Issuu on Google+

Alawiyya Derqawiyya Shadhiliyya Tariqa

Sufi Sama

‫جميع احلقوق محفوظة‬


Sufi Sama’ Education, Ethics and Behavior

English version


Sheikh al-Alawi for Education and Sufi Culture Association N째44 Hashemi Biskri St Mostaganem 27000 Algeria Phone number : +213 045 21 61 73 Mailing : infos@alawi-asso.org Site web : www.alawi-asso.org The first Publication Mostaganem 2010


In the Name of God (Allah), The Compassionate, The Merciful Who says in the Holy Qur’an Those who listen (in truth), be sure, will accept (sura 6, verse 36) Peace and blessings be upon Mohamed, the Seal of Prophets and Messengers, who says No prophet did God send but with a beautiful voice Peace and blessings be upon his family and companions, the noble, the virtuous


4

Sufi Sama’ Education, Ethics and Behavior

Preface The relationship between Sama’ and Sufism is a matter of education and behavior, Sufis used to converse with Souls through listening and hearing. As Sheikh Khaled Bentounes always says; Sama’ comes from the word Sama’ (hear, listen). It is therefore a field related to the sense of hearing, an attribute originating from the very essence of The True One, High as He is in His Majesty— “Allah hears and knows all things“ (Qur’an, sura 3, verse 121). He gave it to His creatures so that they can communicate, understand the many sounds around them, and differentiate between them. Without it, the sense of speaking would not exist ; they go together. God says : “Verily, We created man from a drop of mingled sperm, in order to try him : so We gave him (the gifts) of Hearing and Sight” (Qur’an, sura 76, verse 2). Hearing did indeed precede sight in the stages of creation as it did the blessing of knowledge itself. Hearing is the main path to knowledge. Imam al-Ghazali1 says : “No way there is to the hearts but through the vestibule of the ear.” That is why Sama’ has always been one of the core means of education and discipline for Sufis. They use it to educate their disciples, who feel the impact of the lessons through the soft and beautiful rhythms they are carried. Sufis, possessors of mystical and subtle knowledge, knew the impact of the beautiful voices and the soft rhythms on the listeners, for that they used Sama’ as a mean of progression and as a tool to explore the inner of Souls. Imam al-Ghazali says in his book, The Revival of Religious Sciences : “ God is hidden in the midst of rhythms that balance the souls; these rhythms have an extraordinary effect on the souls. For among the sounds there are those that give joy, 1- Abu Hamed Mohammad Ibn Mohammad al-Ghazali (1058 – 1111).


Sufi Sama’ Education, Ethics and Behavior

5

others that sadden, cause sleep, make people laugh and happy; others that cause body parts to react to their rhythm with hands, feet, and head. One must understand that these actions are not necessary to taste the many meanings of poetry; it is only what has been practiced throughout time. It is said that those who are not moved by the Spring and its flowers and the lute and its rhythms are definitely ill-tempered, with no hope of recovery ”. He continues until he says : “As you see, the influence of Sama’ on the hearts is very clear. Those who are not moved by Sama’ are incomplete, unbalanced, far from spirituality, and only heading for more roughness of being.”2 It is very obvious today that music is one the best means of healing. Psychologists use it to cure their patients from many complicated disorders3. Reference here is to mellow music that strengthens the virtuous attributes of the human being and develops his feelings, not the loud-mouthed and deafening one. It is true that Sama’ is more effective when the sound of the singer is sweet and strong, but we must remember that voice elegance and rhythm finesse are only a path and not a goal in themselves. The goal is to help disciples in their spiritual endeavor. Music is a path of light for all people; every part of our body responds to it, that is our nature. That is why sages and men endowed with divine knowledge always used it in order to be effective in their teaching. Although Sama’ holds this place in Sufism, it is not enough to just listen to the musical part of it without diving into the very depths of its words and drawing the meanings they carry. This can

2- The same reference. 3- Barraqué.P. La Voix Qui Guérit. Ed : Jouvence. 1999 / La Guérison Harmon -

que.ed :Jouvence.1999. Bence. L. La Music Pour Guérir. Ed : Van de Veld.1988.


6

Sufi Sama’ Education, Ethics and Behavior

happen only in the state of total presence4, a condition Sufis call al-Hal (spiritual readiness/drunkenness), for in it they reach the ecstasy of Sama’. Sama’ is what may illustrate an idea, get a parable5 should be listened with consciousness Otherwise it falls into the category of mere rhythms and songs for the ego and its lust. As said above, Sufis, may God bless them, have set some conditions for Sama’ in order to assist their disciples throughout their many levels of realization and help them reach the highest stages of ethics. Sidi Sheikh al-Alawi6 says : Touch people with and through God Be in their midst but see me therein Should you cast the arrow of speech between us Surely will it reach the ear of those aware We believe that the arrow of speech refers to parables and what one can read between the lines. These deep words reach only those with keen hearing, as God says : “That We might make it a message unto you, and that ears (that should hear the tale/words and) retain its memory should bear (its lesson) in remembrance” (Qur’an, sura 69, verse 12). Only those who are able to use their insight when listening, those whose hearts are always present with the divine, can benefit the most from Sama’; God says: “When the Qur’an is read, listen to it with attention and hold your peace that you may receive mercy” (Qur’an, sura 7, verse 204). In his book al-Luma’, Sidi Abu Nasr es-Serraj ties the meaning of God’s Holy Words: “Verily, in this there is a message for any that has a heart and understanding or who gives ear and earnestly witnesses (the truth)”(Qur’an,sura50,verse 37) to the presence of the heart7. 4- Abu Nasr es-Saradj. Al- Luma’ fi et-Tasu’f.p 274 5- Abu Abdullah es-Saji. Mu’jem es-Sufia ( dictionary of Sufis). Mohamed ez-Zubi. 6- Sheihk Ahmed Ben Mustapha al-Alawi 1869-1934. 7- Abu Nasr es-Seraj. The same reference.


Sufi Sama’ Education, Ethics and Behavior

7

Ruwaym8 was asked what Sufis do find in Sama’, he replied they witnesse meanings that others do not9. That is why Sufis concentrate on listening with depth of being even if the intention of attending one of their gatherings is mere intrigue, for, as God says in a Hadith Qudssee (God’s Words—outside the Qur’an—reported by Prophet Mohamed, peace be with him) : “They (Sufis or any group of people mentioning God with spiritual presence) are the ones who always benefit their audience.” We can therefore see that Sufis are able to find in Sama’ what others cannot. Still, they use it only as a means and not a goal in itself, for the goal is realization and self-discovery. But not all Sufis agree on its use, especially when sought for temporal purposes. As-Shablee, on the other hand, allowed it only as a means of education. Abu Othman al-Hariree10 says: “There are three levels of Sama’. The first is for the beginners on God’s path; they use it to get to the most noble of stations, and I fear for them, for they might fall into error. The second is for the true disciples who are always seeking more on God’s path; they listen to melodies and chants that suit their time and space. The third one is for the most knowledgeable among the knowers; these do not choose, they simply enjoy all things that hit their hearts, be they the consequence of movement or stillness.11 Sama’ is both interesting and dangerous, and that depends on who uses it and for what purpose. Since Sufis consider it a means of education, they have set some conditions and rules for it, and 8- Abu al-Hassen Ruwaym Ibnu Ahmed. Died 303h. See Seyer A’lem en-Nubal’. Ed-Dhehabi. 9- Er-Ressala al-Qusheiria.Abu Qassem al-Qusheiri. 10- Abu Othman Saeed Ibnu Ismael al- Neissaburi. 230-289. See Seyer A’lem en-Nubala. 11- Er-Ressala al-Qusheiria.


Sufi Sama’ Education, Ethics and Behavior

8

have written books about it. Our intention in this booklet is to shed some light on the history, development, and performance of Sama’.We have talked to Sheikh Sidi Khaled Bentounes about this project. He helped us with his good advice and gave us valuable information we intend to use.. For that we are so thankful. We want people to have an idea about Sama’ during their presence at the First International Conference on Sufi Sama’ that will take place in Tangier on April 29th and 30th, and May 1st , 2010 under the title of Sufi Sama’, Ethics and Ecstasy. This workshop will focus on four axes : 1. Legitimacy of Sama’ from Qur’an and Sunna. 2. Sama’ by women from Qur’an and the Sunna and what Ulamas do Say about it. 3. Sama’ regulations and its requirements 4. Sama’ characteristics and ethics in Tariqa Alawiyya add to ethics of Jam’a and Emara.

