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CITY OF BOISE

Parks & Recreation

A REPORT TO OUR CITIZENS FISCAL YEAR 2012

INSIDE THIS REPORT Strategic Objectives.......... 1 The Year in Review........... 2 By the Numbers............... 3 What's Ahead................... 4

Our Mission: TO ENHANCE BOISE’S QUALITY OF LIFE BY WORKING IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE COMMUNITY TO FOSTER AND SUPPORT CITIZEN WELL BEING AND HEALTHY COMMUNITY ENVIRONMENTS.

Accolades

• “Everything’s Going for the Boise River Greenbelt” was the cover story of the fall 2012 issue of Rails to Trails magazine. • Boise was named to the top 10 Great Cities for Cycling on msn.com.

About Citizen Centric Reporting

The Association of Government Accountants developed guidance on producing Citizen Centric Reporting as a method to demonstrate accountability to residents and answer the question: Are we better off today than we were last year? Additional details can be found at the AGA website: www.agacgfm.org Additional information is available at www.cityofboise.org/parks.

WHERE WE HAVE BEEN Strategic Objectives The city’s Strategic Plan is a continuous process being used to achieve goals identified by citizens. Created in 2011, the vision is “Making Boise the Most Livable City in the Country.” To accomplish the vision, the city is focusing on four main goals. The goal most closely aligned to Boise Parks & Recreation is: “Foster an environment where learning, the arts, culture and recreation thrive.” Boise Parks & Recreation's Comprehensive Plan, which was updated in 2011, aligns with the city’s Strategic Plan. The comprehensive plan guides land acquisition, park development, wellness programs, recreational opportunities, and other objectives. The department reviews the comprehensive plan on an ongoing basis and evaluates progress annually. An extensive citizen survey is conducted every 5 years to measure public opinion and identify trends. To review the entire document, see parks.cityofboise.org/about-us/comprehensive-plan-(2011). For a free CD, please contact us at bpr@cityofboise.org or call (208) 608-7611. Source: Strategicplan/cityofboise.org.

BOISE DEMOGRAPHICS Total Population: 208,182 Average Household Size: 2.36 Median Age: 35.6 Median Household Income: $64,979 Source: citydemographics.us.boise

Community centers received a grant for gardens and nutrition education from Blue Cross of Idaho Foundation for Health.


WHAT’S AHEAD Challenges Moving Forward—What’s Next? Future Issues FORT BOISE TENNIS COURTS

The aging six-court complex next to Fort Boise Community Center will be completely rebuilt in late summer/early fall 2013. The renovation includes post-tension concrete courts, new MUSCO lighting, nets and fences. The $300,000 project is funded by the City of Boise.

PATAS MONKEY HOUSE MARIANNE WILLIAMS PARK

COMBA PARK SPLASH PAD

ESTHER SIMPLOT PARK

TERRY DAY PARK

A tranquil setting for walking and wildlife viewing, the 71-acre Marianne Williams Park offers an expansive view of the undulating East Foothills rimming the Barber Valley. Amenities include 1.3 miles of paved pathways, a gravel walking path along the river, ponds with docks, a shelter, restroom, streams, wetlands, and forested riparian areas that will benefit wildlife and improve fisheries. The park was donated to the city in 2005 by Larry Williams in honor of his wife Marianne. A dedication celebration is planned for May 2013.

A 55-acre site west of downtown, Esther Simplot Community Park will provide a unique outdoor experience with meandering streams, fishing docks and swimming areas the Simplot family has pledged to fund development of the park. Construction is expected to begin in late 2013.

STEWART GULCH PARK SHELTER

A new 24 x 24-foot shelter is planned in 2013 for the park in Northwest Boise. The $22,000 project is funded by impact fees collected from new home construction in the area. Stewart Gulch Park, 5070 Eyrie Way, is one of Boise’s newest parks. A playground installed in 2011 was designed to complement the Foothills environment with natural-colored climbing boulders and treehouse-themed play equipment for 2–5 and 5–12 year olds.

Tell Us What You Think

We want to hear from you! Do you like this report? Should it include other information? Please let us know by contacting us at the Boise Parks & Recreation accounting office at bpr@cityofboise.org or by calling (208) 608-7639. Additional information is available at: parks.cityofboise.org

The city’s first “splash pad” is being designed for Comba Park, a partially developed site at 2995 W. Five Mile. The splash pad and a new playground would provide needed play features for low-income children in the West Boise neighborhood. In summer, 2012 a community garden, two small picnic shelters and a parking lot were installed in summer 2012. The spray park would include 4 inground fountains and bubblers plus rotating "splash blasters" and interactive water play features. Funding for the spray park has been provided by an anonymous donor.

