Issuu on Google+

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1


22-40-80 HIKE! Expand your

VIC to 80 columns.

H«nmw»i

>

*.__'.,

Quantum Data's new Video Combo Cartridge brings you: 40 or 80 column display, plus 16K RAM and PROM socket. no-cost change inside the cartridge. Instruc

With the Video Combo Cartridge from Quan tum Data you can now have 40 or 80 column

tions are provided. Also provided is a socket for

display, 16K RAM and PROM all in one cartridge.

a PROM, 16K of memory and AC adaptor. If

It comes set for 40 column Display compatible

you don't need memory then 80 columns can be

with the \/\C video modulator and your home TV.

yours for only SI99.50. A listing of the driver soft

Then, when you are ready to upgrade to 80 col

ware is provided at no charge. A programmed

umns and a video monitor, just make a simple.

PROM containing this software is also available for S19.95.

■■Ill

ODI expandor:

■ Expands Basic user memory up to

24 K in 8K steps • PROMS may be mixed with RAM

in 8K blocks • 8K can be assigned lo machine language area

■ Plugs directly into VIC expan sion port • Low power, no additional power supply required

• Professional Quality, full buffering

QDI Printer

ODI

RS-232 interface:

IVHnrmother:

• Provides RS-232 voltage conver sion for VIC serial port

• Adds 3 slots to the memory expansion port

• Allows use of a wide variety of RS-232 peripherals including printers, modems and voice synthesizers

• Removable card guides allow either boards or cartridges

• Low power CMOS circuitry

• Fused to protect VIC power supply from overload

requires no external power supply • Small size: 2]h x 3 inches Prlntor

• Requires no additional power supply

• Simple plug-in installation $49.95

Mini mother

S69.95

on alt signals

• Small size; 6 x 4.5 inches. 16K expander

$149.95

24K expandor

$199.95

QUANTUM i : ;t

.

I Jp

[7!4| 966-6553 DEALER HOT LINE (714) 754-1945

UM I M, inlt. 3001 Redhill Bldg. 4, Suite 105, Costa Mesa CA 92626


Braindrops

From the editor

We're Glad You Asked

.. 2

Answers to some

common questions about the VIC

3

And Now A Word From Oui Sponsor

Comments irom Commodore's upper crust

4

FUN. Access: Commodore User Groups

The VIC Magician Sleight-of-hand for getting the most from your VIC by Michael Tomczyk ..

Play Blackdragon

Our hero fights monsters in

The Source's magic labyrinth

A Little VIC Music

A mystery tune from VIC

expert Jim Butterfield

VIC 20 Helps Deliver the News

A computer

whiz kid runs his paper route with a VIC

.. .

Maryland "VIC-aT Computerizes Sermons Somebody up there likes ihe VIC No More Pencils, No More Books Learning

at home can be fun with these educational programs

GAMES.

Joystick Control on the VIC

joysticking by Andy Finke!

Technical tips for

Great Cartridge Games toi the VIC 20

9II lit 11

A run

down on the best available

Flip Out With VICFLIP-rV Type and save this challenging game program listing by Jim Dubrouillet and Sean Smith

,

Hllllinlfflllllmmll/llmffflflHlfillflflllllllllfl/fflilllfftil

muni ..AND BEYOND

Tele/Scope

Scoping out telecommunications

byJeffHand JINSAM Gives a Golden Anniversary Party

by Nancy Iscaro of Jini Micro-Systems, Inc. Best Books

Helpful reading for both beginners

and advanced users Book Review;

•Wlflmwiwini

Freelance expert Bob Baker

reviews the VIC 20 Programmer's Reference Guide Guide (reprinted from Microcomputing) Program Review:

A helpless beginner reviews

Commodore's "Introduction to BASIC" by John O'Brien

Get Serious

What's happening on the FCWERful

Future File

Commodore MAX Machine and

side of Commodore products Commodore 64 Introduced

MMImM

by Mike Heck

i


POWER/PLAT Staff

Brcdndiops

Editorial Manager

David A. Kaminer Editor

Diane LeBold Contributing Editor Paul Fleming Staff Writers

Andy Finkel Jeff Hand Mike Heck John O'Brien Contributing Writers Robert Baker Jim Butteriield Nancy Iscaro

"technical Editors Paul Goheen Neil Harris Michael Tomczyk "technical Staff

Welcome to the premier issue of POWER/PLAY and

the exciting, expanding world of Commodore computing at home! Whatever Commodore computer you're using in your home, you'll discover in these pages how to get Ihe most

out of its POWERful computing capabilities. In tact, if you

Jeff Bruette Rick Cotton

get good enough at using your computer's POWER, you

Larry Ercolino

Jim Snyder

Now, we do think all that POWER is fine. But you'll also find that Commodore computing at home is intrin sically PLAYiul. And, to be frank, our inclination, here in POWER/PLAY, is more toward the PLAY part. Tun. games and beyond" is our motto, and also happens to define how we've structured this issue. In the FUN section you'll find-what else-fun things

John Stockman

to do with your basic computer. (In this case the "basic

Bill Hindortf Pat McAllister Dave Middleton Mark Scott Joe Siciliano

Circulation Manager John O'Brien Advertising Manager Diane LeBold

may never have to leave your home again.

computer" is a VIC 20 and Datassette.) We consulted Mr. Webster and found out a game is

the same thing as a contest. So that's how we decided what went into the GAMES section.

Which leaves us with BEYOND. In that section you'll find information lor the more sophisticated user, and applications that require peripheral equipment beyond

(II) Ihe basic computer. We've also stashed our reviews and miscellany there.

I think you'll find this first issue of POWER/PLAY both useful and enjoyable.

oh the coved

Many el you will rocoanuo the

artwork Irom Commodore:. Jupiter Umd*i

cartridge gama liee our gamus swcllon [Of more on itie many exciting cartridges availuMu lor Commodore home usera

iCWRI'/llAY is published quarterly by Ihe Carnpuler SyHoinr. Division Commodore Business Macrunm Inc. The Meadows JB7 [>ÂŤvwi fork

Dnvo. Wayne.M IWflV Copynghl- 1982.Com modorn Buslnoss Machine?. Inc US Subscriber

rale SlOOOperyear OutsideHieUS. subscriber role is 51500 per year No material may be repnntf-a without permission Volumu I. Number 1

VIC 20*. and CBM" aro trademarks o[ Commodore Business Macnlnes Inc PET' is a registered Irodtmark ol Ccmmoaore Busmen Mottunes Inc

1982 POWER/PLAY


We're Glad You Asked For the benefit ot the multitude of new Commodore home com-

Programs most easily adapted

this first issue ol POWER/PLAY to

since most PET/CBM programs use PEEKs and POKEs, and

puterisls, we've decided to use

answer some of (he mosl fre quently asked questions about

VIC and its related products Those ol you who have been using your VIC for a while, or who have been reading

COMMODORE Magazine, may have heard some of this before, but you never can tell. Even advanced users might learn a few things here,

are those in BASIC that contain no PEEKs or POKEs. However,

Q How do you use joysticks with the VIC? Do you need joysticks with VIC game cartridges?

the program and completely

A With Ihe current VIC car

because the screen size is so

easier to take the general idea of rewnle it, using memory maps

tridges, joysticks are not neces sary, but they are optional in the

found in the VIC 20 Programmer's

following: VIC Avengers, Superslot, VIC Super Alien and Radar Rat Race. To learn how to use

The VIC memory map can be

Reference Guide, available from Commodore. PET/CBM maps are available in various places,

Q. When will the Programmer's Reference Guide be out?

Computer Guide, published by Osbome McGraw Hill.

A The VIC 20 Programmer's Reference Guide is available right now through authorized Commodore dealers and retail

Q What is the purpose ol the RS232 Terminal Interlace

products. For a complete review ol the Reference Guide, see page 40.

Q How do you clear up wavy lines on the TV screen?

A Wavy lines on the screen are

caused by RFI (Radio Frequency

Interference). Ail computers tend to generate this interference. The

problem can be made less

apparent by re-orienling the modulator with respect to the TV antenna, or by tuning ihe TV set,

making sure the switchbox is connected and set properly.

Q My TV screen sometimes flut ters during operation. How do

you correct this?

A Some TVs do tend to flutter with the use of a home computer. To eliminate Ihe flutter with Ihe

VIC 20, use the following POKE command

POKE 36864.133

Each lime the VIC is reset (in cluding power-up), you must issue this POKE command. Q Why do I sometimes have

problems loading programs irom cassette tapes? A Radiation from Ihe TV screen can interfere with loading a pro gram on tape from your VIC

Datasselte recorder. To alleviate

the problem, move the recorder as far as possible from the TV. Also, because new tapes are often tightly wound, we suggest

you play the tape a lew times

without loading. This will loosen the tape and facilitate loading.

Cartridge?

A The RS232 Terminal Interface

Cartndge converts the signal

produced by the VIC into true RS232 standard format, which is used by some non-Commodore MODEMS. Q How is a MODEM hooked up to the VIC? A Right now, two methods are available for hooking up a

MODEM. II you have a modular phone, your best bet is to get Ihe VIC MODEM cartndge, available a! your Commodore dealer. With

this inexpensive cartridge, you

simply plug the handset cord of your phone directly into Ihe MODEM cartridge, run the soft ware driver, and you're all set lo enter the world of computer tele communications! If you don't have a modular phone, then

you'll have to purchase the VIC RS232 Terminal Interface Car tridge and connect it via an

Finkel's article on page 26, or the VIC 20 Programmer's Reference Guide, available Irom Commodore. a What does the VCU piggy back do for the VIC 20? , A The VCU (Video Circuit Up grade) improves the color of early versions of the VIC 20 units, serial numbers less Irian 50900,

which were manufactured in Japan. Newer VIC units made in the U.S. have this circuit included. Q Is it possible to hook up an

audio cassette recorder to the VIC 20? A A standard audio cassette re corder will not work with the VIC

20. A VIC Datasselte is necessary for use with any cassette tapes. HOWEVER, the VIC Datassette does use audio cassette TAPES. For best results use a short

(C-10 or C-15) tape, and make sure it is NOT chromium dioxide. Chromium dioxide culs the high frequencies, which is exactly where data is stored Q Can more than one periph eral be hooked to the VIC at

one time?

acoustic MODEM. For details on the VIC MODEM, see our tele

Q What telecommunications

Q Is it possible to hook a monitor to the VIC 20?

communications department, page 36.

networks work â– with the VIC? A The VIC MODEM cartridge allows you to access such net works as The Source. Compu Serve. MicroNet, Dow Jones and

the New York Times, to name just a few. In addition. Commodore is presently developing a network

A The VIC 20 can be connected directly to a monitor without

using the modulator. The cable required depends on Ihe monitor's input connector.

Q What kind ol BASIC is used on the VIC 20?

exclusively for Commodore users.

A The VIC 20 uses PET BASIC 2.0,

tions department on page 36.

Q Is there a way to increase the number of columns per line?

Again, see our telecommunica

Q Will more software be available for the VIC?

A Commodore's VIC Product

A Generally speaking, PET/ CBM

Development Group is currently

POWER/PLAY 1982

joysticks with your VIC, see Andy

A Up to five disk drive units can be daisy-chained together. To include a VIC printer in the system, simply connect it as the last unit of the chain.

RS232-1O-RS232 cable to an RS232

& Is the PET/CBM software adaptable for the VIC? software can be adapted to the VIC ll there is sufficient memory

cation software. For more infor mation on the arcade games, see page 28.

different from the VIC, it's almost

sucti as the PET/CBM Personal

stores that carry Commodore

games, as well as helplul appli

working on many new and excit ing arcade-style cartridge

A At this time, Ihere is no really efficient technique lo increase the number of columns per line on the VIC 20. It is possible to write programs to increase the (continued on page A5)


And Now A Word From Our Sponsor... We at Commodore are delighted with the growing interest in computing at home. The potential of home use

is jus! beginning to be tapped, and things that were only possibilities yesterday are rapidly becoming realities today. In fact, home use is expanding so quickly that between the

time I write this and the time you read it a whole new range of products and possibilities will have emerged.

To help the tremendous number of Commodore home users get the most out o! their computing experience, we

decided to create a magazine devoted exclusively to their needs and interests. Our intention is to provide plenty ol information on how to use Commodore computers for personal development and entertainment, as well as for practical purposes.

Most importantly, we hope POWER/PLAY can become a forum lor our home users—a means ol connecting with other Commodore enthusiasts to exchange ideas and information. If you are willing, you can use POWER/PLAY to establish a network of personal support that will greatly

enhance your understanding and appreciation of what your computer can do.

We hope you will come to regard POWER/PLAY as an

essential accessory to your Commodore home computer,

just as our business, scientific and educational users have come to rely on COMMODORE Magazine as an

irreplacable source of information about Commodore products outside the home. You can make POWER/ PLAY whatever you want it to be. by contributing your ideas and energy. We invite and encourage you to participate in creating a magazine that will be uniquely yours.

Kit Spencer Vice President. Marketing

1982POWER/PLW


Enter The U

The Dimension of Mind is

pansion devices, communi

an extension of sight and

and professional programs on tape cassette or on UMI's

sound. A dimension whose

own durable cartridges. UMI

cations programs, as well as programmerand hobby

only boundary is imagina

also provides memory ex-

ist aids.

tion. These same character

istics are inherent in the extraordinary line of hard

I Please Please send send me me tr the

To begin your journey into

The

Dimension of

Mind,

UMI 1982 CATALOG

please mail attached coupon

ware and software products

UNITED MICROWARE IND..INC.

manufactured by UMI for Commodore's VIC, PET,

3503 TEMPLE AVE., SUITE C

to receive UMI's 1982 Cata log or call (714) 594-1351.

and other micro-computers. UMI offers micro-computer users

unique,

innovalive

entertainment, educational,

POMONA. CA

91768

NAME

I

ADDRESS

ZIP

CITY

STATE.

_C0MPANY_

united microuuare industries, inc. • 3503 temple avenue • suite c •pornana, California • 91 768 WE'RE LOOKING FOR A FEW GOOD DESIGNERS UMI is always looking for high quality games from indepennant designers llvou have game programs thai you d like UMI 10 publish, please write or give us a call at 1714) 594-1351.

POWER/PLAY 1982

5


Access: Commodore User Groups User groups have what we call a synergistic effect. That is, cooperative

effort achieves things that indivi duals probably couldn't accomplish independently.

To encourage that cooperation, and help you get the most out of your home computing experience,

this section of POWER/PLAY is devoted to getting users together.

Let us know what your group is doing, send messages via free "classi fied" style ads, or simply list your group. We'll do whatever works to

help you contact other users and/or get the information you need. ARKANSAS

Commodore/PET Users Club Conway Middle School

Davis SI. Conway, AR 72032 Geneva Bowlin

ARIZONA VIC Users Group 1206 N. FraserDr Mesa, AZ 85203 Paul V. Muffulelto

BAMBUG 1450 53rd St. Emeryville, CA 415-523-7396 North Orange County Computer Club 3030 Topaz. Apt. A Fullerton, CA 92361 Dave Smith Lincoln Computer

Club 750 E. Yosemile Manteca, CA 95336 John Fung

PET on the Air CALIFORNIA

Lawrence Hall ci Science UC Berkeley

Computer Projecl.

Room 254 Berkeley, CA 94720 415-642-3598 California VIC Users Group "VJC-VILLE"

c/o Data Equip.

Supply Corp. 8315 Firestone Blvd. Downey. CA 90241 213-923-9361 Meet second lues. ol month

Valley Computer Club 2006 Magnolia Blvd Burbank. CA 213-849-4094 Meet first Wed. ot

monlh. 6 pm Valley Computer Club 1913 Booth Rd. Ceres. CA 95307 PUG ol Silicon Valley 22355 Rancho Ventura Rd. Cupertino, CA 95014

525 Crestlake Drive San Francisco, CA 94132 Max J. Babin PALS (PETs Around Livermore Society) 886 South K Livermore.

CA 94550 John Rambo SPHINX 314 10th Ave. Oakland, CA

415-451-6364

Every 2nd & 4lh Thurs.

San Diego PUG c/o D Costarakis 3562 Union St 714-235-7626 7am—4pm Walnui Creek PET Users Club 1815Ygnacio

Valley Rd.

Walnut Creek, CA 94546

SCPUG c/o Data Equip

Supply Corp.

8315 Firestone Blvd.

Downey, CA 90241 213-923-9361 Meet 1st lues.

Cardinal Sales 6225 Cofiman Rd. Indianapolis,

o! month IN 46268 Sacramento PET 317-298-9650 Workshop Carol Wheeler Box 543 IOWA Davis. CA 95616 PET Users Group John Bowles c/o Don Vorhies Commodore Users Club 132I42SI.SE 1041 Foxenwoods Dr. Cedar Rapids, Santa Maria, IA 52403 CA 93455 KANSAS 805-937-4106 Wichita Area PET Greg Johnson Users Group CONNECTICUT 2231 Bullinger John FGarbanno Wichita, KS 67204 316-838-05 IS Ski If Lane Masons Island Mel Zandler Mystic. CT 06355 MARYLAND

203-536-9789 Association ot Personal Commodore Users Club Computer Users Welhersfield 5014 Rodman Rd. High School Bethesda, MD 20016 411 Wolcotl Hill Rd MICHIGAN Welhersfield, David Liem CT 06109 14361 Warwick St. Daniel G. Spaneas Detroil, Ml 48223 FLORIDA PET User Group JacksonviEe Area 2235 Lakeshore Dr. PET Society

Muskegon, Mi 4944!

