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THE STUDENT LED

Sustainability Movement AT SAN DIEGO STATE UNIVERSITY: 2005-2011


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FORWARD Over the last decade, the theoretical and practical concept known as sustainability has emerged onto the local, national and international stage. It is a concept that traces its early roots to the United States civil rights movement throughout the 1960’s and later during the environmentalist movement in the early 1970’s. For almost 20 years, the concept of sustainability remained dormant as its very definition ran contrary to the mindset of many Americans throughout the 1980’s and 1990’s. However, the inclinations of many Americans, especially younger generations, is beginning to evolve and shift to embrace old concepts and new ideas. This shift has occurred for a variety of economic, social and political reasons, such as an increase in global income inequities, chemical and toxic exposure, natural resource depletion, economic stagflation and debt, climate change, overpopulation, flora and fauna extinction, war and an increase in the cost of living and social services with an overall decline in both. Realizing that finding and implementing solutions to settle these issues cannot be achieved by the same level thinking and mindset we have had over the previous decades, American citizens, especially younger citizens, have begun to think outside of the norm. They have formulated a different way of perceiving these problems in order to find practical solutions, defining the very concept of sustainability. This historic report and work in progress explains what San Diego State University students in collaboration with faculty, staff and administrators have accomplished by utilizing the concept of sustainability. More importantly, this report illustrates a remarkable story of progress and transformation at San Diego State University (SDSU) that has just begun and one that will continue for many years.

WHAT IS SUSTAINABILITY? • Meeting the needs of today without comprising the needs of tomorrow by preserving and using finite resources responsibly, efficiently and intelligently to ensure social equity and prosperity

Environmental Responsibility

Social Justice

• An interdisciplinary and holistic approach to problems by using innovative and progressive strategies to find solutions • Thinking outside of the box to solve today's problems and sustain life as we know it • It’s about the decisions you make and how it affects others and the world around you Categories: Waste, Cultural Diversity, Education, Health, Ethics, Energy, Environment, Economics, Society, History, Water, Politics, Science... LIFE

Economic Prosperity

The Triple Bottom Line of Sustainability


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TABLE OF CONTENTS The Enviro-Business Society Mission Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 2005-2006 Milestones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Spring 2005 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Fall 2005. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Spring 2006 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2006-2007 Milestones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Fall 2006. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Spring 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2007-2008 Milestones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Fall 2007. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Spring 2008 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 The Associated Students Green Love Sustainability Advisory Board Purpose . . . . . . . 9

2008-2009 Green Love Milestones. . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 2008-2009 e3 Milestones. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Summer 2008 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Fall 2008 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Spring 2009 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 2009-2010 Green Love Milestones . . . . . . . . . . . 15 2009-2010 e3 Milestones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Summer 2009 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Fall 2009 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Spring 2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 2010-2011 Green Love Milestones . . . . . . . . . . . 23 2010-2011 e3 Milestones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Summer 2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Fall 2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Spring 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Report Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

KEY PEOPLE IN THE SUSTAINABILITY MOVEMENT Spring 2005: • Oliver Anderson, Enviro-Business Society (e3) Founder • Benjamin Crawford, Enviro-Business Society (e3) Founder • Omar Ortega, Enviro-Business Society (e3) Founder Fall 2005: • Heather Honea, e3 Faculty Advisor • Bill Lekas, SDSU Energy Manager • Steve Lincoln, SDSU Waste Management Coordinator Fall 2006: • Ian Bevan, e3 President Spring 2007: • Ian Bevan, A.S. Green Commissioner • Amanda Costa, e3 President • Erica Johnson, e3 President • Justin Motika, A.S. Vice President of Finance-elect • James Poet, A.S. President-elect Spring 2008: • Glen Brandenburg, A.S. Director of Mission Bay Aquatic Center/Sustainability Coordinator • Erin Lannon, A.S. University Affairs Board Member • Grant Mack, A.S. University Affairs Board Member Summer 2008: • Grant Garske, A.S.Vice President of Finance • Rae Gurne, e3 President • Tara Kelly, e3 Executive Member • Matt Nelson, e3 Executive Member Fall 2008: • Geoffrey Chase, SDSU Dean of Undergraduate Studies • Rae Gurne, e3 President • Danny Ozstriecher, A.S. Vice President of External Affairs Spring 2009: • Tyler Boden, A.S. President-elect • Joyce Byun, A.S. Council Member • Lynn Cacha, A.S. Aztec Center Director • Isaac Castro, A.S. Council Member • Natalie Colli, A.S. Vice President of University Affairs-elect


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• Dan Cornthwaite, A.S. Executive Director • Sean Devlin, A.S. Modern Space Planning Committee Member • Sarah Elkind, SDSU History Professor • Erin Lannon, e3 President • Jeremy Katz, A.S. Executive Vice President-elect • Dola Kuljeet, e3 Executive Member • Grant Mack, A.S. Council Member • Paul Melchior, Aztec Shops Director of Dining Services • Matt Nelson, e3 Executive Member • James Poet, A.S. President • Joy Salvatin, A.S. Executive Vice President • Bob Schulz, SDSU University Architect • Drew Smith, e3 Executive Member • R.D. Williams, Aztec Shops Director of Campus Relations and Commercial Development Summer 2009: • Amber Alix, A.S. Cultural Arts & Special Events (CASE) Representative • Mina Azim, A.S. Events Commissioner • Jenn Bjorklund, A.S. Student Organization Commissioner • Tyler Boden, A. S. President • Glen Brandenburg, A.S. Sustainability Coordinator • Alyssa Bruni, A. S. Vice President of External Affairs • Jamie Lynn Cochran, A.S. Programs Coordinator • Natalie Colli, A.S. Vice President of University Affairs • Iris Crowe, A.S. Assistant Programs Coordinator • Holly Hellerstedt, e3 Vice President • Tara Kelly, e3 CEO • Erin Lannon, e3 President • Grant Mack, A.S. Sustainability Commissioner Fall 2009: • Annie Bessinger, Former e3 Executive Officer • Matt Nelson, Former e3 Executive Officer • Rae Gurne, Former e3 Executive Officer • Kevin Faulconer, City of San Diego Council Member District 2 • Mariah Hudson, Assistant Director for the SDSU Center for Regional Sustainability • Christine Kehoe, California State Senator 39th District • James Kitchen, SDSU Vice President for Student Affairs • Daniel Sullivan, Sullivan Solar Power President • Stephen L. Weber, SDSU President • Brian Wynne, Aztec Shops General Manager of Concessions Spring 2010: • Tara Kelly, A.S. Sustainability Commissioner-elect • Grant Mack, A.S. President-elect • Ignacio Prado, A.S. Vice President of Finance • Berneice Rodriquez, e3 President • Lenny Sczechowicz, e3 President Summer 2010: • Jazmin Allen, GreenFest Executive Committee Public Relations Specialist • Daphney Bitanga, A.S. Assistant Programs Coordinator • Janelle Fejeran, A.S. Diversity Commissioner • Sean Kashanchi, A.S. Executive Vice President • Candice Luistro, A.S. Vice President of University Affairs • Erin Parsons, A.S. CASE Representative • Vinod Sasidharan, Hospitality & Tourism Professor Fall 2010: • Mina Azim, Greenfest Committee • Debbie Burchianti, Aztec Shops Associate Director • Cord Claffey, A.S. Council Member • Alexandria Diaz, Aztec Shops Dining Services Marketing Manager • Tara Kelly, A.S. Sustainability Commissioner • Paul Melchior, Aztec Shops Director of Dining Services • Donna Tusack, Aztec Shops CEO Spring 2011: • Morgan Chan, A.S. Green Love Board Member • Aaron Choy, A.S. Green Love Board Vice Chair


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The Enviro-Business Society MISSION STATEMENT The Enviro-Business Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit student organization at SDSU that offers students of all majors a unique and beneficial way to make a positive environmental impact on campus, in the community and especially in business. The Enviro-Business Society (e3) promotes modern business practices that maximize profit but also a sustainable future. The e3 believes that at the core of this revolutionary new business model there are three pillars, which must always be upheld: ecology, ethics and economics. These are the standards by which the e3 operates and the ideas they try to promote.

2005-2006 MILESTONES • Annual Theme: Re-DEFINE/Re-CREATE • Organization Founded • Infrastructure created • Earth Day (Eco-Fashion Show/Eco-Art Gallery) at SDSU Sold Out!