Opening in June 2013, this 7-acre park is situated in a neighborhood on the Bench near Kootenai Street and Federal Way. Built with $400,000 in tax funds, construction includes a large pond, landscaping, pathways, benches, open space, a parking lot and a community garden. The site was donated by the Pat O. Day family in honor of the late Terry Day.

PEPPERMINT PARK PLAYGROUND

A new playground with sustainable tiles is under construction at Peppermint Park in Southwest Boise. The new rubber playground tiles reduce maintenance costs and increase the play value of the playground. The $316,042 project is funded by impact fees generated by new home construction and a Mayor’s Neighborhood Reinvestment Grant. Peppermint Park, 11855 W. Peppermint Drive, is a 7-acre site located next to Pepper Ridge Elementary School.

Zoo Boise’s three patas monkeys will get a new home when construction is completed on a new 1,500-squarefoot exhibit to be located in the African Plains exhibit near the giraffe barn. The structure will feature indoor and outdoor living space and three large viewing windows for the public. The new exhibit was funded by private donations and the City of Boise in response to the tragic death of a patas monkey at the zoo in November 2012. The new exhibit is expected to be completed in fall 2013.

ROUND THE MOUNTAIN TRAIL

A new 7-mile trail that will circumnavigate the Bogus Basin Ski Area is slated for construction in summer 2013 thanks to a $65,000 grant from the Non-motorized Recreational Trails Program Fund. Additional funding will be provided by Ridge to Rivers, the Southwest Idaho Mountain Bike Association, Bogus Basin, the Boise National Forest and the following Treasure Valley retailers: World Cycle, Shu’s Idaho Running Company, Ken’s Bicycles, The Pulse Running and Fitness, Reed Cycles, Bandanna Running, Joyride Cycles, Eastside Cycles, George’s Cycles and Fitness and Bob’s Cycles. The trail was identified as a future route in the 2006 Shafer Butte Trails Plan.

ECONOMIC SNAPSHOT

In response to reduced revenues, the adopted budget for the fiscal year that began October 1, 2011 reduced overall staffing and expenses in the General Fund, Parks & Recreation’s primary operating fund. This decreased staffing levels to the lowest point in eight years. In January 2013, the Idaho Department of Labor reported that the unemployment rate fell in the Boise Metropolitan Area to 6.5% from 8.6% in 2012 with an increase in the labor force of 7,332. In 2012 housing starts were up in 7.7% over 2011 and are projected to remain on an upward trend through 2015. FY 2013 will bring continuing fiscal challenges that will require thoughtful restructuring of how Boise Parks & Recreation will provide services and expand partnerships with citizens and business. The challenge is to continue to provide quality services and maintain the high community quality of life through this economic recovery period.


CITY OF BOISE

Parks & Recreation

A REPORT TO OUR CITIZENS FISCAL YEAR 2012

INSIDE THIS REPORT Strategic Objectives.......... 1 The Year in Review........... 2 By the Numbers............... 3 What's Ahead................... 4

Our Mission: TO ENHANCE BOISE’S QUALITY OF LIFE BY WORKING IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE COMMUNITY TO FOSTER AND SUPPORT CITIZEN WELL BEING AND HEALTHY COMMUNITY ENVIRONMENTS.

Accolades

• “Everything’s Going for the Boise River Greenbelt” was the cover story of the fall 2012 issue of Rails to Trails magazine. • Boise was named to the top 10 Great Cities for Cycling on msn.com.

About Citizen Centric Reporting

The Association of Government Accountants developed guidance on producing Citizen Centric Reporting as a method to demonstrate accountability to residents and answer the question: Are we better off today than we were last year? Additional details can be found at the AGA website: www.agacgfm.org Additional information is available at www.cityofboise.org/parks.