401 Monument Rd, Peter Oakes #177 Toledo PETs Jacksonville, FL 32211 734 Donna Dr. Richard Prestien Temperance. 6278 SW 14th St. Ml 48182 Miami. FL 33144 Gerald Carter Soulh Florida PET Commodore User Club Users Group 32303 Columbus Dr. 7170SW. lllh Warren. M 48093 West Hollywood, Robert Sieinbrecher FL 33023 MISSOURI 305-987-6982 Clearwater Club Dave Young Oearwater School IDAHO Star Roule GHS Computer Club Piedmont. MO 63957 c/o Grangeville Carolyn Polk High School SI. Louis Club 910 D St. 46WestwoodCt. Giungeville, St. Louis, MO 63131 ID 83530 314-432-5225 208-983-0580 Mary Perkinson Don Kissinger MONTANA ILLINOIS Powder River Computer Club Shelly Wernikofl Powder River County 2731 N. High School Milwaukee Ave. Broadus,MT 59317 Chicago, IL 60647 Jim Sampson Cenlral Illinois PET Commodore User Club Owners 1109West Broadway 2730 Townway Rd.

#E-54

Danville, IL61832 Rick Goldsmith PETVlCCiub(PVC) 40 S. Lincoln Mundelein. 11.60060 Paul Schmidt Rockford Area PET

Users Group 1608BentonSI. RockIord.IL 61107 INDIANA

PET Users P.O. Box 36014 Indianapolis. IN 46236

317-898-3604

Butte.MT 59701 Mike McCarthy

NEVADA

Las Vegas PET Users 4884 Iron Ave. LasVegas,NV891IO

NEW JERSEY

Amateur Computer Group of New Jersey UCTI 1776RarilanRd. Scotch Plains.

NJ 07076 201-233-7068 John Loolbourrow Amateur Computer Group

Jerry Brinson 18 Alpine Dr. CHUG (Commodore Wayne. NJ 07470 Hardware Users Group) Some reel Users Club 12104 Meadow La. 49MarcySi Oaklandon. IN 46236 Somerset. NJ 08873 Ted Powell Robert Holzer

NEW HAMPSHIRE Northern New England Computer Society P.O. Box 69 Berlin, NH 03570 NEW YORK

Capital District

PET Users Albany. NY 518-370-1820 Ben Green

Long Island PET Society Harborfields H S. Taylor Ave.

Glen Schwartz

807 Avon Philadelphia.

PA 19116 Gene Planchak 4820 Anne La. Sharpsville, PA 15150 412-962-9682 Bucks County VIC 20

Usere Club 72 East Rambler Dr. Holland, PA 18966 215-322-0394

Jim Dubrouillet SOUTH DAKOTA

PET User Group 515 South Dull Greenlawn. NY 11740 Milchell.SD 57301 Ralph Bressler 605-996-8277 PET User Club ol Jim Dallas Westch ester Box 1280 TENNESSEE White Plains, River City Computer NY 10602 Hobbyists Ben Meyer Memphis. TN LIVE {Long Island VIC First Mon at Main Enthusiasts) Library

17PicadillyRd.

Great Neck. NY 11023 Arnold Friedman PST User Group Westchesler. NY 914-426-7872 Every 2nd Tuesday PET User Group c/o Meyer 35 Barker Ave. White Plains.

NY 10610

NORTH CAROLINA Amateur Radio PET User's Group PO. Box 30694

Raleigh, NC 27622 Hank Roth Commodore Users Club 4241 CastletonRd, Charlolte. NC282II Ed Hams

OHIO Dayton Area PET User Group 933 Livingston Dr.

Xenia, OH 45385

513-848-2065 B, Worby Central Ohio PET

Users Group

107 S. WestmoorAve Columbus, OH 43204 614-274-6451 Philip H. Lynch

OREGON NW PET Users Group 2134N.E.45lhAvo

Portland. OR 97213 John F Jones

PENNSYLVANIA

Penn Conierence Compuler Club

c/o Penn

Conierence ol SDA 720 Museum Rd Reading, PA 19611 Dan R. Knepp PET User Group P.O. Box 371 M ontgomeryvil le, PA 18936 Gene Beals PACS PET Users Group 20lh&OlneySt. Philadelphia, PA

TEXAS SCOPE 1020 Summit Circle Carrolton TX 75006 PET Users 2001 Bryan Tower

Suile 3800 Dallas. TX 75201 La ny Williams

P.O. Box 652

San Anlonio.TX 78293 PET User Group Texas A&M Micro computer Club Texas A&M, TX John Bowen UTAH

TheVlClic

799 Ponderosa Dr.

SandyUT 84070 Sieve Graham Utah PUG

2236 Washington Blvd. OgdeaUT 84401

Jack Heck

The Commodore Users' Club

742 Taylor Ave.

Ogden, UT 84404 Todd Woods Kap VIRGINIA Northern VA PET Users 2045 Eakins Ct.

ResloaVA 22091

703-860-9116 Bob Karpen

WASHINGTON

NW PET Users Group 2565 Dexter N.*203 Seattle. WA 98109 Richard Ball

WISCONSIN Sewpus

c/o Theodore J. Polozynski

PO Box 21851

Milwaukee, Wl 53221

CANADA Toronto PET Useis Group 381 Lawrence Ave. West Toronto, Ontario

Canada M5M 1B9 416-782-9252 Chns Bennett

1982 POWER/PLAY


WE SELL FUN!

TM

ADVENTURES

I still can't believe we packed full featured adventures into the VIC's 3.6K memory! Adventures are interactive fantasy games in which you solve a mystery by exploring an unknown environment with the assistance of your computer. You tell the computer what to do with the plain english commands like "OPEN THE DOOR", and the computer tells you what it sees! Average solving time for our adventures is six hours. BIG BAD WOLF

$5.95

NOT for kids only! A full packed adven MAZE

$12.95

Trapped inside your computer's memory, you must find your way through the seem

ingly endless corridors to the outside world. The excellent 3-D graphics will stir up any

claustrophobia you may have. Machine code

ture based on the Three Little Pigs fairy tale.

Don't let the wolf gobble you up! COMPUTER ADVENTURE

$5.95

Re-live Ihe "excitement" of getting your computer. An adventure with a very different flavor.

subroutines allow you to move as quickly as

MOON BASE ALPHA

you can push buttons. Plus, there are over 6xlO:i different mazes

You must find a way to destroy the meteor that is racing towards your base, or else all moon colonies will be demolished!

that the program can generate. There is little chance that you (or your heirs) will see the

* + •SPECIAL DEAL* * *

same maze twice! TREK

The classic game that has fascinated combridge of your

Adventure Pack

$12.95

puterists for over a decade. Commanding the

starship,

you

explore

the

$5.95

All three advenlures for $14.95!

NIGHT RIDER Complete three miles of

S12.95 wisting road as

galaxy, fending off the Klingon invasion with

quickly as you can. The road is different every

your phascrs and photon torpedoes, at the

time. Machine language subroutines give smooth, fast action, and a superb graphic display. Keyboard or joystick controlled.

same time conserving your limited time and energy. A real bargain at $12.95.

Send for free catalog.

All programs fit in the standard VIC memory, and can be controlled from the keyboard. All programs on cassette tape.

Ordering—Please add $1.50 postage and handling per order. PA residents please add 6% sales tax.

VICTORY SOFTWARE INC. 2027-A S. J. Russell Circle, Elkins Park, PA 19117

VIC-20® POWER/PLAY I9S2

(215) 576-5625

VIC-20®


or will it be ohe|!!!;:itli| of our WORKIftC YIC C C/?oose from the MOST COMPLETE LINE of VIC® software VIC GAMES II

DECISION MAKER

Cffr SOMBffl /fl*

HOME INVENTORY

Can nttp you ckcie ftefween

tJMflOrtd VtC'tOu nave lo bomb every OWH'tig' MllvEFltLQ is ,j

Oir 11 fo caWo$ your nautsuoni-H rus

Writ also

ush-definable catrgortri

pammtteit. wtrgn

Rtnotd settal

flttmr 0* interne toncenttatran requiring lew

mllumctng ticto'i aril save demons an

numbtn putcfi&it pints i<td otntt useful information jj wen jj computmr; Ihe value q(

JOJtfaf thinking

tapt or flrit

Hems

5 7935 UBrtfr

S>925 casseXe

BLACK HOLE An tKitmg

ttitfitutt origins! tpjct gdW

CAR COSTS

S2-*9S tbti

HOUSEHOLD FINANCE 16 income mo fpemt cutwts p'us

flecoJtf mmnitnanee com, utmift

The swirling BJjc* Holt a constantly irymQ !O

pnymttMl

arawyoum you also have dAngeioin, ipau

mamt ail tosfs to tfate as w#if js compurt fflg

titbits lo nvnta 01 ileilicy -•! you nitss, Itwy ■ ire riMKtofmed info mshcmns space biiSSat out \t gel you' Greol paptocs antf so<jh<1' autridga only

coif o'ofi tn/Hwiuat tiifi

gt&ptti AM tahins

$1995 cassette /$?J95 (fll*

$34 95 cassette t JJS95 Iliik

VIC GAMES

EOUGATIONAL/RECREATIONAL II

EDUCATIONAL/RECREATIONAL I

(jjme wifn iftltertnl tev?fy of i*J"S. iaunfl

on a tiazk whew the Itortiles art atrthmttic

rotof, and challenge' SOUNCtQUI a game 0!

problems' MQHSIEf* MAtt-

ttffert of 3 o/orii Eveiy time ymigiiest wrong takts one step closer lo

tntlupBUon tinti rtfttxts—variable tttw tevth WC IffAP-yw olay win ft the VIC.

being hanged' HANQMAlH-tfy 10 }uSSi lift

tiyimi to Hap VIC vtfia «uWmffWl//y keep.7 j

? D'CQ'ams

HANGMAN- Ify lo guess trie

a CcifJoD/i cftijrjrffff

tiack luei consumption

sum-

b

Mgnftsfy anci Yt&ily tccountmg ttacti nl fm (ktluttthlfi ilemi pio/lures

? programi MATH HUftDLER—yms sie r&nng

tabyrmthten cave poputolrtl kv rnakes a new fttSM way liniv .r.

■:■■

digrts ct 3 mutupttcatiw p/ootetp a gawt of tonic and deduction' Both mitt oitor and

S^J 95

animated tjiaptita

SM9S cassette

LOAN ANALYZER

Has Ameftotlto/i tastes computes murtst

charges compatts v&hjus toWi. inalyses

loan terms, and can manipulate iftw farmeuni

■ SOFTWARE d1 ASCI. Int

LOGIC GAMES PACKAGE an ffie temotn VaittfnvrvJ game by Has coiot paptiics

CREATIVE

and sound*

TO ORDER: viSA-MasierCard

201 S;ipi Amomo Circle Moufil.im Vie*

1415] -3489595

CA

check or money order accepted

It

3 charge, please include equation dale of card Add 51 SO for snip ping ^nd handling

California residents add sales Ian

uisetse

1982POWER/PLAV


Your Hist Computer "Magic"

by Michael Tbmczyk, VIC Product Manager Reprinted irom Commodore Magazine, October 1981

Writing programs for Commodore's VIC 20 is a lot like performing magic. The results are certainly astounding, and your friends are sure

6. Before typing a new program, type the

word NEW and hit RETURN to erase the old program.

7. If a program "hangs up," hold down the

RUN/STOP key and hit the RESTORE key. This resets the VIC without losing the program.

VIC-TRICK #1 (NAMES, NAMES, NAMES) 10 PRINT "YOUR FRIEND'S NAME .. ,";

20 GOTO 10

This is a fun program most of us have used

to be amazed.

Actually, computing isn't much different

over the years to impress friends who never saw a personal computer close up before. Type in

example, the VIC automatically tells you if you make a programming mistake by displaying an "error message" on the screen. That doesn't

a person's name, with some dots to make it more readable on the screen. The PRINT command displays the name, or any message between the quotation marks, on the screen, The GOTO

under the keyboard. It simply means the VIC 20

command tells the VIC to go back to line 10 and

from magic if you're talking about illusions. For

mean there's an "intellectual rabbit" hiding is a "logical" machine.

print it again.

We're going to be exploring the VIC's

1 The semicolon

peculiar logic-and some magic, too-in this

at the end of line 10 makes

senes ol articles which focus on elementary

BASiC programming, The purpose is to show

each message

first-time computer owners how to COMPUTE, with secondary emphasis on hard-line pro gramming, The philosophy is: you don't have to know how to repair a car in order to drive one; likewise, you don't have to be a com puter scientist to "drive" the VIC 20

"^B

That's the beauty of Commodore'ss "friendly computer." It's easy to learn, fun to "drive," and you don't need a license (or PhD.) to use it. Everyone likes to perform magic

with their new computer, but doing the neat tricks the salesperson showed you in the store doesn't seem so easy when you get the thing home.

Here are some of the favorite

H^k

Group. These programs are not only fun, but they incorporate some helpful computing techniques you might want to mix, match, and experiment wilh. Most of these programs

are explained in the VIC owner's guide. Before we begin, here's a quick refresher on how to enter a program into the VIC 20: 1. Type the program line-by-line as shown, including the line number. 2. Hit the RETURN key at the END of each numbered line of instructions.

hit the RUN/STOP key. 5. You can RUN a program over and over by STOPping it and typing

RUN (because the program stays in the VIC's memory when you type it in).

POWER/PLAY 1982

to the last one. Try

changing the m0T semicolon to a comma, or

M

leaving it ofl entirely,

and see what happens.

Magician

programs of Commodore's VIC

3. Type the word RUN and hit RETURN to make the program execute. 4. To stop a program which is "running,

appear right next


VIC-TRICK #2 (255 COLORS) 10 FOR X- 1 TO 255 STEP 1 20 POKE 36879, X

30 PRINT CHRS (147) 40 FOR T= 1 TO 700: NEXT T: NEXT X This little program displays the VIC's 255 screen and border color combinations. It's very helpful because you can go through all 255

combinations step-by-step, and find the color combination you like best for a particular pro gram. The POKE command in line 20 is the key.

RUN the program until you see a color combin

ation you like. Hit the RUN/STOP key'to freeze the colors, Write down the POKE command shown on the screen for reference. Now type CONT and hit RETURN to continue the pro gram from where it left off. This is the "lazy" approach to choosing colors. The best way is to check page 37 or 134 in the VIC owner's guide.

VIC-TRICK #3 (THE ROLLING SCREEN WINDOW)

10 POKE 36867.4: PRINT CHRS (147) 20 PRINT -YOUR MESSAGE HERE , .." 30 FORX=0TO120:POKE 36865,X:NEXT

40 GOTO20 You can change the size and position of the VIC's screen window by using some of the special "POKE" commands. This little program uses these commands to make your message scroll downward across the screen. The message in line 20 should be 22 letters long. Try typing

22 hearts (Hold down the SHIFT key and type S, which has the heart on the front) instead of a message.

VIC-TRICK #4 (THE SEASICK PROGRAM) 10 PRINT CHRS (147) "SEASICK" 20 FOR L = 0 TO 6.28 STEP . 1 30 POKE 36864, 5 + 4 ' SIN(L)

40 POKE 36865, 27 + 4 ' COS(L) 50 NEXT: GOTO 20 This program makes the screen move around .,. and around ... and around. We

call it the Seasick program because that's how

you might feel if you stare at it too long. The programming magic here is the VIC's ability to move the screen around using POKE statements.

VIC-TRICK #5 (DRAWING A HIGH RESOLUTION CIRCLE)

10 FOR S = 7168 TO 7679: POKE S,0: NEXT 20 POKE36879,8:PRINT CHRS (147); 30 FOR S = 7680 TO 8185: POKES, 160: NEXT

40 POKE 36869,255

50 FOR L = 0 TO 7: FOR M = 0 TO 7

60 POKE 7680+NT22+L, L'8+M 70 NEXT M, L

80 FOR X = 0 TO 63

90 Yl = 32 + SQR (64'X-X"X) 100Y2 = 32 - SQR(64-X-X"X) 110FORY = Y1 TOY2STEPY2-Y1 120 CH = INT (X/8) "8 + INT (Y/8) 130 RO = (Y/8 - INT(Y/8))'8 10

140BY=7168 + 8'CH + RO 150BS=7-(X-INT(X/8)'8) 160 POKE BY, PEEK (BY) OR (2 T BS) 170 NEXT Y,X 180 GOTO 180 This 18-line program looks like a lot... but it does a lot. This is our first program to actually draw something on the VIC 20 screen in high resolution, dot programmable graphics, Dot programmable graphics are different from VIC graphics, in that VIC graphics are made up of 8x8 dot blocks (64 dots per block). Dot pro

gramming lets you access each dot individually, and "draw" in high resolution programmable graphics. The mechanics of how to do this are discussed in the VIC 20 PROGRAMMER'S

REFERENCE GUIDE, But, if you really want to get into programmable graphics and plotting, we suggest you get the VIC 20 SUPER EX PANDER CARTRIDGE, This special cartridge gives you 3K RAM extra memory and adds

several new commands to VIC BASIC to let you plot individual points, lines, arcs and circles...

and even "paint" closed figures on the screen in color! The Super Expander also has built-in music writing commands and a special "music mode." We hope this brief "magical" introduction to the VIC gives you some interesting programs to experiment with. In future columns, we'll continue our exploration of the VIC's capabil

ities and give you a magician's hat full of programming tips and tricks to help you

become a "VIC Wizard."

If you have a particular topic you'd like us to discuss in this column, please drop a line

to VIC MAGICIAN, in care of this magazine.

Learning About The Cuisor

Reprinted irom Commodore Magazine, December 1981

The subject of this "magical" installment is how to position or "program" information to print where you want it on the screen, This covers everything from how the cursor works to

how to write programs that print words or

graphics in specific locations on the screen.

Cursoring Around

Cursor control is one of the VIC 20's most

useful features. (The cursor is that blinking square on the screen that tells you where the next symbol will appear),

There are many ways to move the cursor

around the screen, to make it appear and

disappear and do crazy things... but the

cursor's real power is its ability to position

graphics, letters, numbers on the screen. Let's explore the cursor in depth and see how it works.