• Membership Growth • Campus Recognition • Collaboration with SDSU Physical Plant

SPRING 2005 The Enviro-Business Society (e3) was founded in February of 2005 by Benjamin Crawford. Working with classmates and Sigma Chi Fraternity brothers Oliver Anderson and Omar Ortega, these three students launched what soon became one of the most progressive organizations at SDSU. These revolutionary minds started the first and only chapter of e3 (ecology, ethics, economics). At the time e3 was the only environmental organization at SDSU since the 1970’s, attracting a diverse group of students interested in the ecological, social and economic forces that defines sustainability. With this in mind and the passion to make a difference at SDSU, Benjamin, Oliver and Omar began planting the seeds for the organization’s infrastructure. The organization was founded with several key objectives: • Stimulate and develop student interest in the various socially and environmentally responsible practices • Create a forum for environmentally and socially conscious businesses • Coordinate philanthropic events in the San Diego community that emphasize e3’s mission • Actively identify and execute campus-wide action initiatives consistent with e3’s mission • Share knowledge and business practices with students, faculty and staff • Make a REAL impact on the campus and in the community

FALL 2005 In Fall 2005, e3 founder and President Benjamin Crawford recruited SDSU marketing professor, Heather Honea to serve as the faculty advisor for the organization. Professor Honea was instrumental in assisting Benjamin by developing plans for the organization’s infrastructure as well as assisting in the overall creation of the EnviroBusiness Society theme for the year. The theme was coined Re-DEFINE/Re-CREATE in which e3 would focus on redefining and recreating a perception that business can be the solution behind human and environmental suffering instead of a contributor. e3 launched their theme by creating flash marketing advertisements for meetings that included images of pesticide crop dusters, child labor in foreign countries and other eye-catching images to create awareness around environmental and social irresponsibility in business. During this campaign e3 also redefined and recreated their organization, calling

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themselves “Club e3.” Club e3 marketed itself as a next generation student organization and the future of business. Club e3 spread awareness on campus quickly with the Re-DEFINE/Re-CREATE theme, establishing a solid membership base for the rest of the year. Club e3 also began working with the SDSU Waste Management Coordinator, Steve Lincoln and Energy Manager, Bill Lekas, fostering a relationship that would be critical for Club e3’s later success in future years.

SPRING 2006 By early spring of 2006, Club e3 began gearing up for the first Earth Day celebration in over three decades at SDSU. Earth Day is an international holiday celebrated on April 22nd to inspire awareness and appreciation for the Earth's natural environment. Earth Day 2006 was a huge success for Club e3, establishing the organization’s credibility for fun, educational, impactful and wellattended events. Perhaps the most successful event during the Earth Day celebration was the Re-DEFINE eco-fashion show. Club e3 and eco-friendly clothing designers from New York, Los Angeles, San Diego, San Francisco and Montreal, Canada collaborated to “Re-DEFINE” the myth that organically grown fabrics and recycled clothing cannot seduce the high-fashion runways of the world. For the first time ever, students, hair and makeup artists and fashion designers successfully produced the largest educational eco-fashion show for a sold-out SDSU audience. In addition to the eco-fashion show, e3 hosted the “Re-CREATE: Art Gallery,” an adjoining eco-event, which featured gritty and eco-friendly recycled, found and sustainable digital art. The soldout event forced creators to turn away a line of over 150 students, when the 500 person capacity was reached. The collaborative efforts of Club e3 general members and executive officers yielded a truly inspiring end product. A highly profitable silent auction, fair-trade coffee bar, portable solar power generators, recycled art show and organic/recycled fashion, were all elements displaying the ease and practicality of making a difference.

2006-2007 MILESTONES • Annual Theme: GENERATION GREEN • MTV eco-Challenge • Relationships with campus stakeholders • Campus-wide Recycling Bin Expansion

• Membership grew to 250 general members • Increased Amount of Educational Events • Week-long Earth Day: Earth Week (G2EW) • Executive Board Course Credit created

FALL 2006 With Benjamin’s graduation in spring of 2006, Ian Bevan became the new Club e3 President for the 2006-2007 academic year. The common theme for his term was GREEN GENERATION to promote that students are the change enablers for the rest of the world. This generation being the green change that society needs. Ian and the Club e3 executive officers submitted a GREEN GENERATION proposal to MTV for the eco-Challenge project that would enable Club e3 to drastically expand campus sustainability awareness and knowledge to the masses through network building within SDSU’s infrastructure. While the organization was not selected as a winner for MTV eco-Challenge project submittal, all of the hard work of the executive officers paid off because it created a foundation and vision for the organization’s immediate future. Club e3 outlined the different avenues for spreading knowledge to the GREEN GENERATION through educational events, phenomenal guest speakers and campus outreach, all with students, faculty and staff members contributing. Ian worked

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with faculty advisor, Heather Honea, to institutionalize the Club e3 executive board members as a part of an upper-division business marketing course. This course allowed students to gain educational credits for their environmental awareness research and activities on campus. With the business marketing course in place, the Club e3 executive board grew at a rapid pace and was soon up to 20 students who engaged other students on campus, expanding general membership well into the hundreds. Under Ian’s leadership, Club e3 also strengthened the working relationship with SDSU’s Physical Plant to do various projects, including a fraternity and sorority recycling contest. To keep Club e3 members engaged and work-oriented, executive officers hosted monthly beach clean ups and worked with Montgomery Middle School students to teach them about recycling. Of particular note under Ian’s leadership of Club e3 was the Global Warming Action Summit, where Club e3 brought in climate scientists, research analysts and professors across multiple disciplines to explain the science behind global warming and its effects to the campus community. Club e3 also implemented a guerilla marketing “Shock Trash” campaign, where they put up huge facts around the campus about waste on campus and globally, to make students more aware of their inefficient waste and the significance of reducing, reusing and recycling. In Aztec Center, e3 members sorted through trash cans, showing students all of the waste that could have been recycled. Ian also started a continued tradition for Club e3 executive board officers to travel to the annual Green Festival in San Francisco, CA. At the event, Club e3 members were able to create substantial partnerships with over a 100 green businesses, organizations, philanthropic groups and other students across the state.

SPRING 2007 In the spring of 2007, Ian began strengthening Club e3’s relations with the Associated Students, Aztec Shops, the Division of Undergraduate Studies, KPBS and faculty on campus who were relating sustainability to the topic they were teaching in their classrooms. Ian brought together professors from all disciplines to engage in a monthly casual Green Lunch Bag series. Along with students, the early innovators discussed sustainability at large, ideas for the campus and how to make an impact with all the faculty, staff and students who were grasping on to this new movement. The Green Lunch Bag series group eventually evolved into the SDSU University Senate Sustainability Committee. The Club e3 executive board worked together tirelessly for the entire spring 2007 semester to plan Generation Green Earth Week (G2EW) the week of April 22nd. The week-long seven day event consisted of a Green Film Festival, Organic Food Tasting, a Global Warming Action Summit, a Green Lifestyles Fair, a concert with headline band Eek-a-Mouse followed by a weekend beach cleanup and the Earth Day Fair in Balboa Park. Club e3 recruited many volunteers for Generation Green Earth Week in which membership expanded by 440% between 2005 and 2006. In May of 2006, Club e3 created the “Healthy Cooking Oil at SDSU” Petition stating: We, the undersigned– DEMAND – that the Board of Directors of Aztec Shops Ltd. – immediately and permanently replace the Partially Hydrogenated Cooking Oils, currently used, with Natural (non-hydrogenated) Vegetable oil. By signing this petition you can make a difference in how Aztec Shops prepares food at SDSU. As the EXCLUSIVE food provider at SDSU, it is their responsibility to provide students, faculty and staff with dining options that do not hold UNDENIABLE HEALTH RISKS for those that eat there. Making your voice heard is essential.

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At the end of the year, Amanda Costa and Erica Johnson, Club e3 executive officers, became the first female and first co-presidents of e3. Their presidential team was dubbed “Team AmErica.” Soon after Amanda and Erica’s election, Ian was approached by incoming Associated Students Vice President of Finance, Justin Motika, to help formulate an initiative that he was interested in creating for the student body through the Associated Students (A.S.); the initiative known as “Green Love.” Before Ian embarked on this initiative, he was asked by incoming A.S. President, James Poet, to serve on his President’s Cabinet as the first A.S. Green Commissioner; Ian accepted the offer.

