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Handbook & Member Directory

AUGUST 2016

PROMOTING

AGENCY LABOUR BEST PRACTICE


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CONTENTS 1 Contents 2 ALP Welcome

The ALP - Services and Benefits 7 8 9 10 11 12

Introducing the Association of Labour Providers ALP Membership Benefits of ALP Membership for Labour Providers Associate ALP Membership Master List of ALP Member Briefs ALP Representative and Policy Work

Stronger Together

ALP Training and Workshops 29 Complying with the GLA Licensing Standards 30 Preventing Illegal Working 31 In-House ALP Training

ALP Service Partners 34 Brabners 35 Complyer - Agency Labour Compliance Audit Tool 36 Labour Provider Social Compliance Audits 37 ALP Document Translation Service 38 Speak Up – Confidential Helpline 39 ALP Service Partners 40 Becoming an ALP Service Partner

www.labourproviders.org.uk

43 Good Practice Guide for using Labour Providers 45 Charge Rate Guidance for Agency Labour 52 The Agency Workers Regulations 2010 Guide for Labour Providers & Users 71 National Living Wage Discrimination Considerations

The Gangmasters Licensing Authority 83 The Gangmasters Licensing Authority – An ALP Perspective 86 Gangmasters Licensing Authority Advice to the Industry 90 The GLA Licensing Standards – May 2012

Directories 113 ALP Labour Provider Members Directory 135 ALP Associate Members Directory 139 ALP Service Partners Directory

The Association of Labour Providers | Contents

19 Overview and Progress 22 Support for Business 23 Tackling Modern Slavery in UK Businesses 24 Tackling Modern Slavery in Global Supply Chains 25 Tackling Modern Slavery e-learning modules 26 Sponsor your local school

Sector Specific Guidance

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ALP Welcome We hope that you will find this Handbook a useful resource.

The Association of Labour Providers | ALP Welcome

At the time of going to print, citizens of the UK have just voted by a narrow majority to leave the EU. Notice to leave under Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty has yet to be served. Negotiations on the UK’s future relationship with the EU after it has withdrawn and on access to the single market have yet to begin. All of us in business will come together and help shape the future. ALP shall listen to and work with our members to understand how we can best support them. ALP will work with its supply chain partners and fellow trade associations to endeavour to shape policy and ensure that government retains the laws that work, as well as introducing positive changes that bring clarity and reduce complexity. Labour providers play a key role in the consumer goods supply chain by sourcing and supplying the workforce for the food processing, horticultural and wider manufacturing, industrial, warehousing and distribution sectors. Good labour providers will deliver compliance, quality and reliability of service and are happy to do this provided their clients pay a fair, economically sustainable price. The ALP supports reputable labour providers – but not those that flout the law, treat their workers badly or underpay them, because those are the businesses that undercut the reputable ones. The ALP works hard to support labour providers, from representing their views with regulators and government departments to organising Roadshows, issuing clear written guidance and providing individual advice to members. Through its lead in the Stronger Together initiative (www.stronger2gether.org), the ALP plays a key role in supporting businesses to meet their obligations under the Modern Slavery Act 2015 Transparency in Supply Chain reporting provision. We invite every labour provider and employer to play their part in tackling forced labour and human trafficking by joining the Stronger Together network and implementing the good practice.

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t: 01276 509306


If you are a labour provider and are not yet a member or are an employer that engages agency workers and are interested in Associate Membership, then please contact us to learn more about the ALP. Best Regards The ALP Team

Chairman

HEATHER WILD

Member Support

www.labourproviders.org.uk

David Camp

Chief Executive

HEALEY NEWSON

Member Engagement

Jerry Camp

Membership Support Manager

The Association of Labour Providers | ALP Welcome

Kevin Roberts

HANIA SZYMBORSKA

Member Administration

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The ALP - ServiceS and Benefits

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INTRODUCING THE ALP

The ALP works to ensure that the provision of agency and seasonal labour to these sectors is recognised as a model of good practice. The ALP supports and represents labour providers, influencing the environment in which they operate and providing a range of useful information and services to help members run their business. Formed in February 2004, the ALP is recognised as the representative trade body for labour providers by supermarkets, growers and food processors, the GLA, the Home Office, other government departments and industry trade bodies. The ALP is constituted as an incorporated trade association limited by guarantee, governed by a Members’ Council of sixteen labour providers with an independent Chairman and Chief Executive.

ALP KEY STRATEGIES 1. Food Security Driving awareness of the crucial role that labour providers undertake within the supply chain by sourcing and supplying the workforce to plant, pick and produce our food.

2. Raising Standards Continuous improvement in the role, responsibility, standards and service of labour provision.

3. Fair Charge Rate Payment of fair charge rates to labour providers that enable business sustainability and do not foster worker exploitation and tax evasion.

4. Responsibility to workers Labour providers meet their legal and ethical responsibilities and treat workers fairly and with respect.

5. Regulation Support for proportionate regulation of labour provision to facilitate fair competition.

6. Labour Standards A partnership approach between labour providers, growers, producers, trade unions, retailers, regulators, government and other stakeholders to move beyond compliance in labour standards.

The ALP - Services and Benefits | Introducing the Association of Labour Providers

The Association of Labour Providers (ALP) is the trade association for labour providers that supply the workforce for the consumer goods supply chain. This includes the food processing, horticultural and wider manufacturing, industrial, warehousing and distribution sectors.

7. Home Grown Support for UK based agriculture and food production and the opportunities that a career within this industry provides.

www.labourproviders.org.uk

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ALP MEMBERSHIP The ALP subscription year runs from January to December, although new members may join at any point throughout the year. Organisations that:

The ALP - Services and Benefits | ALP Membership

w Supply labour may become ALP Members.

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w Use agency labour may become ALP Associate Members. w Supply business services may become ALP Service Partners. To join the ALP call 01276 509306 email info@labourproviders.org.uk or visit www.labourproviders.org.uk and register online. ALP subscriptions are subject to VAT.

The subscription scale for 2016 is, for labour providers with an annual turnover: w New GLA licence holders

(under £1 million) - £175 w under £1 million - £325 w £1 - 4 million - £650 w £4 -10 million - £1,275 w £10 -25 million - £1,925 w in excess of £25 million - £2,675 w Associate Members - from £550 w Service Partners – on application

t: 01276 509306


BENEFITS OF ALP MEMBERSHIP The ALP serves as the voice for the reputable majority of labour providers and membership delivers many benefits, including:

w Demonstrate your commitment to good practice by joining a body dedicated to improving agency labour supply standards. Retailers prefer their suppliers to use ALP members. w Display the ALP membership logo on your website and marketing materials and customise your own dedicated ALP webpage w Free inclusion in this annual ALP Handbook and Directory which is distributed to thousands of labour users.

Receive specialist support and stay up to date w Protect your business – use our specialist template contracts prepared by recruitment lawyers and take advantage of our email and telephone helpline support from labour provider experts. w Stay up to date - regular sector specific newsletters and specialist briefing documents. w Receive preferential rates on training courses, consultancy and business support services.

www.labourproviders.org.uk

w The ALP has a collective voice, representing labour providers’ interests with labour users, retailers, regulators and government departments. w The ALP is extensively involved in the GLA licensing regime, securing substantial improvements to the benefit of labour providers. w The ALP continuously raises the profile of low charge rates and promotes fair procurement practice. To join the ALP call 01276 509306, email info@labourproviders.org.uk or visit www.labourproviders.org.uk and register online.

The ALP - Services and Benefits | Benefits of ALP Membership for Labour Providers

Promote your business and enhance credibility

Have a stronger voice

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The ALP - Services and Benefits | Associate ALP Membership

ASSOCIATE ALP MEMBERSHIP

The ALP promotes partnership working between labour providers and labour users.

w Receive regular newsletters and briefing documents at the same time as labour providers

Businesses that use agency labour including growers, packers, manufacturers and distribution businesses are invited to become ALP Associate Members and access the following benefits of membership:

w FREE ALP “Model Service Level Agreement”

w The ALP Helpline manned by agency and ethical compliance sector experts

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w Preferential rates on our business support services and specialist training. w Support towards “best-practice” agency labour usage.

w FREE attendance at ALP Roadshows and other member meetings

Demonstrate your commitment to good practice by joining a body dedicated to improving agency labour standards.

w Exclusive access to ALP Members area on ALP website

To discuss joining the ALP please email info@ labourproviders.org.uk or call 01276 509306.

t: 01276 509306


MASTER LIST OF ALP MEMBER BRIEFS The following are technical briefs the ALP prepares and makes available free of charge to members. The list is regularly revised and updated to reflect the current legal position. ALP Template Contracts

Template Contract of Employment – Direct Contractors Template Contract for Services between Labour Provider and Agency Worker Template Contract of Employment between Labour Provider and Agency Worker - PBA Reg 10 Worker Assignment Schedule Template Terms of Business between Labour Provider and Labour User for Supply of Temps Template Terms of Business between Labour Provider & Labour User – Perms Agency Workers Regulations 2010 (AWR)

Service Level Agreement for the Agency Workers Regulations The AWR Qualifying Period AWR Hirer Due Diligence Checklist AWR Implementation Guide The Agency Workers Regulations 2010 Pay and Charge Issues

National Living Wage Discrimination Considerations Charge Rate Guidance Charging Fees for Work Finding Services Agricultural Wages Orders NI Wales Scotland Terms and Conditions

Mobile Workers - Travel Time and Pay Preventing Discrimination in Labour Provision Transfer of Undertakings (TUPE) for Labour Providers The Equality Act & Pre-Employment Health Checks Automatic Pension Auto-Enrolment Accommodation

Accommodation and the Minimum Wage

The ALP - Services and Benefits | Master List of ALP Member Briefs

Template Contract of Employment between Labour Provider and Agency Worker - NOT PBA

Model Licence Agreement for Shared Accommodation Accommodation Standards Audit Checklist Transport

The Cost of Providing Transport Vehicle Insurance for Labour Providers Providing Transport to Agency Workers Charging for Transport to Work

www.labourproviders.org.uk

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ALP Representative and policy work The Association actively represents the interests of labour providers and works to promote fair labour practices in the consumer goods supply chain.

The ALP - Services and Benefits | ALP Representative and Policy Work

The Gangmasters Licensing Authority

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The ALP takes the lead role in representing labour providers on Gangmasters Licensing Authority (GLA) related issues and matters arising from the GLA licensing regime. The Association’s position with regard to the GLA is: w To work in partnership with the GLA to tackle labour exploitation w To work with the GLA to ensure that its processes are fair and proportionate and that unreasonable burdens are not imposed on compliant operators w To challenge the GLA where it is necessary and appropriate to do so.

The ALP is in ongoing dialogue with the GLA Executive on a range of policy matters, currently including: 1. GLA complaints procedure 2. GLA Appeals process 3. Review of the GLA Licensing Standards 4. Tackling recruitment fees 5. Inspection protocols The ALP deals directly with the GLA on specific member issues, particularly keeping a close watch on licensing decisions. GLA licensing decision making should be “clear, consistent and proportionate” and the Association keeps a watchful eye that current standards of proportionality continue to be maintained.

Brexit UK businesses employ about 3.2m foreign-born workers, with about two-thirds of these coming from the EU. Foreign born workers hold about 10% of all UK jobs, many of them working in the grocery supply chain. Without a workforce, British business cannot thrive and the ALP will press the case that the economy needs temporary flexible workers which, in many sectors not least our own, requires migrant workers. If freedom of movement of EU labour is to be constrained over time, the Government will need to ensure that the lifeblood is not squeezed out of British business through insufficient skills and labour supply.

t: 01276 509306


Some employment laws will inevitably change in time although access to the EU single market will involve continued adherence to much of EU employment law.

Tackling Exploitation in the Labour Market The ALP supports proportionate regulation of labour provision to facilitate fair competition. The ALP April/May 2015 survey of labour providers’ views shows 93% in favour of the GLA licensing regime. The ALP is pleased to have been able to influence the decision by government to retain GLA licensing within the food and agricultural sectors and welcomes the measures included in the Immigration Act 2016 as follows: w A new role of Director of Labour Market Enforcement to set the strategic priorities for labour market enforcement bodies in an annual labour market enforcement strategy; w Data sharing between the Director, the Intelligence Hub, labour market enforcement bodies and other bodies with intelligence that inform the preparation of the labour market enforcement strategy; w A new labour market undertaking and enforcement order regime, backed up by a criminal offence and custodial sentence; and

www.labourproviders.org.uk

w Reform of the Gangmasters Licensing Authority to become the Gangmasters and Labour Abuse Authority with a broader remit and stronger powers to tackle labour exploitation across the economy. The ALP will remain actively involved, influencing these measures as they are put into practice.

Fair Charge Rates The Association will continue to argue the case for fair and sustainable charge rates. In 2007 the ALP established agreed charge rate guidance which is updated as required and posted on both the ALP and GLA websites. Supermarkets and other wholesale purchasers of food have an ethical responsibility to ensure fair and legal rates are paid to labour providers throughout their supply chain. Labour users that pay unrealistically low rates are knowingly or recklessly conniving in illegality as such rates can only be achieved through worker exploitation or tax evasion or both. Labour users have suffered reputation damaging publicity when this has been exposed.

The ALP - Services and Benefits | ALP Representative and Policy Work

ALP shall listen to and work with our members to understand how we can best support them. ALP will work with its supply chain partners and fellow trade associations to shape policy and endeavour to ensure that government retains the laws that work, as well as introducing positive changes that bring clarity and reduce complexity.

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The ALP - Services and Benefits | ALP Representative and Policy Work

ALP Representative and policy work

The rate paid by labour users is a key variable that the GLA monitors. Labour providers are encouraged to report confidentially to the GLA any labour users that are currently paying rates which indicate that legal responsibilities to workers cannot be met. Members may choose to discuss this information with the ALP beforehand.

“The common law of business balance prohibits paying a little and getting a lot - it can't be done. If you deal with the lowest bidder, it is well to add something for the risk you run, and if you do that you will have enough to pay for something better.” - John Ruskin

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Fair Procurement Practice An ALP members’ survey in April/May 2015 revealed a significant percentage of labour providers subjected to unfair procurement practices which they regarded as “supply chain bullying” and that the ALP should address this as a policy priority. These poor payment practices included: 1. Flat fees – ‘pay to stay' 2. Excessively long payment terms – ‘pay you later' 3. Exceeding payment agreements – ‘late payment' 4. Discounts for prompt payment – ‘one for you, one for us' 5. Retrospective discounting – ‘balance sheet bonuses' 6. Adding service and supply requirements without increased charge rates ‘just a little bit more’

t: 01276 509306


National Wage Policy The Association puts the case to the Low Pay Commission, BIS, HMRC and the devolved administrations on matters of national wage policy that impact upon labour providers. In 2015 the ALP argued that wage levels should support the supply of labour and there should be a coherent transition policy from the National Minimum Wage towards the Living Wage. The Association was somewhat surprised how readily and swiftly the Chancellor embraced this policy. The ALP will continue to promote the following policy positions: 1. The accommodation offset arrangements work to the disadvantage of workers by removing the option to have accommodation provided by an employer. 2. The HMRC interpretation that a deduction from wages for the optional use of transport to work reduces pay for NMW purposes works to the disadvantage of workers and employers. 3. Separate Agricultural Wages Orders are an anachronistic piece of bureaucracy that cause considerable practical difficulties for agricultural workers and their employers.

www.labourproviders.org.uk

4. The National Living Wage creates discrimination risks for employers and labour providers. 5. The HMRC National Minimum Wage “name and shame” policy is too blunt an instrument and should be reformed.

Level Playing Field The ALP seeks to address areas where legitimate labour providers are undercut by businesses that flout the law. The ALP notes the introduction in April of the Finance Bill 2016 which restricts the availability of tax relief for home to work travel and subsistence expenses where a worker provides their services through an employment intermediary. The ALP will closely monitor compliance with this new legislation. The ALP has also for some years focused on the eradication of “work finding fees” being charged to workers rather than being accepted as a business cost. International Labour Organization Convention 181 Article 7 states: “Private employ­ment agencies shall not charge directly or indirectly, in whole or in part, any fees or costs to workers.” GLA Licensing Standard 7.1 requires licence holders not to: a) Charge a fee to a worker for any work-finding services and b) Make providing work-finding services conditional on the worker using other services or hiring or purchasing goods.

The ALP - Services and Benefits | ALP Representative and Policy Work

The ALP has developed a “Labour Supply Chain Payment Charter” (prompted by the Construction Supply Chain Payment Charter) and is currently in discussion with the Members’ Council and industry bodies as to how to best achieve industry adoption of the Charter.

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ALP Representative and policy work The ALP continues to focus attention on this practice so that:

The ALP - Services and Benefits | ALP Representative and Policy Work

w Legitimate labour providers may compete fairly, rather than being undercut by businesses that charge workers; w Job seekers are not unfairly charged fees to cover their own recruitment costs; w Labour users do not risk reputational damage through being exposed to be using exploitative recruitment methods.

Labour Provider Auditing and Certification Labour providers are accustomed to being audited by clients and social compliance auditors and understand the important role that auditing plays in monitoring compliance with labour standards. However the proliferation and inconsistency of such audits has become unnecessarily burdensome. In order to develop a consistent framework for social compliance auditing and the facility to share ethical audits between clients of labour providers to avoid duplication the ALP is working in partnership to develop a global certification scheme for labour providers that assesses and differentiates “beyond compliance� performance standards of labour provision.

the organisation has taken to ensure that slavery and human trafficking is not taking place (i) in any of its supply chains, and (ii) in any part of its own business. Since 2013, the ALP has taken a lead role in the Stronger Together multi-stakeholder initiative which supports business in tackling modern slavery. Stronger Together provides employers and labour providers with the resources and understanding to engage with their workforces in the fight against modern day slavery and to signpost migrant workers to report abuse and seek help. Initially focused on the food and agriculture sectors, Stronger Together is now extending its scope and guidance to the wider consumer goods and construction supply chains. Tackling this issue in UK labour provision is crucial as the UK government National Referral Mechanism shows that these businesses are a target for human traffickers and organised criminal gangs. Stronger Together progress is detailed over the following pages.

Tackling Modern Slavery in Supply Chains The Modern Slavery Act Section 54 Transparency in Supply Chains reporting provisions are now in force requiring businesses of ÂŁ36m plus turnover to publish on their website a board approved annual statement of the steps

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t: 01276 509306


STRONGER TOGETHER

PROMOTING

AGENCY LABOUR BEST PRACTICE


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OVERVIEW AND PROGRESS

Through www.stronger2gether.org, Stronger Together provides clear guidance and pragmatic resources and training to support employers and labour providers in at risk sectors to deter, detect and deal appropriately with forced labour, labour trafficking and other hidden labour exploitation. The Stronger Together consumer goods supply chain development partners are the Association of Labour Providers (ALP), the Gangmasters Licensing Authority (GLA) and Migrant Help. The project sponsors are Aldi, Asda, Co-operative Food, Lidl, Marks & Spencer, Morrisons, Sainsbury’s, Tesco and Waitrose. The supporting partners are Anti-Slavery International, British Frozen Food Federation, British Retail Consortium, British Growers Association, Crimestoppers, Food & Drink Federation, Forced Labour Monitoring Group, International Organization for Migration, Recruitment & Employment Confederation, Salvation Army and Sedex.

anyone in any country. The guidance is applicable to industry sectors where vulnerable, predominantly migrant workers, may be at risk. It supports in implementing steps that may be reported upon under the requirements of the Modern Slavery Act Section 54 Transparency in Supply Chains reporting provisions. Since its launch, the Stronger Together initiative has achieved significant traction in engaging business: w Over 3000 industry representatives have registered with www.stronger2gether.org to access the resources for use within their organisations. Awareness of the Stronger Together message and resources increases each month, with thousands of unique visitors to www.stronger2gether.org.

Stronger Together | Overview and Progress

Launched in October 2013, Stronger Together is a business led, multi-stakeholder collaborative initiative whose purpose is to support organisations to tackle modern slavery within their businesses and supply chains.

Stronger Together provides accessible open source materials which may be downloaded by

www.labourproviders.org.uk

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Stronger Together | Overview and Progress

OVERVIEW AND PROGRESS

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w The fully updated Stronger Together “Tackling Modern Slavery in UK Businesses” good practice toolkit is supported by innovative “Tackling Modern Slavery in UK Businesses” workshops run across the UK to help businesses understand the best practice in tackling hidden exploitation that can occur in their business. Over 1500 individuals from nearly 900 businesses have attended a workshop and committed to take the tackling slavery message back to over 680,000 workers. w With a team of expert partners, Stronger Together has developed a “Tackling Modern Slavery in Global Supply Chains” good practice toolkit based on the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights framework to guide businesses in any country in implementing a pragmatic approach to combat slavery in supply chains. The toolkit is

supported by regional interactive “Tackling Modern Slavery in Global Supply Chains” workshops for businesses led by labour rights experts who have implemented programmes and projects to tackle human rights issues across the globe. w Stronger Together has: developed a range of capacity building solutions including in-house training courses and briefings for directors and key managers; two online “Tackling Modern Slavery” training modules – one for recruiters in recruitment businesses, the other for first line supervisors in any at `risk employment sector with a free trial available; and worker awareness training aimed specifically at migrant and agency workers delivered by specialist facilitators. For further details please visit http://stronger2gether.org/training/.

t: 01276 509306


w Daniel and Weronika’s Story’, a free to download powerful anti-trafficking video based on real life cases, with subtitles in many languages for use in induction and training, has been viewed over 12,800 times on YouTube.

Stronger Together | Overview and Progress

w The Government Modern Slavery Industry Factsheets (https://www.gov.uk/government/ publications/modern-slavery-industryfactsheets) signpost to the Stronger Together programme stating “For advice on how you can avoid employing victims of trafficking and how you can help ensure your supply chain is slave free visit stronger2gether.org”. But there is much more for Stronger Together to do: w We shall continue to run a full national programme of our core workshops “Tackling Modern Slavery in UK Businesses” and “Tackling Modern Slavery in Global Supply Chains” to support businesses in developing their programmes to combat slavery in supply chains. See http://stronger2gether.org/ training/ for details. w Following the food industry lead, Stronger Together is now working with other industry sectors to implement collaborative multistakeholder programmes to tackle modern slavery in business and supply chains. w Together with a highly regarded NGO partner we are looking to expand our pilot victim reintegration programme offering opportunities for victims of human trafficking with supported safe reintroduction to the world of work.

www.labourproviders.org.uk

Stronger Together is established and equipped to support business to understand their responsibilities in the fight against modern slavery and provide them with the tools, resources and training needed to address this in their businesses and supply chains. For more information, please visit www.stronger2gether.org or contact us at info@stronger2gether.org.

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Stronger Together | Support for Business

Support for Business Stronger Together has brought together a network of experienced trainers, consultants and lawyers to support organisations in developing and implementing effective policies and actions to combat forced labour, slavery and human trafficking within their businesses and supply chains.

C. Identifying and assessing risk

Please contact Stronger Together on 01276 919090 or email info@stronger2gether.org to discuss your particular requirements using the needs assessment below to identify your business support requirements.

3. Reviewing effectiveness of existing due diligence processes.

A. Strategy and policy development 1. Director and senior manager facilitation in developing a modern slavery and human rights strategy. 2. Review existing and develop new employee, supplier, subcontractors and other business partner policies in relation to forced labour, slavery and human trafficking. 3. Support in operationalising organisational tackling modern slavery strategy and policies.

B. Training and capacity building 1. Director and senior manager briefings on the Modern Slavery Act, transparency in supply chain reporting and developing a strategy to combat slavery within businesses and supply chains.

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1. Develop screening and risk mapping to identify high risk industry sectors, activities, country, region and spend suppliers. 2. Technological solutions to create multi-tier supply chain and stakeholder maps.

4. Development of supplier audit processes to assess operational indicators of forced labour across the recognised business models of modern slavery.

D. Taking action 1. Implementing proactive steps to prevent hidden labour exploitation within your business. 2. Implementing proactive steps to prevent forced labour, slavery and trafficking in your supply chains. 3. Implementing collaborative tackling modern slavery supplier engagement programmes. 4. Implementing fair hiring initiatives throughout the supply chain. 5. Implementing proactive steps to enable worker voice and provide access to remedy.

E. Monitoring and communicating effectiveness

2. Interactive workshops to support key managers to develop and implement tackling modern slavery in business and supply chains activities.

1. Advice on developing key performance indicators to measure outcomes and effectiveness in tackling modern slavery in supply chains.

3. Training needs analysis and development of contextualised induction and staff training, including videos and e-learning, for internal delivery and management.

2. Review and support in development of company reports and ‘slavery and human trafficking statements’.

t: 01276 509306


Interactive Training Workshop - 09:30 to 15:30

TACKLING MODERN SLAVERY IN UK BUSINESSES UNDERSTAND THE RESPONSIBILITIES AND BEST PRACTICE ASSOCIATED WITH TACKLING MODERN SLAVERY IN UK BUSINESSES

WORKSHOP DESIGNED FOR: UK industry sectors whose businesses and UK supply chains are characterised by a high proportion of migrant workers undertaking unskilled and irregular work.

WORKSHOP LEADERS To date, experienced practitioners from the Association of Labour Providers, the Gangmasters Licensing Authority and Migrant Help have delivered this workshop to over 1500 delegates from 800 UK businesses Feedback from previous delegates on the value of this workshop is highly positive.

WORKSHOP PROGRAMME

This workshop is for individuals from each business site who have a responsibility to develop policy and implement operational procedures to tackle modern slavery including: HR, CSR, technical and operational managers.

1. What is modern slavery, labour trafficking and forced labour? 2. The business case for tackling modern slavery. 3. How does modern slavery occur in UK businesses today? 4. Implementing good practice to deter and detect this hidden exploitation including spotting the signs. 5. Working with the UK investigation and enforcement authorities and support for victims. 6. Taking the correct actions on discovering potential serious exploitation in order to protect individuals and evidence.

Useful also for worker representatives, NGOs, auditors and others with a responsibility in the area of modern slavery.

7. What to do next - developing an implementation plan. What support is available?

These sectors include food, garment and general merchandise manufacturing; recruitment and labour provision; warehouse and logistics; general factory and industrial work; agriculture and horticulture; car wash; construction; cleaning, catering and hospitality.

WORKSHOP OVERVIEW AND BENEFITS Forced labour and labour trafficking are hidden crimes undertaken by exploitative individuals and criminal gangs. Detected cases in the UK are escalating. Many employers are not aware of how this exploitation may be taking place in their businesses and UK supply chains today, nor the good practice to prevent it, how to spot it or how to deal with it when it is uncovered. Implementing the good practice covered in the workshop not only demonstrates good due diligence and corporate social responsibility but also:

+ May form part of the annual statement required under the Modern Slavery Act 2015 supply chain transparency provisions of the steps taken to prevent slavery or human trafficking offences taking place in their business or supply chains;

+ Demonstrates proactive measures taken to protect business

ABOUT STRONGER TOGETHER Stronger Together is a multi-stakeholder initiative to help business to tackle labour trafficking, forced labour and other hidden worker exploitation. Stronger Together provides free downloadable guidance, tools and resources and a support network for employers, labour providers and others to work together to reduce hidden worker exploitation and to tackle modern slavery. Learn more at www.stronger2gether.org

WORKSHOP BOOKING PROCESS + Register at www.stronger2gether.org + Go to http://stronger2gether.org/training/. Choose your workshop and click on the “Find out more and register� link.

+ Register and pay for your place on the EventBrite system. There is one free delegate place per organisation for ALP members, NGOs and Project Sponsor own label suppliers. Please call 01276 919090 to book a free place.

reputation to clients, investors, shareholders, and other stakeholders;

+ Displays a positive engagement to working together with employee representatives and workforces to protect workers and prevent exploitation.

For more details or to discuss an in-house workshop please call 01276 919090 or email info@stronger2gether.org


Interactive Training Workshop - 09:30 to 16:00

TACKLING MODERN SLAVERY IN GLOBAL SUPPLY CHAINS UNDERSTAND THE RESPONSIBILITIES AND BEST PRACTICE ASSOCIATED WITH TACKLING MODERN SLAVERY IN GLOBAL SUPPLY CHAINS

WORKSHOP DESIGNED FOR: UK industry sectors whose supply chains are characterised by groups vulnerable to labour exploitation: migrant workers undertaking unskilled or irregular work; young people and unskilled or illiterate workers; displaced persons; workers employed in informal enterprises including homeworkers and; workers who are part of a group that has suffered longstanding discrimination. These sectors include: food, agriculture and horticulture, garments, general merchandise and consumer goods retail and manufacturing. This workshop is for staff occupying a corporate social responsibility remit for supply chain practices as well as other business functions such as human resources, procurement, technical, responsible sourcing, social compliance and risk management and representatives of industry sectors operating complex supply chains.

WORKSHOP LEADERS Labour rights experts from the retail sector who have implemented programmes and projects to tackle human rights issues across the globe.

