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CELSO QUIJANO JR. EUGENE CUBILLO MARCO BERMEJO OTEPH ANTIPOLO ROD CAÑALITA AILEEN CASIS PAMELA LIM HEIDI GADDI-SORIANO GRECO MILAMBILING


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I WANT TO BE THE NEXT FLASH ELORDE... THERE’S NOTHING IMPOSSIBLE AS LONG AS YOU DREAM FOR IT AND WORK HARD FOR IT.


HEALTH

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Illustration by GRECO MILAMBILING

60 MANILA BULLETIN SPORTS DIGEST >>

ost the car keys? Forgot someone’s name? Many elderly people suffer slight cognitive problems but men are more likely than women to suffer momentary memory lapse or senior moments, according to a US study. Researchers from the Mayo Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center in Rochester, Minnesota, found 19 percent of men aged 70 to 89 years had so-called mild cognitive impairment, compared to only 14 percent of women. People with mild cognitive impairment have problems with memory but can carry out everyday activities and generally realize that they’re forgetful. The National Institutes of Health says ‘’mild cognitive impairment’’ falls in between normal forgetfulness and dementia. Researcher Dr. Ronald Petersn said the findings were surprising because Alzheimer’s disease, which is preceded by this type of mental decline, affects more women than men. Even after accounting for differences in education, age, and diseases like diabetes and hypertension, men had about 50 percent higher odds than women of having mild cognitive impairment. ‘’The gender differences were somewhat surprising to us because most people believe that women are at higher risk than men,’’ Petersen told Reuters Health. He said not everyone with mild cognitive impairment develops dementia but some people do which makes it a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. An estimated 15 percent of people with mild cognitive impairment end up with full-blown dementia each year. In the general population, that number is between one and two percent. The study, published in the journal Neurology (http://link.reuters.com/bar78n), involved more than 2,000 randomly sampled elderly people from Olmsted County, Minnesota. The researchers spent hours testing each participant specifically for mild cognitive impairment and dementia. About a quarter of the seniors had cognitive problems beyond the signs of normal aging, including Alzheimer’s. Mild impairment became more common with older age but it also turned out that the more education people had under their belt, the less likely they were to have cognitive problems. Petersen said it was unclear how to explain the finding. The researchers speculated that perhaps men get memory problems earlier in life, but then decline more slowly than women. In other words, the reason more men have mild cognitive impairment might be that more women are skipping that stage and going directly to dementia. While there aren’t any drugs available to treat mild cognitive impairment, Petersen said lifestyle changes could have a positive effect. He recommended reading and going to the movies, as well as keeping up with friends and family, eating healthy foods and being physically active. ‘’There are more and more data coming out indicating that some of these lifestyle modifications may work,’’ he said. [REUTERS LIFE]


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HEALTH

By LINDSEY TANNER + Illustration by CELSO QUIJANO JR.

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unior doctors quickly learn that exposure to patients’ germs is part of the job, but a study suggests many are returning the favor. More than half of doctors in training said in a survey that they’d shown up sick to work, and almost one-third said they’d done it more than once. Misplaced dedication and fear of letting other doctors down are among reasons the researchers cited as possible explanations. Dr. Anupam Jena, a medical resident at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, developed food poisoning symptoms halfway through an overnight shift last year, but said he didn’t think he was contagious or that his illness hampered his ability to take care of patients. Jena, a study co-author, said getting someone else to take over his shift on short notice ``was not worth the cost of working while a bit sick.’’ He was not among the survey participants. The researchers analyzed an anonymous survey of 537 medical residents at 12 hospitals around the country conducted last year by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. The response rate was high; the hospitals were not identified. The results appeared in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Nearly 58 percent of the respondents

said they’d worked at least once while sick and 31 percent said they’d worked more than once while sick in the previous year. About half said they hadn’t had time to see a doctor about their illness. Dr. Thomas Nasca, the accreditation council’s CEO, said residents are trained to put patients’ needs above their own but also should recognize that if they’re sick, their patients’ would be better served by having another doctor take care of them. Residents’ hands-on postgraduate training is rigorous and demanding. Many work up to 80 hours a week and sometimes 24 hours a day in hospitals. The atmosphere in some programs is ultra-competitive, and residents may work while sick because they don’t want to be seen as slackers, Jena said. The council, which accredits hospital residency programs, has proposed revisions on residents’ work hours and time off to reduce sleep deprivation and the chances for medical errors. The work week limit would remain at 80 hours. The revisions, to be voted on by the council’s board later this month, also call

for residents and faculty not to ignore signs of illness and fatigue in themselves and colleagues and make sure that they’re fit for duty. That might help reduce the reportingwhile-sick problem, said study co-author Dr. Vineet Arora, associate director of the University of Chicago’s internal medicine residency program. A growing push to require flu shots for health workers also could help reduce the number of junior doctors who work while sick. The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention strongly recommends annual flu vaccinations for all health care workers to prevent their patients from getting sick. And last week, the American Academy of Pediatrics endorsed mandatory flu vaccinations for all health workers. Jena said flu ``is really the main worry,’’ because it’s so prevalent and so easily transmitted. Dr. Lauren Hughes, a former president of the American Medical Student Association and a first-year resident in Seattle, said her program directors have warned residents ``to take extra special care of ourselves’’ << MANILA BULLETIN SPORTS DIGEST