Zawiya Alawiyya Mostaganem - Algeria March 28th,2010


Sufi Sama’ Education, Ethics and Behavior

9

Part I

The Legitimacy of Sama’ Speaking about the Sama’ legitimacy invit us ,firstly, to speak about El Fitra “ God’s pattern in His creation”.. God Says in the Qur’an, sura 30, verse 30 : “So set your face steadily and truly to the faith: (establish) Allah’s handiwork according to the pattern on which He has made mankind. No change (let there be) in the work (wrought) by Allah; that is the Standard Religion; but most people among mankind understand not.” It goes without saying that humans have a natural tendency to lean toward beauty and good taste in all matters of life. We have been endowed with senses that help us in that process. Our tongues allow us to savor the delicacy of food, our noses the fragrant perfumes, our hands the softness of things and beings around us, our eyes to witness the beauty of Allah, our ears all kinds of mellow sounds that lead our souls to quietness and peace (bird songs, lute tones, gentle human voices). We have also been endowed with other gifts like knowledge, love, good, mercy, benevolence, compassion, and many others. It’s the same Fitra which make a baby go on sleeping while hearing a soft voice. Thus has the Almighty set Himself judge between these attributes and their counterparts to straighten what we distort of our inner nature and protect its seed of beauty. Music and beautiful sounds have existed since the dawn of creation12. Imam al-Junayd was asked once why man reacts to Sama’ (music) even when he is resting. He said : “When God addressed all souls with His Words in the First Covenant : “Am I not Your Lord (Who cherishes and sustains you)? They said: ‘Indeed (You are!)’“ (Qur’an, sura 7, verse 172), all souls started savoring God’s call. When all men/ 12- In september 2008 echologists found a flut made of ivory and eagle’s

bones aged more than 35 thousands in the south east of Germany in Hooly Fils caves near Gora mountains.


10

Sufi Sama’ Education, Ethics and Behavior

women heard Sama’ (music), it moved their souls13.Sheikh Khaled Bentounes says : “ For that Music remains a State of insperation and is useful in our rememberance of those souvenirs lived in the Eternel”.14 That is what Sidi Abu Madyan Shua’ib, God bless him, refers to in these verses : When the souls crave their reunion Bodies dance, o you who ignore their real sense Don’t you see the encaged bird on my window Engage in singing the moment it remembers its abode It sings out the feelings it holds within Causing listeners commotion in body and soul It dances in captivity longing for the encounter Causing the witty deep reflection on its melody Thus are the souls of lovers, o young one True feelings elevate them to the world of the above and beyond It is said that when God Almighty ordered the soul to enter Adam’s body, it di so with the musical tones of the praises of the angels for considering that body some sort of prison that would prevent it from flying in God’s holy Ether and glorifying Him.The ecstasy of music, God’s eternal tune, assisted the soul in the process. Music makes Souls to be in state of drunkenness and going high some how to invite Human to go beside their ordinary customs.15 Its echo has always been present, and will do so till the end of times. Prophet Mohamed, peace be with him, heard it as the ringing16 of a bell preceeding angel Gabriel arrival with the Revelation. People 13- Er-Ressala al- Qusheiria. The dame reference. 14- Sheikh Khaled Bentounes. Le Soufism Cœur de l’Islam. P 197. Ed Pocket

Paris. 1996

15- Sheikh Khaled Bentounes. Vivre l’Islam. Ed Le Reliè Gordes 2003.P 45. 16- Sahih al-Bukhari. The Begining of Revelation


Sufi Sama’ Education, Ethics and Behavior

11

with spiritual taste also heard it, and still do. Sheikh Sidi Hadj elMehdi Bentounes compares this grandiose universe to a symphony played by its planets, its stars, its different motions, and everything else that the Almighty created in it. Sheikh Khaled Bentounes defines music “ as the echo of divine Word and a universal melody. He believes that true Sufis use music as a ladder to the realm of God’s secrets where their souls can be free. Then will they be able to hear all the different sounds in the universe as Dhikr (God’s remembrance/prayer) praising The Almighty : “The seven heavens and the earth, and all beings therein, declare His glory. There is not a thing but celebrates His praise, and yet you understand not how they declare His glory” (Qur’an, sura 14, verse 44). “17 If Islam is the religion of Fitra, it’s evident that Sama’ was stated during the Prophet days and so was with his Companions and Followers.The legitimacy or illegitimacy concerning Sama’ is based on the intentions behind its use and the consequences it has on people. Imam al-Ghazali says: “Sama’ is considered an acceptable discipline when it relates to decent, leveled, and understandable sounds. It becomes unlawful when it relates to a cause outside its inner truth.”18 Reference here is to anything that Muslim law disallows, like using music to commit a sin or hinder a bad action. Fortunately, no such things are to be found in the circles of Sufi Sama’; it has always been clean of any vice or vileness; in fact, Sama’ is a major part, if not the heart, of Dhikr as we will see later on. Imam al-Ghazali continues saying : “When someone says that Sama’ is Haram (unlawful), that means that God has punishment for it. We cannot say so just because we think so. Muslim law is 17- Sheikh Khaled Bentounes. Soufism l’Héritage Commun. Ed Zaki Bouzid.

Alger. 2009. 18- Abu Hamed al- Ghazali. The same reference.


12

Sufi Sama’ Education, Ethics and Behavior

based on written laws (Qur’an, Sunna—words and deeds of Prophet Mohamed, peace be upon him) and the rule of analogy (Qeyass). When there is no written text or any sort of rule of analogy in the matter, there is no ground for any unlawfulness…. We have no text or Qeyass that forbids Sama’.”19 Imam Abu al-Qassem al-Qushayree says in his famous Epistle : “God Almighty says: Announce the good news to My Servants—those who listen to the Word (Qawl) and follow the best (meaning) in it, (Qur’an, sura 39, verses 17-18). The word Qawl calls for generalization and inclusion. The proof therein is the fact that He has praised His Servants because they follow the best meaning in the Word (Qawl). And know that listening to poetry that has good rhythm and lovely cadence is generally allowed, as long as the words are not promiscuous. Everyone agrees that Prophet Mohamed, peace be with him, did listen to poems that were sung in his presence and that he never condemned the act.”20 Neither the Qur’an nor the Sunna forbids Sama’ or poetry. God Almighty excludes poets: “Who believe and work righteousness and engage much in the remembrance of Allah,” (Qur’an, sura 26, verse 227). Prophet Mohamed says: “Some poetry is indeed wisdom.”21 Jaber Ibnu Sumra said, as reported by al-Termedee: “The companions of the Prophet used to sing poetry to each other in his presence and he used to smile…” Anas, may God be pleased with him, reports that when Prophet Mohamed, peace be with him, was helping his people build the mosque by carrying bricks, they always chanted these words: O God! There is no life but the life of the hereafter; grant victory to the advocates (Anssar) and those who left their houses and families behind and followed their Prophet 19- Abu Hamed al- Ghazali. The same reference 20- Abu Qassem al-Qusheiri. The same reference. 21- Sahih al- Bukhari. Kiteb al-Adeb. ( Ethics Book).


Sufi Sama’ Education, Ethics and Behavior

13

(Muhajereen).”22 Salama Ibnu al-Akwa’ says: «We took a night trip with the Messenger of Allah to Khaybar. A man asked Amer Ibnu al-Akwa’: “Why don’t chant you for us!” Good poet as he was, Amer started : My God! Without You We indeed would never have found the right path Nor would we have given charity or prayed Forgive us our wrong deeds And firm our steps toward You Cover us with Your tranquility And we will surely respond to Your Holy Call This is the very prayer They want me to chant “Who is this rider?” asked the Prophet. “Amer Ibnu al-Awka’,” they answered. “God bless him!” said the Prophet».23 We must also mention the famous love poem by Ka’ab Ibnu Zuhair, which he chanted in the presence of Prophet Mohamed, peace be with him, when he came to the city of Medina seeking repentance : Su’ad has disappeared, and my heart is filled with shagreen Indeed immersed in love and miserable no more In the twilight zone she attractively sits Like the dark lashes of an eye well adorned People might argue that although Sama’ is allowed, it should not be done in mosques. Actually, poetry was recited in the presence of Prophet Mohamed, peace be with him, inside his mosque, as we said earlier. Imam Muslim in his Sahih reports A’esha saying : “Prophet Mohamed used to set a stand in his mosque for Hass’an 22- Sahih Muslim. 23- Sahih al Bukhari and Muslim.