WORKSHOP PROGRAMME 1. What is modern slavery, labour trafficking and forced labour? 2. How and where does modern slavery occur in supply chains? 3. Tackling slavery: the roles of government and business. 4. Implementing a strategic framework for tackling slavery and human rights. 5. Making senior commitments and developing a strategy to tackle modern slavery. 6. Assessing the risk of modern slavery in supply chains. 7. Developing an action plan to address risk with suppliers. 8. Rectifying issues of modern slavery in supply chains. 9. Monitoring and communicating progress.

ABOUT STRONGER TOGETHER

Useful also for worker representatives, NGOs, auditors and others with a responsibility in the area of modern slavery.

Stronger Together is a multi-stakeholder initiative to help business to tackle labour trafficking, forced labour and other hidden worker exploitation.

WORKSHOP OVERVIEW AND BENEFITS

Stronger Together provides free downloadable guidance, tools and resources and a support network for employers, labour providers and others to work together to reduce hidden worker exploitation and to tackle modern slavery. Learn more at www.stronger2gether.org

Forced labour and labour trafficking are hidden crimes undertaken by exploitative employers, intermediaries and criminal gangs. Many businesses are not aware of how and why this exploitation may be taking place in their supply chains today, how to spot it, how to prevent it or how to deal with it when it is uncovered. Implementing the good practice covered in the workshop:

+ Demonstrates due diligence and corporate social responsibility; + May form steps to be reported in the annual statement required under the UK’s Modern Slavery Act 2015 and the California Transparency in Supply Chain Act 2010;

+ Demonstrates proactive measures taken to manage risk and business reputation to clients, investors, shareholders and other stakeholders.

For more details or to discuss an in-house workshop please call 01276 919090 or email info@stronger2gether.org

WORKSHOP BOOKING PROCESS + Register at www.stronger2gether.org + Go to http://stronger2gether.org/training/. Choose your workshop and click on the “Find out more and register” link.

+ Register and pay for your place on the EventBrite system.


Understand the responsibilities and best practice associated with tackling modern slavery in UK businesses and supply chains tackling modern slavery in supply chains

stronger2gether.org

Tackling Modern Slavery in the UK Online e-learning modules for Supervisors and Recruiters

Context

Learning Outcomes

The UK Home Office estimates that there may be up to 13,000 people held in slavery in the UK.

By the end of the course, the learner will:

Stronger Together online e-learning courses set the learning points in the context of increasing efforts to address labour exploitation, in particular the Modern Slavery Act 2015. The training focuses on the crime of ‘forced or compulsory labour’ as defined in this Act, and was produced in conjunction with Eukleia training. The courses provide key frontline staff with the awareness and tools necessary to help identify and tackle this hidden exploitation of workers in your business. They enable your staff with a key role in spotting the signs of modern slavery to work through training at their own pace and location and at a low cost.

Audience There are two versions of the course. One aimed at first line supervisors working for employers in any risk sector. The other version aimed at front line recruiters who work in employment businesses, labour providers and any employers in sectors that are targeted by exploiters forcing others to work.

Content The course explains: What modern slavery is The industries it most commonly affects How learners can spot the signs of hidden labour exploitation What learners can do personally to protect vulnerable individuals from exploitation It gives clear guidance on what learners can do to help by describing signs to look out for and explaining what supervisors and recruiters should - and should not - do if they believe someone may be being exploited. The message of practical guidance is supported by video and animation to emphasise the importance of helping to stop labour exploitation.

Understand what modern slavery is, and in particular what is involved in labour exploitation Know what they can do to help Know how to recognise the signs that someone may be being exploited, and how to respond

Course Duration and Assessment The course will take approximately 30 minutes to complete. The course does not contain a formal assessment, but there are interactive exercises throughout to check and reinforce learners’ knowledge.

Format and Implementation SCORM 1.2 compliant. The course uses Adobe Flash and Trivantis Lectora. This course runs on any SCORM compliant LMS platform. Adobe Flash Player 8 plug-in (or later) must be installed in the web browser. JavaScript must also be enabled and all pop-up blockers disabled. Pricing The pricing model for the online recruiter and supervisor Tackling Modern Slavery modules is geared to individual businesses who are purchasing a set number of licences to be used within their own organisations for their own staff and volume discounts are available. There is an annual “cost per licence” per individual who undertakes the training; prices as follows: Number of licences 1-99 100-199 200-499 500+

Licence Fee 20.00 GBP 17.50 GBP 15.00 GBP 12.50 GBP

For those businesses that have their own Learning Management System (LMS) this is the only cost. For those that do not have an LMS there is an additional cost of 250 GBP (for up to 200 users) or 500 GBP (for 200 - 1000 users) to set the supplier up on a host LMS and each user needs a licence which costs 10 GBP per user for a year.

For further information on the full range of Stronger Together Tackling Modern Slavery training solutions please visit http://stronger2gether.org/training/. For further information on these online e-learning modules please complete a free trial request or contact sales@eukleia-training.com. To access a free trial of the online training module for first line supervisors visit http://www.eukleia-training.com/StrongerTogether-Supervisors and to access a free trial of the online training module for recruiters visit http://www.eukleia-training.com/StrongerTogether-Recruiters.


TRAINING AND WORKSHOPS

PROMOTING

AGENCY LABOUR BEST PRACTICE


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Please contact us to arrange a quotation or to discuss any insurance related matters Andrew Thompson & Associates 6 Gamma Terrace West Road, Ransomes Europark Ipswich IP3 9FF

T: 01473 727800 E: info@ataib.co.uk W: www.ataib.co.uk


Complying with the GLA Licensing Standards 1 day workshop for Labour Users and Labour Providers This workshop provides an excellent grounding in the skills and knowledge to enable both labour providers and labour users to implement processes to assure compliance to the Gangmasters Licensing Authority Licensing Standards.

It is particularly recommended for both suppliers and their labour providers to attend together to encourage a partnership approach towards addressing areas for improvement.

WORKSHOP OVERVIEW Section 1 – Background and Current issues in UK food industry agency labour Section 2 – Working in Partnership towards Best Practice Section 3 – Complying with the GLA Standards - clause by clause All attendees receive the ALP “Model Service Level Agreement” - a model template for managing the specific arrangements for agency labour supply.

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ALP Training

The Association of Labour Providers deliver specialist training geared to the food & drink, agriculture and labour provider sectors. We are happy to discuss your needs for inhouse and bespoke training, just give us a call or drop us an email.

BOOK YOUR PLACE TODAY

www.labourproviders.org.uk

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Booking Information

For current dates and locations, please visit http://labourproviders.org.uk/training-courses/

Times: 0900 - 1630 Cost: ALP Members - £195 (+VAT), Non Members £245 (+VAT) per delegate To book your place call 01276 509306 or email: info@labourproviders.org.uk

29


Preventing Illegal Working 1 day TRAINING workshop Provides practical knowledge and resources to prevent illegal working and properly establish the statutory excuse. This one day workshop provides the practical knowledge and resources to properly establish the statutory excuse and to help you to prevent illegal working within your organisation. All employers have a duty to check that their employees are legally entitled to work in the UK. Since the Immigration, Asylum and Nationality Act 2006 came into force, knowingly employing an illegal worker has been a criminal offence. Employers now face civil penalties of up to £20,000 per illegal worker for whom the statutory excuse has not been established. Workshop is designed for:

Workshop Benefits Ensure a legal workforce Protect your business from expensive civil penalties l Spot forged documents and impostors l Prevent UK Immigration Enforcement raids and reputational damage l Develop effective in-house immigration compliance procedures l l

PROGRAMME Illegal Working - an overview l Establishing the Statutory Excuse l Entry routes to work legally in the UK l Allowable documents l Spotting forgeries and preventing impostors l Technological solutions l Summary/Questions l

This workshop is recommended for Recruitment and HR professionals responsible for ensuring in-house immigration compliance during recruitment.

Expert Speaker: Ian Westwood is a former Chief Immigration Officer with the UK Border Agency. An expert in his field, he runs a niche consultancy specialising in education and assistance in the UK Immigration field. He has worked with many organisations to ensure compliance.

To book your place call 01276 509306 or email: info@labourproviders.org.uk

BOOK YOUR PLACE TODAY ALP Training

The Association of Labour Providers deliver specialist training geared to the food & drink, agriculture and labour provider sectors. We are happy to discuss your needs for inhouse and bespoke training, just give us a call or drop us an email.

30

Booking Information

For current dates and locations, please visit http://labourproviders.org.uk/training-courses/

Times: 0930 - 1600 Cost: ALP Members - £225 (+VAT), Non Members £285 (+VAT) per delegate

t: 01276 509306


IN-HOUSE ALP TRAINING Our training is specifically geared to the food industry labour supply chain – for growers, producers, retailers and labour providers

Call

01276 509306 or email

info@labourproviders.org.uk to discuss your requirements

If you cannot come to one of our dedicated courses, we can come to you and deliver our expert advice & training – when and where you need it including: l Complying with GLA Licensing Standards l Preventing Illegal Working l Agency Worker Regulations 2010 (including the Swedish Derogation) l Labour Provider Auditing l Achieving success in social compliance audits l Developing Best Practice in Labour Provision l Working Together – Optimising a multi-national workforce

In addition to the above, ALP trainers can work with you to tailor training sessions to meet the needs of your organisation.

www.labourproviders.org.uk

31


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Strong words, softly spoken. For quality, professional legal advice, you can depend on Brabners. Our award-winning team of lawyers offers expertise to clients in the following areas: • employment law • recruitment law • contracts • tribunal work • discrimination • GLA licensing compliance, appeals and actions • working time regulations • agency workers regulations • pensions law • litigation • real estate • corporate • commercial • tax, trusts and wills • family law Contact Brabners today to find out more about the best legal team in the North West. For further information please contact Paul Chamberlain, Head of Employment and Pensions in our Manchester office on 0161 836 8864 or by email to paul.chamberlain@brabners.com

W: www.brabners.com E: law@brabners.com Manchester Office 55 King Street Manchester M2 4LQ T: +44(0)161 836 8800 Liverpool Office Horton House Exchange Flags Liverpool L2 3YL T: +44(0)151 600 3000 Preston Office 7-8 Chapel Street Preston PR1 8AN T: +44(0)1772 823 921


Agency Labour Compliance Audit Tool Complyer is an easy-to-use software tool for auditing agency labour provision Complyer supports labour providers and users to achieve best practice

Why should I use Complyer? Demonstrate a standardised best practice audit process for assessing the compliance of agency labour supply across multiple sites and branches Provide assurance to clients by applying effective due diligence processes Adopt a continuous improvement partnership approach to drive up ethical and quality standards, improve social compliance audit success and improve client satisfaction

Who is Complyer for? Employment businesses/labour providers that supply agency workers Hirers/labour users that use agency workers Non-audit specialists in HR, Technical, Operations, Compliance, CSR etc. in all agency sectors but particularly food, agriculture, industrial and logistics

What does Complyer cover? Over 250 critical control points for ethical agency labour provision using the current Gangmasters Licensing Standards as a framework standard Key questions to monitor compliance to The Agency Workers Regulations 2010 NEW - Assessment of proactive steps implemented to prevent hidden labour exploitation, for reporting in the Modern Slavery Act Transparency in Supply Chain statement

A Complyer licence is annual with ALP member and multi-user discounts available. To buy or watch a demonstration, visit www.labourproviders.org.uk. For further details email info@labourproviders.org.uk or phone 01276 919090.


Labour Provider Social Compliance Audits Labour Provider Social Compliance Audits, conducted by an ALP authorised auditor using the Complyer agency labour audit tool software tool, will help labour providers and labour users to: Improve compliance and demonstrate due diligence Improve client satisfaction Drive up ethical and quality standards Labour Provider Social Compliance Audits assess labour providers’ compliance against any or all of the: Gangmasters Licensing Standards (whether the labour provider operates in the GLA sector or not) Agency Workers Regulations Modern Slavery Act transparency in supply chains good practice There are three types of GLA Licensing Audits available: 1 Labour Provider Internal Audit A confidential internal audit requested by a labour provider on their own business: For provision to potential and existing clients To prepare for forthcoming client or regulatory audits To improve standards and provide peace of mind

2 Labour Provider/User Partnership Audit An audit requested by the labour provider or labour user where the results are shared with both parties: To provide ongoing due diligence to labour users For the labour user and provider to work in partnership to improve standards To be used confidentially or shared

3 Independent/retailer requested Audit An independent third party audit: When requested by a retailer or other third party To be shared as agreed between the parties May be uploaded onto SEDEX if required

All audit clients receive an independent assessment of compliance with a Corrective Action Plan to form the basis for remedial and business improvement. Only ALP authorised auditors have been trained by the ALP; use the Complyer agency labour audit tool software tool and may use the ALP technical helpline resource. The ALP will act as a referral point for clarity on matters of interpretation.

Please contact us on 01276 509306 or info@labourproviders.org.uk to discuss your Labour Provider Social Compliance Audit requirements.


DOCUMENT TRANSLATION SERVICE Low Cost – Fast Turnaround – High Quality – Email Service Our professional document translation service helps organisations communicate more effectively Any language to or from English Fast 3-4 day turnaround Low cost – weekend work no extra charge Documents translated and then proof read by expert mother tongue translators No computer generated translations Translations for contracts, legal documents, inductions, training and more No maximum word-count

Email info@labourproviders.org.uk or call the ALP on 01276 509306 for a no-obligation quotation

No matter what you want to say, it’s important to understand and be understood.


SpeakUp! SpeakUp! SpeakUp! Global Multilingual Confidential Hotline

SpeakUp!

GlobalMultilingual Multilingual Confidential Hotline Global Confidential Hotline

InTouch offers employers and labour providers a global 24/7/365 SpeakUp multilingual confidential telephone and web reporting hotline to enable workers to InTouch offers employers and labour providers a global 24/7/365 SpeakUp report their concerns in confidence. InTouch offers employers and labour a global SpeakUp multilingual confidential telephone andproviders web reporting hotline24/7/365 to enable workers to report their concerns in confidence. multilingual confidential telephone and web reporting hotline to enable workers SpeakUp has been adopted by organisations of every size in over 100 countries. to report their concerns in confidence.

Global Multilingual Confidential Hotline Workforce Annual Cost

SpeakUp has been adopted by organisations of every size in over 100 countries.

SpeakUp been by organisations every size inSpeakUp over 100 countries. Upadopted toWorkforce 250and (min) £700 total InTouchhas offers employers labour providers a of global 24/7/365 Annual Cost multilingual confidential reporting hotline to enable workers to 251-500 251-500 £2.78 per worker Up to telephone 250 (min) and web £700 total report their concerns501-1000 in251-500 confidence. Workforce Annual Cost 251-500 £2.78 £1.96per perworker worker

Up to 250 (min) £700 total 501-1000 £1.96 per worker 1,001-2,500 £1.50 per worker 251-500 251-500 £2.78 per worker 2,501-5,000 £1.24 per worker 2,501-5,000 £1.24 per worker 501-1000 £1.96 per worker Workforce Annual Cost 5,001-7,500 £1.15 per worker 5,001-7,500 £1.15 per worker Up to 250 (min) £700 total 1,001-2,500 £1.50 per worker 251-500 251-500 £2.78 per worker By removing barriers, the SpeakUp programme encourages individuals to come forward 2,501-5,000 £1.24 per worker By removing barriers, the SpeakUp programme encourages individuals to come forward 501-1000 £1.96 per worker and facilitates ongoing communication thediscloser discloser and company 5,001-7,500 per worker and facilitates ongoing communicationbetween between£1.15 the and thethe company eveneven if the if the 1,001-2,500 £1.50 per worker discloser has has remained anonymous. discloser remained anonymous. £1.50 per worker SpeakUp has been1,001-2,500 adopted by organisations of every size in over 100 countries.

2,501-5,000

£1.24 per worker

By removing barriers, the SpeakUp programme encourages individuals to come forward For further details, contact GizelleHandy Handy at at ghandy@peopleintouch.co.uk or 0121 506 9197 5,001-7,500 £1.15 per worker For further details, contact Gizelle ghandy@peopleintouch.co.uk or 0121 506 9197 and facilitates ongoing communication between the discloser and the company even if the quoting the code S2GALP16 accessthe the pricing pricing above. quoting the code S2GALP16 totoaccess above. discloser has remained anonymous. By removing barriers, the SpeakUp programme encourages individuals to come forward and facilitates ongoing communication between the discloser and the company even if the

For further contact Gizelle Handy at ghandy@peopleintouch.co.uk or 0121 506 9197 discloserdetails, has remained anonymous. quoting the code S2GALP16 to access the pricing above. For further details, contact Gizelle Handy at ghandy@peopleintouch.co.uk or 0121 506 9197 quoting the code S2GALP16 to access the pricing above.


ALP PARTNERS The ALP works with other organisations to provide business services that are particularly relevant to the sector we operate in. Many of these organisations offer preferential rates and discounts to ALP Members. Our partners providing the following services include: Business Services

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39


BECOME A SERVICE PARTNER ALP SERVICE PARTNERS SUPPLY BUSINESS SERVICES TO THE RECRUITMENT AND/OR FOOD INDUSTRY SECTORS.

ALP SERVICE PARTNERS SHOULD, WHERE POSSIBLE, OFFER ENHANCED BENEFITS TO ALP MEMBERS.

EACH ALP SERVICE PARTNER MEMBER HAS THE FOLLOWING RIGHTS AND BENEFITS: 1. To have a dedicated webpage on the ALP website. 2. To display and use the ALP Service Partner logo on their documentation and on their company website linking to their ALP webpage. 3. To promote services to ALP members 4. To receive ALP Newsletters, Briefs and other information updates. 5. To submit relevant articles to the ALP Newsletter 6. To access ALP training, webinars & events (at member rates where chargeable).

JOIN TODAY

7. To sponsor ALP events and network with ALP members. PLEASE CONTACT US ON 01276 509306 OR INFO@LABOURPROVIDERS.ORG.UK TO DISCUSS THE DETAILS OF ALP SERVICE PARTNER MEMBERSHIP


SECTOR SPECIFIC GUIDANCE

PROMOTING

AGENCY LABOUR BEST PRACTICE


Specialist providers of labour to the food industry On-site solution experts Nationwide footprint

Ethical standards Cultural alignment Contact us now on 01922 723377 info@jobsatfirst.com www.jobsatfirst.com


Good Practice Guide for using Labour Providers STEP 2 - Ensure that the rate paid to labour providers covers legal requirements

The flexibility of temporary staffing allows business to react quickly to additional orders or shortfalls, production variations, attendance and seasonal fluctuations.

The rate that labour users pay to labour providers is a matter for negotiation. However, labour users must not offer rates that they know cannot be met without cutting legal corners such as false self-employment, tax evasion or denying workers their rights to a minimum wage, holiday pay and other benefits. For detail see the following section on Charge Rate Guidance for Agency Labour.

Employers who use agency labour (the “labour user”) should ensure that their labour providers are members of the ALP – see http://labourproviders.org.uk/memberdirectory/. This section contains the reasonable steps that a labour user can take to ensure that temporary labour supplied through a labour provider is being treated legally and ethically.

STEP 3 – Work in partnership to set and agree standards The labour provider and labour user should work together to agree: a. The “Contractual Terms and Conditions” – This is the legal agreement that governs the terms of supply and is a requirement under GLA Licensing Standard 7.4. The ALP makes a model template contract available to its members.

STEP 1 - Check that the labour provider is GLA licensed All labour providers to the UK agriculture and food industries must possess a valid GLA licence as verified on the GLA Public Register at http://www.gla.gov.uk/our-impact/who-has-agla-licence/. The labour user should register with the GLA Active Check facility to be informed of any changes to the status of the labour provider.

www.labourproviders.org.uk

b. The “Service Level Agreement” - This is a not a legal agreement but is a procedural document that details the operational processes that will apply in the supply of labour. It outlines the services, processes and standards in relation to the provision of temporary workers by the labour provider to the labour user.

Sector Specific Guidance | Good Practice Guide for using Labour Providers

Good labour providers deliver a value added, time saving, cost effective solution.

The ALP provides a model “Service Level Agreement” to delegates on its “Complying with the GLA Standards” training workshop. For details visit www.labourproviders.org.uk.

43


Good Practice Guide for using Labour Providers

Sector Specific Guidance | Good Practice Guide for using Labour Providers

STEP 4 - Conduct ongoing due diligence

44

Labour users should conduct regular audits, checks and interviews in partnership with their labour provider. Effective auditing will have the benefit of:  Improving the legal, ethical and quality standards of agency labour supply  Reducing the risk of media exposé of agency worker exploitation  Improving partnership between labour user and provider to enhance the likelihood of success during client and GLA audits. To assist in this process please see the Complyer “Agency Labour Compliance Audit Tool” and for “Labour Provider Social Compliance Audits” conducted by independent specialist auditors visit www.complyer.co.uk. Areas for due diligence to ensure compliance include:

a. Payment of tax and national insurance That the labour provider has deducted appropriate income tax and NI from pay and has paid employer’s and employees’ NI contributions, PAYE and VAT to HMRC.

b. Workers receive their legal rights  All workers are paid correctly, at least the minimum wage and issued with correct payslips, allowable deductions are legitimate and reasonable.

 All workers have been issued with written contracts detailing their entitlement to Statutory Sick Pay and paid holiday.  All workers are allowed to book and take paid holiday.  Workers and working hours are recorded, can be linked accurately to pay and do not breach working time regulations.

c. Workers are legally entitled to work in the UK Labour providers have carried out checks and kept photocopies of appropriate original ID document e.g. passport or ID cards.

d. Health and Safety The labour user should provide a safe and legally compliant place to work. There must be written agreement between labour providers and labour users on responsibility for health and safety training. This should include as a minimum:  Risks to workers and controls in place  Responsibility for designing and delivering induction and on the job training  Record keeping arrangements to verify training undertaken  Arrangements for provision of PPE; first aid and action in event of accident. Labour users should advise of any skills, qualifications and experience needed for roles and labour providers should check and confirm that workers possess these.

t: 01276 509306


Charge Rate Guidance for Agency Labour

Labour providers are encouraged to report confidentially to the GLA on intelligence@gla. gsi.gov.uk or 0800 432 0804 any labour users that are currently paying rates which indicate that legal responsibilities to workers cannot be met. Members may choose to discuss this information with the ALP beforehand. Supermarkets and other wholesale purchasers of food have an ethical responsibility to ensure fair and legal rates are paid to labour providers throughout their supply chain.

What the figures mean Statutory Charge Factors - This includes the appropriate Minimum Wage, employer’s national insurance, statutory holiday entitlement and pension auto-enrolment costs at 1 % of qualifying earnings. Labour Provider Overhead and Service Charge Costs – Defra analysis conducted in 2003 estimated labour provider overhead costs as 30% on top of the National Minimum Wage. In reaching this figure Defra state that the result is not intended to be a realistic description of the costs of any particular labour provider business (e.g. it makes no attempt to allow for the costs of rent/interest charges on office accommodation, which may vary widely from one business to

www.labourproviders.org.uk

another). It also states that this figure is likely to understate the actual costs for almost all businesses as well as making no allowance for management costs or profit. Rather this is intended to be an illustration of the minimum unavoidable costs that flow from observing the law on basic employment matters such as the minimum wage, national insurance, employers’ liability insurance, and maintaining and insuring roadworthy vehicles. The figure for Overhead and Service Charge Costs is indicative only and will vary with each contract depending on the efficiency of a labour provider and the particular circumstances of the client and site to which labour is supplied. For example, contracts where the labour provider is required to provide workwear, where there is volatility of supply, where transport or supervision costs are high, where invoices are factored and so on will all incur a greater overhead cost. The actual rate charged is ultimately a commercial agreement between the labour provider and user. Any agreed rate should take into account the particular costs of supply. However, charge rates lower than those in the rates tables plus a sustainable net margin may indicate illegal activity - unless there is a legitimate and demonstrable explanation.

Sector Specific Guidance | Charge Rate Guidance for Agency Labour

These rates, effective from April 2016, are a key variable that the GLA monitors. Labour users that pay unrealistically low rates are knowingly or recklessly conniving in illegality as these rates can only be achieved either through worker exploitation or tax evasion or both. A number of labour users have suffered reputation damaging publicity when this has been exposed.

45


CHARGE RATE GUIDANCE EFFECTIVE APRIL 2016 NATIONAL MINIMUM WAGE Apprentices OCTOBER 2015/16 AND NATIONAL LIVING WAGE APRIL 2016/17 1. Minimum wage

Sector Specific Guidance | Charge Rate Guidance - Effective April 2016

Age 21-24

Age 25 plus

£3.87

£5.30

£6.70

£7.20

£-

£-

£-

£0.39

£0.46

£0.40

£0.47

£0.64

£0.86

£0.92

£-

£-

£-

£0.04

£0.04

4. Pensions Auto-Enrolment Cost (1% of qualifying earnings) 5. Total Wage Costs

£3.70

£4.34

£5.94

£7.98

£8.62

6. Guideline Statutory Sick/Maternity Pay cost

£0.11

£0.11

£0.11

£0.11

£0.11

7. Guideline Minimum Labour Provider Overhead & Service Cost

£0.60

£0.60

£0.60

£0.60

£0.60

8. Hourly Cost of Supply (not including Labour Provider Margin)

£4.41

£5.05

£6.65

£8.69

£9.33

WALES AGRICULTURAL EMPLOYEES FROM 26 FEBRUARY 2016 (NLW FROM APRIL 2016)

Grade 1 & Age <25 & < 52 Weeks

Grade 1 & Age 25+ & < 52 Weeks

Grade 1 & Age <25 & > 52 Weeks

Grade 1 & Age 25+ & > 52 Weeks

All Ages <52 Weeks Non-Comp OT

1. Minimum wage

£6.72

£7.20

£6.72

£7.20

£10.08

2. Employers’ NI Contributions

£0.38

£0.44

£0.38

£0.44

£1.39

3. Annual Holiday Pay

£0.96

£1.03

£0.96

£1.03

4. Pensions Auto-Enrolment Cost (1% of qualifying earnings)

£0.04

£0.04

£0.04

£0.04

£0.10

5. Total Wage Costs

£8.09

£8.72

£8.09

£8.72

£11.57

£0.11

£0.11

£0.31

£0.33

7. Guideline Minimum Labour Provider Overhead & Service Cost

£0.60

£0.60

£0.60

£0.60

£0.60

8. Hourly Cost of Supply (not including Labour Provider Margin)

£8.80

£9.43

£9.00

£9.65

£12.17

6. Guideline Statutory Sick/Maternity Pay cost

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Age 18-20

£3.30

2. Employers’ NI Contributions 3. Annual Holiday Pay (5.6 weeks entitlement)

Age 16-17

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Age <25 & < 26 weeks service

Age 25+ < 26 weeks service

> 26 weeks service - All Ages

Age <25 & < 26 weeks Non Comp Overtime

Age 25+ < 26 weeks Non Comp Overtime

> 26 weeks Non Comp Overtime

1. Minimum wage

£6.70

£7.20

£7.24

£10.05

£10.80

£10.86

2. Employers’ NI Contributions

£0.37

£0.44

£0.45

£1.39

£1.49

£1.50

3. Annual Holiday Pay

£0.85

£0.92

£0.93

3a. Special Holiday Pay

£0.06

£0.07

£0.07

4. Pensions Auto-Enrolment Cost (1% of qualifying earnings)

£0.04

£0.04

£0.04

£0.10

£0.11

£0.11

5. Total Wage Costs

£8.03

£8.67

£8.72

£11.54

£12.40

£12.47

£0.11

£0.11

£0.11

7. Guideline Minimum Labour Provider Overhead & Service Cost

£0.60

£0.60

£0.60

£0.60

£0.60

£0.60

8. Hourly Cost of Supply (not including Labour Provider Margin)

£8.74

£9.38

£9.43

£12.14

£13.00

£13.07

6. Guideline Statutory Sick/ Maternity Pay cost

Sector Specific Guidance | Charge Rate Guidance - Effective April 2016

SCOTLAND AGRICULTURAL EMPLOYEES* FROM OCTOBER 2015 (NLW FROM APRIL 2016)

* For workers above school age. In addition to the above minimum hourly rates workers who have been with the same employer for more than 26 weeks and who hold a relevant qualification are entitled to be paid an additional sum of at least £1.10 per hour.