1982 POWER/PLAY


When you first turn on the computer, you should see a blinking blue rectangle (the "cursor") directly below the opening display. The cursor is controlled by the CRSR keys

key and typing CLR/HOME. All information is

CKSRKeys

the RETURN key.,, but be careful when using this method. As a computer, the VIC has been

The CRSR keys are located at the lower righthand corner of your keyboard, They're the ones with the arrows on them. As you can see. these two keys let you move the cursor to

the right or left, up or down. If you press the (|) key, the cursor moves down the screen. If

you hold down the SHIFT key and press the same key the cursor moves up the screen. Moving the cursor right and left is just as

easy. The (--) key moves the cursor to the right and SHIFTing the same key moves the cursor to the left.

Special Features oi the VIC 20 Cursor Here are some special features oi the VIC

20 cursor controls: 1. Automatic repeal. If you hold down either of the two CRSR keys you'll discover that the cursor automatically repeats as long as you

hold it down. This is to help you move quickly to a desired location and is an excellent "screen editing" feature of the VIC 20,

2. Scrolling. If you press the "down" cursor key and keep holding it, you'll see that the

cureor moves to the bottom of the screen ... and when the cursor hits the bottom the entire screen will scroll up one line at a time. This is to give you more space when you're writing a program. Note that the VIC 20 screen scrolls

gone and the cursor is in the "home" position. 5. RETURN/SHIFT. You can also move the cursor down the lefthand column by hitting

taught to read and understand computer

programs, which are identified by typing a line number from 0 to 65000 in the far lefthand column of the screen. If you type a word with out any line number and that word is not one of the "commands" in the VTC's vocabulary, the VIC will tell you that you've made a

programming error. Here's how it works,..

Try this: Hit the CLR/HOME key and type

the word HELLO. Now hit the RETURN key. The VIC responds by telling you you've made a SYNTAX ERROR. This makes it difficult to type several lines on the screen. One way to over

come this is to type your message and then hold down the SHIFT key and hit the RETURN key. The cursor will move to the next line but the HELLO command will not be "entered" and the VIC will not give you an error message.

To try it, type HELLO, then hold down the SHIFT key and hit RETURN. This SHIFT/RETURN key combination can

be a very useful feature. If, for example,

you're drawing a graphic picture ... you can draw the picture and move to the next line quickly using SHIFT/RETURN without getting any error messages. This is helpful because a common technique in creating graphic pro grams in BASIC is to first draw the graphic

only when you "cursor down." Moving the cuisor

picture on the screen, then add line numbers,

to the top of the screen does not have any scrolling effect.

quotation marks and the PRINT command along the lefthand column to convert your

3. Wraparound. Try moving the cursor horizontally by pressing the CRSR RIGHT key. Notice that when it reaches the end of the line you're on, it automatically jumps down to the

beginning of the next line. Conversely, il you SHIFT CURSOR LEFT the cursor will move left and jump up one line when it reaches the edge of the screen. This process of jumping up or down from one line to the next is called "wraparound."

4. CLR/HOME. Often, you want to move the cursor to the top lefthand corner of the screen. This is called the "home" position, The HOME key on the VIC is located at the top right comer of the keyboard. If you hit this key the cursor moves "home." If you hold down the SHIFT key

and type CLR/HOME, you are actually typing CLEAR which erases any information you might have on the screen and positions the cursor at the home position. To see how these keys work, try typing some information on the screen. Now type the HOME key. The cursor jumps to the "home" position. Now type CLEAR by holding down the SHIFT POWER/PLAY 1982

picture into a numbered EASIC program, (See the COLOR & GRAPHICS chapter in the VIC owner's manual). SHIFT/RETURN is also useful

for moving around a BASIC program displayed on your screen when you want to move to different areas for editing purposes without affecting the program lines.

Programming the Cursor So far, we've discussed some ways to move the cursor in direct mode. Now let's see how you can move and position the cursor in your computer programs. You can PRINT cursor commands inside your computer programsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;jus! like letters,

numbers and graphic symbols. The format for doing this is exactly the same as PRINTing any VIC character. Try typing this program line: 10 PRINT "HELLO"

Now press the (CRSR RIGHT I key five times between the first quotation mark and the word HELLO. If you type this it will appear on your screen like this: 10 PRINT "]]]]] HELLO" (Don't forget to hit RETURN at the end of the line to enter it). n


Don't worry about the reverse bracket signs

We'll explain those in a moment. Now type RUN and hit RETURN. In ihe previous example, the word HELLO was printed in the left column. Now the word is printed 5 spaces over to the

right because we put live CURSOR RIGHT commands in our program. The VIC moved the

cursor live spaces from the left column and printed the word HELLO, just as it was instructed. Now ... you're probably wondering why those fanny brackets appeared when you typed the ICRSR RIGHT] key The VIC uses special reverse symbols to show you where cursor commands are located in your program. This is helpful when editing a program or studying a program you haven't seen before. Here's a list of the graphic symbols used to represent the various cursor keys: CURSOR RIGHT

ii

PI

CURSOR LEFT

11

■1

CURSOR UP

ii

CURSOR DOWN

11

HOME

it

CLEAR

n

n

20 PRINT "*]0":FOR X = 1 TO 150:NEXT 30 PRINT ■•*]100'1:FORX= 1 TO 150NEXT 40 GOTO 10

Moving the Cursor With CHR$ Codes Having learned that the cursor can be included in PRINT statements like any VIC character, it stands to reason that cursor

commands would have Sheir own CHRS codes

so you can use them in CHRS statements, like VIC characters.

The format CHRS(90) provides a more powerful alternative to the PRINT statement when displaying and manipulating VIC characters. All characters, including function keys and cursor controls, have their own CHRS

code numbers. For example, the number for the letter "Z" is 90. so if you type the following command, the letter Z will be printed on the screen: 10 PRINT CHRS(9O) This looks more clumsy than simply PR (NTing the letter Z, but in many instances you can't or don't want to use the PRINT statement, so

you use CHRS. In any event, here are the

CHRS numbers for the cursor controls:

72

CHRS CODE ■

The key to positioning a word or graphic image somewhere on the screen ... or even making it MOVE in animated programs... is using the CURSOR key with the PRINT state ment. Here are some exercises to give you some practice: In each program the heart symbol indicates the shifted CLR/HOME key and the right bracket indicates the right cursor. Exercise 1. Type the same HELLO program except use CURSOR UP instead of CURSOR RIGHT. Exercise 2. A common programming technique.

10 PRINT "VHELLO" 20FORX=1TO 1000:NEXT 30 PRINT "TBYE"

Exercise 3. Try combining the CLEAR and CURSOR RIGHT commands. 10 PRINT" )]] HELLO"

20 FOR X = 1 TO 1000:NEXT 30 PRINT "]!lll|]] GOODBYE" 40 FOR X = 1 TO 1000:NEXT 50 GOTO 10

Exercise 4. Here's another version of Exercise 3, using just the CLEAR command.

10 PRINT "¥ HELLO" 20FORX= 1TO 1000:NEXT 30 PRINT ■■VGOODBYE" 40 FOR X = 1 TO 1000:NEXT 50 GOTO 10 Exercise 5. A simple animation example.

10 PRINT " V0":FOR X = 1 TO 150:NEXT 12

SCREEN MOVEMENT CURSOR RIGHT

The lormal lor using

157

CURSOR LEFT

Ihis technique in a

1 ■!'

CURSOR UP

program is lo type

17

CURSOR DOWN

10 PRINT CHRS(29)

19

HOME

147

CLEAR

Exercise 6. Here's an example of how you can print a

"CLEAR" command using the CHRS technique: 10 PRINT CHRS(147yVTC CLEARS. MOVES

HOME AND PRINTS MESSAGE" 20 PRINT CHRS(17)CHRS(17)CHRS(17)"NOW

DOWN"CHRS(17) 30 PRINT CHRS(29)CHRS(29)CHRS(29)'THEN

RIGHrCHRS(17)"OKW!" Things to note in this example include how the CHRS statements are placed alter Ihe PRINT command ... how in line 20 information

printed in quotes can be mixed with CHRS

statements ... how several CHRS statements can be printed in a row to move the cursor more than once .,. how different messages

and CHRS statements can be "mixed and matched" as in line 30. Exercise 7. You can use "variables" in CHRS statements,

(or example if you're going to be using the statements several times in a large program.

Variables are important and we'll do a future article on them, but lor now think o! a variable as one or two letters which can be used as a substitute for a number, word, sentence or other piece of information, In this case, we

will begin by "defining" our variable A equal

to 147 (CHRS code for CLEAR). This means we 1982 POWER/PLAY


can substitute the letter A for the number 147 in my program. Note that we can still use

the letter A normally in words and sentences, and that we can still use the number 147 if we wanl. This example simply clears the screen and prints HELLO.

10A=147 20 PRINTCHRS(A)"HELLO" These few examples were designed to help

you understand how the VIC 20's screen editing commands work, especially in your programs. It's one thing for a computer to be as flexible as the VIC in placing information on the screen, but it's equally impressive that you can write these positioning commands in your BASIC programs!

Time Delay Loops ...An Advanced Technique Made Easy Reprinted Irom Commodore Magazine. December 1981

In this article we want to show you an advanced BASIC programming technique which iirst time computerists often stumble over by accident, If you're just starting out in computing it's important to remember that it's

just as easy to learn a so-called "advanced" technique as it is to learn a "simple" one. The problem is that good descriptions of advanced techniques are hard to find. It seems like you have to read through a whole book to reach them ,, , or search through a dozen computer journals for an explanation you can understand. We forged some new ground with our inno vative PERSONAL COMPUTING ON THE VIC 20 which comes free with every computer, but there are a lot of so-called "advanced"

techniques that VIC owners are ready for as soon as they tinish reading their owner's guide. One place to get advanced programming

information is the VIC 20 TEACH YOURSELF

PROGRAMMING SERIES, which contains a "friendly" self-teaching programming manual and some interactive tapes which lead you through the lessons, step by step. Another good source of programming information is the VIC 20 PROGRAMMER'S REFERENCE GUIDE, which every VIC owner should have. This invaluable "bible" of the VIC covers everything from the VIC'S BASIC vocabulary to machine language programming tips.

Both the TEACH YOURSELF PROGRAMMING series and the PROGRAMMER'S REFERENCE GUIDE are available through your Commodore dealer.

POWER/PLAY 1982

The Time Delay Loop ... Special Use of "For... Next" One of the best "magic" tricks programmers use to control the speed of their programs is

called the "time delay loop." This is a simple line you put in your BASIC program to make it move at a given speed. The technique is simple. All you do is include a line which says: FORT= 1TO 1000:NEXT You can include the line anywhere in your

program, wherever you want a "time delay" and you can include several delays in different places if you want. For example, the first pro

gram below PRINTs two messages, separated by a "time delay," The T in the time delay line can be any

letter, two letters, or a letter and a number, but we usually use a T to specify "time" because FOR ... NEXT loops can be used for purposes other than time delay. Also, using a T for time makes it easy lo spot the time delay loops when

you list a program with a lot of FOR ... NEXT loops used for different purposes. Another changeable item in the time delay loop is the number 1000. This can be any number. A larger number makes the time delay longer and a shorter number shortens

the time delay. Actually, what you're doing is telling the VIC to count to 1000 (or whatever number) before proceeding. If the number is

large, the VIC takes a longer time to count than if the number is short. Example 1... Tune Delay 10 PRINTTHE VIC 20 IS GREAT!"

20FORT= 1TO 1000: NEXT 30 GOTO 10 This prints the message, "THE VIC 20 IS GREAT!." counts to 1000, and goes back to line

10 to print the message over again. The time delay specifies how long the VIC should wait before printing the message over again. Try

substituting X or A2 for the "T" in line 20 and you'll see that this doesn't change the program. Try putting another number (200 or 2000) instead of 1000 in line 20 and see how the program gets faster or slower.

Time delay loops can be used to lengthen or shorten the duration of musical or sound effect tones being played on the VIC, as shown in the following example:

Example 2... Time Delay Loops With Music Here's a program that uses a time delay loop with a musical sound effect. The time delay relates to the length of time each note is played. You might pay special note to line 30 as well, which uses a FOR . .. NEXT .. , STEP statement to "step" through a range of VIC musical note values (from the Table of Musical

Notes in the VIC user manual), Although we're looking mainly at time delay loops, there are other uses for the FOR ... NEXT statement 13


which we will cover in a future article. Back to time delays. Here is the music program: 5 PRINTWATER FILLING UP" Prints this message on the screen while

the sound eflecl is playing. 10V=36878:S=36S75 Set the volume equal to V and the speaker we want to use (in this case 36875) equal toSl. 20POKEV 15 Set the volume at maximum level (15) 30 FORN= 195TO225 STEP 1: POKES. N VIC speakers can accept note values irom

128 to 255. Here we are saying, ior note values from 195 to 225, POKE Speaker 1 with those values, STEPping up one at a time from note lo note.

40FORT=lTO100:NEXTT

and match PRINT statements with sound effects and you're writing programs that "sing."

Conclusion We've taken a quick look at two major uses for time delay loops,,. one to place a "time delay" between two parts oi a program to make it run slower ... the other to place durations in a musical program where the time delay affects the sound being produced.

The best way to use time delay loops is io experiment. The best way to lind out il time

delays are required by your program is to see how fast it runs. II it runs loo fast, slow it down by inserting a time delay. You can put a time

delay loop anywhere you can put an ordinary program line, and you can use as many time delays as needed in a single program. You can even include a time delay as a GOSUB routine

This says count lo 100 before moving to line

and keep coming back to it ii you have a long-

50 (where we play the next note). This is our TIME DELAY LOOP

running program which requires the same delay to be repeated several times. More information on time delays is available in the VIC owner's manual, the VIC 20 PROGRAMMER'S REFERENCE GUIDE,

50NEXTN

POKE the "NEXT N" into Speaker 1 ... keep doing this until we reach the limit (which we set at 225 in line 30). 60 POKES, 0

and most books on BASIC for the PET/CBM

microcomputer. |]

Turn oil the speaker; otherwise it will keep playing.

DRILEY SOFTWARE

In this example, we see how a time delay loop affects the duration of a series of musical notes we want to play. II you want the notes

to be shorter, change the " 100" in line 40 to a smaller number, OR ... use a larger number to make the notes play longer, Notice that if you make the notes VERY short (change 100 to 2 in line 40) you get interesting sound effects. You can get "reverse" sound effects bychanging line 30 to: 30 FORN=225TO195STEP1 :POKES.N This reverses the notes and steps

backwards (- 1) from 225 to 195 for a "water emptying" sound, The key lesson here is ihe FOR ... NEXT

loop. In EXAMPLE 2 above we used the loop for two purposes ... first, a time delay loop

to extend the duration of notes we are playing and secondly, we used the FOR ... NEXT loop to define N as a series of note values, then instructed the VIC to play that series one at a time by STEPping from value to value. The NEXT N in line 50 was the place where the note was actually played. You can prove that the note is actually played when the program hits line 50 by adding this line to your program:

45PRINT"PLAYNOTE" The program will now print "PLAY NOTE" just before it plays each note because you inserted the PRINT instruction before the NEXT N (next note) instruction in your program. This is important because it illustrates how you can combine sound effects with printed information (or graphic symbols) in your programs. Just mix 14

Official Notice!!! All PET/CDM owners who hove not seen our line of useful programs ore hereby requested to con tact the nearest computer store right away! These programs ore also describ ed in the Commodore Software Encyclopedia. Don't delay- Chech us out today! If

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15


Play Black

Dragon It's true the VIC-

MODEM is a serious tool for accessing infor

mation. To get an idea of exactly how serious il is, take a look at our telecommunications

department on page 36.

However, as you may have noticed, somebody always

linds a way to turn a tool

into a toy, which is how we ended up with a lot ot great games on the tele communications networks.

Not all the network

games work well with the

VIC, because they're de

signed tor a larger screen.

For some games, you have better luck with the 80-column screen

on the Commodore CBM, for instance. One game that works

very well on the 22-column VIC

screen is Blackdragon, a cumula tive fantasy role-playing game,

available on The Source

Just so you know there are

really people behind all this, we

might mention that Blackdragon was authored by Bob Maples, a live human being who calls himself a '■mild-mannered telecommunications engineer".

It so happens thai Commodore's own Bill Hindorlf is a Blackdragon Hall of Famer. Fighting his way through the multi-layered maze under the name ol Thrash, Bill has accumulated 3,839,999 experience points over several months of play (probably more, by the time you read this), and has defeated the arch-demon of the maze several times. Those oi you who know the game may raise an eyebrow at that, since, theoretically,

a character is automatically retired to the Elysian Fields forever if he defeats the archdemon just once, and you've got to start all over again with a new character. Bill's secret

method tor avoiding permanent retirement will have to remain just that, however—his secret. And now. lets go back to that tateful night ;■■>

in 1982-the night Bill discovered that some body had rearranged the Blackdragon Hall of Fame, and Thrash, for some reason, was no longer in it. His only alternative, to immedi ately regain his honor, was to descend into the maze, find the evil one. and battle him to the death again,

Bill dials up The Source and gets a menu.

He types in choice number 4 to get into command mode and gets a > symbol. Then he types in play blackdragon

Let's go with him, "You are about to enter the Labyrinth. Many have entered il and 16711 people made it out alive. This Magical Labyrinth is filled with

"Treasure" but... it is also infested with monsters

and filled with traps and pits. If you can make it out alive with some of the gold, your strength and abilities will grow and grow ..." says the computer. Then it wishes the adventurer good 1982 POWER/PLAY


luck-but, oi course, has to add "You'll need Bill requests Thrash, who lives in a file, and asks for his hero's latest data. The computer tells him Thrash's data stacks up like this;

So, as he moves along, he encounters nasty Hobbits and vicious Wood Elves, a Gray Ooze, Gelatinous Cubes, Purple Worms—and even has to fight a Source Progammer. He van quishes all his foes quite easily, however-

Strength 29

Intelligence 28

even the belligerent Programmer—until he meets a floating mass of energy that zaps

Endurance 29 Gold 0

Dexterity 26 Hits 289 Experience 3559699 Level 21

it!!" as a parting shot.