14

Sufi Sama’ Education, Ethics and Behavior

that he might sermon with his beautiful voice, and the latter used to praise him.” Sa’eed Ben al-Mussaib says : “Omar passed by the mosque while Hass’an was chanting. Omar did observe him then Hass’an told him: I used to do that in the presence of him who is better than you.”24 Abu Taleb al-Mekki 25 reported that many of the Prophet’s Companions did allow Sama’; among them Abdullah Ibnu Ja’afar, Abdullah Ibnu Zubeir, Al-Mughira Ibnu Shu’ba and others.. 26 Imam al-Nawawee, for example, says: “There is no problem in chanting poetry inside mosques if it is done to praise prophethood or religion, or if it seeks to teach wisdom, ethics, or anything beneficial for society.” Abu Bakr Ibn al-Arabee, who explained the book of Sunan al-Termedee, says: “There is no harm in chanting poetry in mosques when it praises religion and supports the law (Share’a).” Other people might contend that the problem is not so much in poetry or Sama’ itself as it is in singing it and using beautiful and attractive voices to do so. Here too, proofs for its legitimacy are many. In his Revival of Religious Sciences al-Ghazali says: “Since it is allowed to chant poetry without music, there is no harm in doing so with some tunes. Anas, may God be pleased with, reports that Prophet Mohamed, peace be with him, used to be sung to during his trips, and that comrade Anjasha used to sing to women while al-Bara’ Ibnu Malek used to do the same to men… Sama’ in happy times boosts happiness; it is allowed if the happiness is well founded… What other proof do we need than the chanting/singing of women (in Medina), with drums on the roofs, when they saw 24- Sahih al-Bukhari. Kiteb as-Salet. ( Praises Book) 25- Mohamed Ibnu Ali Ibnu Atia al-Harithi.Died in 386h. See Tarikh Baghdad

wa Lissen al- Mizen 26- Abu Taleb al-Mekki. Qutu al-Qulub.


Sufi Sama’ Education, Ethics and Behavior

15

Prophet Mohamed? They sang the Moon Has Risen (Tala’a al-Badru). That was how they showed their happiness for their Messenger. Showing joy in that fashion, with poetry, rhythm, and dance, is indeed praiseworthy. Actually, some companions were so happy at that time that they started jumping.” Tabari reports Ibnu Jareeh saying: “I asked Ata Ibnu Rabah about tune, poetry, and singing, and he said all are okay as long as they are not promiscuous.” Ibnu Battal says: «When poetry and its rhythmic or lyrical structuring involve remembering God and praising His Oneness, when they bring about obedience and surrender to His Majesty, they are all right and favorable. That is the meaning of the Prophet’s hadith: “Indeed, there is wisdom in poetry.” The point here is that poems with their different poetic meters and cadence were read and performed in the presence of the Prophet. Words with metric foot and syllabic emphasis (stressed or unstressed) are nothing but soft melodies sung gently». Al-Safarenee says in his Composed Letters: “Some scholars say that there is a consensus among clerics and people of knowledge on the permissibility of Sama’/rhythmic wording.” In his book, al-Hadru wa al-Ebaha (Ban and Permission), chapter 70, Khaleel al-Nahlawee al-Dimashqee reports the many arguments of scholars for and against singing. Concerning the Sama’ of the Sufis, however, he says the following : “As for the Sama’ of the Sufis, may God be pleased with them, it is way beyond all kinds of arguments. It is above the level of the allowed; in fact, it is very desirable and encouraged, as many researchers have declared.” Those who pretend there is no basis for the lawfulness of Sama’ in Islam lack the basic elements of spirituality and are not in harmony with their own being. Therefore, they cannot harmonize with nature, nor can they find their own balance, the very balance we all need to relate to the entire universe. There is indeed a very special relationship between man and the universe: God Most High


16

Sufi Sama’ Education, Ethics and Behavior

says in the Qur’an, sura 55, verses1-9 : “(Allah) Most Gracious! It is He who has taught the Qur’an. He has created man: He has taught him speech and intelligence. The sun and the moon follow courses (exactly) computed; and the stars and the trees both (alike) bow in adoration. And the firmament has He risen high, and He has set up the balance of (justice), in order that you may not transgress (due) balance. So establish weight with justice and fall not short in the balance.” Imam Ali, God bless him, says: “Let not your size demean you, for you hold the entire universe within you.”


Sufi Sama’ Education, Ethics and Behavior

17

Part II

Sama’ by Women from Qur’an and the Sunna and what Ulamas do Say about it Women in Islamic law (Share’a) are men’s counterparts. They share the same responsibilities. The only differences are the physical disparities. Each group has its own characteristics; each completes the other. Sheikh Khaled Bentounes says: “We all know that society needs two legs to walk; without them it cannot continue its course. No man can live without a woman and no woman can live without a man. It never crosses my mind that a community can survive without men or without women, (in all levels and tasks of society). Both are needed to balance our existence.”27 Women had a great status in the first Muslim community (Prophet’s era, his successors’ golden age, and the epoch of those who succeeded them with the same ideals) thing which they do miss today. Unfortunately again, many fundamentalist groups, headed by rough leaders, with their severe and inconsiderate concepts, chose to stray away from the path of their wise ancestors who protected and valued women. They demeaned the female side of society by creating laws that restricted women’s mobility, action, and even thinking in some cases. Professor Yahya Berqa28 declares in one of his studies that women have found in Sufism some sort of shelter and breathing space that allowed them to be active participants in the community. Ever since shrines and religious community halls (zawiyas) have seen light during and after the expansion of Islam, women have found relief from daily stress in these premises. Hence, they sought these holy places to fill their emptiness. Here comes the question 27- Sheikh Khaled Bentounes.Workshop Alawiyya researches in Islamic

Philosophy. Mostaganem.1983 28- Yahya Berka. Conference held in Dar Eth’akafa.Mostaganem.2000.


18

Sufi Sama’ Education, Ethics and Behavior

of women’s berial? Is it a fact related / linked to specific time/ period where Arabs in the pre-Islamic era used to bury baby girls alive, simply because they were considered a stain on the family, especially fathers or it is a state or fact used differently?. The case is not so different with fundamentalism today and its narrow-minded thinking. Many are the so called Ulama (men of knowledge or at least that is what they believe) who are still burying the female (wives, sisters, daughters…) by marginalizing them and considering them not fit for playing major roles in the community. It’s the same opinion declared by many of the contemporary Ulama29 Sufism, on the other hand, has always esteemed women, especialy in the region of al-Maghreb where exist many Sufis Turoq(plural of Tariqa/ sufi path). Women paticipate with man in the different tasks among these tasks woman could be Muqaddam [head], knower, teacher, contributor, vocalist. Sama’ spread in the whole of al-Maghreb. Nowadays, it is not performed only by those who are inebriated by it; it is also performed, in good faith, by singing men and women, all over, in weddings, birthdays, funerals, and religious holidays. Women have given this Sufi art a very distinctive breath. Reffering to religious proofs permiting female Sama’/ chanting,this invit us to go back to the Prophet era to check if women had a role in the public life and how their presence was in the society and if they took part in the diferent fields?. In his book, Tahreer al-Mar’a fi Asr al-Ressala (the Liberation of Women in the Era of the Message), Contemporary Egyptian scholar, Abd al-Halim Abu Shaqqa, defends the female legacy and its positive influence on society during the era of Prophet Mohamed, peace be with him. He mentions the important work women did in the community and their assistance to men in all areas of life. The professor says : “Many words and traditions of the Prophet, peace be with him, on 29- Abdelhalim Mohamed Abu Shuq’a : Women Liberation in the Prophet era.


Sufi Sama’ Education, Ethics and Behavior

19

this issue prove that women were active participants in the community…”“… And if some people chose to separate between men and women (concerning the participation in the community) and dared to come up with new rules in this respect, I tell them that the Sunna of our Prophet (words and deeds) is more to our liking than that of someone else…”30 No need to come back to several Hadiths, mentioned in the Sihahs, dealing with female voices to list for instence what El Beyhaqi reported how merrily women of Medina (Anssariyyat) received Prophet Mohamed and his companion Abu Bakr by singing Tala’a al-Badru Alayna (the Moon has Risen) and how happy the Prophet was with that reception. That was an affirmation from him on the legitimacy of Sama’, be it from men or women. There are many hadiths that back the legitimacy of female Sama’. A’esha, the Prophet’s wife, says: «Prophet Mohamed, peace be with him, came into the house one day when I had two servants with me. Both of them were singing. He lay down on his bed and turned his face to the other side. My father, Abu Bakr, stepped into the house and yelled at me: “How can you allow the devil’s flute into the house of the Prophet? Prophet Mohamed, peace be with him, came out and said: “Let them be…” ». «When A’esha accompanied a newlywed to her husband’s house, the Prophet asked her why there was no music: “Why don’t you send with her some girls to play drums and sing?” A’esha asked: “What can they say?” The Prophet answered: “Here we are, coming to you; blessings on us and blessings on you”». Another version of the hadith states that Prophet Mohamed, peace be with him, asked these words : “Didn’t have you some kind of leisure? I know that al-Anssar (people who received him in Medina and supported him) like leisure.”31 Amer Ibnu Sa’ad says: «I visited Qarda Ibnu Kaab and Abee 30- Abdelhalim Mohamed Abo Shuq’a. The same reference 31- Sahih al-Bukhari. Kiteb al-Nikeh.