2007-2008 MILESTONES • Annual Theme: Ecological Footprints (Lifestyle Behaviors) • Bike Lanes Initiative • First female and duo-presidents,“Team AmErica” • Sustainability Trips • Sustainability Day • EarthDay08@SDSU • Recycling Initiative

FALL 2007 In the beginning of fall of 2007, Ian Bevan was approached by the USA Network to do a television spotlight on the growing sustainability movement at SDSU. The Club e3 presidents Erica Johnson and Amanda Costa quickly plunged into the organization by working with the new executive board to organize a huge production event for the USA Network less than one month into the semester. The event became known as Sustainability Day, September 18th, 2007. Club e3 worked tirelessly contacting local businesses, organizations, held auditions for models, sewed new clothing from old items and worked with the University to secure space on campus. The event was a success, with opening remarks from the Dean of Undergraduate Studies, Geoffrey Chase, another green fashion show and about twenty local businesses and organizations. After the new Club e3 executive board established themselves for the year with the planning and coordination of Sustainability Day, the passionate students almost immediately started planning for the implementation of other sustainability initiatives. Erica and Amanda collaborated with Ian to develop the Club e3 theme for the year, Ecological Footprints, as well as operational sustainable efficiencies, policies and purchasing procedures for the A.S. auxiliary. They also began work on an expansion of a campus-wide recycling program. Implementing such a program required Club e3 members to transverse the entire campus and create a comprehensive map illustrating every single outdoor trash bin in comparison to every outdoor recycling bin. The ratio of trash bins to recycling bins turned out to be 15 to 1. The map clearly demonstrated that there were very few recycling bins on campus which was a major inconvenience for the campus community to find a recycling bin on campus. Erica and Amanda joined in a meeting with Ian, James Poet and SDSU President Dr. Stephen L. Weber to present their findings. With some assistance from Steve Lincoln, the University Waste Management Coordinator, the students were able to report the potential savings in tipping costs for converting trash bins to recycling bins. With overwhelming approval from President Weber, one half of the outdoor trash bins on campus

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were converted to recycling bins, saving the campus thousands of dollars and increasing efficiencies on campus. The project was implemented the following spring. Given that the theme for the year was centered on assisting the campus community to lessen their environmental impact, Club e3 began focusing their efforts on alternative transportation on campus. e3 decided that they were going to start an alternative transportation movement on campus. In November, Club e3 hosted a bike crusade, a peaceful demonstration where students on campus were informed to rally for the support of alternative transportation methods on and near campus by riding their skateboards and bikes throughout the campus. The attendance of the event included 50-70 students holding posters, signs and megaphones. At the time Club e3 was not aware that the event would turn into a full campus-wide protest. Club e3 executive board members led the group of students along the exterior of the campus with their bikes and skateboards. They then conducted a march in one cohesive line throughout all the main walkways of the campus where it was illegal to ride bikes and skateboards according to campus policy. Chants of “burn fat, not oil” were heard by students, faculty and staff across the campus. It disrupted classrooms and meetings around the campus as many students ran up and joined the crowd in the bike crusade frenzy. After the bike crusade, Club e3 quickly packed their bags to head for their annual trip to Green Festival in San Francisco. This time, over 15 Club e3 executive board members attended the trip together. At the time, it was the largest sustainability conference in the world. Club e3 executive board members attended the business fair during the day and toured sustainable eateries and facilities throughout the city of San Francisco at night. They also visited the world’s largest Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Platinum certified facility, the California Acad-

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emy of Sciences, in its construction phase. All the Club e3 executive board members left inspired. When Club e3 executive board members returned, they started preparing for the organization’s largest annual event Earth Day, themed as EARTHDAY08@SDSU. Meanwhile, Ian worked with Justin Motika, A.S. Vice President of Finance and other student representatives to develop a student programming referendum that would increase student fees by $20 to fund six different initiatives, including A.S. sustainable facility upgrades and a week-long spring sustainability festival. The student programming referendum was called the Enhance, Evolve, Innovate Referendum. Before the end of the fall semester Club e3, under Erica and Amanda’s leadership continued to meet with campus faculty and staff to discuss incorporating sustainability into the curriculum and to persuade Aztec Shops to ban styrofoam due the human health risk and environmental harm the product causes. Erica and Amanda also began formulating plans to present to the A.S. Council an alternative transportation initiative that included possible routes for potential bike lanes on campus.

SPRING 2008 In the spring of 2008, Club e3 worked tirelessly on their annual Earth Day event. Preparation was endless; meetings with campus officials, public safety, fire marshals, businesses, booking musical artists and marketing. Club e3 also held another popular bike crusade on campus to continue support for bike lanes on campus. Erica and Amanda collaborated with the A.S. University Affairs Board and the A.S. Council to pass the Resolution in Support of the Creation of a Bicycle Lane on the San Diego State University Campus. Erica and Amanda worked with freshman A.S. University Affairs Board members Grant Mack and Erin Lannon to successfully pass the resolution, which passed with little opposition by the A.S. Council on March 26th, 2008. In March, the A.S. launched the Enhance, Evolve, Innovate Referendum. Student representatives, student board members and Club e3 members alike made presentations throughout the campus and engaged in grassroots marketing to inform students about the initiative. The Enhance, Evolve, Innovate Referendum passed by (64.6 %) and allowed the A.S. to move forward with the six initiatives specified in the referendum; including A.S. sustainability facility upgrades and a week-long sustainability spring festival. To assist with the implementation of the A.S. sustainability facility upgrades, Erica began serving as the interim A.S. Green Commissioner. Immediately, Erica began working closely with Justin Motika and Glen Brandenburg, the A.S. Mission Bay Aquatic Center Director to create the A.S. Green Love Sustainability Advisory Board that would be responsible for administering the funds allocated for sustainability projects. Soon, the A.S. Council was presented with the finalized charter for the Green Love Sustainability Advisory Board and was approved by the A.S. Council. For Earth Day 2008, Club e3 created sponsorship packets, charged businesses to attend, sold merchandise and worked with the A.S. Cultural Arts and Special Events Board (CASE).

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Club e3 was also allocated $10,000 from the SDSU Presidential Leadership Fund thanks to President Weber. Club e3 members held signs that stated “Keep your money, I want change” to promote the events. The tagline for Earth Day became “Move clean, live green” as it encouraged and incentivized students to use alternative transportation to and from campus. The event was the largest student organization event to occur at the campus in decades. Over 200 local sustainable businesses attended the Enviro-Business Fair that lasted from morning to afternoon. Media from all over the region came to broadcast all the students’ activities. Electric cars, hybrid busses and other sustainable vehicles took over the walkway stage. Shocking environmental awareness campaigns engulfed the campus. A cultural drum circle took place in the morning and a hip hop female artist group performed over lunch. A green building summit occurred in the afternoon, where Club e3 partnered with the Real Estate Society student organization. Students received extra credit for attending the day-long event from professors. In the evening, a concert took place on the Aztec Green, next to the trolley station, a location that had never before been used for an event but served as a perfect natural amphitheater. Award-winning DJ Donald Glaude performed followed by reggae sensation Rebelution. By the end of the concert over 4,000 students attended the concert, all completely organized by Club e3 with administrative assistance from the A.S. After Earth Day 2008, Club e3 began transitions for the following year and Erica focused a majority of her time on organizing the A.S. Green Love Sustainability Advisory Board. To assist in her efforts, she reached out to A.S. University Affairs Board members and Enhance, Involve, Innovate Referendum marketing leads Grant Mack and Erin Lannon. Grant became the A.S. Green Love Sustainability Advisory Board Vice Chair and Erin Lannon became one of the first voting members of the board and joined Club e3 on their executive board. By the end of the year, Club e3 became known to President Weber as the largest and fastest growing student organization on campus. Club e3 won the “Commitment to Service” and “Outstanding Spirit” at the SDSU Community Service Awards and received the prestigious“Student Organization of the Year” at the A.S. Aztec Achievement Awards.

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The Associated Students Green Love Sustainability Advisory Board & The Enviro-Business Society PURPOSE The purpose of this Associated Students Board shall be to advise the A.S. Council regarding the A.S. sustainability initiatives, programs and services designed to promote broad awareness of sustainability issues to SDSU students. Specifically, the Board will: • Review and make recommendations regarding policies, programs and procedures to encourage and promote the A.S. Council’s sustainability goals • Assist in communicating the A.S. Council’s sustainability goals, initiatives, programs and services within the A.S. organization, to SDSU clubs and student organizations and to the campus community • Identify the Board’s best efforts to address student sustainability interests, concerns and ideas by tracking trends and by collaborating with “green” student organizations and other campus departments and groups engaged in promoting sustainable issues on the SDSU campus. • Implement sustainability initiatives through programs and projects as recommended to the A.S. Council (added spring 2010)

2008-2009 A.S. GREEN LOVE MILESTONES • Established the A.S. sustainability programs • Created Greeks Going Green • Allocated first $250,000 to A.S. sustainability facility upgrades • Green travel • Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Platinum Resolution

2008-2009 e3 MILESTONES • Annual Theme: Sustainable Partnerships • Bike lane study

• Earth Day: Farmers’ Market • Started campus Styrofoam ban

SUMMER 2008 With the criteria set for the A.S. Green Love Sustainability Advisory Board (Green Love Board), A.S. Green Commissioner Erica Johnson began finalizing the Board’s structure. Erica recruited over 50 students to join the Board. There were four students serving as environmental student organization representatives, including three from Club e3 and one from the Association of Environmental Professionals. Much of the summer consisted of Erica working with Glen Brandenburg, the Green Love advisor, to devise different strategies to implement the $250,000 that was allocated to the Green Love Board to direct toward A.S. sustainability facility projects. To secure the funding for future years and prevent the fund from being used for other initiatives, the unofficial Green Love project policy was enacted stating that “the $250,000 allocated each year to the Green Love Sustainability Advisory Board is subject to final approval by the Associated Students Council and can only be directed toward brick and mortar sustainability upgrades/projects to the Associated Students operated facilities.” With the policy in place, Erica and Glen, along with the Green Love Board, created a project spreadsheet that prioritized sustainability projects based on cost, savings, environmental impact, rebates and operation costs. The Green Love project spreadsheet allowed the board to justify their recommendations on which projects to move forward with in the future. The