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CHARGE RATE GUIDANCE EFFECTIVE APRIL 2016

Sector Specific Guidance | Charge Rate Guidance - Effective April 2016

NORTHERN IRELAND AGRICULTURAL EMPLOYEES FROM 6 APRIL 2016 (DRAFT TO BE RATIFIED BY NIAWB IN MARCH)

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Age <25 & Age <25 & Age 25+ <40 weeks 40+ weeks and < 52 Service Service weeks Service

Age 25+ and 52+ weeks Service

Age <25 & Age 25+ <40 weeks & < 52 Non Comp weeks Non Comp Overtime Overtime

1. Minimum wage

£6.76

£7.05

£7.20

£7.20

£10.14

£10.80

2. Employers’ NI Contributions

£0.38

£0.42

£0.44

£0.44

£1.40

£1.49

3. Annual Holiday Pay

£0.86

£0.90

£0.92

£0.96

4. Pensions Auto-Enrolment Cost (1% of qualifying earnings)

£0.04

£0.04

£0.04

£0.04

£0.10

£0.11

5. Total Wage Costs

£8.04

£8.41

£8.61

£8.64

£11.64

£12.40

£0.11

£0.11

£0.11

£0.30

7. Guideline Minimum Labour Provider Overhead & Service Cost

£0.60

£0.60

£0.60

£0.60

£0.60

£0.60

8. Hourly Cost of Supply (not including Labour Provider Margin)

£8.75

£9.12

£9.32

£9.54

£12.24

£13.00

6. Guideline Statutory Sick/ Maternity Pay cost

N.B. When the UK National Minimum/Living Wage becomes higher than the NIAMW, this becomes the minimum rate. Total Wage Costs include charge items numbers 1-4 shown in red covering statutory legal requirements Labour Provider Overhead Costs – DEFRA analysis has estimated overhead costs as 30% on top of the National Minimum Wage, but state that this figure is likely to understate the actual costs of almost all businesses as well as making no allowance for management costs or profit. In reaching this figure of 30% Defra state that the result is not intended to be a realistic description of the costs of any particular labour provider business (e.g. it makes no attempt to allow for the costs of rent/interest charges on office accommodation, which may vary widely from one business to another). It also makes no allowance for any management cost or business profit. Rather this is intended to be an illustration of the minimum unavoidable costs that flow from observing the law on basic employment matters such as the minimum wage, national insurance, employers’ liability insurance, and maintaining and insuring roadworthy vehicles.

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Definitions and Explanations N.B. The numbering below refers to the numbered charge elements in the rates tables:

Workers employed in agriculture have a statutory entitlement to overtime in accordance with the appropriate Agricultural Wages Order. The Northern Ireland and Scottish executives have confirmed that their interpretation is that the agricultural overtime rate will be not less than 1.5 times the higher of the Agricultural Minimum Wage, the National Minimum or the National Living rates, whichever of these applies. The Welsh executive has a different interpretation and has confirmed that the agricultural overtime rate will be not less than 1.5 times the Agricultural Minimum Wage. 2. Employer’s NI must be paid at 13.8% on earnings above the secondary threshold of £156 per week for workers aged above 21. The first £156 is NI free (NI free up to the Upper Secondary Threshold for workers below 21). The NI figures for non-overtime rates are based on 40 hours worked in non-agriculture and 39 hours in agriculture.

a. Calculations of holiday pay to be charged are based on the hourly rate plus Employers’ NI as when holiday pay is paid to the worker, employers’ NI is paid on this and therefore must be accrued from the charge rate. b. Non Agricultural Workers - are entitled to 5.6 weeks holiday (calculated pro rata as 12.07% of the hourly rate and NI = 5.6 weeks / (52 weeks-5.6 weeks). Agricultural Employees in Wales - Workers are entitled under the AWO to a variable amount of “total annual holiday entitlement” depending on how many days per week they have retrospectively worked. Based on a 5 day week workers are entitled to 31 days paid annual holiday from the first day of work equivalent to 13.54% of the relevant hourly rate and NI. This is the figure shown.

Sector Specific Guidance | Definitions and Explanations

1. The hourly minimum rate represents the National Minimum Wage, National Living Wage or the Agricultural Minimum Wage for Grade 1 workers. This rate increases in Scotland after 26 weeks service and in Northern Ireland after 40 weeks service.

3. Holiday Pay

For temporary agricultural employees on overtime, the £156 NI free amount will generally already have been used so employer’s NI has been calculated at the full 13.8%.

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Definitions and Explanations

Sector Specific Guidance | Definitions and Explanations

Agricultural Employees in Scotland - are entitled to 5.6 weeks holiday plus 2 special days per year. A week is equivalent to the number of days that an employee would be expected to work in the course of a regular working week. This is equivalent to 13.04% of the relevant hourly rate and NI. Agricultural Employees in Northern Ireland are entitled under the NIAWO to 5.6 weeks equivalent to 12.07% of the hourly rate and NI. After the completion of 12 months continuous employment with the same employer the annual holiday entitlement increases to 5.8 weeks paid annual holiday equivalent to 12.55% of the relevant hourly rate and NI. c. How holiday pay should be calculated varies dependent on workers contracts and working patterns. Pay used to calculate holiday pay should include any payments intrinsically linked to the work done such as shift pay; performance related bonuses; guaranteed and nonguaranteed compulsory overtime. Currently this does not include non-compulsory optional overtime until case law determines otherwise. i. Where remuneration for normal working hours does not vary i.e. workers on a fixed wage - holiday pay is based on contractual pay i.e. includes guaranteed overtime and pay intrinsically linked to the work done. ii. Where a worker’s working hours are not specified by the contract and that worker

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works irregular hours and is not entitled to overtime pay when employed for more than a fixed number of hours in a week holiday pay is calculated by reference to the worker's average remuneration over the previous 12 weeks (replacing weeks in which no pay was received with previous weeks) for all hours worked and including payments “intrinsically linked” to the performance of tasks. iii. Where a worker works irregular hours, and receives an enhanced overtime rate after a fixed number of hours (such as workers covered by Agricultural Wages Orders) and where these “normal working hours” on assignment are specified in the Worker Assignment Sheet which forms part of the contract with that worker. Holiday pay is based on the average hourly rate over the previous 12 weeks (replacing weeks in which no pay was received with previous weeks) for “normal working hours” and including payments “intrinsically linked” to the performance of tasks. 4. Pension auto-enrolment commenced in October 2012 with staging dates depending on headcount. Currently a minimum of 1% of qualifying earnings must come from the labour provider as a statutory charge factor once due and where eligible workers have not opted out. This rises to 2% in April 2018 and 3% in April 2019. 5. This figure shows the actual minimum unavoidable Total Wage Costs to meet minimum legal requirements.

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with the Defra estimate, of 2 weeks is assumed at ÂŁ88.45 per week. This is accrued on normal time only, not on overtime. This figure also covers the 8% of statutory maternity, paternity, adoption and statutory shared parental pay payments that must be met by the labour provider. Agricultural wages sick pay is payable in Wales and Northern Ireland after 52 weeks employment. In Scotland agricultural employees continuously employed by the same employer for at least 52 weeks are entitled to sick pay at normal rates for normal hours worked for a period of 13 weeks after which SSP applies. 7. Guideline Minimum Labour Provider Overhead & Service Cost - Indicative figure. 2003 DEFRA analysis estimated overhead costs as 30% on top of the National Minimum Wage, but state that this figure is likely to

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understate the actual costs of almost all businesses as well as making no allowance for management costs or profit. In reaching this figure of 30% Defra state that the result is not intended to be a realistic description of the costs of any particular labour provider business (e.g. it makes no attempt to allow for the costs of rent/interest charges on office accommodation, which may vary widely from one business to another). It also makes no allowance for any management cost or business profit. Rather

Sector Specific Guidance | Definitions and Explanations

6. Provision for statutory sick pay leave, in line

this is intended to be an illustration of the minimum unavoidable costs that flow from observing the law on basic employment matters such as the minimum wage, national insurance, employersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; liability insurance, and maintaining and insuring roadworthy vehicles. 8. This is the total hourly cost of supply but does not include any margin to cover labour provider profit.

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THE AGENCY WORKERS REGULATIONS 2010 – A Guide

Sector Specific Guidance | The Agency Workers Regulations 2010 - A Guide

GUIDE FOR LABOUR PROVIDERS & USERS This is a guide to the Agency Workers Regulations 2010 (AWR), which provide the same entitlement in terms of certain basic working and employment conditions for agency workers as directly employed workers after a qualifying period of 12 weeks.

SCOPE OF THE REGULATIONS

The definition of TWA includes all intermediaries within a supply chain. For example: the agency worker is supplied to the labour provider by an umbrella company, and the labour user has a master vendor arrangement through which all placements are channelled – the umbrella company, the labour provider and the master vendor would all be TWAs.

Definition of an Agency Worker An “agency worker” (AW) is defined as an individual who is supplied by a “temporary work agency” to work temporarily under the supervision and direction of a “hirer”, and has any contract (whether a contract of employment or for services) to perform work and services personally.

This does not include supply situations where individuals are provided in a “managed service arrangement”, where they are supervised and directed on a day to day basis, on site by the supplier’s own staff. It also does not include individuals who are genuinely self-employed and in business on their own account.

Definition of a Temporary Work Agency The definition of a “temporary work agency” (TWA) within the Regulations is a person that supplies individuals to work temporarily for and under the supervision and direction of a “hirer”, or pays for, or receives or forwards payments for the services of such individuals. The temporary work agency does not have to be a company, or in business for profit, and may be carrying on such activity in conjunction with others. This definition widens the scope beyond just employment businesses, and includes intermediaries, such as umbrella companies, and neutral and master vendor arrangements.

A payroll bureau providing a pure payroll service to individuals will not be caught within this definition.

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Definition of a Hirer

Where a hirer is part of a group of companies, and each group company (or subsidiary) has its own legal identity, each group company will be considered a new hirer.

Genuinely Self-Employed Individuals The AWR excludes individuals from the definition of agency worker who are genuinely selfemployed and in business on their own account. There are a number of key factors to be taken into account in determining whether a working individual is truly self-employed such as mutuality of obligation, right to substitution, degree of control, number of clients, being in business on their own account and financial risk and reward. This is looked at in the whole. The BIS guidance includes a link to a Directgov site, which lists the main attributes of the supply model of workers who are self-employed, however it will be up to an employment tribunal, in the event of a claim, to decide upon an individual’s employment status. Falsely classifying workers as self-employed will present a number of risks to labour providers and users, both financial and to reputation.

www.labourproviders.org.uk

Transferring workers to their own limited companies in an effort to avoid equal treatment would be a considerable risk. An individual will not be considered outside of scope just by virtue of working through a limited company. Also, an individual could claim to a tribunal later on that they were coerced into changing the supply arrangement, and that they aren’t actually self-employed, and apply for equal treatment.

Sector Specific Guidance | The Agency Workers Regulations 2010 - A Guide

“Hirer” means an organisation to which individuals are supplied to work temporarily for and under the supervision and direction of that organisation.

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THE AGENCY WORKERS REGULATIONS 2010 – A Guide DAY ONE RIGHTS

Sector Specific Guidance | The Agency Workers Regulations 2010 - A Guide

From Day One From day one of their assignment an agency worker has the right to equal access to the following:  Collective facilities and amenities – which will include canteens, child care, transport facilities.  Information about any relevant, vacant posts within the hirer’s organisation.

As these day one rights are totally in the control of the hirer, responsibility for ensuring equal access lies solely with the hirer. This also means that this is the one area of liability within the Regulations that is clear-cut. The hirer will be solely liable for any unjustifiable breach of equal treatment for day one rights.

Equal access does not mean that the agency worker should be given preferential treatment, but should be treated the same as a comparable directly employed worker of the hirer.

These are rights to equal access. Although it would be considered good practice for a labour provider to make an agency worker aware of any collective facilities or amenities, they have no legal obligation to do so.

For instance, if there is a waiting list for a child care facility, then the agency worker must be allowed to put their name down on the waiting list. Also, there is no obligation upon the hirer to pursue an agency worker’s application for a permanent role. The hirer’s only obligation is to make the information available. Less favourable treatment (in other words not providing any of these day one rights) of agency workers can be justified by a hirer on objective grounds. “Objective grounds” has not been defined, but it is likely that cost alone will not be considered as justifying less favourable treatment. Organisational and practical issues may be taken into consideration. For example: it would not be practical to offer child care facilities to agency workers who work on a night shift. Applicable Regulations: 12 & 13

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QUALIFYING PERIOD FOR EQUAL TREATMENT 12 Week Qualifying Period (QP)

This qualifying period requires an agency worker to work for 12 continuous calendar weeks in the same or substantively similar role for the same hirer.

A substantively similar role is one where the main work or duties are the same. Moving an AW to a different department or team, but undertaking the same work, will not be considered a new role for the purposes of the qualifying period. Any period worked during a week will be counted as a calendar week. For instance, if an agency worker works one day a week on an assignment, they will still complete their qualifying period (subject to the other conditions) after 12 calendar weeks. The qualifying period relates to the role the agency worker undertakes for a hirer; it is not specific to the temporary work agency. For example, if an agency worker undertakes the same or similar role for the same hirer over 12 continuous weeks, but through two different temporary work agencies, those 12 weeks will count towards that agency worker’s qualifying period, and the next week worked by the agency worker (in the same role at

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that hirer), through any temporary work agency will qualify for equal treatment. Where the agency worker undertakes a new assignment in a new role at the same hirer the qualifying period will start again from week 1. Applicable Regulations; 7

Where a Break Between Assignments Ends the QP Where there is a break of more than six calendar weeks between an agency worker’s assignments at the same hirer, in the same role, the qualifying period will start again.

Remember, the AW could be working through other TWAs in the same role/hirer. You will need to find the most efficient way of collating information on an AW’s work pattern within each hirer.

Sector Specific Guidance | The Agency Workers Regulations 2010 - A Guide

An agency worker will only have the right to equal treatment (apart from their day one rights) after they have completed a 12 week qualifying period.

For an AW to be considered as working in a new role, the TWA must have informed the AW in writing of the type of work required in the new role.

The AW has no obligation to provide the TWA with this information, but it’s likely that a tribunal would take into consideration any refusal by an AW to respond to a reasonable request for information.

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THE AGENCY WORKERS REGULATIONS 2010 – A Guide

Sector Specific Guidance | The Agency Workers Regulations 2010 - A Guide

Breaks that “Pause” the QP There are circumstances in which the qualifying period may be paused, and restarted when the agency worker returns to the same role/hirer. In this situation, any continuous weeks worked by an agency worker before the break shall be carried forward and treated as continuous with any weeks the agency worker works after the break. These circumstances include:  A break of no more than six calendar weeks.  Absence due to sickness or injury.  Annual leave.  Jury service.  Shutdowns – pre-determined factory shutdowns/school holidays.  Industrial action.  Time off for other contractual or statutory leave, such as parental leave, emergency dependency leave, unpaid holidays (if contractual).

Breaks During which the QP Continues to Accrue Where there is a break between assignments or during an assignment when the agency worker is not working, and the absence is either: • related to pregnancy, childbirth, or maternity (during the period from the start of a pregnancy to 26 weeks after childbirth, or when the agency worker returns to work); or • due to statutory or contractual leave to which the agency worker is entitled for maternity, adoption, or paternity leave the qualifying

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period will continue during the absence for the original intended duration, or likely duration, of the assignment. The Regulations do not prohibit a temporary work agency from providing agency workers on 12 week assignments, and then replacing the agency workers with new agency workers. However, please be aware that there are specific anti-avoidance measures in Regulation 9. The agency worker will be treated as having completed the qualifying period where the most likely explanation for the structure of an assignment (or series of assignments) is to prevent the agency worker from completing the qualifying period. This applies only where the agency worker would have otherwise completed the qualifying period.

Hirers can request a new AW for an assignment every 12 weeks. However, this does not mean that you can rotate an individual, or pool of AWs between a number of hirers.

For example: An agency worker undertakes three 11 week assignments with two six week gaps in between. In the event of a claim an employment tribunal may well consider that the assignments were structured deliberately to stop the agency worker from completing the qualifying period. Applicable Regulations; 7 & 9

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Rights Applicable from Week 13 Once the agency worker has completed the 12 week qualifying period they shall be entitled to the equal treatment rights explained below. This entitlement shall continue until such time as they are no longer working in the same role for the same hirer, or there is a break between or during an assignment of more than six weeks, which is not due to one of the reasons stated in “Breaks Between Assignments”, above, as having the effect of pausing or continuing the qualifying period.

What are “Basic Working & Employment Conditions”? These conditions are defined as the terms and conditions that are ordinarily included in contracts of a comparable employee of the hirer whether contained within:

This will include any variations in those relevant terms made at any time after the qualifying period has commenced.

You will have complied with your obligations to provide equal treatment if the AW is working under the same relevant terms and conditions as a comparable employee.

Relevant Terms and Conditions After the 12 week qualifying period, an agency worker will have the right to equal treatment in terms of:  pay;  the duration of working time;  night work;

 an identifiable pay scale or structure;

 rest periods;

 any collective agreements in place;

 rest breaks; and

 contracts of employment or engagement;

 annual leave (above the statutory entitlement).

 a company handbook, or other similar document; or  by custom and practice.

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Sector Specific Guidance | The Agency Workers Regulations 2010 - A Guide

EQUAL TREATMENT ENTITLEMENTS

Please see definitions of these terms in the following paragraphs.

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Sector Specific Guidance | The Agency Workers Regulations 2010 - A Guide

THE AGENCY WORKERS REGULATIONS 2010 – A Guide EQUAL TREATMENT FOR “PAY”

 Redundancy pay (statutory and contractual).

“Pay” Includes

 Payments or rewards linked to a financial participation scheme.

 Basic Salary

 Compensation for loss of office.

 Overtime

 Expenses payments, such as travel expenses.

 Shift Allowance

 Bonuses, incentive payments or rewards, which are not directly attributable to the quantity or quality of the work undertaken by the agency worker.

 Bonuses or commission payments, which are directly attributable to the quantity or quality of work done by the agency worker.  Vouchers or stamps of a fixed monetary value, which are capable of being exchanged for money, goods, or services.

Please note that any eligibility criteria that would apply to a comparable worker will also apply to the AW. The requirement is for equal treatment, not preferential treatment.

Payments not linked to work undertaken by the AW will not be included. For example payments made to encourage loyalty, or reward long-term service, would not be included. However, a team bonus, for early completion of a project for instance, where the AW worked as part of that team, would be included within the definition of Pay.

“Pay” Excludes The definition of pay does not include all payments that a hirer would make to its permanent staff. The following is a list of the payments specifically excluded by the Regulations and to which equal treatment need not be provided:  Occupational sick pay (entitlements to statutory sick pay are not affected).  Occupational pensions.

 Payments for time off for Trade Union duties.  Notice pay (statutory and contractual).  Guarantee payments if laid-off.  Payments by way of an advance or loan, e.g. season ticket loan.  Any other non-contractual/discretionary payment, the payment of which has not become custom and practice.

 Occupational maternity, paternity, or adoption pay.

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Performance Related Pay Awards

When identifying comparable pay, it is essential that all elements of the financial package are analysed, including any relevant payments discussed above, to ensure that all payments that fall within the definition of pay are included in the comparison with an agency worker’s pay to ensure equal treatment.

Where performance-related bonuses are awarded based on a performance appraisal system, it will not be necessary to integrate the agency worker into the hirer’s permanent staff appraisal process.

It is essential to all parties’ compliance with the Regulations that the Labour Provider fully understands the structure of pay and bonuses within the Labour User’s organisation. This will require a true partnership approach, to aid the flow of information.

www.labourproviders.org.uk

However, the hirer and the temporary work agency will need to utilise an existing, or put in place a new process to appraise the performance of agency workers, to enable them to make informed decisions on the appropriate performance-related bonuses to be paid. Applicable Regulations; 6, 12, & 13

Sector Specific Guidance | The Agency Workers Regulations 2010 - A Guide

Making a Comparison for “Pay”

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Sector Specific Guidance | The Agency Workers Regulations 2010 - A Guide

THE AGENCY WORKERS REGULATIONS 2010 – A Guide EQUAL TREATMENT FOR OTHER TERMS & CONDITIONS

Rest breaks are the breaks that an individual is entitled to take during their working day.

The agency worker will be entitled to equal treatment with regard to the following terms and conditions after they have completed the 12 week qualifying period.

Annual Leave

Definition of the Duration of Working Time

If a hirer gives a comparable employee more than the statutory entitlement, then the agency worker will also have the right to receive the extra annual leave, above the statutory level.

Working time means any period during which an individual is:  working for the hirer;  at the disposal of the hirer and undertaking their duties;  receiving relevant training; or

All workers are currently entitled to 5.6 weeks paid holiday per year, which can include the bank and public holidays.

However, where the agency worker chooses not to take the time off, payment for the proportion of holiday pay above the statutory minimum may be rolled up into the agency worker’s pay.

any period which is to be treated as working time for the purposes of the Working Time Regulations 1998 under a working time agreement.

Definition of Night Work Night work means work undertaken under the following circumstances:  the duration of the working time must be at least 7 hours; and include the period between midnight and 5am, which is determined by a working time agreement; or  in default of such a determination, the period between 11pm and 6am.

Definition of Rest Periods & Rest Breaks

Any extra annual leave entitlement, above the statutory, must not automatically be rolled into pay without the agreement of the AW. We would suggest that you always get the AW’s agreement in writing.

If a comparable employee has the right, whether conferred within a company handbook, or similar, or by custom and practice, to carry over annual leave into the following leave year, the agency worker must be treated equally.

A rest period is any period which is not working time, other than a rest break or contractual or statutory leave. For example, the period between an individual completing one shift and starting the next.

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MAKING A COMPARISON FOR EQUAL TREATMENT

 a pay scale or pay structure;  a relevant collective agreement; or

The “as if” test is what a Labour User should focus on to ensure that they are providing equal treatment to qualifying AWs.

The hirer needs to ask what basic terms and conditions (see “Relevant Terms & Conditions” above) the agency worker would have been given, had they been employed or engaged directly by the hirer to undertake the same role, and make these available to the agency worker once they qualify (see Qualifying Period for Equal Treatment). To be deemed to be compliant, and defend their decision as to what the relevant comparable terms and conditions are that apply to an agency worker, the hirer may identify a comparable employee doing the same or broadly similar work (taking into account, where relevant, whether they have a similar level of qualification and skills). If no comparable employee can be found at the same workplace, then the hirer should extend the comparison to its other establishments, if applicable.

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 a company handbook, or similar.

Only basic terms and conditions ordinarily given to comparable employees shall apply. Please refer to the list of relevant terms and conditions.

If the hirer can show that they have never engaged a worker in a particular role before, and there is no identifiable comparable employee (at any site), and no basic terms and conditions that apply in that work place – that the role is unique – then there is no obligation to provide equal treatment. Applicable Regulations: 5

Sector Specific Guidance | The Agency Workers Regulations 2010 - A Guide

After the qualifying period an agency worker is entitled to the same relevant working and employment conditions as if they had been recruited directly by the hirer. This is known as the “as if” test. A hirer must apply this test to all agency workers who are entitled to equal treatment.

The terms and conditions, which apply, shall be those that are ordinarily included in the contracts of employment of comparable employees, either included in employees’ contracts as a matter of course, those which have become custom and practice, or formally set out in other documents, such as:

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THE AGENCY WORKERS REGULATIONS 2010 – A Guide

Sector Specific Guidance | The Agency Workers Regulations 2010 - A Guide

How to Apply the Relevant Terms & Conditions

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Apply “as if” test to agency worker.

Identify if there is a comparable employee at same workplace, (with regard to differences in qualifications and skills).

Identify Relevant Terms & Conditions

Apply to Agency Worker

If no comparable employee at that workplace, extend to other workplace.

If comparable employee cannot be identified, apply the terms and conditions that generally apply to new hires in that workplace.

Unique Role:  no worker engaged in role before;  no comparable employee;  no general terms apply in workplace. No obligation to provide equal treatment.

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NEW PREGNANCY AND MATERNITY RIGHTS

The following entitlements will only apply once the agency worker has completed the qualifying period. However, the temporary work agency/ hirer must ensure they fulfil any duties regarding the rights of workers under any other legislation.

We would urge caution when dealing with this. Until such time as a labour provider/ user’s reliance on the qualifying period has been reviewed by an employment tribunal or court, and case law exists, we would suggest that you take specialist legal advice as and when an issue arises.

Right to Time Off for Ante-natal Care A pregnant agency worker will have the right to take paid time off for ante-natal appointments (not including the first appointment of the pregnancy) during their working hours.

The agency worker should be paid at the appropriate hourly rate for any such period of absence. The hourly rate shall be calculated by dividing one week’s pay by the number of normal working hours in a week that the agency worker is contracted to undertake for and on behalf of the Labour User. Where an agency worker’s hours of work differ from week to week, the hourly rate shall be calculated by taking an average over the last 12 weeks (ending with the last complete week before the absence) of the agency worker’s normal working hours, and dividing that by one week’s pay.

The entitlement to paid time off is not on top of any contractual liability to remunerate. In other words, if she works 8 hours in a day, and has 2 hours off for an ante-natal appointment, then the total payment to her on that day would be 8 hours.

Sector Specific Guidance | The Agency Workers Regulations 2010 - A Guide

The AWR includes changes to The Employment Rights Act 1996, concerning pregnant workers and new mothers.

If requested by either the hirer or the temporary work agency, the agency worker shall provide evidence of her pregnancy and of any appointments for which she requires time off.

Ante-natal appointments may include medical examinations, and relaxation and parent-craft classes.

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Sector Specific Guidance | The Agency Workers Regulations 2010 - A Guide

THE AGENCY WORKERS REGULATIONS 2010 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; A Guide

Right to be Offered Alternative Work

Right to be Paid

When an agency worker notifies the temporary work agency that they are pregnant, have recently given birth, or are breastfeeding, the temporary work agency must inform the hirer of this fact. The hirer has an obligation to undertake a health and safety risk assessment for that assignment. Where a risk exists, the hirer should make reasonable adjustments to the role to eliminate such risk.

Where her assignment is ended due to the assignment not being suitable (due to risks related to her pregnancy), the agency worker will have the right to be paid by the temporary work agency for the intended duration, or likely duration (whichever is the longer), of the assignment.

Where an adjustment is not possible, the temporary work agency must offer the agency worker any suitable alternative work available.

There is no obligation upon the labour provider to pay the AW beyond the original intended duration of the assignment.

Alternative work offered must be suitable in relation to the AW and appropriate in the circumstances, and must be under terms & conditions no less favourable than those that applied to her previous assignment.

The temporary work agency will not have to pay the agency worker where the temporary work agency has offered the agency worker suitable, alternative work, which the agency worker unreasonably refused. Applicable Regulations: Schedule 2 Consequential Amendments

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PAY BETWEEN ASSIGNMENTS MODEL (SWEDISH DEROGATION)

 maximum hours of work each week during any assignment;  minimum hours of work per week that will be offered during an assignment (minimum of one hour each week);

This derogation only relates to pay; an agency worker’s entitlement to equal treatment in other areas will remain unaffected.

We would urge labour providers to be cautious if intending to provide AWs with employment contracts for the minimum number of hours per week, unless this is a genuine reflection of the work availability.

This is known as the “pay between assignments” model, and to qualify, the employment contract must be entered into before the first assignment under that contract, and such contract must include the following:

 nature of work, including requirements of qualifications or experience; and

The AW will still be entitled to the Day One rights, and to equal treatment for: • duration of working time; • night work; • rest periods; • rest breaks; and • annual leave.

 the minimum scale, rate, or method for calculating remuneration;  the location(s) at which they will be expected to work;

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 confirmation that entering into the contract means they will not have the right to equal treatment in relation to pay for the duration of that contract;

A contract for a minimum of 1 hour per week, where the AW has worked an average of 40 hours per week over a period, may well mean that the contract is varied by custom and practice.

Sector Specific Guidance | The Agency Workers Regulations 2010 - A Guide

Where an agency worker is employed under a permanent contract of employment by a temporary work agency, where the following obligations are met, the agency worker will no longer have the right to equal pay (as defined in “Equal Treatment Entitlements” above).

 hours of work for any assignment;

The temporary work agency must also, during any period under the contract that the agency worker isn’t working, but is available to work (“between assignments”):

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THE AGENCY WORKERS REGULATIONS 2010 – A Guide  take reasonable steps to seek suitable work for them;

Sector Specific Guidance | The Agency Workers Regulations 2010 - A Guide

 propose the agency worker to the hirer offering such work; and

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 pay the agency worker a minimum amount of remuneration during that period. The temporary work agency must not terminate the agency worker’s contract of employment until it has taken reasonable steps to find suitable work for an agency worker, and paid him for that time whilst between assignments for an aggregate of not less than four calendar weeks during the life of the contract.

If using this model labour providers/ users should build the four weeks pay between assignment into the cost of the assignment, as this will always be payable, except in certain circumstances of misconduct or unsuitability dependent upon the contract in place.

Changing the Structure of Supply The law does not prohibit a temporary work agency from offering an agency worker a 12 week temporary contract, and then offering them a permanent contract of employment from week 13, or from moving agency workers into permanent contracts during an assignment.

It is likely that contracts not written in the spirit of the law, which are designed specifically to reduce the Labour Provider’s & User’s financial exposure, may find them challenged fairly quickly.

However, the agency worker must enter into any contract freely and without coercion. There is always the risk of an agency worker going to an Employment Tribunal later on, and claiming that they weren’t in fact employed, or that they were forced to sign an employment contract, otherwise the work would not have been available to them.