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HEALTH

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en hoping to impress women on the dance floor now have science to help them. A European study has found that men who move their necks and trunks more to the beat are most likely to attract women. British and German researchers filmed 19 men, aged 18-35, with a 3-D camera system as they danced to a basic rhythm, and then mapped their movements onto featureless, white, gender-neutral humanoid characters, or avatars. A group of 37 heterosexual women was asked to rate the dance moves of the avatars, which gave no indication of the men’s attractiveness, to help identify the key movement areas of the bodies that decided if their dancing was ‘’good’’ or ‘’bad.’’ ‘’This is the first study to show objectively what differentiates a good dancer from a bad one. Men all over the world will be interested to know what moves they can throw to attract women,’’ said psychologist Dr Nick Neave of Britain’s Northumbria University in a statement. The study, which also involved

speed of the right knee movements were also important in signalling dance quality. A ‘’good’’ dancer thus displays larger and more variable movements in relation to bending and twisting movements of their head/neck and torso, and faster bending and twisting movements of their right knee,’’ the researchers said in a report published in the Royal Soceity Journal German’s University of Gottingen, found that eight movement variables made the difference between a ‘’good’’ and a ‘’bad’’ dancer. These were the size of movement of the neck, trunk, left shoulder and wrist, the variability of movement size of the neck, trunk and left wrist, and the speed of movement of the right knee. The analysis was concentrated on three body regions: legs including the ankle, hip and knee, the arms with shoulder, elbow and wrist, and the central body with neck and trunk. The study found that female perceptions of good dance quality were influenced most greatly by large and varied movements involving the neck and trunk.The

Biology Letters. Northumbria’s School of Life Sciences said the study was the first to identify potential biomechanical differences between ‘’good’’ and ‘’bad’’ male dancers. Neave said he believed such dance movements may form honest signals of a man’s reproductive quality, in terms of health, vigour or strength. He intends to continue research to grasp the implications, but studying dancing in a natural setting is hard as it then also brings in facial attractiveness, height, clothing and socio-economic status. ‘’We now know which area of the body females are looking at when they are making a judgment about male dance attractiveness,’’ he said. (REUTERS LIFE) << MANILA BULLETIN SPORTS DIGEST

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HEALTH

SCIENTISTS USE SYNTHETIC CORNEAS TO RESTORE VISION

by KATE KELLAND + Illustration by GRECO MILAMBILING

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cientists in Canada and Sweden have used laboratory-made biosynthetic corneas to restore vision to patients in a small human trial, and shown for the first time that they can help repair damaged eye tissueS. The scientists, whose work was published in the Science Translational Medicine journal, said their findings offered hope for the millions of people who go blind each year because of a worldwide shortage of corneas for donation. ‘’This study ... is the first to show that an artificially fabricated cornea can integrate with the human eye and stimulate regeneration,’’ said May Griffith of the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, who led the study. ‘’With further research, this approach could help restore sight to millions of people who are waiting for a donated human cornea for transplantation.’’ The cornea is a tiny piece of transparent, film-like tissue that covers the surface of our eyes. Made from parallel strands of the protein collagen, it refracts light to focus images on the retina.

60 54 MANILA BULLETIN SPORTS DIGEST >>>>

Although the fragile film is easily destroyed by trauma or infection, replacement human corneas can be used to restore vision, although this depends on a steady supply of donors. A team led by Griffith and Per Fagerholm, an ophthalmology professor and eye surgeon at Linkoping University in Sweden, conducted the study by removing diseased tissue from the corneas of 10 patients and replacing them with biosynthetic implants designed to mimic a normal human cornea. For the process they used recombinant human collagen, a substance synthesised in the laboratory to mimic human tissue and supplied by the San Francisco biotech firm FibroGen Inc. The patients were monitored for two years after surgery. The researchers found that, eventually, the cells and nerves from nine of the 10 patients regrew completely and packed themselves into the implant, resulting in a kind of ‘’regenerated’’ cornea that looked and functioned like normal, healthy eye tissue. The biosynthetic corneas also became sensitive to touch and the treated eyes

began producing normal tears, the researchers said. Vision improved in six of the 10 patients. After the patients were also fitted with contact lenses, which is common after corneal transplants, their vision was comparable with that of patients who undergo regular human corneal tissue transplants. ‘’The results were pretty encouraging and there is great potential here,’’ Fagerholm said in a telephone interview. Loss of vision due to corneal disease or trauma affects over 10 million people a year, but lack of access to donor tissue limits the number of transplants, particularly in poorer countries. In the United States, an estimated 42,000 corneal grafts a year are performed using tissue from posthumous donors, but there are sometimes problems with rejection and experts say failure rates are significant. Fagerholm said the patients in this trial had no problems with rejection and did not need long-term immune suppression drugs to help their bodies accept the corneas. (REUTERS)