20

Sufi Sama’ Education, Ethics and Behavior

Masoud al-Anssari during a wedding; they were listening to some women singing. I told them : “Never have I seen a companion of the Prophet, peace be with him, or a member of the people of Badr do this. They told me : “Sit with us and enjoy, otherwise leave; for He has allowed us this kind of leisure in weddings”».32 If such is the case for singing and music in general, what are we to say about Sufi Sama’ and its inspiring effect? for they ( women and men ) mention God and His perfections, praise Him, and, in the Words of their Lord, send blessings on Prophet Mohamed, peace be with him, as long as that remains within the boundaries of respect, veneration, spiritual comfort, and innocent exuberance it must be done for a good cause. Prophet Mohamed, peace be with him, says : “People’s actions are based on their intentions; each person will harvest whatever his/her heart intends.”

32- Al-Hakem (al-Mustadrek) / al-Nessa’i.


Sufi Sama’ Education, Ethics and Behavior

21

Part III

Sama’ Regulations and its Requirements Sufis consider their Sama’ sessions time of Dhikr (God’s remembrance and invocation); and since the Almighty is always in the company of those who mention Him, they ought to display reverence, humility, discipline, and consideration during their sessions of Dhikr. Indeed, Sufis, seekers of divine light, and enlightenment, always show their audience they are well aware of their words; they create an atmosphere of benevolence and spiritual inebriation that touches every single person present in their gatherings. Imam al-Junayd33 says that Sama’ needs three conditions : time, place, and the brotherhood34. Time is key; Organizers have to choose the right moment. They cannot celebrate Sama’ when they know that most members of their audience, if not all, are engaged in other tasks, be they religious or of any other nature. People must be spiritually ready for the event. Their hal (inner and mystical fervor) must be taken into consideration.. Besides the right time, people have to select the right places for Sama’, like zawiyas35, mosques, and houses of Sama’ lovers. As for the brotherhood, it refers to all people who love Sama’ and cherish it, who enjoy and taste its divine words wherever they may be, in the heat of the desert or the breeze of the seashore. Sheikh Sidi al-Hadj ‘Adda says in this respect : On the river shore with waves up and down Gentle people found grace with rhythms and Dhikr Inside their circle cups of tea revolved 33- Junaid Ibn Muhammad Abu al-Qasim al-Khazzaz al-Baghdadi (830-910

AD),

34- Mu’jem al-Sufiya.Mohamed az-Zubi. (Sufis Dictionary) 35- Plural for zawiya, literally corner; religious community halls where Sufis

pray, study, teach, and live


22

Sufi Sama’ Education, Ethics and Behavior

As did the lute that produced musical sounds finer than magic My salutation and peace to my brethren As long as the scent of the aloes-wood, the incense, and the white rose In the air spreads My salutation and peace will keep our friendship a virgin flower Lightening the many horizons of land and sea There are other requirements that need to be taken into account; some are physical, others are behavioral. Physically speaking, the performer(s) must be clean36 and make sure that his clothes and his sitting place are spick and span. He must smell good, have a fine voice, and must be familiar with what is to be chanted. He must have a musical ear and must be aware of the different types of rhythm, cadence, and tempo; elegance and finesse in the matter always impress the audience. Should a disciple feel he is not fit for Sama’, he should leave it to someone else who is more capable in the matter. Sheikh al-Alawi always said : “I would never allow my fuqara (plural for faqeer) to sing/chant when they are not good at it, nor would I allow those who are good at it not to do it.” Behaviorally speaking, disciples/performers must be humble, good-hearted, devoted, and loving. They must show no arrogance— they must definitely not see themselves in higher ranks because of their performance. Their good discipline creates an atmosphere of unity and uniformity. Concerning ethics Al-Bakhirzi37 says in his book, Awrad al-Ahbab wa Fossus al-Adab ( the Lovers’ Invocations and the Disciplinary Pearls) : “For their sessions of Sama’, Sufis arrive early, sit with poise and reverence, and keep their inner peace, tran36- Cleanliness here refers to ablution, which every Muslim must perform

before he/she engages in prayer or any other religious act and which he/she must preferably keep whatever the circumstances. 37- Abu al-Mafakhir Yahya Ibnu Ahmed Persian Sheikh. ( died in 724h )


Sufi Sama’ Education, Ethics and Behavior

23

quility, and truthfulness.” Disciples/performers must not engage in Sama’ unless authorized by the Sheikh or his substitute. When asked to stop, they must do so, and must by all means avoid all kinds of nuisance. In his book, al-Futuhat (the Openings), Sidi Ahmad Ibn Ajiba38 says in reference to the words of Saraqestee39 : No words during Sama’ are allowed Nor distraction or smiling “This verse forbids talking when attending sessions of Sama’; it is a space of inner turbulence and drunkenness for the knowers of God. Talking annoys the heart and drives it away from the holy presence of The Lord.” / talking or speaking, especially between mussam’een ( singers), it’s not appreciated not to say forbiden/. “ Sulami says that people who engage in laughter and leisure during Sama’ must not be allowed to attend”40 . Smiling at the performers as a sign of greeting or encouragement is very much appreciated. In his Revival of Religious Sciences, Imam al-Ghazali dedicated an entire chapter to the regulations of Sama’ and the ensuing hal (spiritual inebriation). He focuses on these points : keen listening and attention, heart presence, lower position of the head, little mobility, no unnecessary movements that might irritate people, no unnecessary coughing or yawning. He adds that those among the audience who truly feel overcome by the hal ought to try their best not to raise their voices, be it with crying or screaming, and that those who do so to show off are very far from the blessings of Sama’. Participants should also go along with their brothers when they stand to dance (Emara). Sheikh Khaled Bentounes says : “Performers 38- Ahmad Ibn Ajiba (1747–1809) was an 18th-century Moroccan saint in

the Derqawa Sufi Islamic lineage. He was born of a Hasani Sharif family in the Anjra tribe that ranges from Tangier to Tetouan along the Mediterranean coast of Morocco. 39- Ibnu al-Benna al-Saraqustee at-Tujeibi. ( Died in the 9th century h) 40- Ibnu Ajiba. Al-Futuhet al-Ilahiya.


24

Sufi Sama’ Education, Ethics and Behavior

must choose poems that agree with the hal of the congregation; they must not chant in an imposing and solemn tone (Jalal) in an environment of softness and joy (Jamal).” The entire audience must keep silent and listen with heart and concentration. Both mussame’ and same’ (Chanter and listener) must observe the inner and outer regulations of Sama’ to the last word; that adds to its beauty and sacredness.”


Sufi Sama’ Education, Ethics and Behavior

25

Part IV

Sama’ characteristics and ethics in Tariqa Alawiyya add to ethics of Jam’a and Emara In 1909, Sheikh Ahmed Ben Mustapha al-Alawi41 founded the Alawiyya Sufi path, a spiritual order and mystic path whose goal is to elevate the human soul to global awareness, not only in matters of religion but in all areas of life. His intention was to carry on the work and endeavor of his predecessors in the field of spirituality, namely Sheikh Muhammad al-Buzidi and Sheikh Sidi Qadur al-Wakili (Shadhiliyya and Darqawiyya Treqa), and others, all the way to Prophet Mohamed, peace be with him. The Tariqa flourished well under his authority and tutelage. He created new spiritual and scientific educational ways to reach his disciples and give them a new vision on the world around them. He encouraged them to pursue the path of creativity that they may be able to face the challenges of modernity and evolution within the framework of their traditional upbringing and culture. His sessions were always interesting, very well organized, and attractive. It did not matter whether the sessions were about literature, poetry, philosophy, or gatherings of Dhikr and Sama’. The point is that every participant/guest found relief and serenity inside his zawiya. Sheikh Abdel Hamid Ben Badis42 witnessed all of that during a dinner reception Sheikh al-Alawi arranged in his honor; He says : “The dinner reception was at the zawiya of Sidi Ahmed Ben Aliwa… He was extremely welcoming and affectionate; he served his guests with his own hands. He filled people’s hearts 41- Sheikh Al-Alawi ( 1869 – 1934 ) 42- Sheikh al-Imam Abdelhamid Ben Badis (1889- 1940), an emblematic figure of the Islamic Reform movement in Algeria, was one of Algeria’s most prominent Islamic Scholars. With the aid of his contemporaries and associates, he criticized maraboutic practices and was a great influence in the creation of a conservative subsection of the Algerian Society.