WHERE WE HAVE BEEN Strategic Objectives The city’s Strategic Plan is a continuous process being used to achieve goals identified by citizens. Created in 2011, the vision is “Making Boise the Most Livable City in the Country.” To accomplish the vision, the city is focusing on four main goals. The goal most closely aligned to Boise Parks & Recreation is: “Foster an environment where learning, the arts, culture and recreation thrive.” Boise Parks & Recreation's Comprehensive Plan, which was updated in 2011, aligns with the city’s Strategic Plan. The comprehensive plan guides land acquisition, park development, wellness programs, recreational opportunities, and other objectives. The department reviews the comprehensive plan on an ongoing basis and evaluates progress annually. An extensive citizen survey is conducted every 5 years to measure public opinion and identify trends. To review the entire document, see parks.cityofboise.org/about-us/comprehensive-plan-(2011). For a free CD, please contact us at bpr@cityofboise.org or call (208) 608-7611. Source: Strategicplan/cityofboise.org.

BOISE DEMOGRAPHICS Total Population: 208,182 Average Household Size: 2.36 Median Age: 35.6 Median Household Income: $64,979 Source: citydemographics.us.boise

Community centers received a grant for gardens and nutrition education from Blue Cross of Idaho Foundation for Health.


THE YEAR IN REVIEW How Are We Doing—A Performance Report on Key Missions and Service MOUNTAIN VIEW PLAY EQUIPMENT

Neighborhood kids are enjoying saddle spinners, a swing set and other cool features at the new playground in Mountain View Park, 7006 Ustick Road. The $73,759 project includes new play equipment suitable for kids age 2–5.

HAMMER FLAT SALE

The Foothills Serial Levy fund was replenished by more than $4 million with the sale of Hammer Flat to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG). IDFG acquired the 705-acre from the City of Boise with $4.23 million in Bonneville Power Administration mitigation funds. Hammer Flat is a prime wildlife habitat being managed as part of the Boise River Wildlife Management Area.

BOISE RIVER PARK OPENS

Hundreds of people attended a community celebration to officially open the new Boise River Park and honor the civic leaders and donors who helped make it happen. The park was funded by the City of Boise, the J.A. & Kathryn Albertson Foundation and private donations generated by the volunteer organization, Friends of the Park. The park site is located near 3400 W. Pleasanton Ave., west of downtown Boise between Main Street and Veterans Memorial Park.

COMMUNITY GARDENS & NUTRITION EDUCATION

A project to benefit four community gardens and provide nutrition education to low-income children received a $12,000 grant from the Blue Cross of Idaho Foundation for Health. The project is a partnership between Boise Parks & Recreation and the Boise Urban Garden School (BUGS) to build community gardens and provide nutrition education targeting children who participate in free after-school programs at three elementary school community centers (Whitney, Grace Jordan, and Morley Nelson schools) and one low-income apartment complex (Northwest Pointe).

SLOTH BEAR EXHIBIT

Paji, Zoo Boise’s female sloth bear, made a grand return with the opening of her renovated exhibit. Features include additional landscaping, glass viewing areas and updates to the sloth bear dens to make them suitable for breeding this endangered species. The exhibit also has a new blue façade built in partnership with the Boise State theatre arts department to reflect the villages near the sloth bear’s native habitat in India.

HYATT URBAN WILDLIFE RESERVE

Renovations to the 54-acre Hyatt Hidden Lakes Reserve created a unique urban wildlife sanctuary that is now home to birds, animals and fish. It’s also the site of an innovative stormwater treatment project featuring sand filters, stormwater piping, a permeable pavement parking lot, a pedestrian access bridge, pathways, and educational kiosks. In the late 1990s, a donation of a 22-acre wetland by the Hyatt family made it possible for Boise Parks & Recreation to purchase another 22 acres with the goal of preserving open space and providing key habitat for wildlife in West Boise.

LET’S MOVE BOISE

Boise Parks & Recreation and the Blue Cross of Idaho Foundation for Health hosted a series of free and low-cost physical activities and distributed 1,000 Grow A Row seed packets. The citywide campaign seeks to combat childhood obesity while increasing access to physical activity and healthy food. Grow A Row encouraged citizens to donate fresh produce to local food pantries. Physical activities included a $1 Skate Day at Idaho IceWorld, exercise stations at a Zoo discount day, and other programs.

WILDLIFE MITIGATION PROJECTS

A roaming wood chipper to help homeowners remove hazardous fuels was one of five wildfire mitigation projects funded by grants totaling $170,050 awarded to the City of Boise by the Southwest Idaho Resource Conservation and Development Council. The program also included Oregon Trail Manual Fuel Reduction Project, National Fire Protection Association Home Ignition Zone class, and goats grazing on the perimeter of Military Reserve, Quail Ridge and North Collister. Funding was provide by a $170,050 grant from the Southwest Idaho Resource Conservation and Development Council.