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58 MANILA BULLETIN SPORTS DIGEST >>


HEALTH

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Illustration by EUGENE CUBILLO

firm handshake could be a sign of a longer life expectancy, according to British researchers. Scientists at the Medical Research Council found that elderly people who could still give a firm handshake and walk at a brisk pace were likely to outlive their slower peers. They found simple measures of physical capability like shaking hands, walking, getting up from a chair and balancing on one leg were related to life span, even after accounting for age, sex and body size. The study is the first to provide a comprehensive view of the existing research by pooling data from 33 studies. “These measures have been used in population-based research for quite a long time,” said Rachel Cooper of the Medical Research Council’s Unit for Lifelong Health and Aging. “They may be useful indicators for subsequent health.” Cooper, whose study appears in the British Medical Journal , said more studies are needed to clarify whether the measures would be helpful to doctors as a screening tool. “I wouldn’t suggest that we

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roll them out into clinical practice tomorrow, but it is possible that they could be used in the future,” she told Reuters Health. The researchers examined 33 studies involving tens of thousands of people, most of whom were aged over 60 but living in the community rather than in hospital or care homes. Of 14 studies dealing with grip strength, the researchers found that those with the strongest hand grasps tended to live longer than those with limp grips. The death rate over the period of the studies for people with weak handshakes was 67 percent higher than for people with a firm grip.The slowest walkers were nearly three times more likely to die during the study period than swifter walkers. The people who were slowest to get up from a chair had about double the mortality rate compared to the quick risers. “Those people in the general population who have higher physical capability levels are likely to live longer,” Cooper said. (REUTERS) << MANILA BULLETIN SPORTS DIGEST

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NUTRITION VEGETARIAN TOFU

BURGER WHERE’S THE BEEF? NOT HERE. HERE ARE SOME HEALTHY ALTERNATIVES TO A FAVORITE FASTFOOD STAPLE MINUS THE UNWANTED CALORIES, FAT, AND GREASE.

BLACK BEAN

BURGER

INGREDIENTS:

INGREDIENTS:

1 can black beans (red beans can also be used), rinsed 1 large egg 1/4 cup plain bread crumbs 1 clove garlic, minced 1tsp. chili powder

PROCEDURES:

Salt, pepper, and cayenne to taste 1. Mash black beans in a large bowl. 2. Mix in minced garlic, spices, and egg. Add the bread crumbs. 3. Shape into patties. You can refrigerate them if they are not very firm. 4. Bake or fry in a skillet until golden brown.

NUTRITIONAL INFO: Servings Per Recipe: 5 Calories: 73.1 Total Fat: 1.5 g Cholesterol: 42.5 mg Sodium: 236.2 mg Total Carbs: 11.8 g Dietary Fiber: 2.7 g Protein: 4.8 g

1 12-ounce package firm tofu 2 tsps. olive oil 1 small-medium onion, chopped 1-2 portobello mushrooms, chopped 2-5 garlic cloves, finely chopped 1 egg, beaten 1/4 cup shredded Swiss cheese (mozzarella or cheddar can be substituted if desired) Salt & pepper to taste

PROCEDURES:

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. 2. Chop the tofu into very small pieces . 3. Heat olive oil in small skillet. Lightly sauté onion, mushrooms, and garlic. Remove from heat and place in a medium bowl. Add tofu. 4. Mix in egg, cheese, salt, and pepper until thoroughly combined. 5. Form the tofu mixture into patties. Place onto greased or non-stick baking sheet in 6 portions. Flatten with spatula to form patties. 6. Bake for 30 minutes or until golden brown. Serve with your favorite toppings.

NUTRITIONAL INFO: Number of servings: 6 Calories: 168.4 Total Fat: 10.1 g Cholesterol: 48.1 mg Sodium: 70.5 mg Total Carbs: 7.8 g Dietary Fiber: 2.5 g Protein: 14.5 g

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Manila Bulletin Sports Digest (October 2010)  

The MB Sports Digest is published monthly by the Manila Bulletin Publishing Corporation. It is a sports-based, health, fitness and nutrition...

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