Wisdom 30

Magic spells 51 Cleric spells 50

Thrash has also accumulated the following

magic items: the mythril shield, armor of valor, sword of sharpness, helmet of defense, ring of

protection, boots of levitation, elven boots, a quiver for arrows (with 5 arrows in it), an

invisibility ring, staff of healing and wand of teleportation. In short, he's managed to get just about everything you can get in the course of the game-which is no small accomplishment. In case you're wondering about the zero gold, however, that's simply because you always enter the maze with none. Whatever gold you've accumulated as you've gone through

the maze in the past is Iransformed into

experience points when you come out. Also, the fact that Thrash has risen to character level 21 means he stands a good chance oi

defeating the level 20 arch-devil. In contrast to an experienced character like Thrash, a new character might look something like this: Strength 11

Intelligence 9

Wisdom 10

Endurance 13

Dexterity 11

Hit points 12

and would have only 2 magic spells, and no experience or magic items.

The most points any new character can

star! off with in any category is 18. so this particular new character, whom Bill created purposely to contrast with Thrash, didn't make out too badly for a beginner.

But now, back to the Labyrinth, Using his boots of levitation and his ability to teleport, Thrash descends immediately to level 10 of the maze-the darkest, deepest depths—and the place he's most likely to find his hated rival A new character, without the magical boots and teleportation ability, would have to scramble down bit-by-bit, wandering around each of the higher levels until he found a staircase, hoping he didn't run into any

monsters in the interim, or that he could defeat the ones he sfumbled over. Thrash, on the other hand, moves with

purpose through the halls of level 10. He has much of the maze mapped out in his mind,

and his experience has taught him the archdemon is most likely to be found in a certain section of this level. But even his vast experience can't prevent unexpected attack, because monsters and bad guys are thrown into the maze at random. POWER/PLAY 1982

him, and saps him of 37 hit points. He doesn't dare be in any kind of weakened condition when he meets the super-

devil, so Thrash immediately uses spells to heal himself. Why doesn't he use his staff of healing? Because, through experience, he's found out that once you use the staff, you stand a chance of having it disappear, As long as he has an alternative, he avoids using the staff for thai reason. And he's got plenty of spells to use, instead.

All along the way, Thrash keeps accumu lating gold and frequently comes across "vendors" who want to sell him potions, spells

and books. Try to imagine what these vendors might look like alter years in an underground labyrinth. Probably not like the Avon lady. Although he has the alternative to ignore, bribe or fight these vendors. Thrash always chooses to trade with them instead. This is not so much because he's a nice guy. or anything John Wayne-ish like that. Rather, Thrash's long experience in the maze has taught him that trading is the most efficient way to deal with these guys. But he trades only for potions- not spells or books—because he can examine a potion before he decides what to do with it, and if it's evil, he can throw it away. He doesn't get that alternative with the spells and books. In their case, he gets what he gets. Period. And some times those spells and books can sap him of his magic or cause him all kinds of trouble. In his encounters with vendors this time around, Thrash gains hit points and intelligence from two potions he buys, but wastes a few

thou in gold on three evil potions he has to throw away.

Time goes on as Thrash stays hot on the

hunt for the malignant demon. Bill's been at

the keyboard for over an hour, now. He's fought

a vampire, a zombie, a doom dog and an angkheg (to name a few), and has accu

mulated over 32,000 gold pieces, but still his rival evades him. Then, without warning, he's there. The computer announces the arch-devil with an almost perceptible shiver. Then ,..

"Foolish mortal, dare you defy me?" roars the demon. "To leave this room you must defeat me!"

This is it, at last! Thrash doesn't hesitate. POW! Thrash gives the demon 189 quick

hits. But his antagonist throws a fireball his face for 128 hits. Thrash is hurt, but in his

heroic splendor he manages to get in two more blows, for a total of 347 hits on the demon. (continued on page 22) 17


A Little

VIC Music (Editor's note: We've intentionally left out the title ol this well-known little tune to add an element ol mystery and surprise to your endeavors. Forgive us, Jim.) The following program plays music on

the VIC. The music is listenabte. and the program is worth looking at, too. You'll note that the three voices ol VIC are different. Voice three is sharper, and is belter lor carrying the tune. Voice one is Ihe softest. Hope you don't mind my breaking up the listing with commenls.

90 REM: VIC MUSIC/JIM BUTTERFIELD/DECEMBER 81

This tells you who to blame 100 DIM A (8)

Makes room tor eight voices. How come? We only have three voices on the VIC and lour "lines" in Ihe song. Watch for the trick. 110 POKE 36878. 15

Set the volume lo maximum 120 FORA=5TO0STEP-l Here's our main loop. We're going to play the tune six times. 130 T = TI + S 140 IFTMTGOTO 140

This waits for time "s" before allowing the program to continue. The time is measured in "jiffies"; units of 1/60 second, 150 READ S, A(A + 0). A(A + 1). A(A + 2), A(A + 3) Here comes the song data. It's taken from the DATA statements near the end of this program. We're reading the data into the table cleverly; this way. each voice "comes in" at the proper time.

160 POKE 36874, A(3): POKE 36875, A(4): POKE 36876. A(5) Play Ihe music! This puts the notes into the VICs playing electronics. 170 IFSO0GOTO 130

II there's no more music to play, variable S will become zero (from the data statement at line 1120) We may want to do it again, though. 180 RESTORE: NEXT A

RESTORE takes us back to the start of the data statements (line 1000) so that we can play it again if we wish. NEXT A takes us back for the six repeats. I

1982 POWER/PLAY


A mystery tune from VIC expert Jim Butterfield. 190 POKE 36878, 0: end Turn down the volume and quit, The END statement isn't really needed here, but it's good practice. The rest of the program is our DATA statements containing the music. It's set

up with a timing value followed by the four "parts". By careful reading ol the program, you may be able to work out how the different voices come in during

the repeats (hint: the key to the trick is in lines 150 and 160). 1000 1010 1020 1030

1040 1050

DATA 10. 195,207.215, DATA 10, 195.207.219, DATA 10,201 209.215, DATA 10, 201 209,209, DATA 20, 207, 215, 207, DATA 20, 195. 215, 195,

195 195 175 175 195 0

1070 1080 1090 1100 1110 1120

DATA 10, 195,207,219, 195

DATA 10, 201,209, 215. 175 DATA 10, 201.209, 209, 175 DATA 20. 207, 215, 207, 195

DATA 20, 195,215, 195, 195 DATA 0. 0, 0, 0, 0

1060 DATA 10, 195, 207, 215, 195 It's not very big, but it's interesting to see how the coding comes together. Check Appendix F of your VIC-20 Friendly Computer Guide and you'll see how to set up the notes. Write your own music. If you like programming you mighl want to try your hand at writing a program which allows DATA statements to be written in easier form. For example, line 1000 might be written as DATA. 10,C,E,G,C ... but your program will need to be smart enough to catch the letters and translate them into the appropriate numbers.

Music doesn't have to stand by itself, ol course. You could add it as an extra touch to games and animations. Looking at it the other way, you could add to the musicâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;how about a "bouncing ball" program that lets you sing along with VIC? You can get some nice effects from the VIC, although you'll never quite achieve orchestra quality sound. I can recall showing a group of users some simple music coding on the VIC. At one point, I played a simple rendition of "Dixie", and noticed a listener

who had tears in his eyes, I was touched. I asked him, "Are you a Southerner?" "No," he replied. "I'm a musician."

I guess you can't win 'em all. |j POWER/PLAY 1982

19


VIC 20 Helps Deliver the News means they receive both the

bought the VIC in the summer

of 1981, he has not only

entered the space age:

daily and Sunday papers, cyan is daily only, black is

hometown newspaper carriers

Sunday only. Purple letters

games like Jupiter Lander

have begun computerizing

mean the family is on vaca

("I've gotten up to 91,500

their routes. And at least one carrier— 17 year-old Jim

tion, blue means they don't

points," he says gleefully),

receive the paper, and re

but has modified a few to

Dubrouillet of Holland,

versed letters mean they owe him money.

suit himself, For instance, he and a

Another grand old American institution has

Pennsylvania—is operating

his paper route with the

The colors of the names on

become skilled at cartridge

friend modified a well-known

the map are changed auto matically when he enters new

commercial computer game

gram himself, roughing it out

information concerning the

"Escape,"

in about live days then grad

family's status.

help of a VIC 20, Jim designed the pro

Jim notes that, when he

into a new game they call "We didn't like the original.

It was too simple," Jim says

ually perfecting it over months of use. The program allows

first wrote the program, it

of his motivation for tampering

him to draw a map of his

took 40 seconds for the VIC to

with the program. "So we

route on his TV screen, list out

plot the map on the screen.

modified it and came up

who owes him money and

Now he's got it down to 14.3

with this,"

how much, enter new cus

seconds, give or take a

tomers and delete those who discontinue, note who's on

millisecond,

vacation, and record which

that I've taken out,' he admits

three barbarians, first... then

homes along the route don't

modestly. "The first version was

you get clues to the rooms

receive the paper. Altogether

very bad, I thought. But I've

the program now uses 3,482

improved it,"

that are next to the rooms that have the combination to the

bytes of VTC's 3.5 kilobyte RAM, pared down from the original 3,545 bytes. The detailed map is the most complex part of the pro

"I had some junk in there

Correspondingly, the pro

He explains his version of the game: "It places you in a cave and you have to kill

safe that contains a time

gram has helped improve his

chamber to take you back to

paper route. Jim says his VIC helps him keep his records

regular time." Pause. Gasp.

"much straighter", which

One of his original games,

means, among other things,

V1CFLIP-IV, is a computer ver sion of a popular board

capabilities and only three

that he now avoids the em-

game, complete with sound

lines in the program, VIC

barassment of going back

effects and joystick. He seems

draws the streets covered by

twice to collect from a cus tomer—a common problem in the past.

pretty proud of this particular

gram, Using its screen graphics

Jim's route. Then the location of each oJ the 76 homes along the route appear, in the order

Operating his paper route,

program, which he created with his friend, Sean Smith, although he again tries to

in which he collects. Each one

as you might guess, isn't the

downplay it in his typically

is labelled with a three-letter

only way the high school

modest manner

abbreviation of the family's

junior uses his VIC. Although

last name.

he seems to be a serious kid (however seriousness goes at

he says as he demonstrates been able to do any real

glance exactly what each

seventeen) he has a definite inclination toward the playful

family's status is, White type

side of computing. Since he

know machine language,"

The names are colorcoded, so Jim can tell at a

"It's a boring game, really," how to play, "but I haven't action games because I don't As Jim goes on playing

VICFLiP against the computer, it becomes obvious that he thinks of the VIC as a person ality in itself. When VIC flips its owner's blocks, for instance,

Jim calls the computer "a sneaky little rascal." V.ri

"I know how he (the VIC) plays—which is usually un fairly,1' he goes on. "But it's no problem," he says as he flips 1982IOWER/PLAY


VIC's black blocks inlo white, "He's easy to beat." When Jim finally does beat

kids from fighting over who's turn it is to use it."

tion." he says of these attempts, Jim was first exposed to

You almost might have

been able to predict Jim's

programming in his ninth

sterically—sort of like a swarm

interest in computers from the

of drowning clarinets. (Editor's

detailed kinds ol hobbies he

grade Algebra II class at Council Rock High School in

Note: The Jim Dubrouillet/

pursued before he got his VIC.

Newtown, Pennsylvania. In

Maybe not so much from his tropical fish, but take his card

addition to his class work in computing, he was also one

issue, page 32). In addition to his paper

houses, for instance. Actually,

ol a group of students chosen

"houses" is not nearly ade

to test-run programs on the

route and games, Jim puts his VIC to academic use, as

quate to describe the elabor

school's PET computers—a job

ate constructions he has

he enjoyed, he says, because

well. His spelling program

created out of thousands of

he got to work on his own

prints a phonetic pronunci

playing cards. His most com

programs during that time.

ation on the screen, which Jim then has to spell correctly His

plex construction, which took a day to build, occupied most

as more schools integrate

vocabulary program gives

of the llvingroom, he says.

computing into their curricula,

him a definition, then waits for him to type in the

"I liked thai house so much," he goes on, "I made

correct word.

detailed plans of the whole

wave of youngsters like Jim Dubrouillet, highly literate in

He's also trying to develop a standard test of written

thing, so I could duplicate it."

computers. The results could

English at the elementary

he "demolished it with rubber

goes to press, Jim has given

school level "for a teacher down Ihe street who's inter

bands."

up his paper route to move on to bigger and better things

the machine, VIC beeps hy

Sean Smith V1CFUP-IV pro gram listing appears in this

It seems highly probable,

that we'll be facing a growing

Then, he says, a friend and

He admits he's tried to get

be revolutionary. In fact, as this

ested", he says. His biggest

his VIC to design card houses,

-what else but a computer

problem in developing that program, he explains, is in

but without much success.

ized lawn service. Stay

"figuring out how to keep the

don't have much organiza

"They're not very big, and

tuned for more on the Jim Dubrouillet story.

THE COMMODORE CHALLENGE PRIZES PRIZES PRIZES If you've been playing around at home developing original games and programs for your Commodore computer, send your best— on cassette or disk, please-to the Commodore Challenge contest, Include a brief description

of the program's purpose, including docu mentation on how to use it. If it's a game, be sure to include instructions.

pander. All entries become the property of Commodore Business Machines. Inc., upon submission, Winning entries published by POWER/PLAY will become public domain software. Fill out the entry form below, and submit it with your game or program lo:

Commodore Business Machines, Inc.

Each issue, we'll award prizes to two entries. First place winners will receive a VIC 20 8K Memory Expander Cartridge. Second place winners will receive a VIC 3K Memory Ex

The Meadows, 487 Devon Park Drive Wayne. PA 19087

Attn: POWER/PLAY

COMMODORE CHALLENGE CONTEST ' * " ENTRY FORM Name.

Age,

Phone.

Address. City.

. State.

.Zip.

1 understand thai my solfware entry becomes the property o! Commodore Business Machines. Inc.. upon submission, and lhat winning entnes published by POWER/PLAY become public domain soltware. Signature. Parent's signature, if contestant is minor.

VOID WHERE PROHIBITED


Maryland "VIC-ar" Computerizes Sermons Rev. Ray Murray, Jr, admits he agreed to chip in on

the VIC 20 his son wanted last Christmas because he hoped to be able to use it himself. But, he says, he wasn't sure he could learn to actually program the little computer.

Three months later, he not only had his library oi 400 books entered on an input system, but had devised a program for cataloging his many sermons, and had filled three of the 100 sermon categories he had set up for himseli. Entering the sermons on cassette tape, he explains, is a longterm project for him.

"I've been preaching for about 20 years," he says, "so I honestly couldn't tell you how many sermons I have. It'll take years to put them all in."

Since each sermon takes about 1500 bytes of VIC's

3.5K memory. Rev, Murray says he can get about two

sermons on a tape. Then he has access to them by topic and title.

"When 1 push the number of a category, it lists all the sermons in that category by title. Then I push the number of the title to get the whole sermon," he explains. However, he types in sermons only on Tuesday and

Thursday mornings, the Hagerstown, Maryland, pastor

says. It's a matter of self-control, in a way, because otherwise "I'd be playing with it all the time". It's not hard to conclude that the minister's touch o! apprehension about learning to program faded quickly. "For a fella who's never written a program before," he says enthusiastically, "it was simple to use,"

Rev, Murray says he learned the basics of pro gramming from books he took out o! the library. "I just read them until I memorized them," he goes

on. "In three weeks' time I was doing just about every thing a home computer could do. It's pretty simple, once you learn the idea behind it." He also balances his checkbook with the VIC 20, and, of course, plays games. Using the VIC, he has cut

about an hour off doing his monthly bank statement,

BLACKDRAGON: (continued Irom page 17)

This heavy attack turns out to be fatal-the demon starts to

go down. But he's no marshmallow. He manages to get in 112 hits on Thrash, even as he gasps his dying gasp,

"Thou hast banished (the demon) back to hell," the computer announces triumph antly. "The Ruby Rod is yours!"

Somewhere you think you

hear a cheering crowd. After the long, tedious search, Thrash has accom

plished his purpose very

quickly, thanks to the great strength and courage of his character. A lesser character could not have vanquished

the evil one so expeditiously—

and. in fact, could easily have been killed. Temporarily weakened, but glorious in his victory, Thrash begins his ascent out

of the labyrinth. Using his ability to levitate, he carries the Ruby Rod back into the

light and fresh air of the upper worlds

"Well and goodly, faithful

warrior," says the computer gratefully. "Thou hast proven

thyself in the struggle against evil. For thy efforts thou wilt be retired to the Elysian Fields of spendor, and thy name shall

be added to the ranks." So Thrash's name gets back into the Hall of Fame.

Bui, since Bill is strongly opposed to early retirement,

he isn't about to let Thrash go

to the Elysian Fields. Instead,

he says.