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first projects voted on by the Green Love Board were the Aztec Recreation Center lighting efficiency upgrade, high efficiency toilets, waterless urinals and low flow faucets within Aztec Center and the Aztec Recreation Center, the Mission Bay Aquatic Center water recycling and reuse system, a 41kw solar photovoltaic array at the Mission Bay Aquatic Center and phase I of the Aquaplex 124 kw solar photovoltaic array. Once the projects were determined for the year Glen immediately went to work collaborating with SDSU Physical Plant, SDSU Facilities Planning, Design and Construction, the A.S. Directors and outside consultants. With the Green Love projects determined for the school year, Erica decided that the Green Love initiative needed to expand and not just include projects but programs as well that would be facilitated by the Green Love Board. During the summer Erica proposed her program ideas to the A.S. Executive Committee and was awarded funding for the Sustainability Educational Awareness Campaign. The program’s purpose was to educate the student body by purchasing sustainability manufactured items to pass out to students and educate them about the importance of living an environmentally responsible lifestyle. Erica attended the California State University, University of California and California Community College Sustainability Conference with the A.S. President James Poet, Vice President of Finance, Grant Garske and Glen. Club e3 members also attended the conference with the A.S. representatives to learn more about what other California universities were doing in regard to sustainability initiatives on their respected campuses. The conference proved to be an eyeopening experience for the SDSU students and allowed Erica to teach the officers about sustainability and how projects and programs could be implemented at SDSU.

FALL 2008 At the start of the fall 2008 semester, Erica tasked Grant to organize the board into different subcommittees to discuss ideas centered on sustainability programs and seek different avenues for implementation. Grant was also tasked to implement the Green Love Sustainability Educational Awareness Campaign throughout the entire year. The sub-committees created were the Internal Outreach sub-committee, External Outreach sub-committee, Residence Hall subcommittee and Student Organization sub-committee. With direction from Erica, Grant started the Sustainability Educational Awareness Campaign in October, which consisted of board members tabling every Wednesday from 9 a.m.3 p.m., passing out sustainable products and educating the student body about the concept of sustainability, the importance and the use of the products. In November, Erica and Danny Ozstriecher, the A.S. Vice President of External Affairs, were invited by the Dean of Undergraduate Studies Geoffrey Chase to attend the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability Higher Education (AASHE). Dean Chase has been a long time sustainability advocate and remains a prominent figure in AASHE. AASHE provides resources, professional development and a network of support to enable institutions of higher education to model and advance sustainability in everything they do, from governance and operations to education and research. The conference allowed Danny and Erica to interact with faculty, staff and students across the nation, giving them better insight about all that sustainability encompasses.

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While the A.S. Green Love Board began building its repoire on campus and developing itself as a credible board, Club e3 now termed “e3” under the leadership of President Rae Gurne, continued to develop its working relationship with local sustainable business and media partners that participated in Earth Day the previous semester, thus the theme for the year was coined Sustainable Partnerships. E3 also began collaborating with new local businesses. The on-going collaboration allowed e3 to increase its public relations in the local area and bring sustainable awareness to the community. At this time, e3 also became an official chapter of the California Student Sustainability Coalition (CSSC), a state-wide student network to collaborate on sustainability-related projects and programs. Joining the CSSC allowed e3 to share with the rest of the state all of the great sustainability initiatives occurring at SDSU. Due to e3’s representation on the A.S. Green Love Board, e3 was able to work with Erica to secure funding for the Bike and Skateboard Safety Study. The A.S. hired landscape architectural firm KTU+A to commission the study. E3 worked closely with KTU+A throughout the rest of the year to commission surveys and gathered data for the study being compiled. With an emphasis on relationship building and activities, e3 held its first-ever Green Career Expo on-campus, with the hope of promoting alternative job paths to students beyond the traditional corporate and began formulating plans to implement a weekly farmers’ market on campus in collaboration with Aztec Shops.

SPRING 2009 In spring of 2009, e3 continued its theme of forging partnerships and alliances on and off-campus, increasing visibility of the organization and providing e3 with the tools necessary to run large, sustainable events with a very small budget. Working with the SDSU student organization, the American Marketing Association, e3 promoted going completely paperless at meetings and events to other student organizations focusing on the waste and ineffectiveness of flyers and instead teaching them about sustainably marketing practices, like going digital and reusing or recycling materials. E3 even created their own “Green Org. Award” for the A.S. Associated Business Student Council (ABSC) Future Rising Business Leaders cele-

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bration (FRBLs) to encourage student organizations to embrace sustainable practices. To show they were serious, e3 moved away from paper flyers (on recycled paper) and began to promote the use of websites and social media such as Facebook, and moved all applications, forms and sponsorships online. To further e3’s commitment toward building collaborative partnerships, Rae and other e3 executive members reached out to Aztec Shops and proposed the idea of removing Styrofoam from campus due to the human health risk, toxic chemicals and its drastic effects on the environment. E3 executive members Drew Smith and Dola Kuljeet headed this project and conducted research to convince Aztec Shops to adopt this sustainable practice. Eventually, e3 executive members worked with Paul Melchior, Aztec Shops’ Director of Dining Services, to analyze the financial costs associated with using different products other than Styrofoam. By the end of spring 2009, Aztec Shops announced that they would remove all styrofoam from their venues on campus by spring 2010 and agreed to further the relationship with e3 and learn more about sustainable operational practices. While continuing the sustainability programs launched the previous fall semester, the A.S. Green Love Board expanded these programs to include the Commitment to Sustainability initiative in which the campus community would sign the Commitment to Sustainability document stationed around campus and receive a wrist band that stated“Green Love Live Green.” The wrist bands would encourage students to remember the sustainability commitment they made. A Commitment to Sustainability Stated: By signing this document, I vow to demonstrate my dedication to preserving the environment. To further display my loyalty to being a green student at SDSU, I will wear the commitment wristband. To continue informing myself, I will read the A.S. Green Love newsletter and share my knowledge with others. With my signature, I affirm my commitment to, at minimum, the three environmental standards listed below: …I will recycle ALL products that are capable of being reprocessed (paper, cardboard, plastics, aluminum and glass). …I will ban my consumption of plastic bags and transition to reusable bags. …I will, whenever possible, stop buying bottled water and use a refillable container. The Green Love Board also reignited the Green Lunch Bag Speaker Series program, expanding the original monthly lunch meeting to include not just faculty members but staff, students, local businesses and the community. This diverse group was formed to discuss sus-

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tainability topics, projects and programs while enjoying an all organic lunch provided by Aztec Shops. To assist with sustainability education and awareness throughout the campus, the Green Love Board partnered with prominent members of different SDSU fraternities and sororities to create a new student organization called Greeks Going Green to help facilitate social and environmentally responsible behavior in the SDSU Greek System. The organization started with a healthy 30 members, received one representative seat on the Green Love Board and conducted walk-arounds to Greek chapter houses every other weekend to teach each house about a sustainable habit and action members could initiate at home. Possibly the most prominent educational accomplishment for the Green Love Board was Erica’s partnership with history professor Sarah Elkind and the implementation of SDSU’s first Sustainability and Environmental Studies comprehensive major/minor. The major/minor began with over 60 students declaring their intent to be a part of the new academic program at SDSU, a huge success for the Green Love Board and faculty within the College of Arts & Letters. In April, Grant attended the Power Shift conference. Power Shift brought 12,000 young people from across the country to Washington D.C. to hold elected officials accountable for rebuilding the nation’s economy and reclaim America’s future through bold climate and clean energy policy. From February 27th to March 2nd, young people converged on Washington D.C. to take a message of bold, comprehensive and immediate federal climate action to Capitol Hill. At Power Shift, young people not only delivered the message of change to elected officials, but strengthened the climate and clean energy movement by infusing the nation's young leaders with new ideas, skills, connections with each other and opportunities for employment and action. Grant led the San Diego Power Shift coalition with students from the University of San Diego and the University of California San Diego, lobbying various representatives for a sustainable future. The conference taught Grant a great deal about active collaboration and the sustainability movement, preparing him to be the next A.S. Green Commissioner. Erica and Danny also attended a similar conference in April through the United States Student Association (USSA) and lobbied for sustainability-oriented funding and educational programs as well as enhanced funding the higher education in general. Between April 15th and the 17th the week before Earth Day, A.S. launched its inaugural GreenFest spring festival. The funding for GreenFest was allocated as part of the Enhance, Evolve, Innovate referendum that passed the previous spring semester. The intention of GreenFest is to educate students about the concept of sustainability and create a sense of Aztec pride at SDSU. The planning and the production of the first GreenFest fell upon the A.S. Cultural Arts and Special Events Board (CASE). The Green Love Board did participate in GreenFest and planned the Tree Planting Ceremony at the SDSU Children’s Center to educate and inspire participants that sustain-