26

Sufi Sama’ Education, Ethics and Behavior

with amazement and respect… After dinner, a reciter read some verses of the Qur’an, and then his disciples started chanting poems from Ibn al-Farid’s collection43. Their voices were so sweet and enchanting that they triggered spiritual turbulence in the audience; then we engaged in discussing the many meanings of the words chanted, and that added to the beauty of the gathering.”44 Such is the strength of Sama’. Throughout time, Tareqa al-Alawiyya has developed its own spiritual chanting, its own music, with fine and specific attributes and characteristics. Most of it relates to the artistic atmosphere of the city of Mostaghanem. This old and historic city knew many artistic categories, especially the Andalusian Gharnati type45(al-San’a School, Mostaghanem). People are attracted to this kind of music by nature; most of them learn poems and songs, which they sing in cafés and clubs. In 191246, the al-Hilal Club saw light; the idea was to unite all clubs under its emblem. This club, al-Hilal, got stronger with the special care and supervision of the city’s important people and its Sheikhs, especially Sheikh Sidi al-Haj el-Mehdi Bentounes, God have mercy on his soul, who was one of its honorary members. Sheikh Sidi Khaled Bentounes , while young, was one of its adherent where he learnt Andalusian music and many disciples of Alawiyya Tariqa were. 43- Ibn al-Farid (1181-1235) was an Arab poet. He was born in Cairo, lived

for some time in Mecca, and died in Cairo. His poetry is entirely Sufi; he was esteemed the greatest mystic poet of the Arabs. Some of his poems are said to have been written in ecstasy. 44- Ath’er Sheikh al-Imam Abdelhamid Ben Badiss. P 246. 45- Andalusian classical music (or Arab-Andalusian music, Mussiqa al-Ala) is a style of Arabic music found across North Africa; it evolved out of the music of Andalusia between the 9th and 15th centuries, during a period known as al-Andalus. It is now most closely associated with Algeria (Gharnati, San’a and al-Ma’luf ), though similar traditions are found in Morocco (al-Ala and Gharnati), Tunisia, and Libya (al-Ma’luf ). 46- Abdelkader Ben Aissa. Musteghnem Wa Ahwazuha A’bra al- U’ssur.P 239.


Sufi Sama’ Education, Ethics and Behavior

27

Sama’ in the zawiya was therefore influenced by this kind of music. Both types share the same musical notes, (be they high or low, sharp or flat), the same rhythms, and the same measures. Disciples attend music lessons during which they learn poems and the different tempos they can give them; they master the seven musical measures : Iraq, Gharib, Mazmum, Mawal, Raml al-Maya, Seeka, Zidane. They train their ears and voices for each of these measures. Their tenacity in the whole learning process is their key to stage performance. Besides the Andalusian and al-Gharnati influences, Sufi Sama’ dives into other types of music (Badawi, Qaba’ili, Maghribi, Sharqi) to find sounds and rhythms that fit the spiritual message of its poems and songs.


28

Sufi Sama’ Education, Ethics and Behavior

Ethics of Jam’ (Spiritual Gathering) As mentioned above concerning the ethics of ceremonies rememberance ( Dhikr) and those of Sama’ in general, let’s see how the session of a Jam’ should be done in Alawiyya Tariqa regulations. •• Disciples and lovers of God’s Holy Path of Sama’ and Dhikr (invocation and remembrance), almost all in white and as fragrant as a king’s garden, gather in the zawiya once or twice a week. They sit in rows as they do when performing their regular prayers, the young and fit in the center and the old and disabled with their backs on the walls. The Sheikh, the muqaddams, and the Personalities sit upfront, facing the whole congregation. Remark : Children stand behind chanters to learn from them. But when Jam’ is big, (holidays and special occasions) it is better for them to remain with their parents. •

Jam’ starts with Wird (the Alawiyya Tariqa daily litanies), which includes chapter of the Qur’an (al-Waqe’a, the Inevitable), prayer of forgiveness ( Isteghfar ), honoring Prophet Mohamed by sending him blessings and salutations, proclaiming words of God’s Oneness, and rendering thanks to God. The Wird ends with personal prayers, during which the audience asks for whatever it needs. Then chanters read the sacred prayer of Sidi Abdes’Salam Ben Mashish47 and some parts of Sheikh al-Alawi’s holy communion48. Following that, they engage in a small session of Sama’, after which everyone reads some verses of the Holy Book (Tea is not to be served while Qur’an is read or

47- A widely known Sufi prayer in which believers call on God to bless Prop -

et Mohamed, peace be with him, and thank their loved Messenger for having shown them the right path of Islam, the path of submission and eternal life. 48- Book : The Glowing Light; Wisdom and Secret Communion of Ahmed Ben Mustapha al-Alawi


Sufi Sama’ Education, Ethics and Behavior

29

during El-Mudhakara). Once finished, chanters start a second session of Sama’, during which tea is served only if there’s not Emara otherwise tea is served after. •

During tea serving, Sama’ shouldn’t be stopped till all tea cups are removed. When the waiter removes the cup of Sheikh, knowing that in the Sufi discipline, the Sheikh or his muqaddam (in case the Sheikh is not present) is the first person to be served tea, and his cup must be the last to be rmoved, the Mussam’een give up chanting by a sign from the Sheikh. Jam’ ends with recitation of the Lutfiyya (Sheikh al-Alawi’s prayer invoking God’s Holy Name, Latif “The Gracious One”) Then al-Jalala49, sign of Jam’ ending, finally people stand up to shake hands in unity, quietude and serene atmosphere.

Like every celebration, Jam’ has its managers. They must be well aware of the right supervision of such event. They must take into account the time each part ought to have in order not to cause boredom within the audience. Prophet Mohamed, peace be with him, says : “Engage only in works that you can manage and bear, for God does not turn away until you do. Know that the best among your deeds Allah loves are those you maintain regularly, even if they are small in number.” It remains to mention that Sheikh Sidi Khaled asks always his disciples to organize sessions of reflection either after the Jam’ or they choose a convenient opportunity.

Disciple enters Jam’ with respect, poise, and humbleness. He sits in the first empty place he does face by the end of the rows.

If he is asked to advance, he does it by taking the side left to walk. he must not cross lines or pass between people.

49- La Elaha Ella Lah (there is no god but Allah) three times, Mohammadun

Rassulu Llah (Mohamed is the Messenger of Allah) one time, all performed with a certain rhythm.


30

Sufi Sama’ Education, Ethics and Behavior

Concerning tea serving, the attendant (waiter) starts with The Sheikh (or Muqadem when the Sheikh is not there). The Sheikh must be the first person to be served as mentioned above. Then he continues serving from right to left. For the ethics of serving tea to the Sheikh, the attendant must put one of his knees on the carpt, hold the tray in his left hand, and serve tea with his right. He must put the cup in a saucer in front of the Sheikh, not in his hand. He removes both the cup and its saucer, not from the Sheikh’s hand with the same way while serving. Chanters must not stop chanting during the tea ceremony, unless they are given permission by the Sheikh or his muqaddam. Neither disciples nor the other people attending the Jam’ are allowed to put down their cups on the carpt unless there is a saucer in front.

Remark : When it is time to eat, managers must supervise the entire ceremony. Waiters should not engage in useless talk; and if one of them needs something, he/she should just gesture. They should also not cause any unnecessary noise when disposing of dishes and silverware in the kitchen.


Sufi Sama’ Education, Ethics and Behavior

31

Procedure of Sama’ and Some of its Rules •

As said before, Sama’ starts only when Sheikh ( or Muqaddem or their substitute ) gives permission ; he usually uses his eyes, which is very recomanded, or with hand in a slight manner without using words. It’s not even allowed to throw Diwan (collection of Sufis poems) to musam’. It’s also forbiden for musam’ to start until he/ she is given the permission to do so.

The chanter sits the way he does when praying; if he cannot, he can sit cross-legged. ( see the photo ).

Sometimes, many chanters perform Sama’ all together, not more than three persons if they are more, in this case each one of them takes a turn to intone his/her part.

Should the Sheikh open Sama’, the mussame’ (chanter) must not accompany him unless told to do so; and if that is the case, his voice must not be higher than the Sheikh’s.

The opening of Sama’ begins with al-Haylala (La Elaha Ella Allah, There is no God but Allah), used to express praise and joy, after which they send their blessings on Prophet Mohamed and salute him with all respect.

Each chord of Sama’ has three rhythms : heavy, medium, and light. Singers use the adequate chord to chant their poems while the audience repeats their recurring refrains.