Meanwhile, his 15 year-old son, Ray III. does get to use his Christmas present, the minister assures you. "He uses it to keep track of his paper route—he's

got a pretty complicated program for that -and he uses it for games," the elder Murray explains, Although her two older sons and her husband all think the VIC 20 is a useful tool and an enjoyable pastime, Mrs. Murray evidently isn't quite so enthusiastic about the home computer, according to her husband. "She calls it my second wife," Rev. Murray laughs. "When I get aggravated, she says I should throw it away," If it's any consolation, Mrs, Murray, you're not the first computer widow. Nor will you be the last. But more on

he secrets his character away under cover of darkness to a mysterious hideout, where he will recuperate from his

wounds —and come back to fight again in The Source's neverending "struggle

against evil." (A special note to novice Blackdragon players: Should the network shut you down while you're playing, your character will be killed. If you want to get the character back, call The Source

Customer Service and tell them your problem. Some times they can locate the lost lile and re-establish

your character.)!}

that in a later issue. 22

1982 POWER/PLAY


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Programs for Learning at Home

Just as there is more than one way to skin a cat (never

having skinned one, I can't vouch (or that, but I trust it's

true), there Is also more than one way to have fun with your Commodore computer,

Unfortunately, educational material is generally not

equated with "fun", especially among younger folks, This often exasperates parents, who expend a lot of energy trying to get these balky kids to do their homework. We all

know the story, (rom one side or the other. Right, kids?

Fear not. With educational programs that make learn

ing tun. you can have the best of both worlds. For instance, take a look at this:

MATH FOR THE VIC 20: New From Micro-Ed The people at Micro-Ed, in Minneapolis, have been

busy translating many of their popular PET educational programs into VIC 20 educational programs. For those of you who would love to love math, or have children you love, whom you'd love to love math, Micro-Ed recently added some elementary-level math programs to their

list of what's available for the VIC. These kinds of pro

VIC Fix

VIC Manual Program Corrections Those of you who've tried to type in TANK-V-UFO and

KILLER COMET, two programs in the appendix of your VIC owner's manual, may have run into a problem. Or, to be more specific, two problems.

Since we're very conscientious, we'd like to help you fix the programs so they'll work. Here's how.

InTANK-V-UFO. the problem is in line 135. That line is

exactly 88 characters long-if typed without a space after the line number-which makes it difficult, if not impos

sible, to enter, You can correct this by doing either of the following:

grams are a great way to transform drudgery into fun, as you or your children leam Cor re-leam) important basic skills at home—without worrying about any "teacher's dirty looks." The Micro-Ed Math Sports Package contains 10

the line exaclly as it is.

bul do nol type Itie space aller ihe line number. After the last

character ol Ihe line (the 0 in 170) is typed, the cursor will be

on a blank line. Pressing RETURN will now enier nolhing So.

programs on cassette tape, geared mainly to the ele

mentary level, With these programs you get practice in addition, subtraction, multiplication and division by

playing exciting sports: track, basketball, football and baseball among them. Math Golf takes skills a little further by giving students practice in forming equations with dilferenl math operations, And Numbowl challenges a student's ability to form equations with three random numbers. Each of the tapes in the Sports Package is also available individually,

In addition to the Math Sports Package tapes, seven

before pressing RETURN, cursor

up lo Ihe I of 135 Then press RETURN.

2. Or. type the line using abbreviated commands. P shifted E lor PEEK P shifted O lor POKE GshilledO for GOTO

In the second program, KILLER COMET, you may have difficulty finding the reverse T character in line 0,

other elementary-level math programs for the VIC are also newly available from Micro-Ed. Parting Shots, Pall Green. On the Line, and Branded provide practice with fractions Prime Fishin' works with prime numbers. Sector Five is an exercise in estimation. And A Dollar and Change clocks the player's quickness in making changeMicro-Ed has a complete catalog of educational programs for the VIC 20 (and for the PET. as well) that are ideal for learning all kinds of subjects at home. Write to

program, you can simply ignore the line entirely That

IF I ONIY HAD A BRAIN..,

at all. Or enter it without the quotes.

them at P.O. Box 24156, Minneapolis. MN 55424.

Learning at home is a terrific opportunity for both children and adults to expand their skills and awareness. Adults might take a look at Commodore's Typing Tutorial to learn or brush up on typing skills. Or use our Home

Babysitter to entertain—and teach—preschool tots. If you're looking for some good leam-at-home pro grams, watch our advertisements. Eventually, most VICPET educational software houses will show up here. Or, better yet. take a look at the Commodore Software Encyclopedia for a comprehensive overview of what's available for our whole product line. If that doesn't work,

Since this is the delete char

acter the author used to remove the line number and

the REM during listing of this is, don't bother to enter it

II you're really set on know ing about that reverse T. however, then you can do this: 1. Type: 0 REM" Ihen press RETURN

2. Wilh cursor conlrols. reposition Ihe cursor to the screen position nghl alter the quote mark in

thai lino 3. Press SHIFT and 1NST togeiher 6 times

watch this section of POWER/PLAY for timely information

4

on some of the more interesting developments in educational software for your Commodore computer.

6. Enler the remainder ol Ihe line

Press DEL t> times

5. Press Ihe quote mark

1982 POWER/PLAY


PET/CBM &

"Probably trie bestdocumentedprograms I've soon tor PET/CBM:'

Robert Baker Microcomputing

September 1981

VICOWNERS

"The strongest points o! this

system are Its unsurpassed

f

document/won and its

human engineering." Ralph Bressler. The Paper

NovJDec. 1981

Utilities & Games UTILITIES FOR PET & VIC

GAMES FOR VIC

6502 ASSEMBLER PACKAGE HESBAL is a 1- or 2-pass Assembler using standard

Skier Thrill to downhill skiing, using your joystick to hit (lags and avoid obstacles. Great graphics. 3 levels of dif ficulty.

Maze of Mikor Adventure-like game with stunning graphics challenges you to steal the Warlock's gold as you evade the demon. Tank Wars Match your wits against the evasive enemy,

as you maneuver around obstacles and avoid mines. Vlctrek Graphics and sound add to the excitement as you scan galactic maps, maneuver through star bases,

and battle klingons. Enhanced version included for 8K

MOS mnemonics and operand formats, has pseudo-

opcodes and over 25 error messages. HESEDIT is a full screen text editor for use with HESBAL or alone.

Assembler package runs on PET or VIC with 1 cassette and minimum 8K, (specify PET or VIC). $23.95 on cassette, S26.95 on diskette.

HESCOM transfers data and programs bidirectionally between PETs, VICs. or a PET and VIC at 3 times the speed of the disk. Set up VIC as a terminal to PET and create games for 2 players. Or use VIC as a peripheral to PET for hi-res graphics and sound. Only $49.95 on cassette. S52.95 on diskette.

VIC.

HESCOUNT monitors BASIC program's execution and

Plnball Score points with flippers through bumpers and alleys. This game is the real thing.

accumulates data. Essential for debugging and op timization. Discover how many times your program

Simon Four squares light and sound at random. Then you imitate the sequence. It gets tougher as you get better. Fuel Pirates Protect your stock of atomic fuel from raiding pirates using your particle cannon.

Lazer Blitz Terrific graphics as you destroy enemy air craft from your Hying saucer.

Pak Bomber is dropping bombs that you must catch. Great challenge for eye-to-hand coordination. All games run on any VIC 20. Price each game on cassette $15.95.

looped, and when IF statements were true or false. Fast execution. Runs on PET or VIC. On cassette $23.95. On diskette $26.95. HESCAT Complete hi-speed diskette cataloging system.

Five programs let you sort names, print reports 3 ways, and locate file names in memory or on disk, and much more. Works with any PET^CBM. I6K and dual drives. $39.95.

HESLISTER takes complex BASIC programs and prints (to screen or printer) in an easily understood manner.

Lets you analyze BASIC programs to alter or debug code. Works on any PET/CBM and 1 disk drive. $23.95. HESPLOT Very fast hires graphics subroutines for VIC. Includes line drawing routines. With 8K VIC plot within field of 176 x 160. On cassette S15.95. All products available at your dealer or directly from HES. Add %2 postage. Calif, res. add 6% sales lax.

We accept VISA and MasterCard. Dealer Inquiries Invited.

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT

Human engineered Software

TO OUR CUSTOMERS AND DEALERS

71 Pork lone • Brisbane, CA 94005

HES has relocated to the San Fiancisco Bay Area and is now a division

Dw USI Inteiriotionol

of USI International. Wo now have

Send today for your FREE CATALOG of VIC and PET/CBM Software

greater resources to provide you with

excellent software on cartridge, cassette, or diskette in superior quali ty packaging. Watch for more exciting products from HES

(415) 468-4110

1 Name

! Street | City

1 State

Zip Mail to Human Englneerec Software

PET, CBM. and VIC are trademarks of Commodore. L POWER/PLAY 1982

71 Park Lano

Brisbane, CA 94005

.■'.


Joystick Control on the VIC by Andy Finkel

Switch 0, switch 1. switch 2

Reprinted Irom Commodore Magazine

and the Fire button can be

Like all other input and output, joysticks are controlled using Ihe VIC'S 6522 periph eral interlace adapters (PIAs). The 6522 is a versatile and

read from PIA # 1, which is

complex device. Fortunately, it isn't necessary to delve deeply into the mysteries of the 6522 PIA to read the joysticks.

Each 6522 has two Input/ Output ports, called port A and port B. Each of the ports has a control register

located beginning at loca tion S9110, Switch 3 must be read from the other 6522

(PIA #2), which is located

beginning at location S9120. Now, the key locations for the joystick are as follows: Hex

mal

9113

37139 Data direction register lor I/O pod A on PIA * 1 37137 Output register A

Purpose

Bil 2 Joy swilch 0

Bil 3 Joy swilch I

attached, called the DATA

Bit 4 Joy swilch 2

DIRECTION REGISTER (DDR).

Bil 5 Fire butlon

This highly important register controls the direction ot the

POKE37139.0:DD= 37154 PA=37I37PB=37152 20 FORI=0TO2:FORJ=0TO2;

READJS(J,I):rJEXTJ.l 25 DATA-23,-22,-21.-1,0.1,21,22.23 30GOSUBSO00 PRINT JS(X+1, V+1) GOTO30 TO00POKEDD.127S3=

Doci-

91M

10 DIM JS (2.2).

-((PF.EK(PB)AND128)=0): POKEDD.255 9010P=PEEK(PA):S1 = -((PAND8)=0):S2=((PAND16)= O):S0=((PAND4)=O)

9020FR=-((PAND32)=0)X= S2+E3:Y=S0Sl RETURN

The variables SO, SI, S2,

port. By using this register, you

and S3 will be 0 normally, and

can use the port for input,

will be set to 1 (or - 1) when

output, or both at the same

the joystick is pointed in that direction. Two of the vari ables will be set to 1 on diagonal moves FR will be 1 when the firing button is pressed, and 0 otherwise. The AND function is used to pick out one bit of the joy

9122

time. To set

one bit oi the port to output, set the cor

responding bit of the Data

Direction Register to 1. To set a bit of the port for input, set the corresponding bit of the DDR to 0. For example, to set bit 7 of port A to input, and the rest of the bits to output, poke 127 in the DDR for port A.

To read the joystick, one port (and one DDR) of each of the 6522 PIAs on the VIC mus! be used. The joystick switches are arranged as follows: TOP FIRE BUTTON

tor I/O port B on PIA *2

9120 37152 Outpul register B Bil 7 Joy switch 3

To read the joystick inputs, you first set the ports to input mode by setting the DDR to 0. This can be done by a POKE.

Then the value of the switches can be read by two PEEKs. Sounds easy, right? There is only one problem ... PIA #2 is also used for reading the keyboard. Setting the DDR

can disrupt the keyscan rather

a number whose value is a power of two, a single bit is selected, (For example, to

pick bit 3, AND using 2. 3 or 8). The JS array in the pro gram is set up to make it easy

to move around the screen using the joystick. The num

bers in the DATA statement of line 25 can easily be changed for other purposes. For example...

To 'decode' the joystick in this pattern:

badly. So you have to make sure you restore the DDR to

the original condition il you want to use the keyboard afterwards. To make things really easy,

TOP

FIRE

you can use the following

Swilch 4

program. Lines 10 to 25 are

(FR)

initialization. The rest of the Swilch O(S1)

Switch 2 (S2) â&#x2013;  (SI) Swilch 26

37154 Data direction register

stick port. The bits are num bered from 7 (most significant bii) to 0 (least significant bit). By ANDing the 6522 port with

Swilch 3 (S3)

program, beginning at line 9000. can be called as a subroutine whenever you want to read the joystick.

This data statement should be changed to1 25 DATA 7,0,1,6,8.2.5,4,3 1982 POWER/PLAY


vixel Vixel Volume One

Fire Fly a water-dropping helicopter, and try to put out the high-rise fire before it spreads.

Draw Be an artist! This high-resolution drawing program makes it easy to create pictures on the screen, and then save them on tape.

Race Race the computer, head-on! Simple but lots of fun.

Vixel Volume Two

Superfont Design programmable characters on your VIC-20 with this easy-to-use program.

Especially useful when creating animations, since you can edit four characters at once as a 2 x 2 block. SUPERFONT creates DATA statements after you have finished design ing the characters.

_

_

Safari

You are a photographer on an African Safari in this great game. The jungle animals run past as you try to snap their pictures. An excellent example of how to use large blocks of programmable characters on the VIC to create animation effects.

Quix How good is your memory? QUIX presents patterns of color and sound that gradually get longer and harder to remember.

The programs Fire, Draw and Race are available on VIXEL Volume One for only $12.95. The programs Superfont, Safari and Quix are available on VIXEL Volume Two which is also $12.95. Both Vixel #1 and Vixel #2 work with the standard 5K VIC-20. Foreign orders add $3.50 for shipping. CA residents add 6% tax. VISA and MasterCard wel come. Please add S1.00 shipping for credit card orders. VIXEL ii • ItUtmiiH ot The Codi Works.

VIC 30 II j trMfrurk ol Cwnmodo'« Buslrwu U«Kln»i

(B05)

POWER/PLAY 1982

tupCODF

UIADI/C

Box 55°

Goleta, California 9JH6

27


Great Cartridge Gj Plug in a VIC 20 cartridge game and you'll immediately see the difference between a true computer and a video game machine. VIC computer games on cartridge are real "arcade" games-not imitations. Judge the resolution,

graphics, sound effects and play action for yourself.

Some of the unique feature oi VIC 20 cartridge games: • SCREEN POSITION: When the display first appears on the screen, you can adjust the hori zontal position of the picture by pressing the CRSR control key, This unique feature allows for variances between different TV sets.

• KEYBOARD/JOYSTICK: Most VIC computer games work both from the keyboard and with a joystick. Most standard joysticks plug directly into the VIC 20 game port, A few of our more

sophisticated games/simulations use the keyboard only as a "control console." • SILENT DEMONSTRATION: If you don't play a game within several seconds aiter turning it on, the game gives you a silent demon stration of itself to show you how it is played. Also, the

opening display on most games shows you which keys or joystick positions affect which actions.

• HIGH SCORE CHALLENGE: The "High Score" line shows you the highest total so far. The VIC 20 remembers Ihe highest score recorded, just like an

arcade game, until you turn the VIC off. A /Vj^

few games, like Radar Rat Race, have preset^ high scores that give you targets to shoot for.

Getting Started, with your Cartridge Game 1. Turn on your television set, 2. Turn your VIC 20 off, You will greatly increase

the life of your game cartridges if you turn the VIC off before inserting or changing cartridges.

3. Insert ihe game cartridge firmly in place. 4. Turn on the VIC 20.

5. Adjust the picture on your screen by using the CRSR key.

6. Type the appropriate START key: fl, P or RETURN, depending on what the game requires.

7. Play the game, using either the joystick or keyboard controls.

8. Turn the computer off before inserting another cartridge. 26

*


for theVic 20 What's Available on Cartridge from Commodoreâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; and What's Coming Soon

Key: Works with: J=Joystick, K=Keyboard, P=Paddle

Space Games VIC AVENGER: Blast the rows ol aliens and Hying saucers with your space cannon. Hide behind bunkers for protection,

and watch tor the mystery UFO's worth extra points, An addicting game, and one of Commodore's most popular. (JK)

JUPITER LANDER: One of the most authentic land ing games ever developed. Use your VIC key board like a control console to pilot your Jupiter Lander to a soft landing in one of the game's caverns. Make as many landings as you can

until your fuel runs out. A real challenge.(K) VIC SUPER ALIEN: You're trapped in a mazeand so are the Super Aliens, Capture all the aliens in the maze before they attack and eat (ugh!) you. A last-paced game. (JK)

LORD OF THE SKIES: Killer birds and their UFO allies are out to get you. As the birds become more valuable, the bombs fall taster and taster.

Kill the bird before you get blasted, (JK,.. coming soon)

Bally/Midway Arcade Game Series These popular coin-operated arcade games will soon be available for the home.