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The minimum amount to be paid to an agency worker between assignments must not be below the National Minimum Wage provisions for that period of time.

Example of Pay Between Assignments An agency worker has a contract to work at least 7 hours per week, and is paid weekly at the rate of ÂŁ8 per hour. They complete an assignment where they work 40 standard hours each week (not overtime).

The amount paid to an agency worker between assignments must not be lower than 50% of the highest level of basic pay paid to them in the 12 weeks immediately preceding the end of their previous assignment (or during the assignment, where it was shorter than 12 weeks).

After the assignment they are available to work, but the temporary work agency cannot find them any work for two weeks. During that two week period when no work is available, but the agency worker is available to work, the temporary work agency must pay the agency worker at the rate of National Minimum Wage per hour for 40 hours per week.

For the calculation of pay between assignments, only basic pay should be taken into account, or where applicable payments for actual time worked, or output.

If the worker was receiving an hourly rate of ÂŁ10 per hour, then they would be paid at NMW for that two week period between assignments.

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Sector Specific Guidance | The Agency Workers Regulations 2010 - A Guide

How to Calculate Pay Between Assignments

Applicable Regulations: 10 & 11

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THE AGENCY WORKERS REGULATIONS 2010 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; A Guide

Sector Specific Guidance | The Agency Workers Regulations 2010 - A Guide

AN AGENCY WORKERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S RIGHT TO RECEIVE INFORMATION An agency worker has a right to request (in writing) information from the temporary work agency relating to their entitlement to equal treatment for basic working and employment conditions, where they feel that this right may have been infringed. The temporary work agency must respond to this request within 28 days, providing a written statement to the agency worker setting out all relevant information regarding the basic working conditions, and the factors it took into consideration when determining these.

An agency worker only has the right to request information regarding basic working and employment conditions whilst they are actually entitled to them.

Where the determination is reliant upon a comparable employee, the temporary work agency must explain the basis of the comparison and the relevant terms and conditions that apply to that comparable employee.

There is no obligation to name a comparable employee at this stage.

If the temporary work agency does not respond within 30 days of the request, the agency worker may make a written request direct to the hirer. The hirer must respond to the agency worker with a written statement within 28 days. Where the agency worker considers its Day One entitlements have been infringed, they can make a written request directly to the hirer for information. Again, the hirer has 28 days to respond. If an Employment Tribunal finds that a temporary work agency or a hirer has deliberately, and unreasonably failed to provide information requested, or has provided an evasive or equivocal statement, then the Tribunal may draw the inference that the party concerned has infringed the right in question. Applicable Regulations: 14 & 16

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Day One Rights With regard to the provision of the rights, which all agency workers are entitled to from the first day of their assignment, the liability for failing to provide access to these rights (a breach of Regulations 12 or 13) shall fall upon the hirer.

Equal Treatment Rights Both the temporary work agency and the hirer shall be liable for a breach of Regulation 5, an agency worker’s rights in relation to basic working and employment conditions, to the extent that they are responsible for that breach. Where there is more than one temporary work agency involved, all the temporary work agencies in the supply chain will be held liable to the extent that they are responsible. The question of liability will be decided by the Employment Tribunal, and shall be dependent upon the efforts undertaken by each party to ensure that the agency worker received equal treatment.

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A temporary work agency may have a defence where it can show that:  it obtained, or took reasonable steps to obtain the relevant information from a hirer;  it acted reasonably in determining the agency workers working and employment conditions; and  where it has responsibility, it ensured that the agency worker was treated in line with that determination. To the extent that a temporary work agency is found not to be liable for a breach, due to the actions above, then the hirer, or another temporary work agency in the chain shall assume that portion of liability.

In other words, liability for equal treatment will not automatically fall to the labour provider at the bottom of the chain of supply. The question of liability is by no means clear cut, and will be apportioned dependent upon each party’s actions.

Sector Specific Guidance | The Agency Workers Regulations 2010 - A Guide

POTENTIAL LIABILITY

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THE AGENCY WORKERS REGULATIONS 2010 – A Guide

Sector Specific Guidance | The Agency Workers Regulations 2010 - A Guide

Powers of an Employment Tribunal

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Where an Employment Tribunal finds that a breach of an agency worker’s rights to equal treatment for basic working and employment conditions, or Day One rights has occurred, it shall have the following powers:

Labour Users in sectors with established unions should be very cautious before relying on any agreements, which would put agency workers outside of scope.

 Make a declaration as to the rights of the agency worker regarding the complaint.  Order the payment of compensation to the agency worker.

The unions have always supported the European Directive, and were instrumental in the UK Government voting in its favour. It is, therefore, likely that the unions will encourage and support test cases in favour of agency workers’ rights to equal treatment.

The level of compensation awarded shall be that which the Employment Tribunal considers just and equitable. Where the most likely explanation for the structure of an assignment or assignments is found to be the prevention of the agency worker from reaching the qualifying period, an Employment Tribunal may make an additional award of compensation of up to £5,000.

Read “Breaks Between Assignments”.

All information and opinions given in this guide are correct at time of publication to the best of ALP’s knowledge. Please note that this document is not exhaustive and is not intended to be used as a substitute for legal advice and consequently ALP and its advisors exclude all liability for any claim or loss arising out of or in connection with the use of this document. Decisions made by both agencies and hirers with regard to the Regulations are likely to be risk-based, and therefore, you should consider taking legal advice.

 Recommend action to be taken by the liable party(ies) to obviate or reduce any adverse effect on the agency worker in regard to the breach.

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National Living Wage Discrimination Considerations

The concept of the “Living Wage” has been in existence since the start of the century, and was initially a movement to increase pay for workers in London who struggled to make ends meet on the National Minimum Wage (NMW). Over the course of the following decade the movement has grown nationally calling for employers to raise levels to meet those published by The Living Wage Foundation (www.livingwage.org.uk) to more accurately reflect costs of living. Further guidance on paying a living wage is also available on the Ethical Trading Initiative website at www.ethicaltrade.org/in-action/issue-briefings/ living-wage-workers. On 8 July 2015 in the government’s Summer budget, George Osborne announced the introduction of a new National Living Wage (NLW) to come into effect from April 2016. This is, in practice, a significant increase in the NMW but only for workers aged 25 or over. While there will continue to be annual increases

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to the NMW for workers under the age of 25 it is likely that between 2016 and 2020 a significant gap in pay may develop between workers aged 25 and over and those under the age of 25, even where they carry out the same job. The National Living Wage raises questions about whether these new rates of pay could create issues of potential age discrimination and these are dealt with below.

1. Is it lawful to pay workers under 25 less than workers who will receive the National Living Wage? For several years employee groups and trade unions have called on the Low Pay Commission to end different National Minimum Wage rates

Sector Specific Guidance | National Living Wage Discrimination Considerations

Introduction

arguing that this difference in pay based on age is discriminatory. The introduction of the new pay bracket for over 25’s is likely to further highlight this difference in pay between workers of different ages who carry out similar jobs.

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National Living Wage Discrimination Considerations

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Current discrimination legislation, the Equality Act 2010, protects workers from discrimination, harassment and victimisation on the grounds of an individual’s age, or for reasons related to an individual’s age. So from April 2016 under the new National Living Wage would it be discriminatory to pay a 25 year old £7.20 per hour but a 24 year old who does the same job (and may have been employed for longer) only £6.70 per hour? The Equality Act 2010 contains a specific exemption to the usual rules on age discrimination in relation to payments in keeping with the National Minimum Wage and this allows employers to lawfully base their pay structures for young workers on the National Minimum Wage pay bands and pay workers different rates. This exemption allows employers to use exactly the same age brackets and national minimum rates provided that they are paid less than the over 25’s rate. For example, it would not be discriminatory to pay only the minimum rates set out in the table below. Alternatively, it is also possible for employers to pay enhanced higher rates of pay if they wish to, provided that these are linked to the same age bands and are lower than the over 25’s rate, for example:  Those under 18 - £4.00

2. Will it be possible not to recruit workers over 25 years old or to terminate workers when they become more expensive at 25? Whilst the National Living Wage is set to increase each year (with the rate expected to rise to £9.00 per hour by 2020) it remains to be seen how much the National Minimum Wage rates will increase in line for workers under the age of 25. It appears inevitable that the greater the difference between the rates for younger workers and those over 25 the greater the reluctance will be for employers and clients of labour providers to take on or to retain a worker over the age of 25 who will cost significantly more than a 22 year old with similar experience. This will potentially pose a problem for employers and labour providers who look to recruit younger workers and terminate workers over the age of 25. Whilst it is acceptable to pay different rates of pay in accordance with the National Minimum Wage brackets there is no exemption to the discrimination rules in the Equality Act 2010 to terminate a workers contract, to stop providing assignments or to refuse to take on workers because they are 25 or over, and this could expose both labour providers and clients to claims of age discrimination.

 18 -20 - £5.50

For Labour Providers

 21-24 - £7.00

There are special provisions in the Equality

 25 and over - £7.20

Act 2010 relating to labour providers which

In these circumstances paying different rates will be lawful and not discriminatory.

carries similar obligations to that of an employer. A labour provider must not discriminate against a worker:

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 In the arrangements that it makes for selecting who to offer labour providing services to;  By the terms offered to them;

 By terminating the labour providing service to them;  By subjecting them to a detriment. This includes discriminating against workers because of their age. By way of example, a labour provider having a policy of only offering to take on workers under the age of 25 would be likely be discriminatory as an arrangement for selecting who to provide labour providing services to. In this example the labour provider is choosing not to provide their services to workers aged 25 or over because of their age. Alternatively, if a labour provider failed to put forward workers who were over the age of 25 because it was believed that the cost would be unattractive to the client, this would also almost certainly be discriminatory as these workers would be treated less favourably, because they would not be offered the same opportunity as a younger worker, because of their age. Where a labour provider does treat a worker or prospective worker less favourably because of their age this will normally be an act of discrimination under the Equality Act 2010, and there are only very limited circumstances where some age-based rules and practices are seen as justifiable. This defence to a discrimination claim can only be relied on where the treatment of the worker is a “proportionate means of achieving a

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Labour providers will therefore need to carefully consider any rules or policies which may treat workers over the age of 25 less favourably than younger workers – including the recruitment of new workers or when offering workers to clients to avoid risk. On the Request of a Client It is highly likely that should workers over the age of 25 become more expensive than younger workers that clients and hirers will request that labour providers only supply workers under the age of 25 or stop supplying over 25’s. Hirers and clients are also subject to the Equality Act and will also need to be careful in refusing to accept an assignment for a worker or in terminating an assignment because of the worker’s age without having a valid objective justification. As for labour providers, the additional cost of a worker aged 25 or above is unlikely to be a sufficient justification on its own. There are limited steps a labour provider can take to influence a decision made by a client, but care should still be taken. Whilst the client’s actions

Sector Specific Guidance | National Living Wage Discrimination Considerations

 By not offering the labour providing service to them;

legitimate aim” - and this can be a difficult legal threshold to meet. The fact that workers under the age of 25 are likely to be cheaper, and hence more attractive to clients, is unlikely to be considered a valid reason for the less favourable treatment.

may be discriminatory under the Equality Act 2010 if it treats a worker less favourably because of their age – labour providers can in some circumstances also be liable for the actions of the client by acting as the client’s “agent”.

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National Living Wage Discrimination Considerations

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By way of example, a client may contact a labour provider and explain that they will refuse to consider any workers over 25 years old because of the cost. If the labour provider agrees to the client’s request and agrees not to put forward workers over the age of 25 the labour provider could also be subject to a claim of discrimination brought by a disgruntled worker who has not been put forward for work because of his age as an “agent” of the client. In these circumstances it would be advisable for the labour provider to explain to the client that it cannot discriminate based on age in the workers it hires or offers to clients. For the reasons set out above, care should be taken if a client requests that a worker’s assignment is terminated because they have turned 25. In these circumstances it would be advisable for a labour provider to express concern to the client that its cancellation of the contract because of age may be discriminatory. The National Living Wage is likely to make the recruitment and engagement of workers over the age of 25 more expensive for employers and hirers. However, labour providers, clients and other employers should be mindful of, and avoid, blanket policies restricting the recruitment or assignment of workers based primarily on their age.

AGE

MINIMUM RATE OF PAY (PER HOUR)

25 and over 21 - 24 18 - 20 Under 18 Apprentices aged 16 - 18

£7.20 £6.70 £5.30 £3.87 £3.30

In order to rely on the Equality Act exemption on paying workers different rates of pay based on their age it is important for labour providers to think about: 1. the total hourly rate the worker will receive – so overtime rates and hourly premiums are included, and 2. the pay brackets in the table above. Provided the hourly pay is less than the minimum rate for the age bracket above, this will fall within the exemption. For example, workers aged 21-24 can be paid less than workers who are 25 and over provided this is less than £7.20 per hour.

3. Practical Examples There are a number of circumstances where problems may innocently arise. A number of these potential issues arise out of the importance of being aware of the relevant pay bands, and the significance of these in the context of discrimination claims. From April 2016 the NLW rates are:

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Example 1 Basic Rate of Pay: Under 25’s paid £6.70, over 25’s £7.20.

(a) Overtime - both under and over 25’s are paid a 50p per hour premium This is potentially discriminatory and exposes a risk of a discrimination claim. The effect of the overtime premium is that the pay rates are £7.20 for the under 25’s and £7.70 for the over 25’s. As the rate for the under 25’s is not less than the NLW rate for over 25’s it does not fall within the discrimination exemption (see point 1 above) – so the difference in pay could be discriminatory towards under 25’s. (b) Overtime – both under 25’s and over 25’s are paid £7.70 per hour.

This is not discriminatory. The basic rate of pay is in keeping with the NLW exemption and the overtime pay does not discriminate between an under 25 year old worker and over 25 year old worker. The fact that the overtime rate is proportionately greater to basic pay for the under 25’s would not in itself give rise to a claim by the over 25’s.

Example 2 Basic Rate of Pay: Under 25’s paid £7.00, over 25’s £7.50. This is not discriminatory. While the under 25’s rate is more than the minimum requirement, this is less than the over 25’s minimum rate – and is within the Equality Act 2010 exemption. (a) Overtime - both under and over 25’s are paid a 50p per hour premium

As with Example 1 above, this is potentially discriminatory and exposes a risk of a discrimination claim for the same reasons.

Sector Specific Guidance | National Living Wage Discrimination Considerations

This is not discriminatory. These rates are in keeping with the NLW pay bands.

(b) Overtime – both under 25’s and over 25’s are paid £8.00 per hour.

As with Example 1 above, this is not discriminatory for the same reasons.

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National Living Wage Discrimination Considerations

Example 3

Sector Specific Guidance | National Living Wage Discrimination Considerations

Basic Rate of Pay: Both under 25’s and over 25’s paid £7.20. This is not discriminatory. There is no requirement to pay the under 25’s and over 25’s a different rate of pay. Although this is more beneficial to under 25’s when compared to their minimum entitlement, applying the same rate of pay to both does not distinguish or discriminate against the worker because of their age.

Example 4 Basic Rate of Pay: Under 25’s paid £6.70, over 25’s £8.00. This is not discriminatory. The difference in pay does not need to be equally in line with the NLW levels. While the over 25’s rate is more than the minimum requirement, the fact that the under 25’s rate is only the minimum should not give rise to a claim (but could lead to an unhappy workforce).

Example 5 Basic Rate of Pay: Under 25’s paid £7.30, over 25’s £7.80. Whilst in this example both the under 25’s and the over 25’s are paid 60p per hour over the minimum rates (and this might appear fair) as the under 25’s rate is not less than the minimum rate for over 25’s it does not fall within the Equality Act exemption and this is potentially discriminatory and exposes a risk of a discrimination claim. It may be possible to objectively justify the difference in pay between the age groups but the reality is that this is likely to be a difficult threshold to meet and is likely to be discriminatory.

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4. Frequently Asked Questions and Issues Q. Do I have to pay under 25’s less than the £7.20 National Living Wage? A. No. If you wish to pay your workers who are less than 25 the same rate this is fine (See Example 3 above). Q. If I want to pay the same rate to under 25’s as to the workers over the age of 25 do I have to show this as a basic rate of £6.70 and add a 50p premium?

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A. No. This can be shown as an equal flat rate of £7.20 per hour. The fact that this is the minimum rate for over 25’s but more than the minimum for under 25’s will not lead to this being discriminatory. Q. Even if I do not terminate workers over the age of 25 would it be discriminatory to focus recruitment on workers under the age of 25? A. This is likely to be discriminatory. A labour provider must not discriminate against a worker: • In the arrangements that it makes for selecting who to offer labour providing services to; • By not offering the labour providing service to them;

Sector Specific Guidance | National Living Wage Discrimination Considerations

The introduction by the government of a new pay band for over 25’s is likely to have a greater impact on employers and hirers than under the existing NMW scheme where all workers over the age of 21 have the same minimum entitlement. These examples above highlight the need to consider base rates for workers and the impact that overtime and other premiums can have on discrimination issues.

Focussing recruitment on workers under the age of 25 is likely to be considered an “arrangement” and it may be very difficult to establish an objective justification for this arrangement.

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Q. Would there be an issue in recruiting a low-skilled under 25 over a higher-skilled over 25 year old, for a low-skilled job?

Q. What does “objectively justified as a proportionate means of achieving a legitimate aim” mean?

A. This would depend on the reason for selecting the lower skilled worker. It could reasonably lead to challenge from the higher skilled over 25 year old as to the reasons for the decision. In the event that the sole, or principle, reason for selecting the younger worker was their age then this is highly likely to be discriminatory.

A. The scope of “legitimate aims” is potentially unlimited, although they must correspond to a "real business need". What constitutes a legitimate aim will almost always depend on the individual circumstance of a business. However, cost alone is not a legitimate aim which can justify discrimination.

Q. Is it possible to pay under 25’s different rates when working at different clients? For example £6.70 at client A and £7.00 at Client B?

To show that its actions were proportionate, an employer needs to show that the measures taken were "reasonably necessary" in order to achieve the legitimate aim.

A. This will depend on the labour provider’s terms with the worker, however, provided the rates meet the minimum rates (and subject to the Equality Act exemption rules) this should not be discriminatory.

It is recommended that labour providers take legal advice in these circumstances.

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Q. How do overtime rates affect potential discrimination issues? For example, is it discriminatory to pay 125% overtime to under 25’s and over 25’s?

A. If the employer has always paid £6.70 per hour to all workers, it would not be discriminatory to pay over 25’s £7.20 per hour from April 2016 but to keep the under 25’s at £6.70 per hour.

A. Whilst this appears a fair way of applying overtime, if the employer pays the minimum NLW rates for under 25’s and over 25’s (£6.70 and £7.20 respectively) then this would potentially be discriminatory. The effect of the overtime rate would be to pay under 25’s £8.38 per hour (125% of £6.70) and over 25’s £9.00 per hour (125% of £7.20). As in Example 2 above, this would lead to different rates of pay between the over and under 25’s and the rate of pay falls outside of the Equality Act exemption. In these circumstances it would be necessary to identify the different rates of pay as being objectively justified as a proportionate means of achieving a legitimate aim.

If, for example, all workers were paid £8.00 per hour and the employer changed to £6.70 and £7.20 per hour for under 25’s and over 25’s this would potentially not be discriminatory – but it may be difficult to reduce pay under the contract. Q. Our nightshift workers receive an hourly rate of pay above that of the NLW but this is a basic rate (which is currently below the £7.20 NLW) and a nightshift premium which takes this above £7.20. Will we need to increase the basic rate? A. For over 25’s the NLW will be treated in the same way as NMW is currently assessed. Under the current NMW rules shift premiums/allowances (such as this example) do not count towards NMW pay, the basic rate will need to meet the £7.20 NLW minimum. In this example, if the workers only work night shifts then it may be more appropriate simply to state the rate of pay to be the blended rate – and not to distinguish between basic pay and the premiums.

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Sector Specific Guidance | National Living Wage Discrimination Considerations

Q. If an employer has never differentiated in age when applying the NMW previously, would it be discriminatory to do so now the NLW is in place?

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National Living Wage Discrimination Considerations

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Ethical Trading Considerations

Further Advice

The Ethical Trading Initiative (ETI) has made it clear that companies paying the NLW will not be complying with the ETI Base Code (www. ethicaltrade.org/eti-base-code) on living wage saying at www.ethicaltrade.org/in-action/ issue-briefings/living-wage-workers that the NLW “is not in fact a living wage. UK employers wishing to pay their staff a living wage should use the figures provided by the Living Wage Foundation” (www.livingwage.org.uk/news/ living-wage-foundation-response-budget-2015).

Members are invited to contact the ALP if they have any other questions with regard to this matter.

The ETI position on paying under 25 year olds less than the NLW as older workers for the same work is “Although it will be legal to pay workers different amounts for the same work when the new rate comes in, this would constitute discrimination according to the ETI Base Code.”

Disclaimer - Please note that this document is not exhaustive and provides a general overview only. All information and opinions given in this briefing are correct at time of publication to the best of ALP’s knowledge; it is not intended to be used as a substitute for legal advice. To the fullest extent permissible by law, ALP and its advisors hereby exclude all liability for any claim, loss, demands or damages of any kind whatsoever (whether such claim, loss, demands or damages were foreseeable, known or otherwise) arising out of or in connection with the use of any of these documents and/or the information, content and/ or advice included within these documents.

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The GLA - an alp perspective Tackling Labour Market Exploitation The Immigration Act 2016 which received Royal Assent on 12th May contains the Government’s plans to tackle worker exploitation across all sectors of the labour market.

The Immigration Act 2016:  Establishes the role of Director of Labour Market Enforcement to bring a focus on coordinated, intelligence-led work across the Employment Agencies Standards Inspectorate (EAS); HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) National Minimum Wage (NMW) team and the Gangmasters Licensing Authority (GLA) with an intelligence hub and associated data sharing gateways to identify trends/patterns in areas of the economy where workers are at risk of exploitation;

 To widen the remit, strengthen the powers and change the name of the GLA to the Gangmasters and Labour Abuse Authority with the mission to prevent, detect and investigate worker exploitation across all labour sectors. It will be given police-style enforcement powers in England and Wales to help it tackle all forms of exploitation in all sectors. It will retain the existing licensing regime, but this will be reformed to be more flexible and capable of responding to changing risk, subject to Ministerial decisions, on the advice of the Director of Labour Market Enforcement.

The Gangmasters Licensing Authority | The GLA - An ALP Perspective

Sajid Javid, the Business Secretary whilst confirming that the vast majority of employers play by the rules said “too many still think they can get away with ignoring the rules, breaking the law, and taking advantage of hardworking men and women who want nothing more than an honest job“, adding that “if they’re not being undercut by unfair, illegal competition, responsible businesses will be able to grow faster and create more jobs.” The Home Secretary, Theresa May said “We must deal with those who commit all forms of labour exploitation, and so profit from the misery of others and undermine responsible businesses.

labour market offence has been committed, to request a business to enter into an undertaking to take steps to prevent further offending. A court enforcement order would be applied for where a business had refused to give or failed to comply with an undertaking.

 Introduces a new type of enforcement order, supported by a criminal offence for noncompliance to allow EAS, HMRC NMW and GLA, where there is reasonable belief that a

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The GLA - an alp perspective

The Gangmasters Licensing Authority | The GLA - An ALP Perspective

From the GLA to the GLAA The Government has reformed the GLAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission, functions and powers so that it can prevent, detect and investigate worker exploitation across all labour sectors, changing its name to the Gangmasters and Labour Abuse Authority (GLAA) to reflect the new focus of its remit, while retaining the links with its previous role and doing this with minimal structural changes. The GLAA will have police style powers in England and Wales and the ability to use the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 to investigate money laundering offences and to use the provisions for cash forfeiture and confiscation to remove assets from those who benefit from offences. The GLAA will work in partnership with other law enforcement agencies through formal memoranda of understanding and a formal â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;right to askâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; for assistance. The licensing regime is retained with reforms to ensure that it is flexible enough to respond to changing risks in existing or new labour sectors, if the evidence supports its use. From a labour provider and ALP perspective, retention of licensing in existing sectors, which is supported by a majority of labour providers, has been achieved despite significant opposition from

Compliance Inspections Licence Revocations

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certain quarters. The current licensing standards are likely to remain in place until April 2017 when it may be anticipated that there will be pressure to significantly rationalise them to cover only the more critical forms of labour exploitation meriting an enforcement undertaking. The ALP and stakeholders including the British Retail Consortium and Ethical Trading Initiative have written to the Home Secretary and the Business Secretary requesting that reforms to the licensing regime should not weaken GLA licensing standards or reduce application and compliance inspections and that an expanded role for the GLA should be matched by additional resources. However, with the current deregulatory agenda and pressures on public spending additional funding for the GLAA to fulfil its vastly widened remit is likely to be modest, if any at all.

The GLAA and the food supply chain In 2015, the GLA conducted a compliance inspection on 76 licence holders. Excluding new businesses that will have gone through an application inspection this is approximately 1 in 11 businesses. Approximately 2% of GLA licence holders had their licence revoked.

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

274

127

150

134

88

103

100

76

39

30

28

36

20

19

18

22

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The GLA includes within its current risk, threat and harm issues a significant and escalating threat from allegations of human trafficking and forced labour particularly impacting on the migrant worker community and that organised crime groups have infiltrated the labour provision market within and beyond the GLA sectors and are actively engaged in criminality that links to human trafficking and forced labour.

www.labourproviders.org.uk

The GLAA’s remit is moving from licensing 1000 labour providers in the food and agricultural sectors to tackling worker exploitation in all of the UK’s 5.5 million employers. Retention of the word “Gangmasters” in the title indicates an ongoing mission priority focus on labour providers but extends this remit to all those businesses working in all other sectors. The GLAA must prioritise its limited resources on tackling the most severe cases of worker exploitation and hence its ability to focus on general labour standards compliance in the existing food and horticultural sectors will diminish. The sector will need to respond accordingly to maintain the current high standards of social and ethical compliance and this is likely to involve the introduction of independent third party auditing of labour providers. The ALP will play an integral role in the development of such a scheme.

The Gangmasters Licensing Authority | The GLA - An ALP Perspective

The GLA is a risk-based, intelligence-led enforcement body focusing its limited resources on tackling the most severe cases of worker exploitation, unlicensed gangmasters and criminality and targeting labour providers (and their clients) in the food and agricultural sectors that gain unfair competitive advantage through charging unrealistically low charge rates achieved through tax evasion, imposing work finding fees on job applicants or denying workers their basic legal rights.

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The GLA - advice to the industry Gangmasters Licensing Authority – big changes on the way

The Gangmasters Licensing Authority | Advice to the Industry

The following section has been provided by the Gangmasters Licensing Authority.

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An extended remit, additional powers and a change of name are all in store for the Gangmasters Licensing Authority in the coming 12 months as the UK steps up its fight to tackle labour abuse. In its current guise, the GLA regulates an industry sector worth around £109 billion to the UK economy, protecting more than half a million temporary workers at peak times. But those figures are about to increase dramatically due to changes proposed in the new Immigration Act. The Act which received Royal Assent on 13th May 2016, will result in wide-ranging changes

for the GLA and these are set out below and it is understood will take effect from 1 October 2016.

Immigration Act 2016 In this handbook 12 months ago we reported how the new Modern Slavery Act called for a formal review of the GLA’s role to be carried out before the end of March 2016. This was duly done to gauge the views of the public and the industry on how our work is viewed. We are proud to report that the vast majority of respondents supported our ongoing efforts and suggested we might possibly be asked to do more in other sectors where exploitation is an issue. As a result, a number of proposed changes were worked into the Immigration Act.

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These included:  A change of name to Gangmasters and Labour Abuse Authority - the GLAA.  Extending the reach of the GLAA to permit officers to investigate, detect and prevent exploitation across all UK labour sectors.

(LAPOs) intended to tackle serious instances of worker abuse.  Introducing a new enforcement order to force an offending business to take steps to prevent further offences being committed with a supporting criminal offence for non-compliance  Aligning the GLAA much more closely with Employment Agency Standards and HMRCs National Minimum Wage Unit.  Appointing a Director of Labour Market Enforcement to provide joined-up strategic direction for the three bodies above.  Creating a national intelligence hub to open up data-sharing gateways and promote better flow and sharing of information relating to labour abuse.

What will change for labour providers and existing licence holders? The short answer is: ‘nothing’. The additions to powers and remit when the GLAA emerges will be just that – additions – activities to augment and not replace our day-to-day business. Our corporate aim – to work in partnership to protect vulnerable and exploited workers – will

www.labourproviders.org.uk

 Preventing worker exploitation  Protecting vulnerable people  Tackling unlicensed and criminal activity, and ensuring those licensed operate within the law. Under the GLAA, the regulated sector will still be: shellfish gathering, agriculture, horticulture and the biggest employer – the processing and packaging of food, drinks and all other fresh produce, like sandwiches, salads, pre-packed meats and flowers for example. We will do our utmost to make sure all businesses who supply workers in these areas are offered every support to comply with the prescribed licensing standards, thus ensuring a level playing field on which all businesses can operate and thrive.