They must avoid loud and sharp voices, for that hurts the audience and irritates their spiritual ecstasy to the point where they might lose connection with their own repetitions. Once a mussame’ opens his session with a specific tone, he cannot switch to another one; that disturbs the chanting process and breaks the concentration of the listeners.


32

Sufi Sama’ Education, Ethics and Behavior

Mussame’een must be well acquainted with all seven musical levels and tones ; they must train their ears for the purpose just as they train their eyes to separate between colors.

They must also take into consideration the nature of the gatherings they are attending—Sama’ at a funeral is completely different from one at a wedding, for example.

The mussame’een should be flexible If a mistake is done in this case, they must remedy it right away. Sometimes chanters extend their voices to focus on a specific musical note or a word in a song/poem; that adds to the beauty of the song/poem.

Maw’al is very appreciated tune in the Jam’ but unfortunately, some mussame’een in Sufi gatherings exaggerate in doing so. That blemishes the sublimity and sanctity of Sama’ in Tareqa al-Alawiyya, especially when done for pride purposes. Some might argue that there is nothing wrong with it; indeed, but only in specific occasions—weddings, Emara50 or in the middle of Jam’- or when Sheikh allows it. We have to remember that Sama’ was created to praise Allah and mention Him in remembrance (Dhikr). It is true that music adds to its spiritual influence and depth, but the requirements and rules of Sama’ have to be respected to the last degree.

50- See next chapter


Sufi Sama’ Education, Ethics and Behavior

33

Emara/Hadra Rules and Process Again, what a holy and mystical manifestation! What an exquisite mystical dance. Master, aids, supervisors, disciples, male and female, all stand, when overcome by spiritual desire for their Lord, to thank Allah for His gifts; all sway up and down to show their immersion in His Holy Name. Sheikh al-Alawi says : Their sight cleared up, their Hadra emanated its fragrance Glad tidings came to the servants of Allah They stood inebriated with their news And engaged in Emara thanking Allah Hadra/Emara is perfectly legitimate in Islam. Sheikh al-Alawi listed the proofs of its legitimacy in his book “ el-Qawlu el-Ma’aruf Fi ar- Rddi A’la Men Ankara at-Tsa’uf“ and so did other scholars such as Abi Hamed el-Ghazali in his book “ Revivial..” , Abi Nasr as-Serradj in his book “ el- Lum’a fi Tasa’uf”, Sidi Abdelkarim el- Kettani in his book “Nudjum el- Muh’tedine”, el- Adre’I in his book “ el- Imt’a’ Bi Ah’kemi es- Sama’ “ and many others wiyhout forgetting that we have mentioned earlier how the companions ( camarads ) of Prophet Mohamed, peace be with, swayed up and down on many occasions to show their happiness with and for their messenger. Emara51 starts only in the right ambiance and at the right moment. The audience must have an innate spiritual readiness to feel the Holy Presence of God and be one with Him. Disciples must have the hal (spiritual ecstasy) we talked about earlier. Should some of them not be able to reach that state without effort, then they must work for it, they must force it by listening to their fellow mates with heart and soul or by repeating the Declaration of God’s Oneness (La Elaha Ella Lah, There is no god but Allah) a hundred 51- Root word, verb Ammara; literally, fill


34

Sufi Sama’ Education, Ethics and Behavior

times or more, followed by God’s Greatest Name, Allah, until they reach their spiritual inebriation. Sheikh al-Alawi says in this matter by the end of the poem mentioned above : “Let those who do not reach spiritual readiness naturally, force it until they seize it.” Once ready, fuqara stand in a circular form, very close to each other, the right hand in the left. If the number exceeds the space, then they form many circles, one inside another. (see picture). All participants must have their eyes closed, except the leader (Qutb), his assistor ( Naqib ) and the chanter (mussame’). Both of them oversee the entire evolution of the event. They make sure that the flow and cadence of the Emara remains intact, with no flaws. The role of the Qutb is very significant. He indicates to mussame’een when to stop chanting to allow participants to use and listen to the deep voices of their hearts (Dhikr es-Sadre). No crying or yelling is allowed; and if that happens, the Qutb comes near who does it and whispears in his ear the word Allah, Allah, Allah. if that person does not stop, gently, the Qutb gets him out of the circle(s)in order to prevent him from disterbing the other disciplines. The Qutb shouldn’t extend in using claps unless he notices some discordance in rhythmes. Sama’ at the beginning of Emara is performed with an urban tone, namely the Andalusian pitch moving from heavy mode to medium then to the light one in one or two turns. Once Emara flames, its pulse switches Zerwalia (a badawi country which means) rhythm, a tune very much appreciated by many, but not necessary for the development of such experience. When someone wants to enter the Emara he must do so gently; he must not push himself in, he has to wait until the fuqara open a space for him. If they do not, he must retreat and look for a space he can fill. He shouldn’t enter directly without getting ready; he stands behind eyes closed till being in harmony and coherence


Sufi Sama’ Education, Ethics and Behavior

35

with the hel then he is involved in the circle. Emara ends with the word, Allah, and the phrase, Our Intercessor is the Messenger of Allah (Mohamed). Everyone sits down in his/

her place without changing spaces. Then all participants proclaim this prayer three times : “Our Lord, send Thee blessings on our master Mohamed, Your servant and messenger, the universal prophet, and on his family and companions, and grant him eternal peace, as valued as Your Own Holy Entity is, in every single moment of Your Own Time.” They do so three times, and end with verses 181, 182, and 183 sura 37 in the Qur’an : «Glory to Your Lord, The Lord of Honor and Power! He is way above what they ascribe to Him. And Peace be upon the messengers. And Praise be to God, the Lord and Cherisher of the Worlds». Right after that, the reciter recites some verses of the Holy Book, preferably verses of glad tidings to the believers. A session of Sama’ might follow, and that depends on the atmosphere. Next, the audience recites the Lutfiyya, after which

participants make personal prayers unto God. Then Sheikh or his representative gives a Mudhakara (oration), a lesson full of parables, wisdom, and advice. Sheikh Sidi Hadj el-Mehdi says : “Mudhakara is the spirit of Jam’.” After that, the whole congregation prays for the Prophet in a soft and mellow voice. Sending peace and blessings on the Prophet is always a relief and some sort of calmative in such environment. Cups of tea go around the congregation to help disciples appease their bodies and soothe their throats, while mussame’een perform their last pieces of Sama’. Jam’ ends with the closing of al-Jalala.


36

Sufi Sama’ Education, Ethics and Behavior

Conclusion

Sheikh Khaled Bentounes continuously advises his disciples to respect Sama’, with all its levels and stages, as much as they can. He recommends they observe its rules. He encourages them to learn its process inside their zawiyas and help each other maintain a good relationship with everyone involved in its development and management.

Al-Alawiyya Spiritual Hall (Zawiya) Mostaghanem, 2010


illustrating photos of Jam’ discipline

photos illustreant la discipline du Jam’


Sufi Sama

● Mussam’een sit in rows as they do when performing their regular prayers ● Mussam’een s’assoient en position de prière


Sufi Sama

● Mussam’een sit in front of Sadr al-Mejliss ● Mussam’een s’assoient face Sadr al-Mejliss


Sufi Sama

● Sheikh, the muqaddams and Personalities sit upfront, facing the whole congregation ● Cheikh, les muqadams et les personnalités s’assoient face l’enesemble de l’audience


Sufi Sama

● Disciples sit in rows ● Les disciples s’assoient en rangs


Sufi Sama

● Space should be left between rows ● Un espace doit etre laissé entre les rangs


Sufi Sama

● General view of Jam’ ● Une vue generale du Jam’


Sufi Sama

● During the Emara ( al-Hadh’ra) the disciples form circles, the right hand on the left one. Al-Qutb and an-Naqib are in the center ● Durant la Emara ‘ (al- Hadh’ra) , les discipkes s’organisent dans des cercles la main droite sur la main gauche. Al-Qutb et le Naqib sont au centre


Sufi Sama

● Ethics of serving tea to the Sheikh ● L’ethique de servir le thé au Cheikh.