GORF: Begin as a Space Cadet and advance through the ranks as you shoot down Goriian flagships. But first you have to get through the Invaders, the Laser Ships and much more, (JK ,,. coming soon) OMEGA RACE: Go through Omegan warrior train ing in the Space Arena. You've got to watch out for missiles, space mines and the Death Ship to make it! (JK . . . coming soon)

WIZARD OF WOR: Will you make it out of the Wizard's dungeons? His monster pels, some of them invisible, will make it hard on you. And the Wizard can teleport and throw lightning bolts. (JK ... coming soon)

Family Games MIDNIGHT DRIVE: Turn your VIC keyboard into the dash board of a race car. Play action combines road racing, time trials and night driving. Ignition, kilometers per second, rpm. 4 gears, accelerator ... they're all there. Fast-paced and authentic. (K)

RADAR RAT RACE: Cats and enemy mice try to stop your Radar Rat from getting all the cheese in the maze, Great arcade action. (JK) RAID ON FORT KNOX: In the complex of tunnels under Fort Knox you find the gold. But the guards are on your trail. Get out before

they find you! (JK ... coming soon) POWER/PLW 1932

29


PINBALL SPECTACULAR: Video pinball par excellence, with some of the best action avail

able. Bumpers, free balls, crawling monsters, spinner, drop targets, bonus multipliers and terrilic sound effects. (P ... coming soon)

Casino Games

SLITHER/SUPER SLITHER: Two versions on one tape. Targets appear and disappear at random as you slither around, VIC 21 (BLACKJACK): One or two can play against the computer, with the full range of casino options, including split pairs and

SUPER SLOT: Plays identically to the one-armed

surrender. (K)

bandits in Las Vegas: drop coins, pull the lever ,.. and jackpot! Features increased odds tor larger bets, display of winning combinations and colorful action. (JK)

BLUE MEANIES FROM OUTER SPACE: Defend yourself against the invading Blue Meanies with your laser cannons. Meanwhile, you can repair your ship with your repair robot, (K)

DRAW POKER: Beat the dealer al 5-card draw. Play against the odds for bigger and bigger

stakes; bet double or nothing when you win. (K)

Children's Games MOLE ATTACK: When the moles stick their heads out, try to bop them. But don't hit their tails, or you'll lose points. Action gets faster as time runs out. (JK ... coming soon) THE SKY IS FALLING: A great game to teach motor skills, as you help Chicken Little by

catching pieces of the falling sky. Fun and challenging, (P... coming soon)

Scott Adams Adventure Game Series ADVENTURELAND ADVENTURE: Find the 13 treasures as you explore the dismal swamp and the bottomless pit. Find the hidden caves -bul try not to upset the sleeping dragon. (K ... coming soon)

PIRATE COVE ADVENTURE: Say the magic word, and you're transported from a London apart ment to Pirate Island, Collect the treasures as you sail the sea in a pirate ship. (K) MISSION IMPOSSIBLE ADVENTURE: The nuclear reactor has been rigged as a time bomb by a dying scientist. Can you get past the security system to save the world? (K) THE COUNT ADVENTURE: As night falls, you're trapped in Count Dracula's casile. He wants to

drain your blood. Can you destroy him, first? (K) VOODOO CASTLE ADVENTURE: Your friend. Count Cristo, has had a curse put on him, and you must find the clues to the spell that can free him. But what's that moaning coming from

the fireplace? (K)

Classic Board Game SARGON II CHESS: The world's most popular computer chess game. Play black or white pieces, select from 7 levels of difficulty. You can even ask Sargon to suggest your move. (JK)

Games On Tape Several excellent Commodore games are available on cassette tape, rather than car

tridge. These games have all the excitement of Commodore's cartridge games.

CAR CHASE: Computer cars are trying to crash into you as you race through the maze picking

Games from the Outside World According to several expert Commodore game players the following games are among the best produced by outside software houses for

the VIC 20. If you've got a favorite, let us know. And PLAY ON!

SPIDERS OF MARS, on cartridge from United Microware Industries: You're a fly combatting hoardes of invading spiders and other carni

vorous insects. They come from all sides, so you've got to be fast to get them before they blow you apart! Starts at ten levels of play, all

of them fast-paced. Great sound effects, too. (JK) METEOR RUN, on cartridge from United Microware Industries: Shoot meteorites, aliens and space debris coming in at your rocket. But watch out for those little meteorites that fly diagonally across your path, They can catch you unaware. Progressively complex levels of

Play, (J) SNAK MAN I. on tape from American Peri pherals: Yet another version of a popular arcade game we all know and love. Our ex perts like this version better than the Atari

game machine version. (JK) |j

High Scores For serious game

players who thrive on competition, we'll be running the highest known scores for all Commodore gamescartridge and cassette. If you have a score that beats the existing record, send it in. But please remember

you're on your honor, and phony scores will be on YOUR

VIC AVENGER: JUPITEB LANDER:

JimDubrouillel-91,500 SUPER ALIEN: MIDNIGHT DRIVE:

Neil Hams- 13 km RADAR RAT RACE; Neil Hams-35,050

SUPER SLOT: DRAW POKER:

CAS CHASE;

SLITHER/SUPER SLITHER: BLUE MEANIES:

conscience, not ours.

up points. (JK) 30

1982 POWER/PLAY


LET COMPUTERMAT TURN YOUR VIC-PETCBM INTO A HOME ARCADE

NEW

VIC

PET

SOFTWARE

ALIEN INVASION — Arcade tlylv incitement lor your VIC. Look out here

theycomi.' Aliens Ate descending IroiTiilu'iky Move your l.werintoposilion

BOMB'S AWAY — Can you slop him? The cra^y bomber drops itw bombs

from thelopolthescri'un yougBtSbUCkttllOCMchlhani B*'fure you know

ond defend (he I'drlM The jEtacks B7V unending -- can you survive or will

it iHirnlrsdre foiling so last you wonder when hi' will slop Just wlu'iiyi>ul hmh

V^Jpr ruli' ihi1 galaxy. Many exlr<b on tin* one. 20 levels ol pljy S9.95 CATTLE-HOUNUUP — Thi cowi Jre loose in Ihe nu». You haw 2

you have him under lontrolyour bucket gets sniallt'T. Is your limit! quicker

minutes to get I'.idirowlMik mtoilircoridl You can push, cimx and caJllhi'

lows. Soniif cl^w^ ,iil" nut very sm.iri and siiith1 are very stubborn You will havelo help them. Be carelutTlui yoiuion't leave the corral yate open. Color graphics and sound Eight levels ol play and a time limn $9.% HEAD ON — Your car moves forujatd around the race track. You can move up. down, right and le!l Try to score points by running over the dots on the track Watch out lot the crusher - slyoucrashyoulowacar Fixircarsand bonus levels Full color graphics and sound Fas! action and very addicting 9 levels ol play SNAKEOUT

-

Blocks appear on the screen at random

S9.9S You move up.

down, right and lelt and try to muvi' your snake over the blocks. Each block that you yet raises your score Keep building your score but watch out because the escape route* ket-p (foiling smaller Time limit, color graphics and sound 3 games on this cassette Snakeout — 2 player Snakeout and Trapper. 9 Levels ol Play S9.9i TARGET COMMAND — Move your laser into position and gel ready tor

some quick actiun Different iyp*> of missiles are drooping How many can you shoot down They .ill travel at different speeds and different levels. You musT be last on tin- (nygur to yet (hem all. lime limit, txmus points and very

addicting Color graphics and sound Attade style fun 10 levels

ALL VIC SOFTWARE RUNS IN STANDARD VIC.

S99S

than your eye?

Cass BK

S9.95

ASTEROIDZ — Its your ship vs. ,i swarm of killer giimmaroid?.. You are on a collision course and must destroy them before they blast you into the new

galaxy- Four levels ol play Has hyperspaci1 keys [hat move you around.

Arcade style entertainment at its Imest Gteat graphics and sound. Casi 8K

S9 95

MUNCHMAN — How many dols can you cover? It's you against the computer munchers ZIP and ZAP. Can you deal trie male first or will they get you? Number keys move you uph down, nght and left GKLAT c;kaphics and sound C=>s. 8K S9.SS TARGET COMMAND — Its you against a bairage of enemy laiers that are ajmedat ycur ammo dumps. Sigh I in on the targets and score as many hits as you dare As your skill increases so does the the difficulty — 15 levels lo seledl. This is an arcade style game with gteal graphics and sound elletts A must for your PET/CBM

Cass 8K

VIC AND PET ARE TKAUt-MAKKS OF CISM

S9 95

PET CBM SOFTWARE IS DESIGNED TO RUN ON 40 CHR SCREEN AND STANDARD 8K.

COMPUTERMAT • BOX 1664. DEPT PP

WRITE FOR FREE CATALOG OF VIC/PET SOFTWARE

LAKE HAVASU CITY, ARIZONA 86403

PLEASE ADD $1.00 PER ORDER FOR SHIPPING

.PET/CBM/VIC? SEE SKYLES.

,o

PET owners everywhere sing FRDIT1

SILICON 15

Thanks for the

VOLLEY

HERE

I

to good old Bob Skyles . . . [hey should . . . bcuuise Bob Skyles is [he only complete source for memory boards for any PET ever

The

sold. Old Dob won'l forgel you.

"PROGRAMMER" 3

VIC

\nii iht- Skylw memorj <>Mttnv have iht hightai c|ujIh> comnil ol an> eompuiei product cicr. Ovw KMinillinii bin ol Skjln memory boards arc

$69

alreadv in I In-licit). hrM«ualn> UUicuiddynamk K\MS. ■.olid soldered on nr>i qualu > tflj^epmy I li.n ivujn tin'*. .ircyuarjnicTd—tn\piievfihew*1 tourer prn-f-i—for a full Ivn *^:Jr^.

PACKS

foi tiampli

o 16K BAM

PACK *

a JBOCBAMM(«S -and a MACHINE • All flri avo.f ol

AID PACK'

lANfi

MON*

VDU' local

The FO'

<fiD1*

WUniing

all lh< mryl Plug oil

in

Ihi

The boank, inside the I'l-1 CBM. Irulall in minum without tpecialtoobor

SI 79

MAXIM"

|D

go

6 PACKS i

up lo UK olh.r

Lorn modnii

ci^uipnicru .. ,juil .i ^cr(ndflvcr.

RAM nn '

PACKS hni

la

'hoi

o*t*f

Because (il am np* dyngmicmemor) dcngn. and lo (debute old Bob's 30JJ

birthday, here arc tin- smaihlnj nem prices:

SKMmorySytum

orlg, tlSO.OO

now S!tx).<xl

Sav?S SO.OQ

UK MmorySJfSim

ortg t6SO.O0

mm Uini.m

SavttZSQ.QO

I/,K SttmotySptm

orlg, U1D.06

nn»-5.IWW.6W

.Sun- $150.00

...FaranyPETtnrmate. When ordering, jusi describe youi Cl- ib> model

numtifi jud indicate ihi; amount ;tnd li|n-(or branJlcl minion cuirenll> m

The Linit. I -■ i1,'

fDur

..tnl [an

OP^ (415,6513160

PARSEC RESEARCH Drawer 17(.f»-1'

Shipping and Handling... ,(USA Cunudal S3. Stl (Eumpe/Aim) SIS.Dfi California resldtms must orfdrm/flMfl ra/es lax, in required. rmuil urcli-r-: coll loiifm iHiitil II7-99S! (excepl Calirornrd),

orders; nlease mil iMf-i MJ.173S.

Fremont, CA. 94538 Induct* 13.'° Lhppp<no& 16'.. lo.

Id. CA

PET/CBMAr'IC? SEE SKYLES. POWER/PLAY 1982

31


Flip Out With VICFUP-IV Jim Dubrouillet (our computerized news paper carrier ... see page 20) and his irienci Sean Smith designed this program. II you

people play, the game goes as last as they can play it. Our only criticism is that, when you play against the computer, VIC can be pretty slow making his move, But the sound effects are good, and the game itself is challenging, so Just be patient as VIC scans the scene to choose his flip. All in all, we think you'll enjoy V1CFLIP-IV

like the board game "Othello", you'll love VTCFLIP-IV, The point is to end up with the most blocks (black or white) in your color. The first section contains the instructions.

Then it automatically loads the game. If two

REfiOV. J

G0T021

2 WO-1 iOOSUB100iPOKE19Bj. 1 eP0KE631 .131 »PRlHT"aasIBW!SSlBE!ai!lSftHI11 :EHD 6 PRlHT"arO

PLRV

THE

;■

PRINT ""JUTHE

HIGHER

■=:

PRIMT"ttJTHE

GRME

VIC,

THE

ENDS

TVPEVIC1.

NUMBERTHE WHEN

NOSQUFIRES

3 PRINT"U!TTHE VIC DECIDES WHO IS GETR*:IFR*=""THENI8

19

00T02

21

POKE36879,152iGOTO100

100

CHOOSES

VIC3.

OR

VIC4

THE

GRME."

P.EMRIN

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GETCf :iFC*>•:•'vi=indc*:-:"N"thenIP5

(confifiuod on nox/ pogej

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It costs

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a cassette taps wiih two demonstration programs

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33


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f.t TIME1: "■ . T.. 1 1982 POWER/PLAY


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VIC

1982 CATALOG

AMERICAN PERIPHERALS 1122 Bangor Street

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35

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Ttele/Scope The VICMODEM brings mainframe computing home. fay Jefl Hand

Computer networks were once only an idea in a science flclion writer's mind. Bui science fiction is becoming reality quicker than you may think. Imagine, for instance, having access to tremendous amounts of information, almost unlimited memory and the programming ability ol a mainframe right in your home. That kind of power is available right now

to home computerists, who can use a modem and a telephone to link their small computers to big mainframe computers. Tying into

computer networks via telephone is called telecommunications—which is the subject oi this column.

The VIC 20 and the VICMODEM cartridge can be your keys lo the vas! empire of tele

data management, letters and contracts. Store information and update it at any lime. A back up copy ol all information you enter into the system is maintained, so no data can be lost. Studenls—In school it's virtually impossible to get enough time on the computer terminal.

Wilh the VIC 20 and VICMODEM you can work conveniently al home —and forget about the mobs at the terminals —by tying into the school computer. Or suppose you have an assignment

to write a paper on current American foreign policy in Central America, You simply hook up

the VICMODEM to your VIC 20 and call a service like The Source or CompuServe. Online you access the UPI service and several edi torials from various national papers to gather

communications A modem converts (MOdu-

your information. To make your task even easier, you can use the VIC word processing

lates) a computer's signals so they can be sent

capability to print the report on your VIC printer. You're a step ahead of your peers and it was less work! Farmers-Use a computer net work like Agnet to slay informed on the latest market prices for your

over telephone lines, then translates them back

to signals the computer can understand (DEModu^ lates).

produce. Get up-to-the-minute

weather reports, programs lor soil analysis and scores oi help ful farming tips on a range of

With the VICMODEM. available Irom Commodore, you can

communicate over the phone with computer networks across the nation-from huge main frames to someone else's personal computer. With the VICMODEM, the capabilities of

your VIC 20 are magnified and enhanced, The applications are only as limited as your imagination. You can program in several computer languages-COBOL, FORTRAN.

PASCAL and BASIC-and various assembler

subjects from birthing a calf to exterminaiing moles. Shoppers-Shopping for durable mer

chandise is easy on a computer network like CompuServe. You don't have lo leave home,

and the service is available 24 hours a day. You do all your research, pricing and compari

son shopping right on the computer. Your account is billed for any purchase you make,

and merchandise is delivered right to your door. CBer's-CBing on the computer is the next

best thing to being there, and can be cheaper than a phone call. Since you can converse with more than one person at a time, you can even

languages, for instance.

hold a conference with friends from around

cations networks such as CompuServe and The Source have data banks that include

the tremendous utility o! computer networks.

In addition, subscription telecommuni

scientific information, newswire stories, news papers Irom across the country, numerous

programs, stock quotes, financial advice and various computer utilities. Not only that, but

you and your computer can play a good game

of bridge or backgammon quickly and

the country.

These are just a few ideas to demonstrate

Now we get lo the "how-to" part.

To begin telecommunicating via your VIC 20, you'll need a Datassette, the VICMODEM cartridge, VICTERM 1 software, a modular tele phone and an account with a computer net work. The VICMODEM is the mast inexpensive

inexpensively over the phone. What, specifically, can you do with the help oi a VICMODEM?

modem on the market today, and Commodore has included the VICTERM I software FREE

allow you to gel current stock quotations and

you buy your VICMODEM, Commodore is providing a year's FREE subscription to Compu Serve, an extensive telecommunications net-

Businessmen-The VIC 20 and VICMODEM

company reports. You can use one of many business programs for accounting, statistics. 36

with your VICMODEM purchase.

If you still want more for your money when

1982 POWEB/RjW


work. You say you're still not satisfied? How about this. Commodore is also giving you one hour free on CompuServe to get acquainted

with the service, So, at the amazingly low price of around S484 (counting the cost of your VIC 20), you have everything you need to start telecom municating. If you need a modular phone, however, there's not much Commodore can do.

have any of the capabilities ot V1CTERM I software, This program, by the way. will also work for RS232 modems. TERMINRL i 00 110

You'll have to talk to Ma Bell.

120

Contained in the VICMODEM package you'll find all the information you need for getting onto The Source or CompuServe, in the

130

form of two snappaks—one from The Source and one from CompuServe. Each pack con tains your I,D. numbers, the password for each system, an agreement of use and an expla nation of how to log onto the network, Suppose you take advantage of Commodore's free subscription and decide to subscribe to CompuServe. Then what happens? After you log on, the first thing you'll see is a letter from Commodore welcoming you to Commodore's Information Network. The Commodore Infor mation Network is available on CompuServe to help Commodore users get the most out of their computers. Next on your screen a menu page for the

for

tions. The information menu allows you to easily access any information contained in the data base, In this case, you can choose from such delectables as technical tips, software lips, hotline, directory of user groups. "Program of the Month," bulletin board, product announce ments and free public domain software, Oi course, there are also many small computer networks you can access with your

160 -for

into

case

VIC:

ne>:t

out

into

J*=193 to 218:

*rr&y

PEM

upper

case

n&xt into

k=..i-123: in-to

array

180

-for

190

U«*K<j>

200

i+

to

3rt~s<i--

+"iCj'<=k: fwx*

tX<14S3»16 : +"-X 133>™16 PEM de-fines +1 and PVS/OFF ,i=0

ne:>;t

*ri--*.y

176

as

break

255

PEM rec i evir\rs array

trie same

as send ina srr

REM

kO0

then +KCk>»j s

■fK<U+i2e>«j

REM

2ifl

next

22@

print

"

"

chr*■: 14? ■

REM

c ].&=■]-■£

REM

reads

240

i+

a#="

256

fruit

"

+h*

screen

-Prom

or

modem

stO0

end

-then

pirfcs

cut

+.o

screen

230

REM "

'

chrtC 157!"' ;chr-t<f;i',=i£c(a$> > >

REM

266

it

+;;<a£.ci:3$J>=34 REM

279

goto

2SS

print-

resets

chr*(rv>"

REM

290

i+

"the

then

poke

■HUO'fce

mode

212.0

230 " chr * ' 1 5? .■ rchr * v 1 46 ' : : ge-+

cursor

e*O"

"

then

print#S^chr*<H:H<asc<»*> >>}

REM Ct=tt+1

■310

i+

POWER/PLAY 1982

±'« j > = ..i ;

-for j==91 to 35: +.Ji<j>=j: REM special characters

300

allow you to communicate with another com puter through the modem, although it does not

64:

lower

maintained Irom a private home to post announcements for a user group or a special

cations, this short functional program will

+■€•

characters

VICMODEM. These smaller networks are usually

interest such as computer hardware, education, humor or commodities, Phone numbers lor these networks are available on The Source. Ii you don't have a Datassette or want to borrow a friend's modem to try telecommuni

THE

tK(.13>=13: t:;';2G>=3: rv=18: ct=0 PEM de-rine-s special characters +or j==S5 to 30s k=.j+32i tK<j>™k!