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ability was about the future, a better future for our children and our children’s children. By the middle of April, e3 was ready to facilitate their annual Earth Day celebration. In addition to the annual Enviro-Business Fair, this year’s Earth Day included he firstever farmers’ market. E3 Chief Financial Officer Matt Nelson and Rae worked tirelessly with Aztec Shops to seek approval and successfully implement the event. E3 even provided the vendors with environmentally-friendly plateware to heighten the “green” aspect of the market. To facilitate the day-long event, e3 relied on several key partnerships they had developed, including working with the San Diego Metropolitan Transit System (MTS) to both promote Earth Day and provide free trolley passes to campus, 91X and Stay Classy to bring fresh musical acts to campus, an art class on campus that designed new logos for the event and with Earth Smart who provided free biodegradable plate-ware for all farmers’ market vendors. The GreenFest Executive Committee (GFEC) was eventually created consisting of the A.S. Green Commissioner, e3 President, representatives from CASE and chaired by the A.S. Vice President of University Affairs. The new committee agreed to have meetings over the summer and extended GreenFest to include an entire week of events including Earth Day and a concert. By April of 2009 the final decisions on the“ModernSpace” new Aztec Center Project were coming to fruition. It had been over three years since the passage of the 2006 ModernSpace referendum, which allowed the A.S. to construct a new Aztec Center student union building as the current Aztec Center was inefficient for a student body of 30,000+ students. Unfortunately, due to the economic decline in 2008, which included a variety of factors effecting the construction of the facility, the A.S. ModernSpace sub-committee was tasked for over a year not to plan for a new student union but instead cut out design and programming elements including a satellite gym, increased student organization food, increased meeting space, resources centers, increased food venues and a variety of other elements that were originally voted on by students in 2006. The committee watched as the original hopes and dreams of what students needed in the future were slowly obliterated at each and every meeting held throughout the year. Instead, the “new” Aztec Center was planned to be renovated with little to no new elements. By the end of April 2009, the project had been completely gutted. At this time Grant met with A.S. Green Commissioner Erica Johnson and A.S. President James Poet to express his concerns with the project and asked if anything could be done to save the original intent of the project. Erica called for the construction of a brand new Aztec Center student union that would not only include all the design and programming elements originally voted on in the 2006 referendum but would achieve the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Platinum certification rating, the highest green building rating a building could achieve through the United States Green Building Council (USGBC). To make this proposition a reality, Grant, Erica and James crafted the Resolution in Sup-

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port of LEED Platinum Certification for the ModernSpace Student Union. For the resolution to have any effect it would need to be approved by the A.S. ModernSpace sub-committee and the A.S. Council. At the final A.S. ModernSpace sub-committee of the year, James presented the resolution. Heated discussion commenced amongst University administrators and students alike. To move the resolution forward, Grant moved to approve the resolution, which was immediately seconded by Tyler. The A.S. ModernSpace sub-committee voted in favor to recommend the resolution to the Associated Students Council for final approval and start the project over. Before the next A.S. Council meeting two days later, Erica worked tirelessly to finalize the presentation about green building while James prepared for the most important speech he would ever give at an A.S. Council meeting. At the A.S. Council meeting, Erica presented the resolution and educated Council members about green building practices. James passed his gavel of leadership and voiced his opinion to support the resolution, resonating with many A.S. Council members. Grant and Erin remained adamant and outspoken about the resolution and the future of the new Aztec Center student union building. When the final vote was tallied, only two A.S. Council members opposed the resolution. The time had come to embark on a new course for the ModernSpace project one that would include another fee referendum in the spring of 2010 to make the new LEED Platinum certified Aztec Center student union a reality.

2009-2010 A.S. GREEN LOVE MILESTONES • Zipcar • Zimride • ModernSpace Referendum

• Bike Lane Senate Policy • Expansion of Green Lunch Bag Series • Marine Protected Areas Resolution

2009-2010 e3 MILESTONES • Annual Theme: Join the Revolution! • SDSU’s First Weekly Farmers’ Market

• Kick Gas Festival • California Student Sustainability Coalition San Diego Spring Convergence

SUMMER 2009 Over the summer of the 2009, Erin Lannon, e3 President, Tara Kelly, e3 CEO, and Holly Hellerstedt, e3 Vice President began planning for a weekly farmers’ market on campus after successfully hosting a farmers’ market during Earth Day 2009. The three leaders

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were given the team name The Triple Bottom Line, resonating with the three values of e3 (Erin/Ecology, Tara/Ethics and Holly/Economics). In order to start a weekly farmers’market on campus, during the summer the three e3 executive officers met with representatives from Aztec Shops to implement the SDSU’s Farmers’ Market. For weeks Erin, Tara and Holly visited local farmers’markets and met with vendors to inform them about the possibility of a new opportunity at SDSU. By late August, eight food vendors agreed to be a part of the SDSU Farmers’ Market and with the approval of Aztec Shops to move forward, the Farmers’ Market was ready to become a reality in September. While the e3 Triple Bottom Line execs began laying the foundation for the SDSU Farmers’ Market, Grant Mack the A.S. Green Commissioner, now titled the A.S. Sustainability Commissioner, began formulating plans for the A.S. Green Love Sustainability Advisory Board. Specifically, Grant planned to bring two now alternative transportation programs to campus; Zimride, an online ride-sharing program and Zipcar, a car-sharing program for the SDSU community. To do this Tyler Boden, A.S. President, Alyssa Bruni, A.S. Vice President of External Affairs, Grant and Erin attended the UC/CSU/CCC Sustainability Conference at UC Santa Barbara to not only meet representatives from Zimride and Zipcar but to learn about all the other sustainability oriented projects and programs being implemented throughout the state. Grant was able to initiate the Zimride and Zipcar programs with approval from the A.S. Executive Committee and was able to secure funding for the A.S. Sustainability Educational Awareness Campaign, now titled the A.S. Greening Your Life Campaign, as well as funding from the Cultural Arts & Special Events (CASE) board for the semester-long Green

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Lunch Bag Series. As e3 and the A.S. Green Love board began to prepare for the 2009-2010 academic year, members of the A.S. GreenFest Executive Committee (GFEC) met over the summer to start planning for the spring sustainability and Aztec pride focused festival.

FALL 2009 On Sept. 8, 2009, the weekly SDSU Farmers’Market began on Campanile Walkway from 10 a.m. - 2p.m. with eight food vendors and the e3 informational booth and it was successful! Each week during the fall of 2009 the market grew in vendors and sales. To enhance the sustainability operations of the Farmers’ Market, e3 and Aztec Shops created environmental standards and a mission statement to formalize the Farmers’Market on campus. The environmental standards for the Farmers’ Markets were implemented in phases to ensure the vendors were not overwhelmed with abrupt changes. The first standard consisted of banning plastic bottles, soda cans, Styrofoam and plastic bags. Brian Wynne, Aztec Shops General Manager of Concessions, became the Aztec Shops liaison with e3, working with the e3 executive board to continue to make the Farmers’ Market a success. Brian worked diligently to approve vendor contracts and insurance forms and set up the 8x4’wooden e3/Aztec Shops Farmers’Market signs every morning. To market SDSU’s Farmers’ Market e3 used Facebook, classroom announcements, ads in the Daily Aztec and the Aztec Recreation Center (ARC), as well as the ARC newsletter. E3 also passed out organic apples to professors throughout the campus to inform them of the weekly event. To foster the business relationship between the vendors and e3, each e3 executive officer was assigned a vendor to be their “green Farmers’ Market consultant.” This consisted of communicating with the vendor on a weekly basis and assist implementing the environmental standards. The SDSU Farmers’ Market finished the semester with 22 vendors. With an e3 executive board of twenty five members Erin, Tara and Holly created an e3 blog to accurately and efficiently inform the e3 executive board about meetings, events and responsibilities. The blog was a great tool to foster active communication amongst the board members and organize the many initiatives e3 had embarked on for the year. To further the engagement between the Erin, Tara, Holly and the e3 executive board e3 hosted a beach cleanup in Ocean Beach San Diego, CA, partnering with the Surfrider Foundation and In-N-Out who gave them clean up materials and old potato sacks to pick up trash and debris. The event was not only a bonding opportunity for all the e3 executives but it was also an opportunity to clean up the human generated waste on the beach and in the parking lots. On October 24, people from 181 countries worldwide came together for the most widespread day of environmental action in the planet's history; 350.org’s International Day of Climate Awareness. On this day, 5,200 events were held around the world. People gathered to call for