The vital role you can play If you know of a business operating outside the law, exploiting workers, gaining an unfair or illegal advantage, or you have any information, then please call 0845 602 5020 and speak to the intelligence team. Alternatively, call our free reporting line on 0800 432 0804. Any call to the GLA can be dealt with in strict confidence, if you prefer not to leave your name. It’s also possible to report issues by emailing intelligence@gla.gov.uk, completing our online form or by calling Crimestoppers, also anonymously, on 0800 555 111. You may feel what you know is only a minor point but it could just be the missing piece that completes one of our jigsaws and exposes a major organised crime group.

The Gangmasters Licensing Authority | Advice to the Industry

 Introducing additional specialist investigative posts of Labour Abuse Prevention Officers

not change. Our focus will remain firmly fixed on protecting vulnerable people and we will also continue to concentrate on our existing three key priorities:

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The GLA - advice to the industrY Unlicensed labour supply is a serious offence and carries a penalty of up to 10 years in prison. That’s because for the victims, the effects of being subjected to severe abuse through forced labour, for example, can be devastating.

The Gangmasters Licensing Authority | Advice to the Industry

Trafficking and Forced Labour

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We encounter growing numbers of human trafficking and forced labour cases and this is only likely to increase once our remit is extended. Criminals who deal in such invidious practices are becoming more devious and sophisticated. Driven solely by greed they strive to make it harder for labour providers to identify when an agency employee is actually being forced to work, or is a trafficking victim, transported to the UK specifically for the express purpose of exploitation.

Traffickers are savvy enough to penetrate any workforce so please don’t be naïve enough to think your business, any business, is immune from this issue. If you suspect any of the workers you employ could be victims of trafficking or forced labour please contact the GLA

The GLA recently produced a number of videos that are available to view on our dedicated Youtube channel and these illustrate how the criminals take advantage – see http://bit.ly/gla_ vids. Methods employed by traffickers are explained in ‘Horse Trading’, while the effects on a genuine victim rescued by the GLA can be felt by watching ‘I am Bartos’.

How the GLA works

What the traffickers can never hide, however, are the signs that trafficking and forced labour leave on the victims. They are there, and you can see them if you know what to look for. The video called ‘Spotting the Signs’ flags up these tell-tale indicators during a reconstruction of a typical worker call to our helpline. You can also find an instructive and comprehensive booklet on which the film was based on available to download in pdf format from the website at http://bit.ly/GLAsigns.

What we do is dictated by the information we receive. This could be a report about an unlicensed ‘rogue’ business, or a company that holds a licence but is bending the rules to gain unfair advantages. The GLA is ‘intelligence-led’ and operates to the same standards as the police, in compliance with the National Intelligence Model. We gather, assess, log and analyse information, feeding into national intelligence databases.

immediately. We do not ‘shoot the messenger’! We will, however, work with you to root out and remove any exploitation from your operations, ensuring your business is compliant with our licensing standards and operating on the same footing as your competitors.

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What else can Labour Providers do?

sources is essential for us to operate effectively

Our website allows you to undertake simple checks. It provides guidance on who needs a licence and what activities are covered by the GLA – see http://bit.ly/GLAsector. You can find out which labour providers have been inspected at www.bit.ly/GLAinspections, or if they have had a licence revoked at http://bit.ly/ GLArevoked. We’re also happy to answer your queries about licensing through our helpline, which you reach by pressing ‘option one’ after calling 0845 602 5020.

– e.g. reports from mistreated and underpaid workers, or a labour user that suspects something is not right. All can and indeed do lead to formal inspections of licence holders and may result in conditions being added to a licence, a licence being revoked, or, in the worst cases, a criminal investigation and prosecution. Videos have also been produced to illustrate this aspect of our work. ‘Intelligent intelligence’ explains how we gather, grade and utilise information, while ‘Compliance … and how to cut it’ is a must for licence holders and applicants as it explains the GLA’s inspection process from start to finish.

www.labourproviders.org.uk

For more information on the Gangmasters Licensing Authority, and for any new developments on the new Immigration Act, please visit www.gla.gov.uk.

The Gangmasters Licensing Authority | Advice to the Industry

A healthy flow of information from many

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The GLA licensing standards may 2012 Part One 1 Introduction 1.1 The Gangmasters Licensing Authority

The Gangmasters Licensing Authority | The GLA Licensing Standards - Part one

(GLA) protects workers from exploitation in agriculture, shellfish gathering and food and drink processing and packaging. The GLA operates a licensing scheme for those acting as a “gangmaster”. 1.2 Part One of this document provides background information on the GLA licensing scheme. Part Two presents the GLA’s “licensing standards”. The licensing standards are the conditions of a GLA licence. The standards comprise the requirements set out in the Gangmasters (Licensing Conditions) Rules 2009 plus other relevant legal requirements. This version of the licensing standards replaces the version issued in April 2009. 1.3 For more information, please see the GLA website, www.gla.defra.gov.uk, or contact the Authority by: Telephone: 0845 602 5020 Email: licensing@gla.gsi.gov.uk 2. Who needs a licence? 2.1 Section 4 of the Gangmasters (Licensing) Act 2004 defines the term “gangmaster”. Detailed guidance on who needs a licence is available on the GLA website or by contacting the GLA Helpline. Acting as a “gangmaster” includes:

 supplying labour to agriculture,

horticulture, shellfish gathering and food processing and packaging,

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 using labour to provide a service in the regulated sector, or

 using labour to gather shellfish. 2.2 A licence can be granted to any kind of legal entity, including individuals (sole traders), limited companies, unincorporated associations or partnerships. 2.3 The GLA takes a wide interpretation of the term “supply”. Employment Agencies and employment businesses that come within the scope of the licensing scheme, whether supplying temporary or permanent labour, will be tested against the licensing standards. Labour includes all workers, whether temporary or permanent. 2.4 If the work is undertaken in the UK, a licence is required regardless of where the business is located. 2.5 Someone is considered to be “using” labour if they employ the worker under a contract of employment or engage him or her under a contract for services. The GLA also considers someone “using” labour if they make arrangements with the worker that:

 require the worker to follow his or her instructions,

 determine where, when or how the worker carries out the work, or  (for using workers to gather shellfish)

require the worker to sell their gathered shellfish to them as the first link in the buying chain.

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4.2 The GLA will work closely with other government departments and agencies and exchange information through legal gateways. This forms part of the licensing process and assessment of compliance with the standards.

2.7 There are exemptions from the licensing scheme for some specific circumstances. Advice on these exclusions is available from the GLA helpline or www.gla.defra.gov.uk.

4.3 Compliance with the licensing standards is assessed, where necessary, through inspections of applicants and licence holders.

3. How the Licensing Standards will be applied 3.1 The licensing standards will be applied on the basis of the type of business, for example whether the business provides temporary or permanent workers. This means that not all the licensing standards will apply to all businesses. 3.2 Generally, if a worker is to be paid by the licence holder then they will be expected to meet most, if not all, of the standards. However, if you are not able to meet a standard because it is not appropriate for your business, you may still be granted a licence. 3.3 Further advice on how the licensing standards might apply to an individual business can be obtained from the GLA. 4. Assessing Compliance and GLA Inspections 4.1 The GLA adopts a proportionate approach when applying the licensing standards. The GLA is concerned with identifying the more persistent and systematic exploitation of workers rather than concentrating on isolated non-compliances, unless such a non-compliance is “critical” in its own right.

www.labourproviders.org.uk

4.4 During an inspection, the applicant or licence holder may be asked to give details of contracts with clients. The inspection may include visiting your client to check the place of work. The GLA may also interview workers. The inspection will proceed based on the workers’ responses and any other relevant factors. 4.5 The applicant or licence holder may be asked to provide documentary evidence (such as written terms and conditions with workers and clients, contracts, wage books etc) to demonstrate compliance with the licensing standards. Where an applicant is inspected and they are already operating in non-GLA regulated sectors, the Authority may seek the applicant’s agreement to inspect those activities. 4.6 A new business will be expected to show that it has systems in place that demonstrate its ability to comply with the standards.

The Gangmasters Licensing Authority | The GLA Licensing Standards - Part one

2.6 The above applies whether the licence holder makes these arrangements directly with a worker or makes them indirectly through another person, for example a supervisor, intermediary or agent.

4.7 The information collected during an inspection will assist the GLA in determining whether a licence should be granted or refused for an application or revoked for an existing licence holder.

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The Gangmasters Licensing Authority | The GLA Licensing Standards - Part one

The GLA licensing standards may 2012 4.8 The inspection will test the relevant licensing standards, which will result in an overall score. Each standard has an associated score. Standards designated as “critical” are worth 30 points. All other standards are worth 8 points, except licensing standard 1.4 which can score up to 16 points. There are three possible outcomes: No issues identified 4.9 For applicants, a licence will be granted. There would be no change for existing licence holders.

Inspection score is below 30 points 4.10 Additional Licence Conditions (ALC) will be attached to the licence. An ALC is a specific requirement which a licence holder must comply with. Usually, ALCs will be against individual non-Critical Standards where non-compliance has been identified. The licence will become conditional on those non-compliances being corrected. The GLA will explain what measures need to be taken to rectify identified noncompliances.

Inspection score is 30 points or more 4.11 The application or licence will usually be refused or revoked. However, the GLA may consider attaching ALCs where it is proportionate to do so after considering the extent and nature of the non-compliance. 4.12 If an application is refused, the applicant must not trade in the licensable sectors. Any revocation will be with or without immediate effect depending on which

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standards are failed. If a licence is revoked, the licence holder will be notified of whether trading may continue, usually until the out­come of any appeal is determined, or whether they should cease trading immediately. 5. GLA inspections 5.1 You can apply for your GLA licence online at www.gla.defra.gov.uk or by telephoning the GLA helpline on 0845 602 5020. Please read the GLA’s Application Form guidance before applying for a licence (available on the GLA website or by ringing the GLA helpline). 5.2 The first stage of applying for a GLA licence is to complete the application form. The “Principal Authority”, the person responsible for the day-to-day management of the business, is responsible for signing the declaration of the completed application form on behalf of the business. 5.3 Any information submitted in an application will be processed in accordance with the Data Protection Act 1998. The GLA is the data controller for the purposes of this Act. Information provided may be shared with other government departments and law enforcement agencies. 5.4 Once your application has been submitted, the GLA will run checks with other UK enforcement agencies and if required, authorities in other countries. You may also be inspected or asked to provide additional information. The GLA Licensing Team will then decide whether a licence can be granted.

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5.6 The current fee levels are available on the GLA website. Alternatively, please ring the GLA helpline for the latest levels. Please be aware that fees are nonrefundable. 5.7 Details of all licence holders and applicants are available on the GLA Public Register, available online at www.gla.defra.gov.uk. A list of revoked licences is also available on the GLA website. 5.8 Please be aware that the GLA will usually automatically refuse applications where it is proportionate to do so in the following circumstances:

 if an applicant, proposed Principal Authority or any person named or specified in the application has been found not to be fit and proper. This applies for at least two years from the date of that decision.

 where an applicant, proposed Principal Authority and any person named or specified in the application has been refused or revoked twice within a two year period. This applies for at least two years from the date of the second decision.

www.labourproviders.org.uk

5.9 The GLA will also consider automatically refusing an application in the following circumstances:

 if an applicant, proposed Principal

Authority and any person named or specified in the application is found to have been connected to someone who has been deemed not to be fit and proper. This applies for at least two years from the date of the fit and proper decision.

 where an applicant, proposed Principal

Authority and any person named or specified in the application is found to have been connected to someone who has been refused or revoked within a two year period. This applies for at least a two year period from the date of the second decision.

5.10 Paragraphs 5.8 and 5.9 apply if standards 1.1 and 3.1 have been failed. These paragraphs will also apply if standards 3.2 and 3.3 have been failed where forced labour has been identified. 5.11 The above will apply unless exceptional circumstances can be demonstrated to justify why the application should be considered on its own merits. 6. Results of an inspection

The Gangmasters Licensing Authority | The GLA Licensing Standards - Part one

5.5 Once your application is approved, your licence will usually be granted for a 12 month period. The GLA will contact you before the expiry date to remind you that your licence is due for renewal. You must renew your licence before your current one expires otherwise a new application must be made.

6.1 A licence authorises a business to act through named individuals or specified posts. The Public Register displays those named or specified on a licence.

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The Gangmasters Licensing Authority | The GLA Licensing Standards - Part one

The GLA licensing standards may 2012 6.2 Anybody with a responsibility for negotiating contracts with clients for supplying workers or providing services needs to be named or specified on the licence. For licence holders with a turnover of less than £5 million a year in the GLA regulated sectors, actual names are required. For licence holders with a turnover of £5 million or more, individuals can be specified by job titles. 6.3 For licences authorising the use of a worker to gather shellfish, supervisors or group leaders must be individually named on the licence (please see Licensing Standard 6.5 for further details).

8. Criminal Offences 8.1 The Gangmasters (Licensing) Act 2004 includes a number of criminal offences. The GLA enforces these criminal offences on behalf of the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (in Great Britain)

7. Appealing against a GLA Decision 7.1 There is a right of appeal against any decision of the GLA:

 to refuse an application for a licence,  to attach conditions to a licence,  to revoke a licence, or  to refuse the transfer of a licence 7.2 Any decision the GLA makes will explain the process for making an appeal. Guidance on the appeals process is available from the Gangmasters Licensing Appeals Secretariat. The Secretariat can be contacted at: Gangmasters Licensing Appeals

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7.3 In Northern Ireland, the Secretariat may be contacted at: Office of the Industrial Tribunals and the Fair Employment Tribunal Gangmasters Licensing Appeals, Long Bridge House, 20-24 Waring Street, Belfast, BT1 2EB Telephone: 02890 327 666 Fax: 02890 230 184

Alexander House, 14-22 The Parsonage, Manchester, M3 2JA DX address: DX 743570 Manchester 66 Telephone: 0161 833 6100 Fax: 0161 832 0249 Email: gangmasters.appeals@hmcts.gsi.gov.uk

and the Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (in Northern Ireland).

Section 12(1) Offence: Acting as a Gangmaster without a Licence 8.2 It is illegal to act as a gangmaster without a licence. The maximum penalty for operating without a licence is 10 years in prison and a fine.

Section 12(2) Offence: Possessing False Documents 8.3 A person commits an offence if, in an attempt to make another person believe they are licensed, they possess or control:

 A relevant document that is false or they know or believe is false

 A relevant document that was improperly obtained and or that they know or believe was improperly obtained, or

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 A relevant document that relates to someone else

Section 13(1) Offence: Using an Unlicensed Gangmaster 8.5 It is illegal to use an unlicensed gangmaster. The maximum penalty for this offence is 6 months in prison and a fine.

GLA Licensing Standards This section sets out the detail of the GLA licensing standards and explains what is expected to demonstrate compliance. The standards are the conditions of a licence. References to a “licence holder” include applicants for a GLA licence.

 Licensing Standard 1: Fit and proper test

Section 18(1) Offence: Obstruction 8.6 It is an offence to obstruct a GLA officer in the course of his or her duties. It is also an offence to fail to comply, without reasonable cause, with any requirement made by a GLA officer.

9. Complaints 9.1 If you are dissatisfied with the service you receive from the GLA, please write to:

Gangmasters Complaints Gangmasters Licensing Authority PO Box 8538, Nottingham, NG8 9AF Email: complaints@gla.gsi.gov.uk

1.1 Critical: Fit and proper

The licence holder, Principal Authority and any person named or specified in the licence must at all times act in a fit and proper manner.

Please note

The GLA will assess all relevant factors in considering whether a licence holder acts in a fit and proper manner.

The factors the GLA will consider include, but are not limited to, whether the Principal Authority, directors or company officers (where the licence holder is a company), partners (where the licence holder is a partnership), members of the association (where the licence holder is an unincorporated association) and any person named or otherwise specified in the licence has:

The Gangmasters Licensing Authority | The GLA Licensing Standards - Part two

8.4 “Relevant” means any document the GLA issues in connection to a licence and being licensed.

Part Two

 Intentionally obstructed the GLA. This

includes preventing an inspection being conducted without reasonable cause,

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The GLA licensing standards may 2012

The Gangmasters Licensing Authority | The GLA Licensing Standards - Part two

 been convicted of any criminal

 not been candid and truthful in all their

convictions unspent under the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974. Particular consideration will be given to offences of dishonesty, fraud, violence, forced labour, human trafficking, carrying offensive weapons, fire arms offences, intimidation, blackmail or harassment,

dealings with any regulatory body and they have not demonstrated a readiness and willingness to comply with the requirements and standards of the regulatory system and with other legal, regulatory and professional requirements and standards. This includes deliberately under declaring turnover, or

 contravened any of the requirements

and standards of other regulatory authorities, including the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills, Department for Work and Pensions, HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC), Health and Safety Executive (including where the HSE issue a Prohibition Notice), UK Border Agency, Police, local authorities or overseas authorities,

 been influenced by a third party who

the GLA considers not fit and proper.

The GLA treats each case individually, taking account of the seriousness of, and circumstances surrounding the matter in question. The GLA will consider the explanation offered by the person to whom it relates, the relevance of any conviction, rehabilitation and evidence that the matter will not reoccur.

Failure against this standard may lead to a licence being revoked with immediate effect.

 been an owner, director or partner,

or has been concerned in the ownership or management of a business that has gone into insolvency, liquidation or administration whilst the person has been connected with that organisation,

 been investigated, disciplined, censured or

criticised by a regulatory or professional body, court or tribunal, whether publicly or privately in matters relating to any business with which they have been involved,

1.2 Critical: Principal authority competency test

 been dismissed from, or asked to resign

and resigned from, employment or from a position of trust, fiduciary appointment or similar,

 been disqualified from acting as a

director or disqualified from acting in any managerial capacity,

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The GLA will consider the Principal Authority’s competence and capability to hold a GLA licence in deciding whether the Principal Authority is “fit and proper”. In making this decision regard will be given to matters including, but not limited to whether the Principal Authority has an understanding of the GLA licensing standards and / or has sufficient management processes.

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Please note

Where this standard is failed for licence holders where a new Principal Authority has been appointed, the licence may be revoked with immediate effect.

1.3 Critical: Correcting additional licence conditions

A licence holder must correct any Additional Licence Conditions (ALCs) within the time period prescribed by the GLA.

Please note

This includes notifying the GLA within 20 working days once the licence holder starts to supply workers in the licensable sectors following the issue of a licence.

This should be done in accordance with the GLA’s instructions on clearing ALCs.

Failure against this standard will lead to a licence being revoked without immediate effect.

1.4 Changes in details

A licence holder must notify the GLA within 20 working days if:

 the Principal Authority changes (16 points)

 the Principal Authority, directors, company secretary or partners are convicted of any criminal offence or

 the trading name changes (16 points),  any directors, company secretary,

partners or other individuals named on the licence change (8 points),

 any contact details for the business change (8 points)

Please note

 Please see paragraph 4.8 of Part One

for information on the scoring system of the licensing standards.

 Non-compliance with this standard will

contribute a maximum of 16 points to a licensing standard compliance score. If more than one non-compliance is identified, the standard will only be failed once with only the highest score being accrued. The points will remain on the licence for a 12 month period and will count towards any subsequent inspection score within that period.

 This standard will not be failed if the

licence holder can provide a reasonable explanation for why they have not notified the GLA within the timescale required.

 A licence will expire if a licence holder’s registered company number, Unique Tax Reference or VAT number change. A licence will also expire if the business is in liquidation.

The Gangmasters Licensing Authority | The GLA Licensing Standards - Part two

receive an alternative civil sanction (16 points),

 the business enters administration or is made bankrupt (16 points),

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The GLA licensing standards may 2012  Licensing Standard 2: Pay and tax matters

Please note

Failure against this standard will lead to the licence being revoked without immediate effect.

The Gangmasters Licensing Authority | The GLA Licensing Standards - Part two

2.1 Critical: PAYE, NI and VAT

 be registered with HMRC and have a valid PAYE number, and

 accurately calculate and deduct tax and

National Insurance from all workers’ pay and pay the correct amount to HMRC in a timely manner.

A licence holder who exceeds the VAT threshold must:

 be registered with HMRC, and  charge and pay the correct amount of

2.3 Benefits

Please note

Failure against this standard will lead to the licence being revoked without immediate effect.

A licence holder must provide workers with itemised payslips at or before the time when wages or salary is paid.

Please note

The payslip should contain the gross and net amount of wages or salary and the amounts and purposes of any deductions.

 Licensing Standard 3:

orced labour and mistreatment F of workers

3.1 Critical: Physical and mental mistreatment

 A worker must not be

2.2 Critical: Paying Wages

A worker must be paid at least the National Minimum Wage (NMW) or, if applicable, in accordance with appropriate Agricultural Wages Order (AWO). Sufficient records must be kept to prove payment of NMW or in accordance with the appropriate AWO.

A licence holder must maintain records to show that a worker receives paid annual leave, sick, maternity, paternity and adoption pay to which they are legally entitled.

2.4 Payslips

VAT in a timely manner.

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A licence holder who employs workers under a contract of employment, contract of service, engages them under a contract for services or where the provisions of Chapter 7 of Part 2 of the Income Tax (Earnings and Pensions) Act 2003 apply must:

subjected to physical or mental mistreatment.

 Threats must not be made to a worker or others.

Please note

Failure against this standard may lead to a licence being revoked with immediate effect.

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 must be provided in writing with

3.2 Critical: Restricting a worker’s movement, debt bondage and retaining ID documents

A licence holder must not: should be no debts between a licence holder and worker that prevent the worker freely seeking other employment. Workers must be free to work elsewhere without incurring, or fear of incurring, any other detriment,

Please note

Failure against this standard may lead to a licence being revoked with immediate effect.

3.3 Critical: Withholding wages

 subject, or threaten to subject, a worker to any detriment because the worker has terminated or given notice

 the licence holder has not received

to terminate any contract between the

payment from the labour user,

worker and the licence holder or the

 the worker has failed to prove that they

worker has taken up or proposes to

have worked during a particular period of time (but this does not prevent the licence holder from satisfying itself by other means that the worker worked for the particular period in question),

take up employment elsewhere,

 require the worker to notify the licence holder, or any person connected to the licence holder, the identity of any future employer,

 the worker has not worked during any

 retain identity papers, except when

period other than that to which the payment relates, or

it is necessary to check a worker’s entitlement to work in the UK, and then

 any matter within the control of the

only until the check is complete, or

 force or coerce a worker to work against their will.

If a worker is loaned money directly or indirectly by the licence holder to meet their travel or other expenses to take up a position, the worker:

A licence holder must not withhold or threaten to withhold the whole or part of any payment due to a worker in respect of any work they have done on any of the following grounds:

licence holder.

Please note

Failure against this standard may lead to a licence being revoked with immediate effect.

The Gangmasters Licensing Authority | The GLA Licensing Standards - Part two

 restrict a worker’s movement. There

full details of the repayment terms of any loan.

 cannot be required to repay a sum greater than the sum loaned, and

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The GLA licensing standards may 2012  Licensing Standard 4:

Accommodation

The Gangmasters Licensing Authority | The GLA Licensing Standards - Part two

4.1 Critical: Quality of accommodation

Please note

The accommodation must be maintained in a good state of repair, must contain adequate kitchen, bathroom and toilet facilities for the number of occupants and must not be overcrowded. Any category 1 hazards as assessed under the Housing Health and Safety Rating System must be properly resolved.

Furniture and furnishings supplied in the accommodation must comply with all relevant legislation.

Gas installations must be maintained at least annually by a suitably qualified person registered with the Gas Safe Register: www.gassaferegister.co.uk. Copies of the annual gas safety check must be given to all occupants or prominently displayed in the property. If such a person has said that remedial actions are needed to make the installation safe, this remedial work must be undertaken as soon as possible by a suitably qualified person.

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A licence holder who provides, or effectively provides, accommodation must ensure the property is safe for the occupants.

Electrical equipment, including the fixed wiring and any appliances, must be safe and properly maintained. The GLA will take a proportionate view in deciding on whether to fail this standard for minor infringements or easily fixable issues.

A licence holder will be considered as providing or effectively providing accom­ modation in all the following circumstances whether or not the accommodation is let by the licence holder or a third party:

 the accommodation is provided in

connection with the worker’s contract of employment,

 a worker’s continued employment is

dependent upon occupying particular accommodation, or

 a worker’s occupation of

accommodation is dependent upon remaining in a particular job.

Where the provision of accommodation by a licence holder and a worker’s employment are not dependent upon each other, a licence holder may be considered to be providing accommodation in circumstances where:

 a licence holder is a worker’s landlord

either because they own the property or because they are subletting the property,

 a licence holder and the landlord are part of the same group of companies trading in association,

 a licence holder’s and the landlord’s business have the same owner, or business partners, directors or shareholders in common, or

 a licence holder or an owner, business

partner, shareholder or director of the licence holder’s business receive a monetary payment and/or some other benefit from the third party acting as landlord to the workers.

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A third party in this instance includes:

 a business and company which is a

separate legal entity to the licence holder, family members of a director, business partner, shareholder, owner or Principal Authority of the licence holder, and

4.3 Situations where workers are provided with travel or required to live away from home

 a business or company with a director,

shareholder, owner or business partner who is a family member of a director, shareholder, owner, Principal Authority or business partner of the licence holder.

This interpretation will apply whenever the licence holder is providing accommodation regardless of whether the worker can choose whether or not to occupy the accommodation. Even if the accommodation is optional, where the worker chooses to accept the offer, this interpretation will apply. Failure against this standard may lead to a licence being revoked with immediate effect.

4.2 Licensing of accommodation

A licence holder who provides, or effectively provides, accommodation must ensure the property is properly licensed or registered:

A licence holder must not arrange work for a worker (except where the worker is employed by the labour user) if, in order to take up that work the worker must live away from their UK home, unless the licence holder has taken all reasonable steps to ensure that:

 suitable accommodation will be available for the worker before they start work,

 the worker has been informed

of details of the accommodation including any cost to them, and

 suitable arrangements have been made for them to travel to such accommodation.

Where a worker is:

 to be supplied to a labour user, except

as the labour user’s employee, or is under 18 years old, and

 the licence holder, labour user or any

intermediary has arranged free travel or paid the worker’s travel expenses to work,

 the licence holder must, if the work

does not start or when it finishes, either:

 if it is a licensable House of Multiple

 arrange free travel for the worker’s

 if it is in an area subject to selective

 pay the worker’s return fare, or  arrange for the labour user or any

Occupation, licensing, or

 if the accommodation is on a caravan site which requires licensing.

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The Gangmasters Licensing Authority | The GLA Licensing Standards - Part two

 an individual including those who are

A licence holder who provides accomm­ odation in Scotland must be registered with the local authority as a private landlord.

return journey,

intermediary to provide free travel or pay the return fare.

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The GLA licensing standards may 2012

The Gangmasters Licensing Authority | The GLA Licensing Standards - Part two

 Any agreement must be voluntary,

A licence holder must give notice to the worker setting out the details of the free or paid for travel, including any conditions which apply. A licence holder must not arrange work for a worker younger than 18 years old where they are required to live away from home unless the worker’s parent or guardian has consented.

Please note

Where a labour user does not comply with the undertaking to arrange free return travel or pay the return fare, the licence holder must either arrange free travel for the return journey of the worker or alternatively pay their fare.

in writing and signed by the worker.

 A worker must be free to amend or cancel this agreement, subject to notice requirements.

5.3 Right to belong to a Trade Union

5.4 Providing workers in industrial disputes

Where a worker lives in accommodation provided, or effectively provided, by the licence holder, they must be allowed to find suitable alternative accommodation after giving 10 working days notice.

official strike or any other industrial action, or

 to do work of someone who has been transferred by the labour user to perform the duties of the person on strike or taking industrial action.

Please note:

This standard will not be failed if the licence holder does not know, or has no reasonable grounds for knowing, that official strike action is in progress.

This standard also does not apply to unofficial strike action.

 Licensing Standard 5: Working conditions

5.1 Rest Periods, Breaks and Annual Leave

A worker must be able to take the rest periods, breaks and annual leave to which they are legally entitled.

5.5 Confidentiality

A licence holder must not disclose any personal data about a worker without their prior consent unless it is required by any other licensing standards or any other law.

more than 48 hours a week on average

Please note

unless they agree to work beyond

If a worker gives consent and then withdraws it, the licence holder cannot

5.2 Working hours

 A worker must not be forced to work this limit.

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A licence holder must not introduce or supply a worker:

 to replace a worker taking part in an

4.4 Tenancy notice periods

A worker must not be prevented from taking up trade union membership nor be penalised for doing so.