Network will appear, A menu is a listing of the information selections available to the user, just as a restaurant menu is a listing of meal selec

.j=32

PEM 15S

FOR

a pan 5.2.3. chr* <6> REN opens channe l to modem dim +;; < 255 > . *K < 255 > REM dimension in & out buf+ers REM

140

SOFTWRRE

PEM

ct=8

then

ct=0:

i--=l<iA-\-i

P.EM

320

i+

f peek<37151 >and REM

330

goto

check

modem

64J-1 before

then

::::20

sending

2 3ill

If you have any suggestions, problems, or

compliments, drop us a line through the FEED BACK command on CompuServe, Have fun expionng . . ,

37

l&


JINSAM Gives A Golden Anniveiscny Party by Nancy Iscaro, Jini Micro-Systems, Inc.

This is if, the BIG one. Fifty years married to one man, for my mom. Fifty years married to one woman, for my dad. As a daughter, how do you express your love and appreciation? A

blank fields, then entered the names of friends and relatives. My sister Susan called and checked addresses, my sister Karen entered the

data into JINSAM and 1 composed the invita

party, of course.

tions on the WordPro word processing system.

But it's got to be more. You've got to consider the folks' temperaments and idiosyncrasies.

we used WORDPROPACK to prepare a variable

Once the names were entered into JINSAM,

They had the first TV on the block and the first

block file with five variables (or name, address,

computer in the condo. They've never needed to keep up with the Joneses. Instead, they've always taken the lead. They're modern and

city, state and zip code, While JINSAM prepared the file, my sisters revised the invitation. We

FULL of life.

into WordPro's extra text area and printed sample invitations onto a one-way mailer

The party was no secret, You can't ignore or

placed ihe WORDPROPACK variable block file

hide a party like thisâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;it's a family affair. My

called a TRANS-O-GRAM. With very little fuss the

sisters and I gol together and planned the strategy. The place, the food, the time were all

copy was perfect. We typed "RVS" "O" "L" "C"

set, Then came the invitations. What should we

invitation was printed.

"RETURN", and personalized invitation after

use? Caligraphy? Raised printing on parch ment? NO!! That might be special, but not special enough for our folks. JINSAM, the data base management system by JINI Micro-Systems, Inc., designed to be used with the Commodore CBM micro, came to the rescue. The system was originally created

for the FOX-TANGO Corporation, which dad founded. It seemed only logical that this modem 50th anniversary couple should have JINSAM/WordPro designed invitations.

On our CBM, we created a mailing list database with plenty of room for names, addresses, telephone numbers and several

At first my folks objected to the fuss and bother of a party, but as plans fell into place my mom loved Ihe whole affair because it was different. Dad thought it was unpretentious and

gave us lots more names. And if someone did give a gift or make a donation to a charity, as Mom and Dad had requested, they had a great way to thank people. Dad entered the names in JINSAM and had WordPro write a thank-you letter. The party turned out to be a marvelous success. Because ourTRANS-O-GRAMS looked so authentic, everyone thought they had gotten a telegram. In fact, the invitations turned out to

be the talk of the party, second only to the anniversary couple, Some people thought they must have been expensive, most thought they were "different", and some just thought they were strange- especially our Uncle Irv a music ologist who said they reminded him of invitations

to sil on international music committees, But we just thought it had been a fun family project.

Best Books This is mainly a starter list for new computerists. But we've thrown in a few goodies for more advanced users. Basic Programming VIC 20 Programmer's

Reference Guide

Hnkel, Hams, Higginbottom & Tbmczyk

Commodore Business Machines, Inc.

available al your Commodore dealer

Hands-on BASIC with a PET Herbert D. Peckham

McGraw Hill: New York, NY

available al your local bookstore

38

The PET/CBM Personal Computer Guide

(1st edilion is belter lor VIC users)

Adam Osbome fit Carroll S. Donahue; Osborne/McGraw Hill Berkeley. CA available at your local bookstore

Some Common BASIC Programs PET Edition Lon Poole

Osborno/McGraw Hill. Berkeley. CA available at your local bookstore

Dwye: & Critchlield

BASIC liom Ihe Ground Up David E. Simon Hoyden Book Company.

and Menlo Park, CA available at your local bookstore

(continued on page 45)

BASIC and the Personal Computer

Addison Wesley: Reading, MA

Rochelle Park. NJ

available at your local bookstore

1962 POWER/PLAY


JINSAM

Data Manager selected by NASA, Kennedy Space Center SAVE TIME! SAVE MONEY! JINSAM saves taxpayers lOO's of thousands of S

lo huiki jinsam databases automatically. For

♦ CUSTOM DATA FILES

♦CUSTOM REPORTS/LABELS

♦ KEYED RANDOM ACCESS * FAST/EASY/MENU DRIVEN

• MULTIPLE SEARCH KEYS

"Much more powerful than Robert Baker

Kilobaud Microcomputing JINSAM is an Integrated system, li makes ii

easy ui use your information toils fullest. No more

would place them into JINSAM files.

All accessories arc accessed thru the JINSAM menu and require security password to gain entrance.

HNSAMgives you FREEDOM OPCHOICE

* PRIVACY ACCESS CODES • WILD CARD SEARCH

you can imagine!"

example: You could ■■download" information on holenth cards to sequential Hies and INTERAC

Start with JINSAM I 0 and upgrade hardware and data al any time. Choose from accessories at

JINSAM EXECUTIVE version (soon lo be

released) is our most powerful professional system

for the CBM R(KK) and 9000 aeries. Executive will have S.2 extended features plus, allow multiple users with in-use lockout protection, executive command files, automatic math relations, join. mugeor link files, greatly increased record capacity

and machine Information search by word, us well as by key or record number and many, many more features.

any time The JINSAM Newsletter brings the latest updates, user inpul and uses and keeps an eye on the future.

JINSAM stands alone by placing "a lot of potential computing power in one integrated program package" (Fred Klein. Ferson div. of

Bausch & Lomb). "The JINSAM package is

Justification for buying »system no mailer what the

hardware, be it Vector or Commodore or whatever

the system" (Larry Colvin. Micro Computer Systems I. Ii is a "grandfather" in this young field

mil hundreds of i aluahlc hours be spent .searching

There are current!) 7 mare interfacing modules -

or analyzing needed information nor re-entering

and more under development, including independent

information for various reports JINSAM transforms your desk-top computer

interfaces between JINSAM and business pack ages for your G/L, A/R. A/P needs, We announce the availability nf modules and enhancements in JINSAM's quarter!) newsletter

JINSAM systems arc sophisticated and flexible

WORDPROPACK - Intelligent interface for WordPro 3. 1 + . 4. ■! + . creates lists ohnformation

and research institutions. husmev> and industry

into the "stale ofthc an" data processing machine with features and BCCGIlorfe$ found nowhere, cien ai 10 limes the price. NASA. Kcnncd> Space

Center selected JINSAM 8.0 and saicd approxi

since the first JIM MICRO database system has

been marketed since 1979. JINSAM EXECUTIVE will he the third generation in development, All

yet easy to use. JINSAM is saving its users

valuable time and monej internment, educational worldwide,

mately S95.0O0 over other software/hardware costs. RilcyCouniy. Kansasalsoselectcd JINSAM 8.0 and saved approximately S90.00O over other software hardware costs. JINSAM i* designed for you. It is forgiung. It has help command) (or evwy option, available al the much of a button. The amount <if Information

based on each item of information. Produce indi

JINSAM is a Commodore approved product Sec your local dealer for a demonstration

checks, invoices, etc.

JINIAK In tUllMMfcalJlHl MICRO-tYITIMl, Inc.

you More, its structure and/or your hardware can

labels, hulk mall labels, ate

change but your data won't have to be re-entered.

From JINSAM files. It allows up to 10 conditions vidualized letters, report cards, special reports,

MULTI-LABEL

Prims multiple labels per

record wuh up to 2 lines for messages and

consecutive numbering, Produce inventory, caution

MATHPACK

global calculator editor +. -,

Recovery utilitesare included even for catastrophes,

. .. by another Held or constant: null (remote

security passwords arc built in for pniacj. simple

editing and entry includes auiorecoil, and deleting

contents) of a field or replace contents of a field with an) word, number or phrase. Sum multiple

records is easy and Ulc space is reclaimed JINSAM

fields in each record or running sum of single Held

includes TWO FREE accessories for reports and labels. You have unlimited report formats with

m all records Kutract Information or cllect permuienl change. Replace in the same Held or

summing and lined up decimals and Ihe label printer

place in a waiting field

prints up to 5 across - any size and even allows single envelopes or index cards.

JINSAM LO allows Tast and easy file handling.

DESCRIPTIVE STATPACK - Determine

MEAN. MEDIAN. MODE. STANDARD DEVIATION. VARIANCE. RANGE, Generate

manipulation and report generation for any CBM

HISTOGRAMS from I to 25 steps, and produce

computer with CBM 2040 disk dm e. It features a

Z-SCORE reports ADVANCED STATPACK - (You must also

menu for ease, has encrypted passwords. 3 deep sons. 5 to 3 second recal!.

JINSAM 4.0 for CBM 4000 series adds JINSORT. user accessible machine son of 1000 records in 15 seconds; compaction, expansion of

information, automatic list maintainance. unlimited number offields, unlimited record length and much more.

JINSAM 8.0 for CBM K000 series lias all 4.0 features plus unlimited sort, horizontal lormat.and search by key or record number JINSAM 8:. NEW FOR '83 expands 8.0 capabilities by adding information search b> word. key or record number and machine language pnnt.

formal and manipulation routines. POWER/PLAY 1982

acquire DESCRIPTIVE STATPACK) Generate one. two or three way CROSSTAB'S I number of occurance) CHI SQUARE. LINEAR RE GRESSION, with graphic representation and prediction.

LINEAR

CORRELATION

and

SIMPLE ANALYSIS OF VARIANCE.

CALCPACK

2 waj interlace to VisiCalc or

any user program, it lets you use VisiCalc for

complex manipulation, editing, placing results in JINSAM for sorting, storing or moving data to WordPro as well as gumg the ability lor exchange with your own applications.

INTERAC ■ Interlace which can read VisiCalc

tiles. WordPro files and almost anj sequential lilts

V* *rjfr» It i trmd, mrk *l F r.rt uLtnil itttwirt. lHc. " l.l

.1

|i

..

Hlilpul

.1

r.r..n.[

lattwan, I.I.

■■ in I. ■■■J.-.fl .IC.nM.^ ■ ,*!,,..„ u .. i.!,.,.. Ibc

JINSAM Data Manager .... Additional Information and nearest dealer

Newsletter Subscription (S5 US S8 Worldwide) JINSAM Demo Disk (S15. plus shipping& tax) . User's Guide (S40.00. plus shipping & taxi Please -end to

Name Position _ Company

City. State. Zip Plume I

)

Computer. Disk. Application

JINI MICRO-SYSTEMS, Inc. Box 274-CI • Kingsbridge Station

Riverdale. New York 1046.1 (2I2> 796-6200 Dealer Inquiry Welcome

39


BOOK REVIEW

We present here an objective review ol one of Commodore's many publications, by a freelance expert in the field.

VIC 20 Programmer's Reference Guide by Robert Baker Repnnted with peimission irom Microcomputing. June 1982

As mentioned in early announcements, the book is divided into four sections: Basic Program

language programming and the internal work

ming. Programming Tips. Machine Language

information for all levels of users, but is primarily

ings of the machine. It attempts to provide

and Input/Output.

tor the more advanced programmers. It starts

A short applications guide is really a bit of subtle

out with an overall functional description of the VIC 20 to give you an idea ol the way the VIC 20 processes programs within the system. The system overview contains a block diagram of the system as well as the internal 6502 microprocessor itself. Simple memory maps are included along

advertising for various VIC accessories and

programs, but it does give a nice list of ideas on ways to use the system. Besides the normal reading material, the book has a number of use

ful charts and tables in the appendices. For hard ware enthusiasts, there's even a full schematic of the VIC 20 inside the back cover. The first part of the book describes the

with a discussion of how a BASIC program is stored in memory. All this information should be useful to some degree to just about any VIC user.

various commands and operations ol VIC BASIC

The last part of the book covers input and

in detail. It's a handy yet thorough reference for

output to the VIC system. There's a complete description of the User Port, the Serial Bus and the VIC Expansion Port. There's a big write-up

VIC BASIC, but does not attempt to teach you how to actually program. Each entry in the BASIC vocabulary guide explains how the instruction

is used and includes simple examples to help clarify matters. You'll even find information on how to abbreviate most of the commands to save typing time or to cram more commands into each program line. The sections on numbers,

variables and operators should be especially helpful to newcomers in the world ol computers. The second portion of the book covers var ious programming tips for writing your own BASIC

program. About one-third ol this section covers

cursor controls and program editing, using the GET statement, and simple discussions ol various ways to save memory within the programs. The

ilUfflUllftlMtilUl remainina two-thirds covers â&#x2013; 

the use of graphics and sound,

with a good deal of informa tion packed into those 20some pages. There's a nice description of the program

mable characters and how you can even use them for high resolution or multi-color graphics. Several sample pro grams are included at the end

to help illustrate the techniques covered, including the mixing

ol sound and graphics. The third part ol the book is an introduction to machine

on the RS-232 interface, but a few important details are omitted. In particular, a previous section ol the book refers you to this section for

the valid secondary addresses when OPENing the RS-232 channel, but the information is just not there. It would have been really nice if there were some information on actually connecting

RS-232 devices to the VIC lor those unfamiliar with the RS-232 handshake lines. Brief information is also included in this last section on using a joystick, paddles or a light pen with the VIC. There's even a short section on the VIC graphic printer and how it's used.

There are a number of charts, maps and tables in the appendices, and most are very useful and handy references. However, novice programmers might need more help than what's

presented in Appendix I when converting pro

grams to VIC 20 BASIC from other systems. The authors only touch the surface with the infor mation they present, but it should be useful. Don't forget, there's also a lull VIC 20 schematic and a complete index as well. As a whole, the book is very well done and probably the best I've seen Irom Commodore.

It provides information of value for users at all levels of experience. As its name suggests the book is a reference guide for programmers. It

will not teach you how to program, but it will

provide a wealth ol information in one handy

source that is just not available elsewhere.

1982 POWER/PLAY


For PET and CBM owners only: This is just 1 of 20 pages of the newest and biggest Skyies catalog, hot off the press.

We know you'll want this page, in its full 8V2 x 10 splendor, and another 19 pages of peripherals, software and books that will make your

PET or CBM '

computer even nicer

to live with. So, if we missed sending POWER/PLW 1982

you your very own

copy within the last few weeks, call us at (800)227-9998 (unless you live in California, in which case call (415) 965-1735.

From Skyies Electric Works, the oldest and largest professional specialists in the business.

Skyies Electric Works 231 -ES.Whisman Road Mountain View, California 94041 41


PROGRAM REVIEW

We gave Commodore's new "Introduction to BASIC" software package to a helpless beginner, who then spent his evenings learning basic programming skills. Here are the results of his endeavors,

Commodore's "Introduction to Basic" Helps Teach Programming at Home by John O'Brien

With the introduction of the low-cost VIC 20, Commodore made computers affordable to almost anyone, Now Commodore's teachyourseli-programming courses are making it affordable and convenient (or almost anyone io learn BASIC programming. The first part of the teach-yourself series is "An Introduction to BASIC. Part One" The package includes a 152-page manual, two cassettes containing 17 programs to be used with the manual, and a stencil lor drawing program (low charts, "An Introduction to BASIC" assumes no prior knowledge of programming. That's why I reviewed this program. Like many of you. I have no background in computers or pro gramming. However. I do have a strong interest in learning. 1 just never found the time to take courses, and thought programming might be beyond me,

I found "An Introduction to BASIC" a great way to ease inlo programming. The first few chapters are very easy, and everything is

thoroughly explained. You are taken into programming so gradually you don't realize how much you are learning. The manual is consistent with the VIC owner's manual and the VIC 20 Programmer's Reference Guide in that technical material is explained in a way that puts the reader at ease. The examples always help clarify and solidify the concepts that were just learned. Ol

course, this is what examples are supposed to do. but anyone who went to school can probably remember textbook examples that only confused you about what you thought you understood. The author. Andrew Colin, puts strong

emphasis on doing, rather than just reading. Although the text is important, the student spends more time using the VIC or writing

programs than reading from She manual. For example, Unit Eight is about "tracing" programs to find mistakes. The tape that goes with it provides a program packed with mistakes lor the student to fix. Although you get the theories and methods in the manual,

it's fixing the program on tape that really drives the message home,

demonstrate how to make changes in existing programs. To teach this, the program makes

random sentences, with each word and phrase picked randomly from short lists of possibilities. Some rather unusual sentences come out. such as "The Ayatollah Khomeini made friends with Mrs. Thatcher in the public baths." The student goes into the program and changes the list of possibilities—not only names, but phrases and adjectives that the program chooses from. You can imagine the possibilities—I ended up changing the program around for hours, had a lot of fun, and actually learned something in the process. As you get deeper into the course, you find

you must have total understanding of all the information you learned previously or you will have to keep going back over earlier chapters. To prevent this, be sure you haven't glossed over something just because you didn't think it was important at the time. The units in the manual move forward logically, building on all previous information. Once something is explained in an earlier unit, it is used later without lurther explanation. That's why it's best to take this course all at once. If you don't, you'll probably end up having to go back and refresh your memory each time you start.