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strong action and bold leadership, as well as to solve the growing climate crisis. With guidance from 350.org the International Day of Climate Awareness became the largest grassroots movement/event in history. In San Diego former e3 executive officers, Annie Bessinger, Matt Nelson and Rae Gurne partnered with various non-profit organizations, including e3, as well as government agencies and local companies to host the Kick Gas Festival. The festival encouraged San Diegans to ditch a car and utilize the public transportation options in San Diego to prevent the use of oil and the production of Green House Gas emissions. The enormous event, which was dubbed the "EcoPart of the West Coast," consisted of the following elements: 91X Sustainable Waves Solar Stage featuring Matisyahu plus 20 more bands and DJs, Sterling Collwood Sustainable Living Zone, K1 Speed EV Auto Cross Racing and Showstopper Wax EV Car Show, OB Farmers Market Zone, Ocean Beach Surf and Skate Interactive Zone, Go Vavi Fun Zone, Earthlist.com ECO World Zone, Julian Hard Cider Adult Beverage Garden and a Kick Gas time! At the peak of the event, there were 8,300 attendees. Current e3 members became the grassroot volunteer force for the event and assisted with the set-up, operations and teardown of the entire production. While the grassroot sustainability initiatives were being implemented by e3, Grant Mack successfully implemented programs on campus. Two new alternative transportation programs on campus, Zipcar and Zimride, were launched during the semester. With collaborative funding and direction between Grant and Mariah Hudson, the Assistant Director for the SDSU Center for Regional Sustainability, the Green Lunch Bag Series became a once a month event in which professors, community members, nonprofit organizations, government agencies and companies were asked to present their sustainability projects, programs and initiatives while enjoying a healthy catered organic lunch. Each event was hosted at Scripps Cottage and attracted between 25 and 40 students every month. In November, e3 attended the California Student Sustainability Coalition's (CSSC) Fall Convergence at UC Santa Cruz. The weekend was full of workshops, panel discussions, locally grown organic food, a group sleepover in a barn, beautiful hikes and passionate students. The e3 executive board also attended San Francisco’s Green Festival for the third consecutive year. This year Grant and Green Love board members also attended the festival. Similarly to the past two years, e3 members networked and re-

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cruited businesses to be a part of e3’s Earth Day celebration at SDSU. Typically, Earth Day was not only a celebration at SDSU but also a time in which e3 would push the envelope on an issue that had not been addressed on campus. E3 had already produced on an eco-fashion show, an epic concert, a weekly farmers’ market and a yearly green business fair, so it was time to raise the bar that much higher. Erin, Tara and Holly decided that the next big event for Earth Day would be a local, organic beer garden! The three e3 executive officers crafted a lengthy and detailed proposal for the Save the Ales: A Garden, Compost and Cultural Event. The proposal covered various aspects of sustainability, including global and local environmental issues, climate change and water conservation. The goal was to incorporate social equity into the event while raising awareness about how to “green” a student’s everyday life through composting, transportation, purchasing and gardening facts. To receive approval, Erin worked closely with Natalie Colli through the GreenFest Executive Committee to seek approval from the University Vice President for Student Affairs, Dr. James Kitchen. After multiple meetings Dr. Kitchen approved the beer garden appreciating the educational components it had to offer. To finish the fall semester with a bang, a ribbon-cutting ceremony was held at the Aztec Aquaplex for the final installation of the 124 kw solar photovoltaic array, the largest solar project ever completed by the A.S. that doubled the amount of solar energy production at SDSU. The project was a collaboration between Sullivan Solar Power, the contracting company who installed the Aquaplex solar panels, and the A.S. Green Love board. What was most unique about the ceremony is that Erica Johnson, former e3 President and A.S. Green Commissioner, worked for Sullivan Solar Power and assisted with the event. Speakers included, Tyler Boden, A.S. President, Grant Mack, A.S. Sustainability Commissioner, Dr. Stephen L. Weber, SDSU President, California State Senator 39th District Christine Kehoe, Daniel Sullivan, Sullivan Solar Power President and City of San Diego Council Member District 2 Kevin Faulconer. The event was a huge success with many students, faculty, administrators and media personnel present. To conclude 2010, 350.org hosted a second climate action day in which people from all over the world gathered at iconic and

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strategic locations in their communities to host candlelight vigils. E3 planned a vigil in Balboa Park and together with community members lit candles of hope to stand in solemn solidarity with the citizens and peoples of other nations whose very survival is threatened by the growing climate crisis. These nations called for a "survival pact" and commitments from developed nations to cut Green House Gas emissions and reduce the atmospheric concentration of CO2 from 410 parts per million to 350 parts per million, the tolerable amount the earth’s atmosphere would sustain without significant climate change.

SPRING 2010 Once the spring 2010 semester began, the A.S. was well underway to move forward with a new ModernSpace referendum in March. In order to construct a new LEED Platinum student union building that consisted of all the necessary elements students voted upon in the 2006 ModernSpace referendum, the A.S. needed to pass a $94 fee increase effective fall 2013. The summer and fall of 2009 were strictly dedicated toward the planning and organization of a successful ModernSpace referendum in the spring of 2010. A new architect firm, CANON Design, and the LEED Consultant firm Lynn Simon & Associates, were hired earlier in the semester with the hope of the ModernSpace referendum passing in spring. All the plans were in place for the referendum to launch in March and under the guidance of the ModernSpace Referendum Marketing committee the A.S. was more than ready. However, before the ModernSpace referendum campaign was launched Grant and Glen finalized the implementation of the solar water heating array at the SDSU Children’s Center, heating all of the hot water used at the facility. The official Zipcar launch was also implemented by the beginning of February as well as the installation of the Aquaplex variable frequency pool pumps which drastically reduced the amount of energy consumed at the popular facility. By the middle of February, the A.S. rolled out its ModernSpace

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referendum campaign. A.S. Council members, e3 members, A.S. board members and many other students spent three weeks of campaigning across the university giving presentations to classes, staff members and student organizations, handing out brochures and promotional items, as well as tabling at various spots across the campus and hosting educational events to encourage students to vote on March 9th & 10th. Grant, Tara and Erin were named the “green experts,” who were asked to be present at each presentation to answer questions’ students may have about the sustainability elements of the new LEED Platinum student union. After all of the hard work each and every member of the campaign volunteered, the ModernSpace referendum passed with a 54% approval! In the fall of 2013 SDSU will have the first LEED Platinum student union in the entire California State University (CSU) system! The time had come for SDSU and A.S. to be placed on the map as an institution and organization who considers sustainability and the future of our community as the highest priority. With the SDSU LEED Platinum student union project moving forward, Grant who helped plan the sustainable messaging behind the ModernSpace Referendum campaign, shifted his focus toward the implementation of bike lanes throughout the campus. In order for bike lanes to be implemented Grant worked with Ignacio Prado, A.S. VP of Finance and Natalie Colli, A.S. VP of University Affairs to modify the University Senate Policy banning the use of bikes within the interior of the campus. Grant received approval from both the University Environmental Health & Safety Senate Committee and the Senate Sustainability Committee to proceed with the modifications to the policy that would stipulate bikes are legal within the interior of the campus as long they are within designated lanes. Grant, along with Ignacio, presented the policy modification to the University Senate, it was approved unanimously. After forty years of a no wheels policy, SDSU finally modified the policy to allow bikes within the campus interior. The next step was to discuss and act upon the implementation the bike lanes throughout the campus based on KTU+A’s 2008-2009 Bike and Skate Lane Safety study. With progress being made on all fronts, Earth Day 2010 had finally arrived. April 19-23 marked the second annual GreenFest. e3 was ready to launch Earth Day with the theme of Join the Revolution, based on the revolutionary sustainability progress e3 had enacted and been a part of at SDSU. E3 had contacted over sixty local green businesses for the third annual Earth Day Enviro-Business Fair, set up an Eco-Action Center and hosted the Save the Ales Beer Garden in Aztec Center. The Eco-Action Center on Earth was also a great event as it allowed students to learn about sustainable related issues in their communities and how to take steps to solve them. The goal of the Eco Action Center was to give people the chance to actually take action while being surrounded by inspiring green businesses and the overall spirit of Earth Day. Local organizations came to provide information on water, food, and waste. The Save the Ales Beer Garden was perhaps e3’s most celebrated event as brew master Karl Strauss explained the process of making beer, the ingredients and why it is important to consume local beer to decrease

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the transported miles and support the local economy. The Save the Ales Beer Garden also included educational banners featuring “Green Your Life”tips and advice. GreenFest events throughout the week-long included keynote speaker addresses from Jerome Ringo, Senior Executive for Global Strategies by Green Port and former president of the World Wildlife Foundation, an enviro-fashion show, a bike brunch, an herb garden expo, student organization competitions and an evening concert featuring the headline performer LMFAO. Despite all the obstacles that arose from the gloomy and rainy weather during the week of GreenFest the entire event was a huge success for the A.S., e3 and the campus community. With the semester coming to an end, Grant and the A.S. Green Love board moved forward with the Resolution in Support of a Nine Square Mile Minimum Marine Protected Reserve in South La Jolla they had been working on with San Diego Coast Keeper. After three weeks of revisions, the A.S. Council approved the resolution showing its support for environmental stewardship, not just at SDSU but in the San Diego region. Even though GreenFest and Earth Day were over, e3 was not ready to stop pushing for progress at SDSU. Following the creation of the Food Justice Political Science course, and the Aztec Farm at the SDSU Santa Margartia Ecological Reserve, the SDSU Center for Regional Sustainability and e3 played an integral role in planning the Cultivating Food Justice Conference (CFJC) held at SDSU. The CFJC was a regional conference focused on gathering all organizations and people working on food justice--turning lawns into food gardens, making county policies affecting home gardens less stringent, bringing real food into schools, providing access to healthy, local food in all neighborhoods and forming groups of likeminded community members to hold discussion. The CFJC had many volunteers and attracted over 800 participants. The CFJC brought well-renown author and food advocate Raj Patel to speak, as well as local farmer and activist Barry Logan. Workshops ranging from Food Policy 101 to How to Preserve Foods were held, and attendants received a 100% free, local and organic lunch, with produce from farms across San Diego, prepared by local food volunteers. Local