PIONEER HOMELESS SHELTER

For the 4th year, the Pioneer Neighborhood Center provided safety and warmth for more than 20 homeless families per day from November through April.

Selected Service Statistics

FY11

FY12

Miles of trails maintained

148

148

Adaptive programs offered

286

282

Park acres maintained

1,739

1,739

Zoo attendance

323,741

322,771

Idaho IceWorld attendance

365,729

373,541

Rounds of golf played

49,242

46,828

Average youth scholarship

$50.18

$40.72

Youth scholarships awarded Number of youth served

3,006

3,302

655,492

511,721


BY THE NUMBERS Amount for General Fund

• In 2012, Boise Parks & Recreation facilities and programs logged 976,883 visits, including 511,724 visits from youth.

FY11 Park Administration

• Volunteers contributed an astonishing 70,969.64 hours in FY 2012, saving the department $1,069,642 in labor costs. These contributions are equivalent to 34 additional full-time employees.

All Expenditures

Depot & Park Reservation

• Registrations outpaced budgeted plans by nearly $90,000. • Department achieved budgetary savings of over $200,000.

Foothills & Open Space

2,070,400

1,658,984

391,947

400,729

615,681

552,001

Park Resources

8,176,730

7,754,728

Recreation Services

3,966,023

4,237,819

Idaho Ice World

1,711,017

1,546,686

Warm Springs Golf Course

1,316,703

1,462,348

Zoo

• Recreation Services recovered 43% of costs through user fees.

FY12

1,808,183

1,738,263

20,056,684

19,351,558

36,680

36,462

Park Administration

• Due to 2012 high temperatures, water utilization increased by more than $45,000.

Depot & Park Reservation

335,029

303,618

Foothills & Open Space

124,754

134,551

Park Resources

436,064

310,798

Recreation Services

1,691,256

1,816,069

Idaho Ice World

1,518,517

1,469,500

Warm Springs Golf Course

1,361,391

1,422,386

Zoo

1,162,631

1,150,302

6,666,321

6,643,686

• Municipal government is likely to face constricted resources and slow growth for an extended period; additional adjustments to this “new normal” will be addressed by Parks & Recreation in the Fiscal Year 2014–15 Budget build.

All Revenues

• Parks personnel were reduced by two full-time staff.

Expenditures by Service Group

2012 Revenue by Source

9%

Park Administration

2%

Depot & Special Events

65.67% Intergovernmental Revenues

3%

Foothills & Open Space

0.07%

Licenses & Permits

40% Park Resources

30.35% Charges For Services

22% Recreation Services

2%

Rental Revenue

8%

Warm Springs Golf Course

0.89%

Grants & Contributions

8%

Idaho IceWorld

0.30%

Transfers In

9%

Zoo Boise

0.71%

Miscellaneous Revenue

Revenues by Service Group

Intergovernmental Resources Licenses & Permits

FY11

FY12

13,390,364

12,707,872

23,316

14,466

5,745,177

5,873,045

Rental Revenue

415,780

387,760

Foothills & Open Space

Grants & Contributions

225,975

172,475

Resources

Transfers In

33,898

57,986

1%

Park Administration

Charges for Services

5%

Depot & Special Events

2% 5%

27% Recreation Services 21% Warms Springs Golf Course 22% Idaho IceWorld 17% Zoo Boise

Miscellaneous Revenues

222,174

137,954

20,056,684

19,351,558

An independent audit of the City’s financial statements resulted in an unqualified audit opinion. Financial information is prepared according to Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). For the Comprehensive Annual Financial Report, see the Division of Finance and Administration at www.cityofboise.org.


WHAT’S AHEAD Challenges Moving Forward—What’s Next? Future Issues FORT BOISE TENNIS COURTS

The aging six-court complex next to Fort Boise Community Center will be completely rebuilt in late summer/early fall 2013. The renovation includes post-tension concrete courts, new MUSCO lighting, nets and fences. The $300,000 project is funded by the City of Boise.