Sufi Sama

● Serving tea in the Jam’ to disciples ● Servir le thé aux disciples


Sufi Sama

● Reflection’s sessions ● Séance de reflexion


Sufi Sama

● Female disciples in their Jam’ ● Jam’ des Faqirate (disciples femenines)


SAMÂ’ soufi Education, Ethique et Conduite

Partie Française


2

Samâ’ soufi Education, Ethique et Conduite

Introduction Ce livret est une traduction résumée de l’etude faite sur le Samâ’ Soufi1 Dans l’education Soufie, le Samâ’ est un moyen pour raffiner les comportements du disciple et lui faciliter le cheminement. Les Soufis l’utilisent pour interpeller les âmes a travers l’ecoute. Le Cheikh Khaled Bentounes, confirme ce que : «les soufis ont toujours défini par leur goût élevé que le Samâ’, chant spirituel inspire ses origines du «sam’e» qui veut dire ouïe, lié donc au sens de l’écoute, tout en se référant au verset coranique qui illustre ce don divin, qui nous vient du /Sami’e/, celui qui entend, pour qu’on puisse differencier entre les voix et comprendre leur sens. L’ecoute a précédé même la vue et la parole. Acquérir un savoir, n’est point possible sans cette faculté de pouvoir entendre,»2. Et comme l’a mentionnée El Ghazali3 dans son «ihya ‘e» : «aucun chemin ne mène au cœur sauf celui de l’écoute».4 Sidi Abdellah Abou Nasr es-Saraj, rajoute dans son livre «al-Lumma’» : «le Samâ’ chant spirituel, est l’art d’écouter, avec présence interne, et une sensibilisation a la compréhension , et sans préjugé»5. Pour le Cheikh Khaled Bentounes : «A la difference du dhikr, le Samâ’ repose sur une ambiguité profonde. Toute musique,en effet, n’est pas bonne à entendre, on s’en rend compte chaque jour d’avantage. Au lieu d’elever l’âme, certaine peuvent la devoyer, la 1- Samâ’ Soufi. Poblications de l’Association Cheikh al-Alawi Pour l’Education et la Culture Soufie. Algerie.2010 2- Cheikh Khaled Bentounes.Extrait d’une moudhakara. Tanger. Fevrier.2010 3- Abou Hamed Mohamed Ibnou Mohamed al-Ghazali. 1058 - 1111 4- La Revivification de la Foi. 5- Abou Nasr as-Serradj. Son livre al-Luma’ Fi at-Tssauf.


Samâ’ soufi Education, Ethique et Conduite

3

perdre dans le «divertissement», la distraction mondaine… En fait, c’est l’«ecoute» (Samâ’, au sens propre) qui est spirituelle et non la musique ou le poème qui lui sert de support,car ceux-ci n’ont pas obligatoirement un caractère sacré. L’etre «realisé», on l’a vu, est apte a transmuer tout son, même le plus profane en apparence, en musique spirituelle car, dans son « eveil » ce n’est pas le monde qui change mais la perception qu’il on a.Inverssement, la musique la plus subtile n’aura aucun effet sur l’etre frustre».6 Pour les soufis, Le Samâ’ n’est pas sans risque; ils lui ont établiaient des conditions et une éthique. Ils ont redigés plusieurs ouvrages dans cette discipline. Ce livre est edité a l’occasion du colloque international sur le Samâ’ qui aura lieu du 29 Avril au 1er Mai 2010 à Tanger. Nous souhaitons la reussite a cette rencontre. Et que Dieu nous accorde son aide et son agrement.

6- Le Cheikh Khaled Bentounes.Soufisme : l’Heritage Commun.ed Zaki Bouzid. Alger.2009.p : 194.


4

Samâ’ soufi Education, Ethique et Conduite

1ère recherche

La licéité du Samâ’ et les déclarations des Ulemas à ce sujet Aborder le sujet de la licéité du chant soufi nous invite à la reflexion sur la nature primordiale de la creation humaine (al-Fitra). Dieu dit : «Acquitte-toi des devoirs de la religion en vrai croyant et selon la nature que Dieu a donné aux hommes en les créant, il n’y a pas de changement dans la création de Dieu. Voici la Religion immuable; mais la plupart des hommes ne savent rien». (XXX - 30) Il est connu que l’homme, par sa nature, a tendance à être attiré vers la beauté. Par le goût, il apprécie la saveur de la nourriture, par l’odorat les bonnes odeurs, par le toucher la douceur et la finesse, par la vue les couleurs, la verdure, l’eau et le beau visage et en même temps il aime, par l’ouïe, le son harmonieux, le chant du rossignol, la parfaite résonance des instruments de musique et toutes les belles voix A côté de ces sens physiques, Dieu l’a gratifié, de privilèges tels que, la science, la connaissance, le bien, la clémence, l’amour, la compassion, la douceur, la bienveillance ainsi que d’autres qualités louables que la Loi divine nous ordonne d’en prendre soin et de les préserver. C’est cette même nature primordiale (al-Fitra) qui fait que l’enfant s’assagit et s’endort lorsqu’il entend un son mélodieux. Toutes les recherches et découvertes, anthropologiques et archéologiques7 ou autres, ont démontré cette relation innée avec la musique qui remonte au debut de la creation sinon avant «On demanda, à l’Imam Al-Juneid, pourquoi l’homme est-il calme mais dès qu’il entend le chant il est agité? Il répondit : Lorsque Dieu, lors du premier pacte, s’adressa aux âmes et leur dit : «Ne suis-je pas votre Seigneur?» (VII – 172) Les âmes se délectèrent 7- En mois de septembre 2008, la découverte d’une flute datant de plus de 35000 ans prés des grottes Fils dans les montagnes de Goras sud ouest d’Allemagne.


Samâ’ soufi Education, Ethique et Conduite

5

de cet appel divin et lorsqu’elles entendent le chant, dans ce monde, ce rappel les remue».8 Le Cheikh Khaled Bentounes dit dans ses livres : «Dans la genèse, l’âme etant libre, refusa d’entrer dans ke corps d’Adam. Alors Dieu appela les anges et leur ordonna de charmer l’âme en jouant de la musique. Celle-ci n’acceptait d’entrer dans le corps d’Adam que parce qu’elle était ivre de musique. C’est pour cette raison que la musique inspirée a toujours été bénifique pour nous en rendant à l’âme ce souvenir de l’ivresse vecu dans la pré- eternité ».9…«la musique accompagnée ou non de chants joue un très grand role dans le soufisme. A toutes heure de jour, à tout moment de la vie, à toute émotion correspond un Samâ’».10 C’est une musique immuable et éternelle. C’est cette musique que le Prophet (S.P.S.L) entendit comme des sons de cloches qui précède toujours l’avenement du Saint Esprit avec la revelation. Le Cheikh Sidi El-Mehdi a dit que les Gens de l’entendement et de l’Intuition la savourent dans leurs retraites lors de l’invocation du Nom de l’Aimé, comme la plus belle des symphonies jouées par les astres et les constellations dans cet univers. En tout atome se trouve la louange et la glorification de la magnificence divine. Le Cheikh Khaled dit que «...la musique que «l’Etre Spirituel» entend ici-bas est comme un echo du Verbe divin et de la musique célèste»11...la mélodie de l’Univers pour l’être «realisé» c’est une ascension vers le monde manifesté pour liberer son âme. Il entend dans les sons des différents tons de cet univers le Rappel de Dieu et en vérité : «Le Glorifient Les sept cieux et la terre et ce qu’ils contiennent. Il n’est aucune chose qui ne Le glorifie par Sa louanges, mais vous 8- La Revivification de la Foi ( al- Ih’ya). Cheikh al-Imam Abu Hamed al-Ghazali 9- Cheikh Khaled Bentounès. Soufism cœur de l’Islam. Ed Pocket Paris. 1996. P 197. 10- Cheikh Khaled Bentounès. Vivre l’Islam – Le Soufisme. Ed Le Relié, Gordes. 2003. P 45. 11- Cheikh Khaled Bentounes.Soufisme l’Heritage Commun. Ed Zaki Bouzid. Alger.2009.P 194.


6

Samâ’ soufi Education, Ethique et Conduite

ne comprenez pas leur glorification». (XVII - 44). Tout ce qui précède nous donne l’assurance que le chant existait à l’époque du Prophète (S.P.S.L.), de ses Compagnons et de leurs Suivants. Et si des divergences sont apparues par la suite sur sa licéité, ceci est dû? a l’amalgame et la confusion entre le Samâ’ et le chant dans son principe car dans la langue arabe il désigne les chansons en général. Par contre Le Samâ’, qui est synonyme de chant ou audition soufi, se differe depart son contenue des chants profanes. Selon l’Imam El-Ghazali12 (que Dieu soit satisfait de lui) : le Samâ’ est la voix mélodieuse et gracieuse, mesurée et compréhensible et son illicéité est contraire à son essence même qui signifierait qu’il accompagne un tabou ou qu’il appelle à l’antagonisme et à la haine, qu’il suscite des troubles et contrecarre le bien. Cette approche est dénuée de tout bon sens. Dans les réunions ou cercles soufis le Samâ’ est pur de toutes obscénité ou inconvenance et il fait partie des invocations comme nous le verrons par la suite. Dans le préambule de son livre, l’Imam El-Ghazali, dans ses arguments sur la licéité du chant soufi dit : «Sache que l’affirmation que le Samâ’ est illicite et que Dieu punira son auditeur ne peut être accepté par simple bon sens mais, au contraire, dans les poèmes du Samâ’ on trouve les règles religieuses et ce que a été révélé le Prophète (S.P.S.L.), ses paroles, ses actes, ses approbations ou leur analogie. Aucun de ces textes ne déclare son illicéité et qu’il n’est pas prohibé comme toute autre chose permise».13 Dans sa célèbre épître (rissala), l’Imam El-Q ocheiri écrit : «Dieu dit : «Annonce la bonne nouvelle à mes serviteurs qui écoutent la Parole et qui obéissent à ce qu’elle contient de 12- Abu Mohamed Hamed al- Ghazali 13- Abou Hamed al-Ghazali. Même reference.