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 any health and safety training, including

consider itself to have the worker’s prior consent. In addition, it may not make provision of its services conditional upon the worker giving their consent or agreeing not to withdraw it once it has been given.

induction training, deemed necessary to carry out the work safely has been agreed and assigned,

have received any necessary health and safety training, including induction

A licence holder must deal properly with disciplinary matters and grievances.

training, appropriate to the site(s) at which they are working and the work

5.7 Discrimination

A licence holder must not unlawfully discriminate against a worker or work seeker on the grounds of age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex and sexual orientation.

 Licensing Standard 6: Health and Safety

6.1 Assigning responsibility and assessing risk

A licence holder must co-operate with the labour user to ensure that:

 responsibility for managing the day to day health and safety of the workers has been agreed and assigned,

 a suitable and sufficient health and safety risk assessment has been completed (and recorded where required) before work commences, and

 any risks identified are properly controlled. 6.2 Instruction and training

A licence holder must co-operate with the labour user to ensure responsibility for:

www.labourproviders.org.uk

they have been employed to do, and

 making sure all information and training is comprehensible.

No charge may be made for providing health and safety training. Any time spent training should be treated as an extension of time at work.

6.3 Safety at work

A licence holder must co-operate with the labour user to make sure that:

 adequate and appropriate Personal

Protective Equipment (PPE) is provided. Employees and workers who would be legally regarded as employees for health and safety purposes must be provided with PPE without charge,

 adequate arrangements have been made

to provide welfare facilities (sanitary conveniences, washing facilities, drinking water, facilities for changing clothes and for rest and consuming food and drink) where it is reasonably practicable to do so or if it is legally required, and

The Gangmasters Licensing Authority | The GLA Licensing Standards - Part two

 making sure that the workers provided

5.6 Disciplinary and grievance procedures

 adequate arrangements have been made

for first aid and the recording and reporting of reportable incidents at work.

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The Gangmasters Licensing Authority | The GLA Licensing Standards - Part two

The GLA licensing standards may 2012

Please note

A licence holder must not ask for payment for PPE from employees and workers who would be legally regarded as employees for health and safety purposes. This includes seeking refundable or non-refundable deposits.

(PCV) entitlement and driver Certificate of Professional Competence if driving a vehicle with nine or more passenger seats used for hire or

Accidents must be properly investigated so that lessons can be learned and changes can be made to ways of working, equipment or supervision if necessary.

A vehicle used by the licence holder to transport workers must:

required,

 have appropriate insurance, including cover for all circumstances of hire or reward regardless of the size of the vehicle,  be in a roadworthy condition and have

reward, and

 Comply with rules covering drivers’ hours and tachographs.

Please note

In assessing whether a vehicle has “obvious or identifiable” defects, the GLA will apply a common sense test of whether the vehicle is clearly unsafe, for example, without seatbelts or with unsafe seats and doors.

A licence holder who operates vehicles with 9 or more passenger seats used for hire or reward must:

 have a Public Service Vehicles (PSV) Operator’s licence, and

The GLA will take a proportionate view in deciding on whether to fail this standard for minor infringements or easily fixable issues.

Failure against this standard may lead to a licence being revoked with immediate effect.

no obvious or identifiable defects, and

 carry workers in a safe manner.

A driver used by the licence holder to transport workers must:

 hold a valid driving licence,  have Passenger Carrying Vehicle

 have a valid vehicle licence (tax disc)  have an applicable MOT certificate if

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vehicles are registered and maintained as PSVs and have a Certificate of Initial Fitness.

If a worker fails to return the PPE, as long as the requirement to do so has been made clear in writing, the licence holder may deduct the cost of the replacement from any wages owed.

6.4 Critical: Transport

 have documentary evidence that the

6.5 Critical: Using workers to gather shellfish - planning and supervision

A licence holder must ensure each group of workers has a recognised and competent supervisor / group leader named on the licence. The supervisor / group leaders must:

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 have knowledge of local tide tables (and

 allow sufficient time to get workers

have an accurate watch) and forecast weather and local conditions (including quicksand, shifting gullies, rivers in flood, the nature and speed of the tide),

ashore safely,

 have high visibility clothing which is both warm and weatherproof available

 notify the Maritime and Coastguard

workers under their control,

Agency Rescue and Coordination

 have a suitable communications device (either a VHF marine band radio or a mobile telephone where reception is adequate). Batteries should be sufficiently charged and the devices should be kept dry,

Centre of times going out and coming back, where the work is planned to take place, the size of the group, the licence holder’s URN and contact details.

Please note

 have a location device, preferably

Failure against this standard may

 have emergency telephone numbers for the Maritime and Coastguard

6.6 Critical: Using workers to gather shellfish - getting to the work area

Agency and other Emergency Services

lead to a licence being revoked with

a Global Positioning Unit (GPS) and/or compass,

as well as appropriately maintained and correctly used emergency equipment (including flares and whistles in case of fog or mist),

 recognise that working at night creates

additional risks and requires appropriate and special precautions,

 accompany the workforce as

appropriate when working below the high tide mark,

 be able to demonstrate they can

immediate effect.

A licence holder must ensure:

 any vehicle used to access the fishery

is suitable for the work area and has sufficient fuel for emergencies. If access is via public roads, all vehicles must be roadworthy and properly insured, and

 where a trailer pulled by any vehicle is used to carry passengers, they must be suitable, including being fitted with a headboard, tailboard and suitable side protection to prevent passengers falling off and provided with adequate means of

adequately supervise all workers.

communication between the driver and

The size of the group will depend on the

trailer. Passengers should not be carried

experience of the licence holder and/or

in tractor cabs (unless the manufacturer

supervisor as well as the prevailing

has provided a second seat), on tractor

weather and local conditions,

steps or on the drawbar.

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The Gangmasters Licensing Authority | The GLA Licensing Standards - Part two

for the workers,

 be able to communicate directly with

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The Gangmasters Licensing Authority | The GLA Licensing Standards - Part two

The GLA licensing standards may 2012

Please note

Please note

Failure against this standard may lead to a licence being revoked with immediate effect.

Failure against this standard may lead to a licence being revoked with immediate effect.

6.7 Critical: Using workers to gather shellfish - lifejackets and life rafts

and life rafts must be routinely checked and maintained in accordance with the supplier’s instructions. A worker using a lifejacket and/or life raft must be properly trained and be able to

7.1 Critical: Fees and providing additional services

A licence holder must not charge a fee to a worker for any work-finding services.

A licence holder must not make providing work-finding services conditional on the worker:

operate them in an emergency.

Please note

Failure against this standard may lead to a licence being revoked with immediate effect.

6.8 Critical: Using workers to gather shellfish - use of boats

Any boat used by a licence holder for accessing fisheries and transporting workers must be a Maritime and Coastguard Agency certificated workboat.

Please note

Failure against this standard may lead to a

 using other services or hiring or purchasing goods provided by the licence holder or any person connected to them, or

 giving or not withdrawing consent to disclosing information about that worker

A worker must be able to cancel or withdraw from any services provided at any time without incurring any detriment or penalty, subject to the worker giving 5 working days notice or, for services relating to providing accommodation, 10 working days.

licence being revoked with immediate effect.

Please note

6.9 Critical: Using Workers to Gather Shellfish

“Work-finding services” means services (whether by providing information or otherwise) provided by a licence holder:

– Shellfish gathering permits and licences

Where a permit or licence for shellfish gathering is required, a licence holder must ensure that the workers possess and comply with that permit or licence.

106

Recruiting Workers and Contractual Arrangements

A licence holder must provide lifejackets and life rafts where required. Lifejackets

 Licensing Standard 7:

 to a person for the purpose of finding

that person employment or seeking to find that person employment,

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 to an employee of the licence holder

 whether the worker is or will be supplied

for the purpose of finding or seeking to find another person, with a view to the employee acting for and under the control of that other person, or

by the licence holder under a contract of service (i.e. a contract of employment) or a contract for services, and in either case,

 an undertaking to pay the worker for

finding or seeking to find another person (“B”), with a view to A becoming employed by the licence holder and acting for and under the control of B.

any work carried out regardless of whether the licence holder has been paid by the labour user,

 the length of notice the worker is

Failure against this standard will lead to a licence being revoked without immediate effect.

required to give and entitled to receive to terminate any particular assignment,

 the pay rate or the minimum rate to

7.2 Right to Work

be expected

A worker must have entitlement to undertake the work in question in the UK.

 details of the intervals at which

Please note

A worker’s visa restrictions must be complied with.

 details of any entitlement to annual

In the event that it is discovered that a worker is not legally entitled to work in the

remuneration will be paid, and holidays and to payment in respect of such holidays

where possible in one document, and give

UK, this standard will not be failed if the

the worker the written terms before the

licence holder has established and retained

licence holder provides any services to the

a statutory defence.

worker. This does not apply if the worker

7.3 Workers: Contractual Arrangements and Records

Agreeing Terms with Workers

Before supplying a worker to a labour user, a licence holder must agree the terms which will apply between the licence holder and the worker. The terms must include:

 the type of work the licence holder will find or seek to find for the worker,

www.labourproviders.org.uk

A licence holder must record all the terms,

has been given a written statement of employment particulars in accordance with Part I of the Employment Rights Act 1996.

Terms may be varied only by written

The Gangmasters Licensing Authority | The GLA Licensing Standards - Part two

the terms and conditions which will apply,

 to a person (“A”) for the purpose of

agreement from the worker. A copy of this agreement must be provided to the worker as soon as possible and no later than the end of the fifth working day following the date the variation was agreed.

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The Gangmasters Licensing Authority | The GLA Licensing Standards - Part two

The GLA licensing standards may 2012

Notifying Details of Fees and Services

A worker must be informed in writing of any fees relating to services which they have taken up. This should include:

 the amount or method of calculation

 details of any requirements specified

of the fee,

by the worker in relation to taking up employment,

 the identity of the person to whom the fee is or will be payable,

 the names of labour users or sub-

 a description of the services or goods to

contractors/other labour providers to whom the worker is supplied,

which the fee relates as well as explaining the worker’s right to cancel or withdraw from the service and the length or notice period required, and

 details of any resulting engagement and the date from which it takes effect,

 the date any contract was terminated, where applicable, and

 the circumstances, if any, in which

refunds or rebates are payable to the worker, the scale of such refunds or rebates, and if no refunds or rebates are payable, a statement to that effect.

A licence holder may not make the continued provision of any services by them

 where payments are made by a worker,

other than those legally required, there is evidence of the worker’s written consent.

Please note

A licence holder must record all terms in writing, where practicable in one document, and give the worker the written terms before they provide services to the worker.

Records must be kept for at least one year. Records may be kept either in written or electronic form.

A licence holder may keep records either at the premises where they trade, or elsewhere, provided they are readily accessible and capable of being delivered to the licence holder’s premises in the UK or to the Authority within two working days.

to a worker conditional on the worker agreeing to any variation.

Worker Records

A licence holder must record as soon as reasonably practicable:

 the date terms are agreed between the licence holder and the worker,

 the worker’s name, address

and, if under 22, date of birth,

 any terms which apply or will apply

between the licence holder and the worker, and any document recording any variation,

 any relevant details of the worker’s training, experience or qualifications

108

and any authorisation to undertake particular work (and copies of any relevant documentary evidence obtained by the licence holder),

7.4 Labour User: Agreements and Records

Agreeing Terms with Labour Users

Before first providing services, other than providing information, to a labour user, a

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licence holder must agree in writing the terms which will apply between the licence holder and labour user, including:

 a copy of the terms between the licence

Details of any fee which may be payable by the labour user to the licence holder including:

 the names of workers supplied,  the details of each resulting engagement

holder and the labour user, and any document recording any variation,

and date from which it takes effect, and

the fee.

 dates of requests by the licence holder

 the circumstances in which a refund or

for fees or other payment from the labour user and of receipt of such fees or other payments, and copies of statements or invoices.

rebate will be payable to the labour user and, if none is payable, a statement to that effect in the terms, and

 the procedure to be followed if

a worker introduced or supplied to the labour user proves unsatisfactory.

 If any variation to those terms is agreed,

Please note

Records must be kept for at least one year.

A licence holder may either keep records at the premises where they trade, or elsewhere, provided the records are readily accessible and capable of being delivered to the licence holder’s premises in the UK or to the GLA within two working days.

Records may be kept in either written or electronic form.

A licence holder must send a copy of the terms to the labour user as soon as reasonably practicable. The licence holder and the labour user must agree to any variation in the terms set out in this document and the licence holder must provide a document containing details and the date of the variation as soon as is reasonably practicable.

the licence holder must provide the labour user with a document containing details and the date of the variation as soon as reasonably practicable.

Records

A licence holder must record, as soon as reasonably practicable, the following details relating to each labour user:

 the date terms are agreed between the licence holder and labour user,

 the labour user’s name and address, and

location of the place of work if different,

 details of the position(s) the labour user seeks to fill,

 the duration or likely duration of the work,  any training, experience or qualifications and any authorisation to undertake particular work,

 the terms offered in respect of the

position the labour user seeks to fill,

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The Gangmasters Licensing Authority | The GLA Licensing Standards - Part two

 the amount and method of calculating

7.5 Restriction on charges to labour users

A licence holder must not seek a transfer fee from a labour user, or seek to enforce any other contractual terms, for a worker to be employed by the labour user or for

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The GLA licensing standards may 2012 another licence holder to supply that worker to the labour user if:

The Gangmasters Licensing Authority | The GLA Licensing Standards - Part two

 the contract between the licence holder

and labour user does not include an option for the licence holder to choose for an extended period of supply, as specified in the contract, at the end of which the worker will transfer without charge,

 the worker is employed by the labour

user or supplied by another licence holder after eight weeks from when the worker last worked for the licence holder or 14 weeks from the first day on which the worker started work for the labour user, whichever date is later.

Please note

Where a labour user opts for an extended period of supply, the licence holder must supply the worker for the entirety of that period on terms no less favourable to the labour user than those that applied between the licence holder and the labour user before the licence holder received notice that the labour user wished to opt for the extended period of supply. If there has been a period of more than 42 days where a licence holder has not supplied the worker to the labour user, then this will break continuity for calculating the start of the 14 week period.

A licence holder must only use a sub-contractor and/or other labour provider who holds a current GLA licence.

Please note

It is a criminal offence to use an unlicensed gangmaster under section 13 of the Gangmasters (Licensing) Act 2004.

Failure against this standard may lead to a licence being revoked with immediate effect.

The standard will not be failed if the licence holder has complied with the Reasonable Steps guidance or the GLA’s Active Check process for verifying that the subcontractor or other labour provider is licensed, and has retained documentary evidence of such compliance to establish a statutory defence.

8.2 Records of dealing with other licence holders

A licence holder must record as soon as reasonably practicable the names of any other sub-contractors whose services the licence holder uses.

Please note

Records must be kept for at least one year.

Records may be kept at any premises a licence holder uses for or in connection with the carrying on of their business, or elsewhere; if kept elsewhere, the licence holder must ensure the records are readily accessible and capable of being delivered to the licence holder’s premises in the UK or to the GLA within 2 working days.

Records may be kept either in written or electronic form.

 Licensing Standard 8:

Sub-contracting and using other labour providers

8.1 Critical: Sub-contracting and using other labour providers

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professionalism

experience seriousness

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Tel: 07512 646489 andy@jackdawcreative.co.uk www.jackdawcreative.co.uk


ALP MEMBERS DIRECTORY

PROMOTING

AGENCY LABOUR BEST PRACTICE


HANDBOOK & MEMBER DIRECTORY 2017 Please contact 01276 509306 or email info@labourproviders.org.uk to reserve space or request your 2017 Media Pack

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ALP MEMBERS 1st Stop Recruitment Ltd

A D & R Fisher

6 Jubilee Walk, Haverhill, Suffolk, CB9 8DA t: 01440 763021 e: lesley@1ststoprecruitment.co.uk www.1ststoprecruitment.co.uk

44 Churchfield Road, Outwell, Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, PE14 8RL t: 01945 772608 e: fisher.regina@googlemail.com

Lesley Whiting

24 Hour Recruitment Limited t/a Nationwide Recruitment Services Sarah Bannister

24-7 Employment Solutions Ltd Harem Kamishi

198 Parrock Street, Gravesend, Kent, DA12 1EW t: 01474 328693 e: harem@247esl.co.uk www.247esl.co.uk

360 Recruitment Ltd Gregory Tyler

The Landmark, Tudor Square, West Bridgford, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, NG2 6BT t: 01159 233366 e: greg@360rec.co.uk www.360rec.co.uk

365 Resources and Recruitment Ltd t/a MRR Recruitment Adam Raybould

Unit 32, Wem Business Park, New Street, Wem, Shropshire, SY4 5JX t: 01939 234660 e: adam@mrrrecruitment.co.uk www.mrrrecruitment.co.uk

725 Ltd

Bashir Ali

48 High Street, Gravesend, Kent, DA11 0AY t: 01474 533745 e: bashir@725ltd.co.uk www.725ltd.co.uk

www.labourproviders.org.uk

A

Abbey Personnel Services Ltd Mark Straw

3 Gowthorpe, Selby, North Yorkshire, YO8 4HE t: 01757 212020 e: mark.straw@abbeypersonnel.com www.abbeypersonnel.com

Abby Services Ltd Olesgun Abiodun

114 Eastwood Road, Boston, Lincolnshire, PE21 0PN t: 07740 281343 e: enquiries@abbyservicesltd.co.uk www.abbyservicesltd.co.uk

Ablet Limited

Manjinder Aytain

Unit 2, Community Enterprise, 1 Beeches Road, West Bromwich, West Midlands, B70 6QE t: 07747 337090 e: info@ablet.co.uk

Active Recruitment Academy Ltd

ALP Membership Directory | ALP Members

Security House, 6 Tilbury Avenue, Holbeck, Leeds, West Yorkshire, LS11 0BP t: 0113 276 0330 e: sarah.bannister@24nationwide.co.uk www.24nationwide.co.uk

David Fisher

Sinead Osborne

c/o Tayto Group, Princewood Road, Earlstree Ind Est, Corby, Northamptonshire, NN17 4AP t: 01536 260045 e: sineadosborne@outlook.com www.activerecruitmentacademy.co.uk

ADS Recruitment Ltd Mike Panchmatia

1 Queensway, Southampton, Hampshire, SO14 3AQ t: 02380 630077 e: mike@adsrecruitment.co.uk www.adsrecruitment.co.uk

113


ALP MEMBERS A

AG Recruitment and Management SRL

Ambitions Personnel Ltd t/a Ambitions Personnel

Jull Cottage, Rhode Common, Selling, Faversham, Kent, ME13 9PU t: 01227 752813 e: estera@agrecruitment.eu www.agrecruitment.eu

Firth Court, Firth Road, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, LN5 7WD t: 01522 546643 e: mandy.watson@ambitionspersonnel.com www.ambitionspersonnel.com

Agentis Agriculture Ltd

Anglia Farmers Ltd

Estera Amesz

ALP Membership Directory | ALP Members

Jane Fielden

2-4 Carr Street, Ipswich, Suffolk, IP4 1EJ t: 01473 220999 e: jane@agentissolutions.com www.agentisagri.co.uk

Agrico Workforce Ltd Asen Gyuneliev

84 Luton Road, Chatham, Kent, ME4 5AB t: 01634 812492 e: info@agricoworkforce.co.uk www.agricoworkforce.co.uk

Agricola Recruitment LLP Nicholas Cooper

Hill Farm, Whitchurch Road, Broomhall, Nantwich, Cheshire, CW5 8BZ t: 07803 370559 e: agricolallp@outlook.com

Agrix Ltd

Edgars Miezitis

5 Princes Croft, Coupar Angus, Perth & Kinross, PH13 9EH t: 01828 627992 e: info@agrixltd.co.uk

Alpha Facilities Management Ltd t/a Aktrion Food & Drink Derek Quinn

Pemberton House, Stafford Court, Stafford Park 1, Tetford, Shropshire, TF3 3BD t: 01638 742400 e: derek.quinn@aktrion.com www.aktrionfood.com

114

Amanda Watson

Clarke Willis

Honingham Thorpe, Colton, Norwich, Norfolk, NR9 5BZ t: 01603 881881 e: clarke.willis@angliafarmers.co.uk www.angliafarmers.co.uk

Anytime Resources Ltd Muhammad Malik

Heathrow Cube, 9 Arkwright Road, Colnbrook, Berkshire, SL3 0HJ t: 01753 681391 e: mn.malik@anytimeresourcesltd.com www.anytimeresourcesltd.com

Aqumen Business Solutions Ltd t/a Aqumen Recruitment Andy Taylor

Bank House, 12 Bank Street, Castleford, West Yorkshire, WF10 1HZ t: 01977 515626 e: andy.taylor@aqumenrecruitment.co.uk www.aqumen-recruitment.co.uk

Assist Recruitment UK Ltd Natalie Roberts

Suite 11 The Matchworks, Speke, Liverpool, Cheshire, L19 2RF t: 07970 951774 e: natalieroberts@assist.co.uk www.assist.co.uk

Aven Ltd

Giedrius Venckunas

32 Corbyn Shaw Road, King's Lynn, Norfolk, PE30 4UL t: 01553 761576 e: info@avenltd.uk www.avenltd.uk

t: 01276 509306


ALP MEMBERS Baileys Permanent Agency Ltd t/a Baileys Job Agency Ltd Maureen Bailey

Blue Arrow Ltd t/a Blue Arrow Suzanne Lewis

2-4 Palace Ave, White Rock, Hastings, East Sussex, TN34 1JR t: 01424 430033 e: admin@baileysjobagency.co.uk

800 The Boulevard, Capability Green, Luton, Bedfordshire, LU1 3BA t: 01582 692 695 e: suzanne.lewis@bluearrow.co.uk www.bluearrow.co.uk

Bailie and Bailie Ltd

Blue Mountain Recruitment Ltd

8 Bittern Way, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, LN6 0JG t: 01522 800768 e: dee.bailie4@yahoo.com

28 Sidney Close, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, TN2 5QQ t: 07828 010864 e: bluemountainrecruitment@hotmail.co.uk www.bmrjobs.co.uk

David Bailie

Paulo Freitas

Unit 33, Broadfield Lane, Boston, Lincolnshire, PE21 8DR t: 01205 316529 e: hr@balticservices.co.uk www.balticservices.co.uk

Barway Services Ltd Will Goosen

Barway Road, Ely, Cambridgeshire, CB7 5TZ t: 01353 727251 e: will.goosen@gs-fresh.com www.gs-fresh.com

Be Personnel Ltd Angela Brunton

85 High Street, Alness, Ross-shire, IV17 0SH t: 01349 883303 e: angela@bepersonneltd.com www.bepersonneltd.com

Best Links UK Ltd Amjad Aziz

660 Washwood Heath Road, Ward End, Birmingham, West Midlands, B8 2HQ t: 0121 448 9898 e: amjad@bestlinksuk.com www.bestlinksuk.com

www.labourproviders.org.uk

Marilena Panaite

Borders Area Services Ltd Michael Bayne

Galamoor House, Netherdale, Galashiels, Scottish Borders, TD1 3EY t: 01896 758091 e: michael@ringleader.co.uk www.ringleader.co.uk

C & H Agency t/a Staff UK Bolton Julie Ramsden

Mawdsley Terrace, 17 Mawdsley Street, Bolton, Greater Manchester, BL1 1JZ t: 01204 399700 e: julie.ramsden@staffukbolton.co.uk www.staffukbolton.com

ALP Membership Directory | ALP Members

Baltic Services (Boston) Ltd

B|C

C B Jones Ltd

Christopher Jones

5 Troed-y-Bryn, Builth Wells, Powys, LD2 3FE t: 07825 181405 e: cbjones21@outlook.com

C F Recruitment Ltd t/a Cityfield Recruitment Marcel Houweling

The Old Airfield, City Fields Way, Tangmere, West Sussex, PO20 2FT t: 01243 755840 e: marcel@cityfield.co.uk www.cityfield.co.uk

115


ALP MEMBERS C

C R Services North West Limited t/a Central Recruitment Natalie Smith

Unit 309 Daisyfield Mill, Appleby Street, Blackburn, Lancashire, BB1 3BL t: 01254 460800 e: natalie@centralrecruit.co.uk www.centralrecruit.co.uk

Capital Outsourcing Group Food Ltd

ALP Membership Directory | ALP Members

Melissa Jordan

131 Lichfield Street, Walsall, West Midlands, WS1 1SL t: 01922 666714 e: melissa@headofficeaccounts.com www.coguk.com

Careermakers Recruitment (UK) Ltd t/a Careermakers Recruitment Mohammed Akram

86 Cheetham Hill Road, Manchester, Lancashire, M4 4EX t: 0161 764 2169 e: omair@career-makers.co.uk www.career-makers.co.uk

CC Business Services Ltd t/a City Centre Recruitment Dan Shrimpton

114 Old Christchurch Road, Bournemouth, Dorset, BH1 1LU t: 01202 586930 e: dan.shrimpton@citycentrerecruitment.co.uk www.citycentrerecruitment.co.uk

CDS Labour Ltd t/a CDS Carl Steele

The Office, Chapel Farm, Hop Pole, Spalding, Lincolnshire, PE11 3DS t: 01775 302010 e: carl@cdslabour.co.uk www.carldavidsteele.co.uk

Central Trade Sales Ltd t/a Central Labour Solutions Mike Pearson

Westminster Buildings, 1-3 Mill Street, Crewe, Cheshire, CW2 7AE t: 01270 505606 e: mike@centrallaboursolutions.co.uk

116

Century Services (UK) Ltd Carl Allen / Paul Allen

Garage Lane, Setchey, King's Lynn, Norfolk, PE33 0BE t: 07787 521218 / 07917 152009 e: century.services@hotmail.co.uk

CIP Recruitment Services Ltd Alison Clement

116 Lumley Road, Horley, Surrey, RH6 7JJ t: 01293 778006 e: alison.clement@ciprecruitment.com www.ciprecruitment.com

City Resource Ltd Jeannette Elrick

54b Broadway, Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, PE1 1SB t: 01733 344382 e: hr@cityresourceltd.co.uk www.cityresourceltd.co.uk

CJ & KE Dawson Agric Services Ltd Christopher Dawson

43 Woolram Wygate, Spalding, Lincolnshire, PE11 1PB t: 01775 714111 e: admin@dawsonagriculturalservices.co.uk www.dawsonagriculturalservices.co.uk

Class1Personnel

Bernadette Collins

1A High Street, Hounslow, Middlesex, TW3 1RH t: 0208 569 5055 e: bernadette@class1personnel.com www.class1personnel.com

Concept Recruitment Group Ltd Tracey Oxley

4215 Park Approach, Thorpe Park, Leeds, West Yorkshire, LS15 8GB t: 0843 290 3323 e: traceyoxley@conceptrecruitment.com www.conceptrecruitment.com

t: 01276 509306


ALP MEMBERS Concordia (UK) Ltd

Cornish Labour Services Ltd

19 North Street, Portslade, Brighton, East Sussex, BN41 1DH t: 01273 426498 e: dean.mosdell@concordia.org.uk www.concordia.org.uk

Higher Trevaskis Farm, Connor Downs, Hayle, Cornwall, TR27 5JQ t: 01736 850960 e: tom@pesimmons.com www.rivieraproduce.eu

Dean Mosdell

Thomas Simmons

Connect Personnel Ltd t/a Connect Personnel

Cream Personnel Services Limited

11 Milton Road, Gravesend, Kent, DA12 2RE t: 01474 328838 e: paul@connectpersonnel.co.uk www.connectpersonnel.co.uk

2 Victoria Square, Hanley, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, ST1 4JH t: 01782 262731 e: jenny.muir@creampersonnel.co.uk www.creampersonnel.co.uk

Paul Bennett

Sarah Hooper

1 & 2 Saints Court, All Saints Green, Norwich, Norfolk, NR1 3LP t: 01603 764044 e: sarah@contract-personnel.ltd.uk www.contract-personnel.com

Contracts Support Services Ltd t/a CSS Recruitment & Training Stephen Gleeson

CSS House, 10-12 Manor Street, Braintree, Essex, CM7 3HP t: 01376 330700 e: stephen.gleeson@csspeople.co.uk www.csspeople.co.uk

Cordant Group Plc Ken Steers

2nd Floor, 7-9 Swallow Street, London, W1D 4BE t: 0203 771 2217 e: ken.steers@cordantgroup.com www.cordantgroup.com

Jennifer Muir

Daranden Ltd Agricultural Recruitment Specialists Darren McCarthy

235 Lynn Road, Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, PE13 3DZ t: 07876 776604 e: darren@daranden.co.uk www.daranden.co.uk

Databail t/as CSA Recruitment Robert Rees

Llanelli Gate Business Park, Dafen, Llanelli, Carmarthenshire, SA14 8LQ t: 01554 746746 e: robert@csarecruitment.co.uk www.csarecruitment.co.uk

