after the inspected the shoulder of Barbillus, picked up

7

A sponge and submerged it in vinegar.

8

Barbillus fell back unconscious.

9

Petro turned to me.

10

"It is necessary for you to listen to me" He said. "It is difficult for me

11

To cure Barbillus. I despair for his life, because much blood

12

Still now flows.

13

And so I gave help to the doctor. Petro, after demanding he boiling water

14

Diligently washed the forecasts. Then he firmly held the forceps and

15

Inspected the shoulder with the greatest care.

16

After he finished this, he washed the wound of Barbillus. The skin

17

Which the spear had cut, he stitched. At last he firmly tied he shoulder

18

In this way petro warned me

19

It is necessary for Barbillus to remain in this bed. It is necessary for him

20

To sleep and rest. Nature alone is able to save him, not astrologers.

21

I gave Petro the greatest thanks.

22

For a long time I remained in the house of Barbillus, looking after his

23

Business arrangements. Barbillus trusted me alone. I went to the

24

Were he lay sick every day. I had many conversations with Barbillus.

25

Latin Page 57


Were he lay sick every day. I had many conversations with Barbillus.

25

After I got to know Barbillus closely, he told me much about his own

26

Life. Without a doubt, had seriously hurt him.

27

28 29 30 31

32

Latin Page 58


Translation of "Asrologus Vicor" Thursday, June 11, 2009 4:08 PM

The astrologer, who was living in the house of Barbillus, was a man of evil character. The astrologer and Petro were enemies. The Astrologer was a Syrian, the doctor was a Greek. Petro practiced the art of medicine in the city. Many Alexandrians, who Petro cured, praised his art. The astrologer however, lived in the house of barbullus, the doctor in the city. Therefore it was easy for the astrologer to visit Barbullius. He often came to the bedroom were the sick master lay.

You anre in grave danger, master. Petro is the worst docoor. He has sent many sick to his death. Surely you don't trust petro. Petro is a very mean man. No one is meander than him. He wants your money. It Is necessary for you to send him out of the house. Barbillus listened to the astrologer, although the pain grew worse every day, even now he trusted the doctor. When Barbillus did not want to kick out the doctor, the astrologer made a plan.

He erupted into the bedroom of the master, shouting: Master! Your messanger brings very good news to you. You are able to be healed, The goddess issis, who always hears my prayers, came to me in a dream at night. In the dream I was walking through the streest of the city of alexandria. Suddenly I saw a boy standing in the street. The boy was your slave, the egyptian. Who the slaves had killed in the riot. He told me about a special ointment . Barbillus, when he heard this, handed himself over fully to the astrologer. Therefore, after putting together the ointment, he opened the masters shoulder, and smeared it. However, the astrologers ointment was very bad. Barbillus shoulder grew worse. The astrologer, when he saw this, became terrified, and raan froom te house. Barbulis, disoaring for his life, called me to the bedroo, Quintus, he whiispered in my hear, don’t cry, I am gooing to did. It is clearly understood It is necessary for all to die This is my one demand of you Search for my son in britain Cary this letter to him When I was angry, I expelled Rufus from the house To him I have done a large injustice Now, however, I seek mercy from rufus. When I heard this, I summoned Petro. Barbillis stubornly refused. I summoned him anyway. When he arived, Barbilis was already dead.

Latin Page 59


Stage 20: Word Study Tuesday, June 02, 2009 6:11 PM

A. Give a derivative from the Latin words below to match each of the definitions. ---Word List--- Domus - Luna - Novem - Persuadere - Relinquere - Vulnus

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

--- Definitions--To abandon or give up Devoted to the home or household affairs To use reasoning to cause someone to do something Originally the ninth month in the Roman calendar Insanity or utter foolishness Able to be wounded.

B. Match each word to it's antonym (opposite)

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Pessimus Adire Mors Curdelis doctus

a. b. c. d. e.

Vita Begignus Optimus Stultus discedere

C. Match the definitions to the nouns.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Dereliction Desperation Indoctrination Liberation Mortification Temptation

a. b. c. d. e. f.

Enticement or attraction Embarrassment or humiliation A setting free The teaching of principles or beliefs An abandoning or a forsaking Recklessness resulting from having little or no hope.

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Stage 20 Vocabulary Sunday, May 31, 2009 10:03 PM