The only problem I found with the package is that some of the quizzes on tape were too

easy. If you use only the quizzes to measure your mastery of the material you have just studied, you may get a false sense of security. The best indication of how well you're doing is the ease with which you write programs. If you find you must look constantly in the back of the

book for information, then it doesn't matter how well you have done on the quizzes, "An Introduction to BASIC" will not make

you an expert programmer, but it will give you an excellent foundation to build on. By the end of the course you will be able to write some practical programs and even some fairly sophisticated games. But it requires a com mitment of time, energy and concentration, Just reading the manual will greatly expand your understanding of BASIC, but to get the most out of the package—you'll have to do some work.

The tape that goes with Unit Six is a good example of a fun tape that also teaches effectively. The point of the program is to A2

1982 POWER/PLAY


Someday, in the comfort of your home or office, you'll be able to shop and bank electronically, read instantly updated major newswires, analyze the performance of a stock that interests you, send electronic mail to business associates across the country, then play Bridge with your best friend in San Francisco and two strangers in Chicago and Dallas.

Someday is todoy with the CompuServe Information Service. CompuServe Is available through a local phone call in personal computer or terminal with our big mainframe computers and data bases. All you need to get started is an inexpensive telephone coupler and easy-to-use software.

CompuServe's basic service costs only S5.00 per hour, billed in minute increments to your charge card. Sample CompuServe before you buy. Stop in at any Radio ShackR Computer Center, or many Radio Shack 'â&#x2013; 

electronics stores, and ask for a free demonstration. Welcome to someday.

CompuServe Information Service Division 5000 Arlington Centre Blvd.

Columbus, Ohio 43220 (614) 457-8650

Bat*o Shoe* o a ftoOwnorti 01 *XXJÂť Caporerton


Get Serious

What's happening on the POWERful side of Commodore microcomputers I!you're interested in the applications of Commodore's microcomputers outside the home-or in more sophisticated home usesyou'll find some tidbits here to whet your appetite. For the full story on these products, consult our sister publication, COMMODORE Magazine While Commodore continues to revolutionize the whole concept ol home computing, the company is also devoting substantial time to expanding the capabilities of its PET, CBM, and

SuperPET computer products. In recent months, several noteworthy hardware and software developments have confirmed Commodore's

commitmenl to developing new and innovative products for all levels o! microcomputing. Some of these recent developments include three new disk drives, COBOL for the SuperPET, and lots of new software for the CBM.

Hard Disk Drives Introduced Three new disk systems will greatly enhance

the power of your Commodore microcomputer. Two of the new disk systems are 5[.i inch rigid Winchester technology disk drives, the DV060 and the D9090. The third is a dual floppy disk unit, the 8250, These three new products were designed around the concept of providing users with large file handling capabilities supported by the same BASIC program statements and DOS commands used with other Commodore disk units. All three of the units are compatible with any of Commodore's PET or CBM series com puters, and all conform to PET IEEE interface requirements.

Cobol Will Become 6TH SuperPET Language Reaffirming its commitment to continued

development of a new generation micro computer, which offers the features and languages of a mainframe, Commodore has announced an agreement with Waterloo Com puting Systems Limited to develop COBOL (or the SuperPET computer.

With this announcement, COBOL becomes the sixth interpretative language developed by Waterloo for the SuperPET. Other languages include; BASIC. FORTRAN, APL. Pascal, and 6809 Assembler,

Presently, documentation for the SuperPET package includes a system overview and refer ence manuals for each o( the product's five languages. The newly revised package will also include a COBOL reference manual.

Software, Software, Software Three new software packages for the CBM are now available from your authorized

Commodore dealer. These new products include UCSD Pascal, CMAR Multi-Key File

Access System, and the ATLAS 1200 Equipment Maintenance System

• UCSD Pascal

Pascal has become one of the standard languages used to teach programming and for writing business application packages, The UCSD implementation of Pascal, originally developed at the University of California

at San Diego, has become one of the most popular Pascal implementations for education and business today. SUGGESTED RETAIL PRICE: S175.00 • CMAR Multi-Key File Access System CMAR is a utility that allows you to set up

files, by generic key, and will perform all the necessary file maintenance functions such as

read, write, change, and delete. CMAR files are dynamic, eliminating the need for reorgani zation whenever key and data records are modified. The product is written in 6502

machine language and it interacts directly with BASIC 4.0. SUGGESTED RETAIL PRICE: S150.00. • Atlas 1200

Equipment Maintenance System

If you are an Independent Service Organi zation (ISO) or a Third Party Maintenance

Company, and would like to increase revenue

flow while decreasing time spent on accounting

and administration, then ATLAS 1200 may be your solution. ATLAS 1200 allows the user to maintain service, customer, and equipment

information, keep an accounts receivable on

each customer, identify and log all call lor

later retrieval, track equipment under warranty, and produce statements on a timely basis. SUGGESTED RETAIL PRICE: S595.00.

Attention Commercial Programmers! Commodore is compiling a list ol software commercially available lor its computers II you have software you

would like lo have included in this lisling. please submil Ihe following lor review.

• copy o! program on disk or casselte tape • documen:aiion describing the purpose and utility of the program • Information on pnce ol program and where it can be purchased • speciticalion of equipment necessary lor program lo operate

Selected programs will be reviewed in POWER/PLAY at the discretion ol our Software Committee. Please submit this information to. SOFTWARE COMMITTEE

Commodore Business Machines, inc. The Meadows. 487 Devon Bark Drive. Wayne. PA 19087

1982 POWER/PLAY


BEST BOOKS:

QUESTIONS:

mands may be typed as new

fconiinued from page 38)

(continued from page 3)

Understanding Your VTC. Vol. 1 David E. Schullz Tola! Inlormalion Service Box 92]

use too much memory to be

BASIC commands or accessed by hitting one of the VIC's special lunction keys. Super Expander has 1024 x

Los Alamos. NM 87544

Machine Language Programming

6502 Software Design LeoJ Scanlon Howard W. Sams & Co.: Indianapolis. IN

available at your local books I ore MOS Programming Manual

MOS Technology available trom Falk Baker Associates 382 Franklin Avenue Nutley.NJ 07110

Miscellaneous

Commodore Software Encyclopedia CBM Software Group

available at your Commodore dealer International Microcomputer

Software Directory

Imprint Editions 420 South Howe Fort Collins, Colorado 80521

Computerist's Directory:

The National Phone Book ol Com puling RO Box 405 Forestville, CA 95436

number ol columns, but they effective. Last minute note: see inside front cover.

Q. Is it possible to use CBM Dual Disk Drives with the VIC 20? A It will be possible to conned CBM Dual Disk Drives using the VIC IEEE adapter cartridge.

available in the near future. Also available is a VIC single disk drive, Well keep you posted on those developments as they occur

Q How can I obtain VIC schematics and a VIC memory map? A Schematics, memory map and other technical information for Ihe VIC 20 are included in

the VIC 20 Programmer's Refer ence Guide, available at your Commodore dealer.

a What does the Supei Expander do? What is the pixel matrix size? A The VIC Super Expander is a cartridge I hat nol only expands

Ihe VIC's memory by 3 kilobytes but also gives you high resolution graphics plolting, color, paint and sound commands. All com

1024 dot screen plotting. The resolution of the VIC screen is 176 x 184 pixels. The Super Expander maps down to the actual resolution oi the screen,

Q Can more than 32K oi RAM be added to the VIC? A The 6502 microprocessor, which is the heart of the VIC 20,

can address only 64 kilobytes oi memory Much ol Ihe memory in the VIC is ROM (Read Only

Memory), which is already allo cated to system routines, When

we subtract the used ROM from the possible 64K of memory, this leaves room for approximately 32 kilobytes of RAM (Random Access Memory).

Q Do the various application software cartridges reduce the amount of RAM available? A The Programmer's Aid and VICMON Machine Language

Monitor cartridges, soon to be available, do not reduce the amount of RAM accessible lo BASIC. The VIC 20 Super Ex pander adds 3 kilobytes to Random Access Memory.

J8 The national phone book of computing

Computerist's Directory Alphabetical

j-"--*> the

Compulcrist'sDirectory PO BOX 405

FORESTVILLE, CA (707)887-1857

POWER/PI AY 1982

Bulletin Boards

"Let your lingers do the

talking" j£™£BKl


Turn To The Future With COMPUTE! Publications The Beginner's Guide To Buying A Personal Computer

COMPUTERS First Book of VIC From the Editors of COMPUTE! Magazine,

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A Novice's handbook of useful, helpful in formation designed to teach you the basic

cafions articles and programs for the VIC-20. Appeal and utility for the abso lute beginner to the more ad

of evaluating and selecting a personal

computer. Written in plain English for the interested beginner, Complete with personal com

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By Raeto Collm West

256 pages of Commo dore PET and CBM orticles from COMPUTE! magazine issues now in print. Includes

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such classic articles and programs as "Feed Your PET Some Applesoft," "Disk Lister: A Disk Cataloging Program," and "Cross Reference For The PET."

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COMPUTE! Magazine A Monthly encyclopedia of informative applications articles and programs. COMPUTE! features articles, programs, and columns covering the spectrum of home and educational computing. Monthly reviews, complete BASIC and machine language listings of games, utilities, applications such as "Programming Your Home Insurance Inventory," "Real Estate Investment Analysis," "Telecommunications: How To Use A Modem," and much more. Written for children and parents, educators, novices to advanced programmers. Principal editorial coverage is

Atari, Apple, Commodore PET/CBM, and VIC-20. Editorial coverage is expanding to include TI-99/4A, Sinclair ZX-81, and Radio Shack Color Computer. Latest issue: 224 pages,

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1982 POWER/PLAY


Future File

Commodore MAX Machine and Commodore 64 Introduced by Mike Heck

Two new Commodore computer systems,

complementing the current VIC line at both the high and low end, will soon be appearing on your dealer's shelves. These new products are breakthroughs in terms of both price and performance, and will be of real interest to any

one who currently owns Commodore equipment or who is considering a personal computer.

Commodore MAX Machine The new low-end computer, called the Commodore MAX Machine, provides surprising graphic and music capabilities, and will teach computing with the use of a BASIC language plug-in cartridge. You can also add a cassette recorder to the MAX Machine for program

loading and saving. Some of the software initially available lor the MAX Machine includes a number ol "space" games, a "music maker" cartridge, and con verted versions of programs currently running on the VIC 20, such as Sargon II chess and the Bally/Midway arcade games like GORF and OMEGA RACE.

Commodore 64 At the other end o! the home computing spectrum is the Commodore 64, which, on the surface, looks a lot like a VIC 20, but packs features normally found only on much larger microcomputer systems. The Commodore 64 contains a huge 64K RAM, can accept a ZBO microprocessor on a plug-in cartridge, and supports multiple levels of high-resolution graphics, it is a sophisticated personal com puter, ideal for those who can make use o! its power and capabilities. It can even handle small business applications.

Besides looking like a VIC 20 clone, the Commodore 64 contains many ol the same

interfaces as the VIC, including an 8-bit user port for attaching the VIC modem or accessory communication cartridges. A cassette interface

allows use of programs and files created on all other Commodore computers. This compatibility means most BASIC programs written for 40column PET computers will run without modification. The only exceptions to that are programs that POKE screen memory locations, an area that is different on each Commodore system, To ease that incompatibility problem, Commodore will have a PET emulator that will eliminate BASIC program conversion and make the '64 operate like a PET in most areas Machine language would still need some work to operate properly, however. The Commodore 64, through a serial port, can also use VIC peripherals such as the VIC single disk drive and VIC graphic printer. "With the addition of an 1EEE-48 cartridge, the '64 POWER/PLAY 1982

will run any Commodore peripheral, such as a

dual disk drive or CBM printer.

Although all the games designed for the MAX Machine will operate on the Commodore

64, the '64 is not a game machine. In fact, with the 64K of RAM (about 40K is user accessible for BASIC programs and 52K for machine lan guage programs), you can put some real busi ness applications on this machine Versions of

the popular WordPro and WORDCRAFT word processing programs will be available, along with an "electronic spreadsheet" package. Data base programs and sophisticated personal financial applications are also part of the first software offerings planned for the Commodore 64. One of the most impressive features of the

Commodore 64 is its ability to run CP/M* using the Z80 cartridge, giving users access to one of the largest collections of microcomputer

software available.

The Heart Ol The Systems Although they are designed for very dif ferent purposes, both new computers have certain things in common. Both rely on state-

of-the-art integrated circuits designed and

produced by Commodore's MOS subsidiary. A new 6500 family microprocessor, the 6510, is common to both computers. It uses the same

instruction set as the familiar 6502 â&#x20AC;&#x201D;the heart ot all other Commodore systems-but contains additional input/outpui (I/O) lines to handle the processing required by the new systems. The 6510 microprocessor, upward com

patible from the 6502, allows machine lan guage programs running on other Commodore computers to be easily converted to run on the MAX Machine or Commodore 64.

Graphics Capabilities Both computers also rely on a new display chip to handle all the display characteristics that normally would require a character gen erator and other supporting circuits for color and graphics.

The video display produced by both com puters is 40 columns by 25 lines, with 255 foreground/background color combinations,

16 text colors and all 64 PET graphic characters. Additionally, the user can construct program

mable characters to replace the normal character set, Both have a high-resolution graphic mode of 320 by 200 points (pixels) and can use 16 colors simultaneously. To facilitate game graphics and animation. 256 independently movable display objects can be created, with

up to 8 objects per line. Each object is 21 by 24 pixels in size, and can be up to 3 colors. CP/M is a registered trademark of Digital Research. Inc. 47


Both computers provide collision detection between objects, so a program can tell it one objecl hits another and can determine what to do next. You can also select object display priority to determine whether one object will move in front of or behind another.

a programmable ADSR (attack, decay, sustain, release) generator, and a programmable filter, independently selectable for each voice, that contains low pass, high pass, band pass and notch outputs. The sound synthesizer also has variable resonance and a master volume

Independent magnification in both hori

control.

zontal and vertical directions tor each object is also possible, to add a lot ol versatility to creating graphics. To make movement easier and smoother, you can scroll objects in horizontal and vertical directions, pixel by pixel, In addition, the Commodore 64 has a number of other high-resolution modes that are not pos

sible with the MAX Machine. These extra modes give you additional colors in each pixel zone and allow more flexibility in designing graphics.

With all these sophisticated features you have almost complete control over the type of sound produced by either computer. Hooked up to a good quality audio system, you'll be amazed a! the orchestration you can command.

Other Similarities In addition, both computers can accept a variety of plug-in program cartridges. These cartridges are smallâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;about 2 inches by 2Vi

Sound Capabilities Another feature of both new Commodore computers is the SID (Sound Interface Device) sound synthesizer circuit, It can produce music

inches-but can contain RAM or ROM (Read Only Memory). The cartridges will allow up to 16K of ROM and 2K of RAM. Both also have two game controller sockets. Each socket will accept a joystick, double

and sound that rivals some of the dedicated

paddle or lightpen. And each computer has a

music synthesizers now available. The SID produces three independent voices, each with a nine-octave range. Four waveforms are possible: sawtooth, Iriangle, variable pulse and noise. The sound synthesizer also contains

direct audio and video output for connection to an audio amplifier and video monitor. An RF modulator is supplied for hook-up to a standard

TV set. |]

Quick Reference Facts Commodore MAX Machine

Commodore 64

Memory

2K built-in 2KRAM, 16K ROM add-on

64K built-in 16K ROM add-on

Screen Size

40 col x 25 lines

40 col x 25 lines

Graphics

320 x 200 pixels 255 foreground/

320 x 200 pixels

background color combo

background color combo 16 text colors 64 graphic characters 256 movable Sprites Independent magnification Extended Hi-res modes

16 text colors 64 graphic characters

256 movable Sprites Independent magnification

Sound

255 foreground/

6581 Sound Interface Device (SID)

6581 Sound Interlace Device (SID)

3 independent voices, 9 octaves each

3 independent voices. 9 octaves each

Programmable ADSR

Programmable ADSR

Programmable filter

Programmable filter Vanable resonance & master vol. control

Vanable resonance & master vol. control

Games

All Commodore games on cartridge

Peripherals

Datassette

Datassette

Joystick

Joystick

Double paddle

Double paddle

bghtpen

All Commodore games on cartridge

Lightpen

Z80 microprocessor on cartridge VIC MODEM VIC disk drive VIC graphic printer With IEEE-48 cartridge: All Commodore peripherals

Compatability

48

Same game cartndges will work on Commodore 64.

Other BASIC Commodore programs easily converted. PET emulator to be available 1982 POWER/PLAY


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This special service adds a new dimension to your home computer. Your personal com puter is already capable of performing many

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I ■■

commodore

COMPUTER

Commodore Business Machines, Inc. The Meadows, 487 Devon Park Drive Wayne, Pennsylvania 19087

Address Correction Requested

Bulk Rate

U.S. Postage Paid Permit No. 845 Philadelphia, PA 19707


Commodore_Power-Play_1982_Issue_01_V1_N01_Premiere_Issue