Deepmist Ltd Alan Precious

67 Marshfield Road, Goole, East Yorkshire, DN14 5JQ t: 01405 720020 e: alan_precious@yahoo.co.uk

Core Staff Services Ltd t/a CSS Ltd

Dial-a-Worker Ltd

Office 18, Welland Work Space, 10 Pinchbeck Rd, Spalding, Lincolnshire, PE11 1QD t: 01775 710226 e: css@corestaffservices.co.uk www.corestaff.com

Sandpit Lodge, Reepham Rd, Briston, Melton Constable, Norfolk, NR24 2LJ t: 01263 861962 e: barbndaw@btinternet.com www.dialaworker.co.uk

Marion Bird

www.labourproviders.org.uk

ALP Membership Directory | ALP Members

Contract Personnel Ltd

C|D

Barbara Nutkins

117


ALP MEMBERS D|E

Direct Response Employment Services

Encore Personnel Services Ltd

50 Fore Street, Trowbridge, Wiltshire, BA14 8ES t: 01225 776500 e: dmills@direct-response.co.uk www.direct-response.co.uk

Encore House, 32 Millstone Lane, Leicester, Leicestershire, LE1 5JN t: 01162 620651 e: ibriers@encorepersonnel.co.uk www.encorepersonnel.co.uk

Diane Mills

Direct Staff UK

EST-VEST Services SRL

Vista Business Centre, 50 Salisbury Road, Hounslow, Middlesex, TW4 6JQ t: 0208 538 0378 e: mac@directstaffuk.com www.directstaffuk.com

34-36 Carol I Ave, Floor 12, Sector 2, Bucharest, Romania, t: 00407 4436 7473 e: alex_rombar@yahoo.com www.europik.com

ALP Membership Directory | ALP Members

Mac Hear

Alexandru Barbacaru

East Recruitment Admin Ltd

ETW Recruitment Ltd

Unit 4, Wolf Business Park, Alton Road, Ross-on-Wye, Herefordshire, HR9 5NB t: 01989 763284 e: imelda@eastrecruitment.co.uk www.eastrecruitment.co.uk

30 Reform Street, Blairgowrie, Perthshire, PH10 6BD t: 01250 798715 e: etwrecruitment@gmail.com

Imelda Keturkaite

Easyrecruituk.com Ltd Fraser McLean

Tower Buildings, 48 West George Street, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, G2 1BP t: 0330 004 0506 e: fraser.mclean@easyrecruituk.com www.easyrecruituk.com

EDS Recruitment Ltd t/a J & C Recruitment John Ransom

Ivatt Way, Westwood, Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, PE3 7PG t: 01733 334396 e: john@jandcrecruitment.co.uk

ELL Recruitment Ltd Margarita Naab

2 Kirk Street, Peterhead, Aberdeenshire, AB42 1RX t: 07789 686545 e: ellrecruitment@yahoo.com

118

Ian Briers

Alexander Gingioveanu

Euro Connect Center Ltd Tomasz Markiewicz

29 Vicarage Road, Watford, Hertfordshire, WD18 0DE t: 07769 680522 e: t.markiewicz@ecclimited.co.uk www.ecclimited.co.uk

Euro Contracts Services Ltd Alan Barber

165a Chalvey Grove, Slough, Berkshire, SL1 2TD t: 07414 919185 e: ecs-limited@btconnect.com

Europa Personnel Ltd Ollie Bekker

Clockhouse Farm, Packhouse Cottage, Coxheath, Kent, ME17 4PG t: 07841 912052 e: europapersonnel@gmail.com www.europapersonnel.co.uk

t: 01276 509306


ALP MEMBERS Europeople Ltd John Davison

Unit 1, Stablethorpe, Thorpe Constantine, Tamworth, Staffordshire, B79 0LH t: 01827 839260 e: info@europeople.co.uk www.europeople.co.uk

Euroployment Ltd Rodger Ashcroft

Mark Foster

22 Queens Road, Brighton, East Sussex, BN1 3XA t: 01273 202453 e: mark@fprgroup.com www.fprgroup.com

First Personnel Group Ltd Matthew Reddy

Celtic House, 135-140 Hatherton Street, Walsall, West Midlands, WS1 1YB t: 01922 723377 e: m.reddy@jobsatfirst.com www.jobsatfirst.com

Euwork Ltd

Focused Recruitment Limited

77-81 Seaview Road, Wallasey, Merseyside, CH45 4LE t: 0151 324 0111 e: info@euwork.co.uk

Business & Technology Tredomen Park, Ystrad Mynach, Hengoed, Mid Glamorgan, CF82 7FN t: 01443 832400 e: office@focusedrecruitment.co.uk www.focusedrecruitment.co.uk

Marcell Tanay

Extraman Ltd

Adrian Gregory

2 Hogarth Place, Earls Court, London, SW5 0QT t: 0207 373 3045 e: apg@extramanrecruitment.co.uk www.extramanrecruitment.co.uk

Farm Solutions Ltd Joe Rowe

Renelec House, 46 New Street, Devizes, Wiltshire, SN10 1DT t: 01380 720567 e: jrowe@farm-solutions.co.uk www.farm-solutions.co.uk

First Call Contract Services Ltd David Segust

19 Duke Street, Chelmsford, Essex, CM1 1HL t: 01245 266550 e: david.segust@firstcallcontractservices.co.uk www.firstcallcontractservices.co.uk

www.labourproviders.org.uk

E|F

Kathryn Morgan

Free2Move Ltd Stan Georgiev

Alexandra House, 33 Alexandra Road, Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, PE13 1HQ t: 07859 859859 e: office@free2move.co.uk www.free2move.co.uk

ALP Membership Directory | ALP Members

1 Sawtry Rd, Glatton, Huntington, Cambridgeshire, PE28 5RZ t: 01487 834348 e: rodger@euroployment.co.uk www.euroployment.co.uk

First People Recruitment Ltd t/a FPR Group

Frontline Recruitment Partnerships Ltd Kurt Witcomb

Whitefriars House, 25 Friar Lane, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, NG1 6DA t: 01159 838633 e: partnerships@frontlinerecruitment.co.uk www.frontlinerecruitment.co.uk

Fruitful Jobs Ltd Rachel Hubbard

The Smithy Warehouse, Harewood End, Herefordshire, HR2 8JT t: 01989 500130 e: info@fruitfuljobs.com www.fruitfuljobs.com

119


ALP MEMBERS F|G

Fruits of Labour Ltd

Gary's Labour Agency

22 High Park Avenue, Hove, East Sussex, BN3 8PE t: 01243 210241 e: paul@fruits-of-labour.com www.fruits-of-labour.com

52 Swallow Avenue, Skellingthorpe, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, LN6 5XW t: 01522 828197 e: gary@glarecruitment.co.uk

Paul Woodrow-Hill

G M Recruitment Agency Ltd

ALP Membership Directory | ALP Members

George Sheppard

Gateway Recruitment Services Nigel Stearn

52 Tytton Lane East, Wyberton, Boston, Lincolnshire, PE21 7HW t: 01205 359218 e: georgesheppard@tiscali.co.uk

Unit G, Camilla Court, Nacton, Ipswich, Suffolk, IP10 0EU t: 01473 558860 e: nigel@grsrecruit.co.uk www.grsrecruit.co.uk

G Team Recruitment Ltd

Genesis Employment Services Ltd

3 Grosvenor Road, Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, PE13 3NS t: 01945 466328 e: gteamrecruitment@hotmail.com

First Floor, 8 Hay Lane, Coventry, West Midlands, CV1 5RF t: 02476 553553 e: enquiry@genesisemployment.net www.genesis-employment.co.uk

Grant Sparrow

G Tek Labour Ltd

Richard Frost

Eamon Watson

Gi Group Recruitment Ltd

Galaxy Personnel Ltd

Draefern House, Dunston Court, Dunston Road, Chesterfield, Derbyshire, S41 8NL t: 01246 267000 e: joanne.young@gigroup.com www.gigroupuk.com

44 Kyme Road, Boston, Lincolnshire, PE21 8NQ t: 07919 341101 e: gteklabourltd@gmail.com

Peter Blackmur

8 Market Place, Thetford, Norfolk, IP24 2AL t: 01842 820409 e: pblackmur@galaxypersonnel.co.uk www.galaxypersonnel.co.uk

gap personnel Holdings Ltd Mark Roberts

gap personnel House, Unit K2 Yale Business Village, Wrexham Technology Park, Ellice Way, Wrexham, Clwyd, LL13 7YL t: 01978 294201 e: mark.roberts@gap-personnel.com www.gap-personnel.com

120

Gary Cook

Joanne Young

Go Produce Ltd Ruth Counsell

First Floor Knightrider Chambers, 12 Knightrider Street, Maidstone, Kent, ME15 6LP t: 01622 690555 e: ruth@go-rg.com www.go-rg.com

Golden Angels

Edyta Siemieniuk

13 Kings Road, Coupar Angus, Perth & Kinross, PH13 9EQ t: 01828 958257 e: goldenangels.e@gmail.com

t: 01276 509306


ALP MEMBERS Goldteam Recruitment Ltd t/a Goldteam

HC Recruitment (East Anglia) Ltd

Montrose House, 1st Floor, 155-161 Farnham Road, Slough, Berkshire, SL1 4XP t: 0333 444 0222 e: naveed@goldteam.co.uk www.goldteam.co.uk

12 Bank Street, Norwich, Norfolk, NR2 4SE t: 01603 768400 e: kathryn.cooper@hcrecruitmentlimited.co.uk www.hcrecruitmentlimited.co.uk

Naveed Ahmed

Kathryn Cooper

Grafton Recruitment Ltd

Helping Hand Recruitment Ltd

The Boat, 49 Queens Square, Belfast, County Antrim, BT1 3FG t: 02890 242824 e: kadams@graftonrecruitment.com www.graftonrecruitment.com

Customs House, The Quay, Penzance, Cornwall, TR18 4AA t: 01736 335900 e: andrew.david@orange.fr www.helpinghandltd.com

Kerri Adams

Andrew David

Holbeach Recruitment Ltd

59 Llanmiloe Estate, Llanmiloe, Pendine, Carmarthenshire, SA33 4UE t: 07784 707000 e: rovnaknavohejbak@gmail.com

Unit 8 Wrights Mews, 12a Park Road, Holbeach, Spalding, Lincolnshire, PE12 7EE t: 01406 426637 e: steve@holbeachrecruitment.co.uk www.holbeachrecruitment.co.uk

H2 Contracts Ltd Neville McGroarty

Office Unit 6, Itec Business Park, 52 Armagh Road, Newry, Co Down, BT35 6HL t: 02830 252447 e: info@h2contracts.co.uk www.h2contracts.co.uk

Hands To Work Recruitment Ltd Katarzyna Wieczorek

Millbank Business Centre, 1 Williams Street, Southampton, Hampshire, SO14 5QH t: 02380 230025 e: kasia@handstowork.co.uk www.handstowork.co.uk

Harper and Guy Consulting Ltd t/a H & G Recruitment Solutions Charlotte Harper

E2 The Courtyard, Alban Park, St Albans, Hertfordshire, AL4 0LA t: 01707 636680 e: enquiries@h-g-recruitment.com www.h-g-recruitment.com

www.labourproviders.org.uk

Steven Conroy

HOPS Labour Solutions Ltd John Hardman

YFC Centre, Stoneleigh Park, Kenilworth, Warwickshire, CV8 2LG t: 02476 698008 e: john.hardman@hopsls.com www.hopslaboursolutions.com

ALP Membership Directory | ALP Members

Grasshoppers Crop Care Ltd Daniel Jungmann

G|H

HR Essentials Ltd t/a Essential Recruitment Gary Wilson

Blenheim Court, 17 Newbold Road, Chesterfield, Derbyshire, S41 7PG t: 01246 278000 e: gary.wilson@essentialrecruitment.co.uk www.essentialrecruitment.co.uk

Hunterskill Recruitment Ltd Reg Jacob

245 Norwich Road, Ipswich, Suffolk, IP1 4BU t: 01473 557941 e: reg.jacob@hunterskill.com www.hunterskillrecruitment.co.uk

121


ALP MEMBERS I |J

IEPUK Ltd

Vanessa Peach

18 Leicester Road, Uppingham, Rutland, LE15 9SD t: 01572 823934 e: vanessa.peach@iepuk.co.uk www.iepuk.co.uk

Industrial Temps Ltd

ALP Membership Directory | ALP Members

Roisin Thompson

Park House, 87-91 Great Victoria Street, Belfast, County Antrim, BT2 7AG t: 02890 322511 e: roisin.thompson@industrialtemps.com www.industrialtemps.com

Integral Recruitment Services Gary Peake

Sherbourne House, 59 Corporation Street, Coventry, West Midlands, CV1 1AQ t: 02476 224359 e: gary@integral-recruitment.co.uk www.integral-recruitment.co.uk

Interaction Recruitment PLC Geoff Holder

Interaction House, 43 High Street, Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire, PE29 3AQ t: 01480 436111 e: geoff.holder@irweb.co.uk www.irweb.co.uk

Iwona Services Ltd t/a Local Link Recruitment Steve Buttery

22 Wide Bargate, Boston, Lincolnshire, PE21 6RF t: 01205 369944 e: steve@llrecruitment.com www.llrecruitment.com

Vincent Morris

49 Greenhill Lane, Kirkby-in-Ashfield, Nottinghamshire, NG17 9GA t: 07884 065266 e: jvsmorris @btinternet.com www.jsmorris.co.uk

Jark Industrial Ltd Paul Mizen

Beechurst, 8 Commercial Road, Dereham, Norfolk, NR19 1AE t: 01362 697888 e: pmizen@jark.co.uk www.jark.com

Jasper Corporation Ltd Sebastian Hall

Cherry Tree House, Hacheston, Woodbridge, Suffolk, IP13 0DR t: 01728 748444 e: sebastian@sebastianhall.co.uk

JMAC Solutions John McDermott

80 High Street, Edgware, Middlesex, HA8 7EJ t: 0208 952 5512 e: john@jmacsolutions.co.uk www.jmacsolutions.co.uk

Johnston Accounting Services t/as JoAgri Labour Doreen Johnston

PO Box 6627, Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, PH10 6WJ t: 07810 080493 e: doreen.johnston@btconnect.com

J M Recruitment Ltd

JPM Labour Services Ltd

Colombier Building, Castle Road, Sittingbourne, Kent, ME10 3RN t: 01795 519000 e: mike@jm-recruitment.co.uk www.jm-recruitment.co.uk

Unit B, 1-2 North End, Swineshead, Boston, Lincolnshire, PE20 3LR t: 07717 227956 e: jpmlabour@aol.com

Mike Bailey

122

J.S.Morris t/a J.S.Morris Agricultural Contractors

Mark Robinson

t: 01276 509306


ALP MEMBERS JSD Recruitment Services Ltd

KHS Personnel Ltd

Unit HD 5, Dungannon Enterprise Centre, Coalisland Road, Dungannon, Tyrone, BT71 6JT t: 02887 726264 e: info@jsdrecruitment.com www.jsdrecruitment.co.uk

City House, Stanford Street, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, NG1 7BQ t: 01159 590555 e: km@khs-jobworld.co.uk www.khs-jobworld.co.uk

Jim Devlin

Kevin McCormick

JSSINA Ltd

KMV Recruitment Ltd

UK,Bulgaria,Romania,Slovakia, Latvia,Lithuania, t: 0203 287 7714 e: jssinaltd@gmail.com www.jssina.co.uk

201 Broadcasting House, Newport Rd, Middlesborough, Cleveland, TS1 5JA t: 01642 244609 e: k-b-m@btconnect.com

Maksims Vapne

Sanu Hajur Gurung

106 King Street, Maidstone, Kent, ME14 1BH t: 01622 752192 e: sanu@kentgurkha.co.uk www.kentgurkha.co.uk

Kettle Produce Ltd Crawford Comrie

Kenneth McVeigh

Labour Direct (SW) Ltd Eva Maslocha

Lower Rosudgeon Farm House, Prussia Cove Road, Rosudgeon, Penzance, Cornwall, TR20 9AX t: 01736 339118 e: eva.labourdirect@gmail.com

Labour-Tech Recruitment Ltd Keith Wilson

Balmalcolm Farm, Cupar, Fife, KY15 7TJ t: 01337 831000 e: crawford.comrie@kettle.co.uk www.kettle.co.uk

57-59 Market Street, Ely, Cambridgeshire, CB7 4LP t: 01353 664200 e: info@labourtech.co.uk www.labourtech.co.uk

Keyo Agricultural Services Ltd

Lincolnshire Recruitment Services Ltd

Europa Way, Ancholme Business Park, Brigg, Lincolnshire, DN20 8AR t: 01652 659005 e: josh@keyo.co.uk www.keyo.co.uk

17 Gleedale, North Hykeham, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, LN6 8PN t: 01522 839373 e: granted456@gmail.com

Joshua Van Den Bos

KFM Recruitment Ltd t/a KFM Recruitment Solutions Anthony Jackson

29 - 30 Silver Street, Hull, East Riding of Yorkshire, HU1 1JG t: 01482 210002 e: info@kfmworld.co.uk www.kfmworld.co.uk

www.labourproviders.org.uk

ALP Membership Directory | ALP Members

Kent Gurkha Company Ltd

J|L

Don Grant

Linklife Ltd

Edward Roberts

Bentley House, 16 Chearsley Road, Long Crendon, Buckinghamshire, HP18 9AW t: 01844 204320 e: edr@linklifeltd.co.uk www.linklifeltd.co.uk

123


ALP MEMBERS L|M

Lukasz Labour Ltd

Mach Recruitment Ltd

Unit 5, 93-95 Portobello Row, Boston, Lincolnshire, PE21 8TA t: 07979 330772 e: zasada@btinternet.com

5 Carlton Court, Brown Lane West, Leeds, West Yorkshire, LS12 6LT t: 0113 386 7510 e: tom@mach.co.uk www.machrecruitment.co.uk

Lukasz Zasada

ALP Membership Directory | ALP Members

M & L Management Ltd Leslie Gilbert

Margot Recruitment Support Ltd

M A Labour Ltd

Rose House, 4 Preston Street, Faversham, Kent, ME13 8NS t: 0800 047 6766 e: gosia@margot-rec.co.uk www.margot-rec.co.uk

8 Wellington Street, Southport, Merseyside, PR8 1QJ t: 07877 435593 e: les.gilbert@mail.com

Malgorzata Daracz

36/38 High Street, Boston, Lincolnshire, PE21 8SP t: 01205 368141 e: maofficeboston@gmail.com

M C Personnel Ltd Jodie Stringer

83B High Street, Gillingham, Kent, ME7 1BL t: 01634 576111 e: jodie.stringer@mc-personnel.co.uk www.mc-personnel.co.uk

M MacPherson Contractors Marie MacPherson

142 High Street, Newburgh, Fife, KY14 6DZ t: 01337 840217 e: mariemacpherson50@hotmail.com

M S Agricultural Services Ltd Mark Sargent

15a Wormgate, Boston, Lincolnshire, PE21 6NR t: 01205 359423 e: msasltd@hotmail.co.uk

124

Tom Zyzak

Malgorzata Gaszczyk

Masterstaff Ltd Jon Howard

101-102 Penny Street, Lancaster, Lancashire, LA1 1XN t: 07535 023128 e: jon.howard@masterstaff.co.uk www.masterstaff.co.uk

MAW Personnel Solutions Ltd Mick Wilson

Unit D Boston Business Centre, Norfolk Street, Boston, Lincolnshire, PE21 9HG t: 07710 583170 e: mick@maw-personnel.co.uk

Mercury Personnel Solutions Ltd Gary Turner

Office 2 Morgan House, Gilbert Drive, Boston, Lincolnshire, PE21 7TQ t: 01205 368075 e: info@mercurypersonnelsolutions.co.uk www.mercurypersonnelsolutions.co.uk

Meridian Business Support Ltd Cathy Kendrick

Roberts House, Manchester Road, Altrincham, Cheshire, WA14 4PL t: 0161 929 3878 e: ckendrick@meridianbs.co.uk www.meridianbs.co.uk

t: 01276 509306


ALP MEMBERS Monitor Hygiene Services Ltd

NRS Recruitment Services Ltd

3b Robins Wharf, Grove Rd, Northfleet, Gravesend, Kent, DA11 9AX t: 01474 320435 e: mick@monitorservices.co.uk www.monitorservices.co.uk

9 Magee Street, Northampton, Northamptonshire, NN1 4JT t: 01604 615825 e: nick@nrsrecruitment.co.uk www.nrsrecruitment.co.uk

Michael Donnelly

Nicholas Berry

Mploy Staffing Solutions Ltd

Omega Work and Travel Ltd

Mployment House, 3 Longfleet Road, Poole, Dorset, BH15 2HN t: 01202 668360 e: mark@mploystaff.com www.mploystaff.com

38a Hristo Botev Street, Floor 2 Apartment 4, Nova Zagora, Bulgaria, 8900 t: 00359 4576 2185 / 07742 999987 e: omegaworkandtravel@gmail.com www.omegaworktravel.com

MRN Recruitment Ltd

Omni Facilities Management Ltd t/a The Omni Group

Mark Nash

5B Sheep Market, Spalding, Lincolnshire, PE11 1BH t: 07713 113248 e: brendan@mrnrecruitment.co.uk www.mrnrecruitment.co.uk

Necton Labour Services Ltd Amanda Wright

1a Burnside, Necton, Swaffham, Norfolk, PE37 8ER t: 01760 722185 e: nectonlabourservices@yahoo.co.uk www.nectonlabourservices.co.uk

Nicholas Associates Group t/a Stafforce Recruitment Tony Boorman

Reginald Arthur House, 2-8 Percy Street, Rotherham, South Yorkshire, S65 1ED t: 01709 377177 e: tony.boorman@stafforce.co.uk www.stafforce.co.uk

North Kesteven Agricultural Services Tom Pearson

Station Yard, Station Road, Scredington, Sleaford, Lincolnshire, NG34 0AA t: 01529 419009 e: tompearson@cmagriculture.com

www.labourproviders.org.uk

Ivan Vasilev

Edward Murray / CEO

3 Albion Count, Albion Place, London, W6 0QT t: 0208 741 1190 e: enquiries@omnifm.com www.omnifm.com

On Loan Recruitment Limited Tracey Clark

On Loan House, Manby Road, Immingham, Lincolnshire, DN40 2LG t: 01469 577698 e: tracey@onloanrecruitment.co.uk www.onloanrecruitment.co.uk

ALP Membership Directory | ALP Members

Brendan Moran

M|O

On-Call Recruitment Ltd Adrian Rawden

25 Vivian Ave, Sherwood Rise, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, NG5 1AF t: 01158 715990 e: adrianrawden@oncallrecruitment.co.uk www.oncallrecruitment.co.uk

One Call Recruitment Ltd Martin Knowles

30c Lincoln Road, Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, PE1 2RL t: 01733 560408 e: martin@onecallrecruitment.co.uk www.onecallrecruitment.co.uk

125


ALP MEMBERS O|P

Option A Ltd

PCS Poultry Services Ltd

Berwick Workpace, 90 Marygate, BerwickUpon-Tweed, Northumberland, TD15 1BN t: 01289 545050 e: nick@optiona.co.uk www.optiona.co.uk

Unit 29, Northwick Business Centre, Blockley, Gloucestershire, GL56 9RF t: 01386 701812 / 0800 066 5535 e: admin@pcspoultry.com www.pcspoultry.com

Nick Scott

OSR Recruitment Services Ltd

ALP Membership Directory | ALP Members

Jane Fielden

First Floor, 2-4 Carr Street, Ipswich, Suffolk, IP4 1EJ t: 01473 222311 e: jane@osr-recruitment.co.uk www.osr-recruitment.co.uk

Perfect Home & Office Solutions t/a Perfect Recruitments Jolanta Drewnik

The Manor House, Mill Lane, Southampton, Hampshire, SO16 0YE t: 02380 196673 / 07702 159382 e: jola@perfectrecruitments.co.uk www.perfectrecruitments.co.uk

P G Agricultural Ltd

Phoenix Recruitment UK Ltd

25 William Bradford Close, Austerfield, Doncaster, South Yorkshire, DN10 6RB t: 01302 710774 e: macoop659@aol.com

3 Berkeley Waye, Hounslow, Middlesex, TW5 9HJ t: 01895 236395 e: niraj@makologistics.co.uk

Mary Cooper

Niraj Agrawal

Paragon Meed Ltd

Pirates Cutters Ltd

Imperial House, 79-81 Hornby Street Wiltshire, BL9 5BN t: 0161 7054362 e: mike@paragonmeed.co.uk www.paragonmeed.co.uk

68 Eastwood Road, Boston, Lincolnshire, PE21 0PL t: 01205 839457 / 07969 874593 e: jonski.r@wp.pl www.piratescutters.com

Michael Rogers

Partners Employment European Recruitment Ltd

Lynda Huxham M.R.E.C. CertRP MoD 7 Church Walk, Trowbridge, Wiltshire, BA14 8DX t: 01225 760777 e: lynda@partnersemployment.co.uk www.partnersemployment.co.uk

Patrick Moore & Smaranda Popovici Smaranda Popovici

Crorry Upper, Crossabeg, Wexford, Irish Republic, t: 00353 539177012 e: anda.gpopovici@yahoo.com

126

Graham Gadsby

Ryszard Jonski

PJL Recruitment Darren Overton

30 Pen Street, Boston, Lincolnshire, PE21 6TJ t: 01205 311493 e: pjlrecruitment@aol.com www.pjlrecruitment.co.uk

PMP Recruitment Ltd t/a PMP Recruitment, Abacus Recruitment and Cordant People David Stott

1 Hazelwood Road, Northampton, Northamptonshire, NN1 1LG t: 01604 887200 e: david.stott@pmprecruitment.co.uk www.pmprecruitment.co.uk

t: 01276 509306


ALP MEMBERS Poultry Services Ltd

PRG Recruit Ltd

Mortimer House, Holmer Road, Hereford, Herefordshire, HR4 9TA t: 01432 266100 e: stuart@poultryservices.co.uk

The Lodge, 71-73 Doddington Road, Wellingborough, Northamptonshire, NN8 2JH t: 01933 274211 e: enquiries@prgrecruit.co.uk www.prgrecruit.co.uk

Stuart Aldridge

Premier Recruitment (S.E.) Ltd Tom Vickers

Premier Recruitment Solutions Ltd Marcus Hackney

56A London Road, Southampton, Hampshire, SO15 2AH t: 02380 202666 e: info@premierrecruitmentsolutions.co.uk www.premierrecruitmentsolutions.co.uk

Premiere Employment Group Ltd t/a Premiere People NI and Cordant People Ken Steers

Prime Time Recruitment Ltd t/a Prime Time Recruitment and Cordant People Ken Steers

2nd Floor, 7 Swallow Street, London, W1D 4BE t: 0203 771 2217 e: ken.steers@cordantgroup.com www.primetime.co.uk

Pro-Force Ltd

Matthew Jarrett

Hunstead House, Nickle Farm, Chartham, Kent, CT4 7PE t: 01227 733880 e: matt@pro-force.co.uk www.pro-force.co.uk

QAS Copak Ltd

Elizabeth MacDonald

2nd Floor, 7 Swallow Street, London, W1D 4BE t: 0203 771 2217 e: ken.steers@cordantgroup.com www.cordantgroup.com

Mitchelston Drive, Kirkcaldy, Fife, KY1 3UF t: 01592 656980 e: qas@qascopak.co.uk www.qascopak.co.uk

Premium Staffing (UK) Ltd

Quattro Recruitment Ltd

5 Keats Road, Banbury, Oxfordshire, OX16 9QY t: 07985 269270 e: chris@premiumstaffinguk.co.uk www.premiumstaffinguk.co.uk

The Red Building, Old Bank of England Court, Queen Street, Norwich, Norfolk, NR2 4SX t: 01603 767617 e: markb@quattrorecruitment.co.uk www.quattrorecruitment.co.uk

Chris Hughes

Prestige Recruitment Specialists Ltd Dawn Benson

Prestige House, 12 Bowlalley Lane, Hull, East Riding of Yorkshire, HU1 1XR t: 01482 212581 e: dbenson@prestige-recruitment.com www.prestige-recruitment.com

www.labourproviders.org.uk

P|Q

ALP Membership Directory | ALP Members

13a Lakedale Rd, Plumstead, London, SE18 1PP t: 02037 522660 e: tom@premierrecruitmentse.co.uk www.premierrecruitmentse.co.uk

Peter Green

Mark Brown

Quest Employment Ltd David Parker

112 Abington Street, Northampton, Northamptonshire, NN1 2BP t: 01604 232227 e: david.parker@questemployment.co.uk www.questemployment.co.uk

127


ALP MEMBERS R

R E Personnel t/a RE Resource Group

Recruit Right Ltd

CPS House, 7-9 Ambrose Street, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, GL50 3QR t: 01242 505400 e: richarde@reresourcegroup.co.uk www.reresourcegroup.co.uk