First part

Second Part Third Part

Definition

Adeo

Adire

Adii

Go up to, approach

Arcesso

Arcessere

Arcessivi

Summon, send for

Ars

Artis

Art

Auris

Auris

Ear

Colloco

Collocare

Collocavi

Place, put

Crdelis

Crudelis

Crudele

Cruel

Denique

At last

Despero

Desperare

Desperavi

Despair

Doctus

Docta

Doctum

Learned, clever

Infero

Inferre

Intuli

Bring in, bring on

Irrumpo

Irrumpere

Irrupi

Burst in

Latus

Lata

Latum

Wide

Libero

Liberare

Liberavi

Free

Luna

Lunae

Moon

Mors

Mortis

Death

Oculus

Oculi

Eye

Persuadeo Persuadere Persuasi

Dersuade

Pessimus

Pessima

Very bad, worst

Preces

Precum

Relinquo

Relinquere

Pessimum

Prayers Relinqui

Leave

Remedium Remedii

Cure

Sermo

Conversation

Sermonis

Sicut

Like

Tam

So

Tempto

Temptare

Vulnus

Vulneris

Temptavi

Try Wound

Latin Page 61


Written Review : Attempt 01 Monday, June 08, 2009 3:33 PM

LATIN II FINAL WRITTEN PRACTICE

I.) Noun Forms. Decline the whole word with its endings for the required declensions. 1st Declension: villa 3rd Declension, Neuter: nomen, nominis nd 2 Declension: cibus 4th Declension: portus 2nd Declension, Neuter: plaustrum, i 5th Declension: dies 3rd Declension: mater, matris S

1st

2nd

2nd Neuter

3rd

3rd Neuter

4th

5th

NOM

Villa

Cibus

Plaustrum

matris

nomen

Portus

dies

GEN

Villae

cibi

plaustri

matris

nominis

Portus

diei

DAT

Villae

cibo

plaustro

matri

Nomini

portui

diei

ACC

Villam

cibum

plaustrum

matrem

nonen

portum

diem

ABL

Villa

cibo

plaustro

matre

nomine

portu

die

NOM

Villae

cibi

plaustra

matres

nomina

portus

dies

GEN

Villarum

ciborum

plaustrorum

matrum

nominu m

Portuum dierum

DAT

Villis

cibis

Plaustris

matribus

nominib us

portibus

diebus

ACC

Villas

Cibos

plaustra

matres

nomina

portus

dies

ABL

Villis

Cibus

Plaustris

matribus

Nominib portibus us

P

diebus

II) Verb Forms. Conjugate the verb, voco, vocare, vocavi in the required tenses below and translate each form.

Present tense Sing. Latin Sing. English Pl. Latin

1st per

Voco

Vocamus

2nd per

Vocas

Vocatis Latin Page 62

Pl. English


2nd per

Vocas

Vocatis

3rd per

Vocat

Vocant

Imperfect tense Sing. Latin Sing. English Pl. Latin

1st

per

Vocabam

Vocabamus

2nd per

Vocabas

Vocabatis

3rd per

Vocabat

Vocabant

Pl. English

Perfect tense Sing. Latin Sing. English Pl. Latin 1st per.

Vocavi

Vocavimus

2nd per.

Vocavisti

Vocavistis

3rd per.

Vocavit

vocaverunt

Pl. English

Pluperfect tense Sing. Latin 1st

per.

Sing. English Pl. Latin

Vocaveram

Vocaveramus

2nd per.

Vocaveras

Vocaveratis

3rd per.

Vocaverat

vocaverant

Pl. English

III.) Irregular Verb Forms. Conjugate the verb sum and nolo on the back of this page. Conjugate the irregular verbs, possum and volo in the required tenses below.

Present tense Sing.

Pl.

Sum

sumus

2nd per.

es

estis

3rd per.

est

sunt

1st

per.

Imperfect tense Sing.

1st

per.

Pl.

eram eramus

2nd per.

eras

eratis

3rd per.

erat

erant

Present tense Latin Page 63


Present tense Sing.

Pl.

1st per.

volo

volomus

2nd per.

vis

vultis

3rd per.

vult

volunt

Imperfect tense Sing.

Pl.

1st per.

volebant

volebamus

2nd per.

volebas

volebatis

3rd per.

volebat

volebant

Present tense Sing.

Pl.

1st per.

nolo

nolumus

2nd per.

non vis

non vultis

3rd per.

non vult

nolunt

Imperfect tense Sing.

Pl.

1st per.

nolebam nolebamus

2nd per.

nolebas

nolebatis

3rd per.

nolebat

nolebant

Present tense Sing.

Pl.

1st per.

possum possumus

2nd per.

potes

potestis

3rd per.

potest

possunt

Imperfect tense Sing.

Pl.

1st per. 2nd per. 3rd per.

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Latin Page 65


Noun Declension Study: 02 Monday, June 08, 2009 4:15 PM

S

1st

2nd

2nd Neuter

3rd

3rd Neuter 4th

5th

NOM

Puella

Servus

Templum

Leo

nomen

Portus

Res

GEN

Puellae

Servi

Templi

Leonis

nominis

Portus

Rei

DAT

Puellae

Servo

Templo

leoni

nomini

Portui

Rei

ACC

Puellam

Servum

Temlum

leonem

Nomen

portum

Rem

ABL

Puella

Servo

Templo

leone

nomine

porti

Re

NOM

Puellas

Servi

Templa

leones

Nomina

Portus

res

GEN

Puellarum Servorum Templorum

leonum

nominum

portuum Rerum

DAT

Puellis

servis

Templis

leonibus nominibus

Portibus rebus

ACC

Puellas

Servos

Templis

leones

Portus

ABL

Puellis

servi

Templi

leonibus nominibus

P

Latin Page 66

nomina

res

Portibus rebus


Latin II Final Exam Study Guide