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musicians capped off the event during the free lunch. Overall, the goal of the conference was to educate and move people to act on issues in their communities. The CFJC was a huge success and continued e3’s movement in the sustainable food world, adding new ideas to the SDSU Farmers’ Market. By May, e3 was proud to hear that Aztec Shops had banned all Styrofoam on campus by switching to non-toxic more environmental responsible alternatives. Tara Kelly was officially appointed the A.S. Sustainability Commissioner by A.S. President Grant Mack. e3 now had two new presidents, Lenny Sczechowicz and Berneice Rodriguez to lead the organization.

2010-2011 A.S. GREEN LOVE MILESTONES • Sorority Greek Recycling Program • Residence Hall Recycling Program • Trial Period & Permanent Bike Lanes

• Establishment of Aztec Shops New Student Union Food Committee • A.S. Long Term Corporate Sustainability Goals • A.S. Sustainability Video and Report

2010-2011 e3 MILESTONES • Annual Theme: The World is in YOUR Hands! • Continuation of Farmers Market

SUMMER 2010 In between planning the Green Love board initiatives for the academic year. Tara was also in constant contact with the new e3 leadership, Lenny Sczechowicz and Berneice Rodriguez. With the successful collaborative implementation of GreenFest 2010 the GreenFest Executive Committee for GreenFest 2011 once again begun meeting in early June. The committee expanded by adding three positions, A.S. Diversity Commissioner, Greek liaison and a public relations specialist. The ideas, collaborative understanding and overall goal to make GreenFest more exciting and sustainable were always the main priority. In June, a handful of Green Love board and e3 members attended the annual California Higher Education Sustainability Conference at LA City College. The annual conference, which was formally named the University of California, California State University, California Community College Sustainability Conference, gave students and Glen Brandenburg a unique opportunity to network with like minded individuals and feed off one another’s ideas for projects, programs and initiates. Both Tara and Glen gave five presentations, including joint presentations with Sullivan Solar Power and Simon and Associates, the LEED Consultant hired for the LEED Platinum New Student Union project formerly known as ModernSpace. While Tara and Glen presented at the California Higher Education Sustainability Conference in LA, Grant was busy attending the California State Student Association (CSSA) meeting at California State University (CSU) Stanislaus as the SDSU A.S. President. CSSA is the single recognized voice for students of the CSU system that serves to represent the collective interests of CSU students to the CA governor, legislature, CSU Board of Trustees, CSU Chancellor, CSU faculty and alumni and the public. As a voting members on the Board of Directors of this organization, Grant became the CSSA Environmental Affairs Officer. Grant’s vision for the position was to create a sustainability fund that could be applied for by the different Associated Students throughout the CSU system to implement various sustainability related projects and programs. This fund became known as the Greenovation fund and was launched in Spring of 2011. Throughout the summer Tara, Grant and A.S. Executive Vice

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President Sean Kashanchi attended meetings about the new Student Union project to ensure that the project was on schedule and would meet the minimum LEED Platinum point requirements to be certified by the United States Green Building Council (USGBC). Tara also attended many meetings over the summer to set up a Greek Recycling Program, figure out logistics to start a bike-sharing program on campus and assisted Dr. Vinod Sasidharan with the establishment of his Sustainable Development course (PSFA 100). As Tara was busy finalizing all the sustainable initiatives for year, Grant worked with Dan Cornthwaite, A.S. Executive Director and Bob Schulz, SDSU University Architect to implement the installation of a trial period bike lane down Campanile Walkway. The trial period was initiated to test the viability and safety of bike lanes in the middle of campus before the finalized red concrete stained lanes would be installed by the end of the academic year. The overall purpose of the bike lanes on campus was to encourage the use of alternative transportation to and from campus, reduce parking infrastructure costs to the university, reduce car related costs to students, faculty and staff, encourage exercise via bike use, reduce pollution within the college area, reduce car traffic around the campus and in the community and reduce the University’s overall Green House Gas index.

FALL 2010 On August 30th, the first day of the fall semester at SDSU, the first bike lane in campus history was established on Campanile Walkway. Due to the lane being a trial period enhancement to the campus it was decided to install neon green bike lane tape that would run along the west side of Campanile Walkway to mark the designated bike lane on campus. After five years of advocacy, e3’s vision of a bike lane in the central part of campus had finally started to be-

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come a reality. To celebrate the addition of a bike lane on campus, on September 15th the A.S. and e3 hosted a bike lane ribbon-cutting ceremony and bike fair on Campanile Walkway to acknowledge all the individuals who worked on the project. Tara spearheaded the event, which drew attention from students, faculty, staff, administrators and local media. To memorialize the project SDSU President Weber joined Grant and a handful of Green Love and e3 students to bike down the lane breaking through the green ribbon to start the ceremony. Speakers included President Weber, Bob Schulz and Grant while Tara directed the event and introduced each speaker. In addition to the ceremony, booths at the bike fair gave students the opportunity to win related prizes. To ensure the safety and success of the bike lane Grant encouraged Tara and Candice Luistro, A.S. Vice President of University Affairs to establish a joint board bike lane monitoring program between the A.S. Green Love board and the University Affairs board. For a couple of hours a day for two weeks students from each of the boards set up a booth next to the lane to educate students to walk outside of the lane and remind bikers to watch their speed. Photos, brochures and giveaways were used to entice students to become more informed and educated about the purpose of the lane and to be safe. The bike lane monitoring program seemed to help decrease the amount of students walking in the lane and the speed of bikers. However, the culture change that was in order would take time in order for students to fully realize the change that had occurred on campus. By the end of the semester the decrease in students walking in the lane compared to the beginning of the semester was significant. One of the areas on campus that e3 and the A.S. Green Love board had tried for years to influence and encourage becoming more sustainable were students who lived in the residence halls. Due to Tara living in the residence halls as a Residential Advisor, she was excited to actively engage and collaborate with the Residence Hall Association (RHA) to implement various sustainable initiatives in the living communities. Tara was appointed as the Eco Chair of the Residence Hall Association to push for certain sustainability initiatives. Tara worked tirelessly to initiate various programs in the residence halls. The A.S. Green Love board and RHA were able to host a Dance in the Dark, an event aimed for students in the residence halls to dance and enjoy other students company while learning about the important of conserving energy. Over one hundred students showed up to the event throughout the night with an original estimate of only thirty.

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With the plans for the New Student Union underway, Grant became concerned about the planned food venues that would be offered in the new facility as constructing a building to meet LEED Platinum certification goes far beyond just the construction as it is also a major driver of the sustainable operations in the facility as well. To begin planning for sustainable food options in the new building Grant worked with Donna Tusack, Aztec Shops CEO to form the Aztec Center Food Venue Oversight Committee. The committee met in early November to discuss possible food venues in the new building, and decided that a survey was necessary to establish what students were looking for in the new student union. Would they want more vegan options? Gluten free? Local? Organic? What do students think is healthy? The survey would answer these questions. Once again in mid-November e3 and A.S. Green Love board students attended the annual GreenFestival in San Francisco, networking with green businesses, gaining ideas and contacts for the e3 Earth Day Enviro-Business Fair. The group of students who attended did all they could to reduce their carbon foot print to travel to and from the event by carpooling, staying in a hostel and used public transportation to attend the conference, It was a great bonding and educational experience for the group of e3 and A.S. Green Love board students. One of the ideas students who attended the GreenFestival in San Francisco brought back was to implement and expand composting on campus. Aztec Shops composts in a couple of their venues. To bring awareness about composting, the A.S. Green Love board started a composting pilot program by the end November. The A.S. Green Love board moved forward, receiving permission from SDSU Dining Services to staff a bin in the East Commons food venue for two hours a day. Collaborating with the students on campus, Tara was able to have an art student paint the compost bin with a garden theme to bring visually stimulating awareness as it was staffed by A.S. Green Love board members during peak lunch hours on campus. Many students had never heard of composting, so it was difficult to encourage students to compost, but an opportunity to bring awareness to what composting means, how it works and what the benefits are was another great opportunity for the A.S. Green Love board to engage the campus community. San Diego Coast Keeper once again contacted the A.S. Green Love board to advocate on behalf of Marine Protect Areas (MPA) in San Diego. Specifically Coast Keeper and WiLDCOAST asked if A.S. Green Love board members would help testify in front of the California Fish and Games Commissioner during one of two meetings that would decide if the Marine Protected Areas were adopted or rejected in South La Jolla. A.S. Green Love board members ended one of their meetings early to take a bus to the hearing to testify and due to their hard work as well as the work of many other San Diegans, it was decided that the Marine Protect Areas would be adopted for South La Jolla! The AS Green Love board continued the Green Lunch Bag Series in collaboration with the SDSU Center for Regional Sustainability. The programs attendance increased each week during the semester due to Erin Lannon’s efforts to promote the program and the promotional prizes that were given to students who answered questions about the speaker’s presentations. This monthly program provided more than just an organic lunch and was an important forum for students, faculty, staff and local business leaders to connect with one another and discuss different projects, programs and issues that related to sustainability, As the Green Lunch Bag Series