Second Floor, Marwood House, Riverside Business Park, Bromborough, Wirral, Merseyside, CH62 3QX t: 0344 846 2802 e: helen@recruit-right.com www.recruit-right.com

Richard East

R2L Recruitment Ltd

ALP Membership Directory | ALP Members

Ravita Lahori

Office 2, c/o Storage King, 133 Birmingham Road, West Bromwich, West Midlands, B71 4JZ t: 07552 001848 e: r2lrecruitment@gmail.com

Ramsgate Consultants Ltd t/a Industrial Temporaries Gary McAuliffe

122 Walsgrave Road, Coventry, West Midlands, CV2 4AX t: 02476 651651 e: gary@indtemps.co.uk www.industrialtemporaries.co.uk

Rapid Employment & Recruitment Ltd Lionel Sheffield

33a Regal Road, Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, PE13 2RQ t: 01945 474355 e: lionel@rapid-employment.com www.rapid-recruitment.com

Rapid Recruit Ltd Beverley Curston

9a Hargreaves Street, Burnley, Lancashire, BB11 1LH t: 01828 410023 e: bev@rapid-recruit.com www.rapid-recruit.com

Recroot Ltd Joe Marrs

Crescent House, 1st Floor, Angel Hill, Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, IP33 1UZ t: 01284 747121 e: joemarrs@recroot.net www.recroot.net

128

Helen Cornah

Recruitmentfinder Limited Sonya Noreen

725 Lincoln Road, Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, PE1 3HD t: 01733 344200 e: sonya.noreen@recruitmentfinder.co.uk www.recruitmentfinder.co.uk

Red Eagle Ltd

Wayne Hodgson

39 Bouverie Square, Folkestone, Kent, CT20 1BA t: 01303 851133 e: wayne@redeagle.jobs www.redeagle.jobs

Red Recruitment 24/7 Ltd Mark Morley

78 Newland, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, LN1 1YA t: 01522 522922 e: mark@redrec247.co.uk www.redrec247.co.uk

Red Rock Partnership Ltd Matthew Pearl

8 Napier Court, Gander Lane, Barlborough, Chesterfield, Derbyshire, S43 4PZ t: 01246 575250 e: matthewpearl@redrockpartnership.co.uk www.redrockpartnership.co.uk

Reliance Employment Ltd Mike Holmes

West House, 34 Broomfield Road, Chelmsford, Essex, CM1 1SW t: 01245 252622 e: kirstyp@relianceemployment.com www.relianceemployment.com

t: 01276 509306


ALP MEMBERS Resource Staffing Ltd

S & A Poultry's

Pembroke House, Llantarnam Park Way, Cwmbran, Torfaen, NP44 3AU t: 07812 636655 e: steves@resourcestaffing.co.uk

6 Oakland Road, Forest Town, Mansfield, Nottinghamshire, NG19 0EJ t: 01623 469698 e: angel.lowe@ntlworld.com

Steven Skivens

Angela Lowe

RFC Recruitment Solutions Ltd

S & D Recruitment Ltd

155-156 High Street, Southampton, Hampshire, SO14 2BT t: 02380 226644 / 07812 084023 e: reggie@rfcsolution.com www.rfcsolution.com

69 Boothferry Road, Goole, East Yorkshire, DN14 6BB t: 01405 767600 e: sashashirbon@sdrecruitmentltd.co.uk www.sdrecruitmentltd.co.uk

Reggie Campbell

Sasha Shirbon

Sandwell Recruitment Ltd

Coombe Lynher, Saltash, Cornwall, PL12 5AJ t: 01752 851287 e: richardrowancoombe@googlemail.com

134 Broadmoor Avenue, Smethwick, West Midlands, B67 6JX t: 07533 371188 e: info@sandwellrecruitment.co.uk

Balkar Singh Bhatti

Ringlink Services Ltd

Sastak Services Ltd

Cargill Centre, Business Park, Aberdeen Road, Laurencekirk, Aberdeenshire, AB30 1EY t: 01561 377790 e: graham@ringlinkscotland.co.uk www.ringlinkservices.co.uk

1 & 7 BDC Business Park, Craven Arms, Shropshire, SY7 8DZ t: 01588 673636 e: office@sastak.com www.sastak.com

Graham Bruce

Caroline Whiteman

Riverside Recruitment Ltd

Scope HR Solutions Ltd

1st Floor, 113 High Street, Midsomer Norton, Radstock, Somerset, BA3 2DA t: 01761 410433 e: staff@riversiderecruit.co.uk www.riversiderecruit.co.uk

Kent House, Romney Place, Maidstone, Kent, ME15 6LH t: 01622 685259 e: david.west@scope4jobs.com www.scope4jobs.com

Faye Francis

Rural Development Services Ltd t/a Farm Relief Austin Duigan

Strabane Enterprise Agency, Orchard Road Industrial Estate, Strabane, County Tyrone, BT82 9FR t: 02825 651283 e: cmoffitt@donegalfrs.com www.farmrelief.co.uk

www.labourproviders.org.uk

ALP Membership Directory | ALP Members

Richard Rowan Richard Rowan

R|S

David West

Skillsco UK Ltd Robin Brisley

46 Market Place, Leicester, Leicestershire, LE1 5GF t: 01162 619339 e: rob@skillsco.co.uk www.skillsco.co.uk

129


ALP MEMBERS S|T

Skilltech Recruitment Ltd

Stafflex Ltd

Kent House, Charles Street, Bluetown, Sheerness, Kent, ME12 1TA t: 01795 668111 e: penny@skilltechrecruitment.com www.skilltechrecruitment.com

International House, Chapel Hill, Huddersfield, West Yorkshire, HD1 3EE t: 01484 351010 e: brianstahelin@stafflex.co.uk www.stafflex.co.uk

Penny Mosdell

SM Global Consultancy Ltd t/a Staffing Match

Staffline Group Plc t/a Staffline Recruitment Ltd

Bradleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business Centre, 1st Floor Central Way, North Feltham Trading Estate, Feltham, Middlesex, TW14 0UX t: 0203 602 8430 e: hr@staffingmatch.co.uk www.staffingmatch.co.uk

19 - 20 The Triangle, NG2 Business Park, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, NG2 1AE t: 01159 500885 e: andy.hogarth@staffline.co.uk www.staffline.co.uk

ALP Membership Directory | ALP Members

Erum Salman

Smart Solutions (Recruitment) Ltd Hannah Bloomfield

Raleigh House, Unit 3, Langstone Business Village, Langstone Park, Newport, Gwent, NP18 2LH t: 01633 415600 e: hbloomfield@smartsolutions.co.uk www.smartsolutions.co.uk

Smith and Reed Recruitment (SW) Ltd Mark Bamber

The Old Chapel, St Clement St, Truro, Cornwall, TR1 1EX t: 01872 222338 e: mark.bamber@smithandreed.co.uk www.smithandreed.co.uk

South West Recruitment Ltd Alan Hoey

1 Holdenhurst Road, Bournemouth, Dorset, BH8 8EH t: 01202 292907 e: alan@swr.uk.net www.swr.uk.net

SR Catchers Ltd Shaun Miles

2 Northside, Wells Road, Chilcompton, Radstock, Somerset, BA3 4ET t: 01761 233923 e: shaun@accounting-solution.co.uk

130

Brian Stahelin

Andy Hogarth

Supreme Workforce Ltd Kulwinder Singh

37A Upper Wickham Lane, Welling, Kent, DA16 3AB t: 01322 410004 e: kulwinder@supremeworkforce.co.uk

Swanstaff Recruitment Ltd Zoe Bristow

Lakeview West, Crossways, Dartford, Kent, DA2 6QE t: 01322 618100 e: zoe.bristow@swanstaff.co.uk www.swanstaff.co.uk

Taskmaster Resources Ltd t/a Taskmaster Andrew Skorupka

8 Leodis Court, David Street, Leeds, West Yorkshire, LS11 5JJ t: 0113 246 5995 e: askorupka@tmrec.com www.tmrec.com

Taylor Made Services UK Ltd Christopher Taylor

20 Willoughby Rd, Boston, Lincolnshire, PE21 9EG t: 01205 362896 e: taylormadeltd@yahoo.co.uk www.taylormadeservicesltd.co.uk

t: 01276 509306


ALP MEMBERS Taylor Martin Recruitment Ltd

Temporary Labour Solutions Ltd

Ground Floor Chiltern House, St Nicholas Court, 25-27 Castle Gate, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, NG1 7AR t: 01158 247777 e: rob@taylormartinrecruitment.co.uk www.taylormartinrecruitmentgroup.co.uk

Unit 4, Langthwaite Business Park, South Kirkby, Pontefract, North Yorkshire, WF9 3AP t: 01977 651804 e: paul@temporarylaboursolutions.co.uk www.temporarylaboursolutions.co.uk

Robert Taylor

Taylor's Poultry Services Ivan Taylor

TBC Recruitment Ltd t/a Vital People Jason Fox

6th Floor, Hilton House, Lord Street, Stockport, Cheshire, SK1 3NA t: 0161 474 0254 e: jason.fox@vital-people.co.uk www.vital-people.co.uk

Team Support Staff Ltd trading in Scotland as Margaret Hodge Greg Taylor

18 The Broadway, Stratford, London, E15 4QS t: 0203 771 3824 e: gtaylor@tss.uk.com www.teamsupport.co.uk

Technique Recruitment Solutions Ltd Katrina Massingham

Henderson Business Centre, 51 Ivy Road, Norwich, Norfolk, NR5 8BF t: 01603 251727 e: katrina@technique-solutions.co.uk www.technique-solutions.co.uk

Templine Employment Agency Ltd Antonio Bucciero

Unit 3650, Bishop's Court, Solihull Parkway, Birmingham, West Midlands, B37 7YB t: 0121 329 1340 e: t.bucciero@templinerecruitment.co.uk www.templinerecruitment.co.uk

www.labourproviders.org.uk

T

Tennial Personnel Ltd Dennis Tennial

6 Northgate Street, Ipswich, Suffolk, IP1 3BZ t: 01473 565292 e: office@tennialpersonnel.com www.tennialpersonnel.com

The Best Connection Group Ltd Michael Cooper

Unit 1, Topaz Way, Bromsgrove, West Midlands, B61 0GD t: 0121 504 3161 e: mike.cooper@thebestconnection.co.uk www.thebestconnection.co.uk

The Labour Bureau Andrew Everitt

30 Matmore Gate, Spalding, Lincolnshire, PE11 2PN t: 07710 859524 e: thelabourbureau@btinternet.com

The Recruitment & Employment Bureau Ltd

ALP Membership Directory | ALP Members

Unit 5/6, Urban Business Park, Urban Road, Kirkby-in-Ashfield, Nottinghamshire, NG17 8AP t: 01623 721957 e: info@taylorspoultryservices.co.uk www.taylorspoultryservices.co.uk

Paul Finney

Philip Shoker

2 St Peter's Court, Mansfield, Nottinghamshire, NG18 1EF t: 01623 703602 e: philip@recruitment-bureau.co.uk www.recruitment-bureau.co.uk

The Staffing Group t/a Single Resource Ltd Jeremy McGrail

Forster House, Hatherton Road, Walsall, West Midlands, WS1 1XZ t: 01922 615488 e: jeremy.mcgrail@thestaffinggroup.co.uk www.singleresource.co.uk

131


ALP MEMBERS T|U

The Staffing Group t/a Extra Personnel Ltd Julie Giles

Forster House, Hatherton Road, Walsall, West Midlands, WS1 1XZ t: 01922 615488 Ext:3226 e: julie.giles@thestaffinggroup.co.uk www.extrapersonnel.co.uk

The Training and Recruitment House Ltd

ALP Membership Directory | ALP Members

Jonathan McComb

51 Church Street, Portadown, County Armagh, BT62 3EU t: 02838 394580 e: jonathan@thetrainingandrecruitmenthouse.co.uk www.thetrainingandrecruitmenthouse.co.uk

The Workshop (Wisbech) Ltd Ruth Whitehurst

22-23 The Horse Fair, Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, PE13 1AR t: 01945 580100 e: workshopboss@aol.com www.theworkshopwisbech.co.uk

Thomas Whittle Contracts Ltd Thomas Whittle

Bernard Gaughan

Main Office, 5 West Garleton, Haddington, East Lothian, EH41 3SL t: 01620 824700 e: info@totallaboursolutions.com www.totallaboursolutions.com

Total Staff Solutions Ltd Belinda McCurry

The Barn, Bucks Holt Road, Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, PE14 7AR t: 07881 953541 e: belinda@totalstaffsolutions.co.uk

TS Developments Ltd t/as Imperial Workforce Claire Watson

The Imperial Centre, Grange Road, Darlington, Durham, DL1 5NQ t: 01325 467437 e: claire@imperialworkforce.com www.imperialworkforce.com

Turner Stubbs Ltd Rob Bacon

Muiredge Farmhouse, Methilhaven Road, Buckhaven, Leven, Fife, KY8 1EF t: 01592 715004 e: elainemckenzie_9@hotmail.co.uk

Office Suite B, 40 George Street, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, NG1 3BG t: 01159 503030 e: robbacon@turnerstubbs.com www.turnerstubbs.com

Thorns Workforce Ltd

UAB "Agropraktika"

Mahollam Farm Yard, Kington, Herefordshire, HR5 3PT t: 07832 253290 e: zsikogery@aol.com

Lvovo 89a-1, Vilnius, Lithuania, LT-08104 t: 00370 5272 7768 e: natalia@agropraktika.lt www.agropraktika.lt

Gergely Zsiko

Natalia Babelis

Three Way Solutions Ltd

UK Recruitment Agency Ltd

336-338 Huddersfield Road, Salterhebble Hill, Halifax, Yorkshire, HX3 0QT t: 01422 322733 e: alex.griffiths@threewaysolutions.co.uk www.threewaysolutions.co.uk

Highland Farm, Silt Pit Lane, Wyberton, Boston, Lincolnshire, PE21 7AG t: 01205 366221 e: highland.farm@btconnect.com

Alex Griffiths

132

Total Labour Solutions

Rasa Jokubaitiene

t: 01276 509306


ALP MEMBERS Vital Recruitment Ltd

Office 5 & 6, 47-49 Winsover Rd, Spalding, Lincolnshire, PE11 1EG t: 01775 761126 e: adrian@unique-employment.co.uk www.unique-employment.co.uk

Endeavour House, Saville Road, Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, PE3 7PS t: 01733 331155 e: terry.waite@vitalrecruitment.com www.vitalrecruitment.com

Universal Consulting s.r.o.

WMS Recruitment Ltd

Sturovo Namestie 18, Trencin, Slovakia, 911 01 t: 00421 3274 40174 e: lucia@universalconsulting.sk www.universalconsulting.sk

Fridaybridge Farm Camp, 173 March Road, Fridaybridge, Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, PE14 0LR t: 01945 580806 e: enquiries@wmsfridaybridgecamp.co.uk www.wmsfridaybridgecamp.co.uk

Adrian Ormes

Terry Waite

Lucia Hencelova

Wayne Cottrill

van Stomp Ltd

Workforce Consultants Ltd t/a WCL Recruitment

Leon Jonck

Dernford Barn, Dernford Farm, Sawston Road, Stapleford, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, CB22 5DY t: 01223 506384 e: leon@vanstomp.co.uk www.vanstomp.co.uk

Victor Foster Poultry Services Ltd Victor Foster

t: 02838 988101 e: vfosterpoultry@aol.com

Vine Works Ltd Darcy Gander

6 Gladstone Road, Burgess Hill, West Sussex, RH15 0QQ t: 07916 294167 e: darcy@vine-works.com www.vine-works.com

Vital Recruitment (UK) Ltd Penny Floyd

Suite 3 Nova House, Audley Avenue Enterprise Park, Newport, Shropshire, TF10 7DW t: 01952 815659 e: penny@vitalrecruitment.co.uk vitalrecruitment.co.uk

www.labourproviders.org.uk

Agnieszka Bleka

412 Blackpool Road, Ashton on Ribble, Preston, Lancashire, PR2 2DX t: 01772 735030 e: info@workforceconsultants.co.uk www.workforceconsultants.co.uk

Workmates Premier Ltd Janet Kirkwood

24 Station Road, Bognor Regis, West Sussex, PO21 1QE t: 01243 842765 e: janetk@workmates247.com www.bognorregisrecruit.co.uk

U A|B X

ALP Membership Directory | ALP Members

Unique Employment Services Ltd

WPHR Ltd

Karolina Kirszling

9 Silver Street, Trowbridge, Wiltshire, BA14 8AA t: 01225 781227 e: kay@wphr.co.uk www.wphr.co.uk

Xpress Solutions Recruitment Ltd Sarah Sanderson

25 Queen Street, Oldham, Lancashire, OL1 1RD t: 01614 843800 e: info@xpresssolutions.co.uk www.xpresssolutions.co.uk

133


ALP MEMBERS Y|Z

Yorkshire Repak Ltd Terry Foy

Summer Lane, Barnsley, South Yorkshire, S70 2NP t: 01226 204747 e: terry@yorkshirerepak.co.uk www.yorkshirerepak.com

Yourstaff

ALP Membership Directory | ALP Members

Pedro Garcia

134

57A Hawthorn Road, Bognor Regis, West Sussex, PO21 2BW t: 01243 602652 / 01243 824878 e: pedro@yourstaffrecruitment.com www.yourstaffrecruitment.com

t: 01276 509306


ALP ASSOCIATE MEMBERS Aâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Z LISTINGS

www.labourproviders.org.uk

135


ALP ASSOCIATE MEMBERS A|E

2 Sisters Food Group

Bernard Matthews Foods Ltd

Biocity, Pennyfoot Street, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, NG1 1GE t: 01924 205555 e: fergus.morgan@2sfg.com www.2sfg.com

Great Witchingham Hall, Great Witchingham, Norwich, Norfolk, NR9 5QD t: 01603 872611 e: andrew.sherwood@bernardmatthews.com www.bernardmatthews.com

Fergus Morgan

ABP UK

Compagnie Fruitiere UK Ltd

6290 Bishops Court, Birmingham Business Park, Birmingham, West Midlands, B37 7YB t: 0121 717 2500 e: jone.martinezgomez@abpbeef.com www.abpfoodgroup.com

12 Newtons Court, Crossways Business Park, Dartford, Kent, DA2 6QL t: 01322 293355 e: jfotheringham@cfuklimited.com www.cfuklimited.com

ALP Membership Directory | ALP Associate Members

Jonè Martinez Gomez

Jade Fotheringham

allianceHR Ltd

Cranswick plc

Camberley House, 1 Portesbery Road, Camberley, Surrey, GU15 3SZ t: 01276 919090 e: enquiries@alliancehr.co.uk www.alliancehr.co.uk

Straithes Road, Preston, Hull, Lancashire, HU12 8TB t: 01482 891001 e: miranda.walker@cranswick.co.uk www.cranswick.plc.uk

David Camp

Miranda Walker

Angus Soft Fruits Ltd

Direct Table Foods Ltd

East Seaton Farm, Arbroath, DD11 5SD t: 01789 772033 e: maria.baptista@angussoftfruits.co.uk www.angussoftfruit.co.uk

Saxham Business Park, Little Saxham, Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, IP28 6RX t: 01284 747819 e: diane.zabroski@directtable.co.uk www.directtable.co.uk

Maria Baptista

Bakkavor Foods

Gillian Haythornthwaite

West Marsh Road, Spalding, Lincolnshire, PE11 2BB t: 07885 136509 e: gillian.haythornthwaite@bakkavor.com www.bakkavor.com

Barfoots of Botley Ltd Tom Spragg

Sefter Farm, Pagham Road, Bognor Regis, West Sussex, PO21 3PX t: 01243 268811 e: tom@barfoots.co.uk www.barfoots.co.uk

136

Andrew Sherwood

Diane Zabroski

Emmett UK Ltd Emma Lewis

Washway Road, Fosdyke, Spalding, Lincolnshire, PE12 6LQ t: 01205 260000 e: emma.lewis@emmettuk.com www.emmettuk.com

ERMS (UK) Ltd David Christmas

E3 Ronald House, Fenton Way, Chatteris, Cambridgeshire, PE16 6UP t: 01354 694000 e: david.christmas@ermsuk.com www.ermsuk.com

t: 01276 509306


ALP ASSOCIATE MEMBERS Flamingo Flowers Ltd

Hain Daniels Group

Great North Road, Tempsford, Sandy, Bedfordshire, PE10 0GS t: 01775 711608 e: david.brown@flamingo.net

2100 Century Way, Leeds, West Yorkshire, LS15 8ZB t: 07872 544210 e: nadine.maggi@haindaniels.com www.haindaniels.com

David Brown

Freshtime UK Ltd Joanna Campling

Fyffes Group Ltd Jon Tugwell

Houndmills Rd, Houndsmills Industrial Estate, Basingstoke, Hampshire, RG21 6XL t: 01256 383232 e: jtugwell@fyffes.com www.fyffes.com

Greencell Ltd

Elizabeth Williams

Hollylodge Facilities, West Marsh Road, Pinchbeck, Spalding, Lincolnshire, PE11 3UG t: 01775 717395 e: elizabeth.williams@greencell.com www.greencell.com

Greenvale AP Ltd Andy Ferguson

Craigswalls, Duns, Berwickshire, TD11 3PZ t: 01890 818181 e: andy.ferguson@greenvale.co.uk www.greenvale.co.uk

Griffin and Brand (European) Ltd Jeremy Barnes

Trophy House, Leacon Road, TN23 4TU t: 01233 645941 e: jbarnes@griffin-brand.co.uk www.griffin-brand.co.uk

www.labourproviders.org.uk

F|L

Icelandic Seachill Katie George

Head Office, Estate Road No 2, South Humberside Industrial Estate, Grimsby, Lincolnshire, DN31 2TG t: 01472 502334 e: katiegeorge@icelandic.co.uk www.icelandic.is

Integrated Service Solutions Ltd Gavin Knight

c/o Fowler Welch Coolchain, London Road, Teynham, Kent, ME9 9RR t: 01795 523310 e: gavin.knight@issproduce.co.uk www.issproduce.co.uk

K J Curson Growers Linda Davey

52 Baptist Road, Upwell, Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, PE14 9EY t: 01945 773105 e: linda@kjcursongrowers.com www.kjcursongrowers.com

KSSA

ALP Membership Directory | ALP Associate Members

Riverside Industrial Estate, Marsh Lane, Boston, Lincolnshire, PE21 7PJ t: 01205 312010 e: joanna.campling@freshtime.co.uk www.freshtime.co.uk

Nadine Maggi

Keith Stamp

Rowan Cottage, Woodside, Ryton, Tyne and Wear, NE40 4SX t: 07931 521465 e: keith@kssa.uk.com www.kssa.uk.com

Lincolnshire Field Products Ltd Wendy Woolf

Wool Hall Farm, Wykeham, Spalding, Lincolnshire, PE12 6HW t: 01775 725041 e: wendy.woolf@lincsfp.com www.lincsfp.com

137


ALP ASSOCIATE MEMBERS M|Z

Mack

P.D. Hook (Hatcheries) Ltd

Transfesa Road, Paddock Wood, Kent, TN12 6UT t: 01892 835577 e: sue.leeves@mack.co.uk www.mwmack.co.uk

Cote, Bampton, Oxfordshire, OX18 2EG t: 01993 850261 / 01993 853815 e: jackie_newman@pdhook.co.uk www.pdhook.co.uk

Sue Leeves

Minor, Weir & Willis Ltd

ALP Membership Directory | ALP Associate Members

Leighton Hughes

Altitude, 206 Deykin Avenue, Witton, Birmingham, West Midlands, B6 7BH t: 0121 344 4554 e: leighton.hughes@mww.co.uk www.mww.co.uk

Moy Park Ltd John Cromie

Jackie Newman

PDM Produce (UK) Ltd Rainey Jackson

Chadwell Park Farm, Great Chatwell, Newport, Shropshire, TF10 9BN t: 01952 691617 e: rainey@pdmgroup.co.uk www.pdmgroup.co.uk

Samworth Brothers Ltd Deborah Carlin

39 Seagoe Industrial Estate, Portadown, BT63 5QE t: 02838 368042 e: john.cromie@moypark.com www.moypark.com

Bradgate â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Ashton Green, 5 Bennion Road, Beaumont Leys, Leicester, Leicestershire, LE4 2AD t: 01162 361687 e: deborah.carlin@samworthbrothers.co.uk www.samworthbrothers.co.uk

Natures Way Foods Ltd

Tulip Ltd

Park Farm, Chichester Rd, Selsey, West Sussex, PO20 9HP t: 01243 603111 e: benjaminfountain@nwfltd.co.uk www.natureswayfoods.com

Seton House, Warwick Technology Park, Gallows Hill, Warwick, Warwickshire, CV34 6DA t: 01223 895231 e: joanne.collins@tulipltd.co.uk www.tulipltd.co.uk

Ben Fountain

Noble Foods Ltd Kirsty Black

Corringham Road, Gainsborough, Lincolnshire, DN21 1QH t: 01427 616667 e: kirsty.black@noblefoods.co.uk www.noblefoods.co.uk

Orchard House Foods Ltd

Joanne Collins

W.D. Irwin & Sons Ltd Sheree Totton

The Food Park, Carne, Portadown, County Armagh, BT63 5WE t: 02838 332421 e: stotton@irwinsbakery.com www.irwinsbakery.com

Alda Ellison

79 Manton Road, Earlstrees Industrial Estate, Corby, Northamptonshire, NN17 4JL t: 01536 274161 e: aellison@ohf.co.uk www.ohf.co.uk

138

t: 01276 509306


ALP SERVICE PARTNERS Aâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Z LISTINGS

www.labourproviders.org.uk

139


ALP SERVICE PARTNERS A|Z

ATAIB - Andrew Thompson & Associates Insurance Brokers Andrew Thompson

Epsilon House, Ransomes Europark, Ipswich, Suffolk, IP3 9FJ t: 01473 276188 e: andrew.thompson@ataib.co.uk www.ataib.co.uk

Brabners LLP

ALP Membership Directory | ALP Service Partners

Paul Chamberlain

55 King Street, Manchester, Lancashire, M2 4LQ t: 0161 836 8800 e: paul.chamberlain@brabners.com www.brabners.com

In Touch MCS Ltd Gizelle Handy

Blythe Valley Innovation Centre, Blythe Valley Park, Solihull, B90 8AJ t: 0800 097 0128 e: info@peopleintouch.co.uk www.peopleintouch.co.uk

interSOFTWARE Adrian Kruger

Entrance 3, Crossford Court, Sale, Manchester, Lancashire, M33 7BZ t: 0161 969 4433 e: adrian.kruger@intersoftware.com www.intersoftware.com

Interventions Consulting Ltd Sarah Abenbrook

125 Main Street, Garforth, Leeds, West Yorkshire, LS25 1AF t: 07951 043099 e: sarah.abenbrook@interventionsconsulting.com www.eucanlearn.com

140

Licence Bureau Ltd Mike Reed

5 Amberside House, Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire, HP2 4TP t: 01442 430980 e: m.reed@investigation.co.uk www.licencebureau.co.uk

NSL Ltd

Ken Hanslip

Fourth Floor, Westgate House, Westgate, London, , W5 1YY t: 07736 898251 e: kenneth.hanslip@nsl.co.uk www.nsl.co.uk

OnePay

Alison McPhail

3 Wells Road Business Centre, Wells Road, Ilkley, West Yorkshire, LS29 9JB t: 0113 320 1460 e: alison.mcphail@onepay.co.uk www.onepay.co.uk

Optima Corporate Finance LLP Philip Ellis

10 Furnival Street, London, EC4A 1YH t: 0203 405 3166 e: philip@optimacf.com www.optimacf.com

Segura Systems Peter Needle

4th Floor, 86-90 Paul Street, London, EC2A 4NE t: 01509 223638 e: peter.needle@segurasystems.com www.segurasystems.com

t: 01276 509306


For all your recruitment needs Red Eagle are recognised as one of the major suppliers of blue-collar workers for providing on-site support to their major accounts. Red Eagle has gained the coveted REC Audit status and operate to their strict code of practice at all times.

Our services:

We supply to:

• GLA licence holders

• Food manufacturing

• ALP members

• Processing and dispatch

• On-site managed services

• Preparation & collation

• Ad hoc staffing cover

• Warehouses

• Level 2 food hygiene training

• Fields

• Operate to ethical code of practice

• Greenhouses and growers

• Registered with SEDEX

• All businesses requiring GLA regulated staff

• All staff paid PAYE (no expense schemes) • Testimonials from large prestigious operations

For more information visit www.redeagle.jobs call 0845 6120444 email info@redeagle.jobs Head Office: 39 Bouverie Square • Folkestone • Kent • CT20 1BA T 01303 851133 E info@redeagle.jobs Bexley Office: Recruitment House • rear of 23 Bourne Road • Bexley • Kent • DA5 1LW T 01322 528333 E bexley@redeagle.jobs


ALP Handbook & Member Directory  

Association of Labour Providers - The official Handbook & Member Directory

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