PATAS MONKEY HOUSE MARIANNE WILLIAMS PARK

COMBA PARK SPLASH PAD

ESTHER SIMPLOT PARK

TERRY DAY PARK

A tranquil setting for walking and wildlife viewing, the 71-acre Marianne Williams Park offers an expansive view of the undulating East Foothills rimming the Barber Valley. Amenities include 1.3 miles of paved pathways, a gravel walking path along the river, ponds with docks, a shelter, restroom, streams, wetlands, and forested riparian areas that will benefit wildlife and improve fisheries. The park was donated to the city in 2005 by Larry Williams in honor of his wife Marianne. A dedication celebration is planned for May 2013.

A 55-acre site west of downtown, Esther Simplot Community Park will provide a unique outdoor experience with meandering streams, fishing docks and swimming areas the Simplot family has pledged to fund development of the park. Construction is expected to begin in late 2013.

STEWART GULCH PARK SHELTER

A new 24 x 24-foot shelter is planned in 2013 for the park in Northwest Boise. The $22,000 project is funded by impact fees collected from new home construction in the area. Stewart Gulch Park, 5070 Eyrie Way, is one of Boise’s newest parks. A playground installed in 2011 was designed to complement the Foothills environment with natural-colored climbing boulders and treehouse-themed play equipment for 2–5 and 5–12 year olds.

Tell Us What You Think

We want to hear from you! Do you like this report? Should it include other information? Please let us know by contacting us at the Boise Parks & Recreation accounting office at bpr@cityofboise.org or by calling (208) 608-7639. Additional information is available at: parks.cityofboise.org

The city’s first “splash pad” is being designed for Comba Park, a partially developed site at 2995 W. Five Mile. The splash pad and a new playground would provide needed play features for low-income children in the West Boise neighborhood. In summer, 2012 a community garden, two small picnic shelters and a parking lot were installed in summer 2012. The spray park would include 4 inground fountains and bubblers plus rotating "splash blasters" and interactive water play features. Funding for the spray park has been provided by an anonymous donor.

Opening in June 2013, this 7-acre park is situated in a neighborhood on the Bench near Kootenai Street and Federal Way. Built with $400,000 in tax funds, construction includes a large pond, landscaping, pathways, benches, open space, a parking lot and a community garden. The site was donated by the Pat O. Day family in honor of the late Terry Day.

PEPPERMINT PARK PLAYGROUND

A new playground with sustainable tiles is under construction at Peppermint Park in Southwest Boise. The new rubber playground tiles reduce maintenance costs and increase the play value of the playground. The $316,042 project is funded by impact fees generated by new home construction and a Mayor’s Neighborhood Reinvestment Grant. Peppermint Park, 11855 W. Peppermint Drive, is a 7-acre site located next to Pepper Ridge Elementary School.

Zoo Boise’s three patas monkeys will get a new home when construction is completed on a new 1,500-squarefoot exhibit to be located in the African Plains exhibit near the giraffe barn. The structure will feature indoor and outdoor living space and three large viewing windows for the public. The new exhibit was funded by private donations and the City of Boise in response to the tragic death of a patas monkey at the zoo in November 2012. The new exhibit is expected to be completed in fall 2013.

ROUND THE MOUNTAIN TRAIL

A new 7-mile trail that will circumnavigate the Bogus Basin Ski Area is slated for construction in summer 2013 thanks to a $65,000 grant from the Non-motorized Recreational Trails Program Fund. Additional funding will be provided by Ridge to Rivers, the Southwest Idaho Mountain Bike Association, Bogus Basin, the Boise National Forest and the following Treasure Valley retailers: World Cycle, Shu’s Idaho Running Company, Ken’s Bicycles, The Pulse Running and Fitness, Reed Cycles, Bandanna Running, Joyride Cycles, Eastside Cycles, George’s Cycles and Fitness and Bob’s Cycles. The trail was identified as a future route in the 2006 Shafer Butte Trails Plan.

ECONOMIC SNAPSHOT

In response to reduced revenues, the adopted budget for the fiscal year that began October 1, 2011 reduced overall staffing and expenses in the General Fund, Parks & Recreation’s primary operating fund. This decreased staffing levels to the lowest point in eight years. In January 2013, the Idaho Department of Labor reported that the unemployment rate fell in the Boise Metropolitan Area to 6.5% from 8.6% in 2012 with an increase in the labor force of 7,332. In 2012 housing starts were up in 7.7% over 2011 and are projected to remain on an upward trend through 2015. FY 2013 will bring continuing fiscal challenges that will require thoughtful restructuring of how Boise Parks & Recreation will provide services and expand partnerships with citizens and business. The challenge is to continue to provide quality services and maintain the high community quality of life through this economic recovery period.

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