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continued for the remainder of the semester so too did the Greening Your Life campaign, but with a new standard; all promotional products purchased by the A.S. Green Love board would be made in America from recycled materials that were recyclable. Although this was a bit of a challenge since the majority of promotional products are made in China. The made in America standard also applied to the GreenFest Executive Committee. The committee members realized the importance of buying American made promotional items for GreenFest because purchasing American made products reduces the carbon footprint of a product through reduced transportation while supporting the local American economy and ethical business practices. The A.S. Green Love board also participated in the statewide elections by advocating for No on Proposition 23 campaign which if approved by California voters would abolish the state of California’s Global Warming Solutions Act (Assembly Bill 32) that stated the state of California had to reduces its Green House Gas emissions lower than 1990 levels before 2020. The Proposition was voted down by California voter in November, securing California’s green future. Due to Tara’s and Mina Azim’s, A.S. Events Commissioner, involvement in the GreenFest Executive Committee both individuals were invited to attend the This Way to Sustainability Conference at California State University (CSU) Chico. At the same time, Grant was invited through CSSA to present a workshop about a CSU wide sustainability vision statement to campus administrators and staff to push forward the movement at an administrator level. After the conference Tara and Mina, began working compiling a list of A.S. Green Programming Guidelines to implement the follow semester. After two years of the Urban Corps. of San Diego County (a nonprofit organization whose mission is to provide job training and educational opportunities to young adults, in the fields of conservation, recycling, and community service) securing a state grant for a Greek Recycling system at SDSU, Tara and Grant were finally able to establish connections with the Greek systems leadership to implement the program. The program was set to give each sorority house a large outdoor recycling bin and small bins for the inside that would be collected regularly, with funds being returned to the respective sorority houses. The grant also included funding for a kick-off event, promotional items, prizes for the winning sorority, funding for sororities to encourage others to recycle, as well as a celebration event at the end of the semester. By December the foundation was laid for the program, promotional items ordered and the details for the January kick-off event were ready to be implemented. Before the end of the Fall semester, the A.S. Green Love board hosted a Zipcar day to bring awareness to the campus community about the program. Also, thanks to Glen Brandenburg's efforts, the A.S. SDSU Children’s Center 23kw solar photovoltaic array was constructed offsetting roughly 33% of the total energy used by the facility. In collaboration with the University department of Campus Design, Construction and Facilities Planning the A.S. visionary leadership decided with proper financing to increase the planned 173kw solar photovoltaic array for the New Student Union building to a 343kw solar photovoltaic array to offset about 50% of the total energy used

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for the facility in a given year. These projects like so many other A.S. Green Love board projects were another step forward for a more just and sustainable campus.

SPRING 2011 At the start of the spring semester, Tara appointed a new A.S. Green Love board Vice Chair, Aaron Choy. Tara then planned Panhellenic Recycling Program Kick-Off Event, Sororities from across the Greek system came to the event excited about the competition and ready to learn more about sustainability. The event was huge success with hundreds of women in attendance. After the event, the recycling bins were delivered to each of the sorority houses and the program finally began. In addition to Tara’s efforts through the A.S. Green Love board, Grant began finalizing the plans for the final implementation of bike lanes throughout the University campus. Although an initial aspect of the original study, skateboards were removed from the project scope entirely. However, the implementation for the final red concrete stained bike lanes were planned to be constructed over spring break. Grant also moved forward with the LEED Platinum recognition wall in the new Student Union building to recognize all the individuals who were key to the development of the New Student Union building and began finalizing plans for the approval of A.S. Long Term Corporate Sustainability Goals as well as the A.S. Sustainability video and report after receiving funding from the Presidents Leadership Fund the semester prior. All these initiatives were slated to be completed by the end of the spring semester. In collaboration with e3, the Farmers’ Market continued to be a success and established a food container program where students would buy for $5 a reusable food container to prevent waste and receive discounts from the vendors in addition to more food. After five short weeks, the container was planned to pay for itself, while reducing waste each week. Due to e3’s diligence and hard work with Aztec Shops the Farmers’ Market was planned to continue for another two years while the construction of the new Student Union was being constructed starting June 1st of 2011. Along with the Farmers Market Tara and e3 continued to work with Aztec Shops to brainstorm various sustainable programs in the many food venues like the possibility of banning plastic bags and water bottles in the near future as well as posting signage for students in the market to fill up their reusable water bottles.

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The schedule of events for GreenFest 2011 was finalized and ready to be fully implemented from April 18th – 22nd. Events on Monday included the Sector 9 Bike Brunch, the Amazing Race Green Edition student competition and a sustainable music video competition and film screening. On Tuesday there would be the Enviro-Fashion Show and Recycled Art Show while on Wednesday there would be the Green Lunch Bag Series featuring keynote speakers and inspirational activists Julia “Butterfly” Hill and Daryl Hannah, as well as “In Conversation With Julia and Daryl” event and a University Reception following their large keynote address in Montezuma Hall with seats for 800 people. To incentivize students to participate, Tara and Aaron sent over a hundred personalized emails to professors over winter break asking them to offer credit to hear the keynote speakers, giving students the opportunity to hear two phenomenal environmental activists speak. Wednesday also would include the new Sustain Your Roots: World Map To Sustainability, event where twenty countries and a showcase of cultural performers would teach the campus about sustainable practices in other countries and cultures. Thursday would mark e3’s third annual Enviro-Business Fair in addition to the weekly SDSU Farmers’ Market, which would have a culinary showcase from Chef Brian Malarkey. E3 would also plan five days of advocacy through the week; Meatless Monday, Transportation Tuesday, Mega-Watt Wednesday, Thriving Thursday and Free 4 All Friday. To conclude the week-long celebration, on Friday evening a festival would take place on the large Environmental and Nutritional Sciences (ENS) field with e3’s Save the Ales Beer Garden, rides, performers, composting and recycling stations, games, farmers’ market food vendors and more! After the festival an epic concert featuring performers Lupe Fiasco, Steve Aoki, followed DJ Skinnie at the Viejas Arena.

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This report has been written up until March of 2011 with the following initiatives listed below to be completed by the end of the spring 2011 semester: • Finalized Bike Lane funding on Campanile and Aztec Walkways (Approved by the AS Council on March 9th, 2011 and planned for implementation over summer 2011) • AS Long Term Corporate Sustainability Goals (Approved by the AS Council on March 16th, 2011) - All Associated Students managed facilities will achieve Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Existing Building: Operations & Maintenance (LEED EB: O&M) silver certification or better by 2020. - All Associated Students managed facilities will become net-energy zero by 2020. - The Associated Students will encourage full-time and part-time employees to embrace sustainable lifestyles by implementing programs to incentivize socially and environmentally responsible behavior. • Attendance at the Powershift Conference in Washington DC April 15th - 18th • Completion of the AS Sustainability Documentary and Report (Planned for completion May 2011) • Continuation of the Aztec Center Food Venue Oversight Committee (2011 - ) Everything we have done is a piece of a much larger puzzle and there is much more that needs to be done. But this is our vision, our progress and our desire to make San Diego State University a more sustainable campus. We hope this report has inspired you to become involved in the ever growing sustainability movement and that you have learned that simple actions can dramatically change the discourse of your life and the lives of others. Written by: Grant Mack Associated Students President/CEO, 2010/11 Tara Kelly Associated Students Sustainability Commissioner, 2010/11

TO BE CONTINUED...

SPECIAL THANKS TO... Glen Brandenberg, A.S. Sustainability Advisor and Mission Bay Aquatic Center Director Heather Honea, e3 Advisor Jennifer Esquivel-Parker, A.S. Government Executive Affairs and Program Administrator Quentin Skaggs, A.S. Graphics Supervisor 2005-2011 e3 Executive Officers 2008-2011 Green Love Board Members Erica Johnson, 2007-2008 e3 President and 2008-2009 A.S. Sustainability Comissioner


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visit as.sdsu.edu

The Student Led Sustainability Movement  

SDSU Sustainability Report: 2005-2011

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