Samâ’ soufi Education, Ethique et Conduite

7

meilleur» (XXXIX - 18). Le terme «la» de «la Parole» requiert la généralisation et l’approfondissement et Sa louange pour ceux qui «obéissent ce qu’elle contient de meilleur» en est la preuve. Sache que l’audition des poèmes récités avec des sons mélodieux et harmonieux et si celui qui les écoute n’y pense pas à mal ou à ce qui est interdit ou blâmé par la Loi divine est licite dans son ensemble. Il n’y a pas de divergences sur que des poèmes ont été récités devant le Prophète (S.P.S.L.), qu’il les a écouté et n’a pas réprouvé leur déclamation».14 Dans le Qoran, Dieu a excepté parmi les poètes ceux : «qui accomplissent des œuvres bonnes, qui invoquent souvent le Nom de Dieu» (XXVI - 227). Le Prophète (S.P.S.L.) dit : «Une certaine poésie est de la sagesse». Tirmidhi rapporte que Djaber Ibnou Samra a dit : «Quand des Compagnons du Prophète (S. P. L.S.) récitaient des vers en sa présence il souriait». D’après Anas Ibnou Malik en portant avec ses Compagnons des briques sur ses épaules lors de la construction de la Mosquée le Prophète (.S.P.L.S) prosodiait en disant : «O’ Dieu il n’y a de vie que celle de l’au-delà, fais triompher les Ansars et les Mohadjirs». Salama Ibnou El-Aqwa’ (que Dieu l’agrée) rapporte : «Nous sortîmes de nuit avec le Prophète (S.P.S.L.) pour Khaïbar et un homme parmi nous dit à A’mer Ibnou El-Akwa’ qui était poète, «Que tu ne nous fasse pas entendre une de tes compositions». Il se mit à déclamer des vers. Le Prophète (S.P.S.L.) demanda qui était ce récitant. On lui répondit que c’était A’mer. «Que Dieu lui fasse miséricorde» leur dit-il (Hadith)». Nous ne pouvons oublier le célèbre poème de Ka’b Ibnou Zoheir - qui contenait des propos galants - et qu’il déclama devant lui, lorsqu’il se présenta repentant à Médine. 14- Ar-Ressala al-Qusheiria.


8

Samâ’ soufi Education, Ethique et Conduite

On nous dira : «Nous ne pouvons nier cela, mais pas dans les mosquées». Nous leur répondrons que des poèmes ont été récités en la présence du Prophète (S.P.S.L.) dans sa mosquée selon le hadith d’Anas précédemment rapporté. Selon Mouslim, d’après un hadith de Sayda Aïcha (que Dieu soit satisfait d’elle) que le Prophète (S.P.S.L.) faisait monter Hass’an sur le minbar de la mosquée pour déclamer, debout; des vers. D’après Saïd Ibnou Moussayib, Omar (que Dieu l’agrée) passa un jour dans la mosquée et Hass’an y récitait des vers. Il le réprimanda. Hass’an lui déclara : «J’ai récité, ici, des vers et s’y trouvait celui qui est meilleur que toi». Abou Taleb Al-Makki rapporte que beaucoup de Compagnons ont déclaré licite le Samâ’. Parmi eux, Abdallah Ibnou Djaâfar, Abdallah Ibnou Zobaïr, al-Moughira Ibn Cho’ba et d’autres ainsi que d’illustres et vertueux Suivants. L’Imam En-Nawawi considère qu’il n’y a pas de mal à réciter des vers, dans la mosquée, pour des louanges au Prophète (S.P.S.L.), l’islam, la sagesse, l’exhortation pour l’élévation des mœurs ou tout autre chose de bien. ce qui précède suffit. Ceci en ce qui concerne la poésie en particulier. La réciter ou la chanter avec des voix ou des mélodieux ne diminue en rien la preuve licéité et l’auteur de l’»Ihya» en a suffisamment et que l’on y revienne si l’on veut en savoir davantage. Cela ne nous empêche pas de rappeler quelques uns de ces arguments pour acquérir un avantage. Il écrit : «Comme il est licite de réciter des poèmes en silence et sans airs il est aussi licite de le faire en les chantant; d’après Anas, les chameliers chantaient, en voyage, pour le Prophète (S.P.S.L.). Andjacha chantait les femmes et al-Baraou et Ibnou Malik les hommes jusqu’à ce qu’il affirma : le chant dans les moments de joie étaient licites si cette joie était licite. Lors de l’arrivée du Prophète (S.P.S.L.) à Médine, les femmes, sur les terrasses, avec


Samâ’ soufi Education, Ethique et Conduite

9

des tambourins, chantaient «Tala’a al badrou a’laïna» et ceci est la preuve de sa licéité. Montrer cette joie par la récitation de poèmes, des mélodies, des danses et des mouvements est louable. Il est rapporté que des Compagnons sautillaient de joie quand quelque chose d’heureux leur arrivait». Selon Tabari, d’après Doraïdj, que celui-ci interrogea son maître A’ta Ibnou Rabah sur la mélodie des caravaniers, la poésie et le chant et ce dernier lui répondit qu’il n’y avait pas de mal en cela s’il n’y s’y trouvait pas de grossièretés ou d’obscénités. Ibnou Batal avait dit : «Toute poésie qui renferme le Rappel de Dieu, sa glorification, son unicité et qui pousse à son obéissance est excellent et souhaitable. Ceci explique le sens du hadith : «une certaine poésie est de la sagesse» et il affirme que l’usage du chant par les chameliers et de la poésie était pratiqué en la présence du Prophète (S.P.S.L.) et il est même très possible que cela soit sur sa demande et tout cela n’était que des poèmes déclamés par des voix et des sons mélodieux mesurés Soufaraïni, dans son poème sur l’éducation, a cité des savants qui avaient déclaré unanimement la licéité du chant des caravaniers. Les arguments ne manqueraient pas à celui qui considère que le Samâ’ est illicite mais lui ferait défaut, par contre, une spiritualité épanouie, la symbiose, avec sa propre nature, qui le ferait chanter avec la nature, l’équilibre avec son corps qui, sans lui, lui ferait perdre sa relation avec l’univers et causerait son déséquilibre avec les repères de cette harmonie car entre l’homme et l’univers existe un secret subtil. Dieu (qu’Il soit exalté) dit : «Le Miséricordieux /a fait connaître le Coran / Il a créé l’homme/ Il lui a appris à s’exprimer/ Le soleil et la lune se meuvent d’après un calcul / L’étoile et l’arbre se prosternent / Il a élevé le ciel / Il a établi la balance : / ne fraudez pas sur le poids; / évaluez la pesée avec exactitude; / ne faussez pas la balance (LV - 1 à 9). L’Imam Ali a dit : «Tu crois être un très petit corps alors qu’en toi se trouve le monde infini.


10

Samâ’ soufi Education, Ethique et Conduite

2ème recherche

sur la licéité du chant de la femme La femme, dans la vision de la loi musulmane et dans ses arrêts, est la sœur de l’homme, sans distinction entre eux que par la constitution naturelle de sexe. La femme a des particularités inexistantes chez l’homme qui, lui aussi, en a d’autres et que l’on ne trouve pas chez la femme. Ils sont complémentaires entre eux. Le Cheikh Khaled a déclaré que la société ne marche pas avec un seul pied. Sans les deux pieds, l’un ne pouvant se passer de l’autre, la société ne peut poursuivre son cheminement. Je ne peux imaginer une société sans l’homme ou sans la femme et si cela arrive elle sera déséquilibrée.15 La femme était, durant la période prophétique puis celle des Compagnons et celle des pieux Suivants dans une meilleure situation que dans le monde musulman d’aujourd’hui. L’inertie dans l’activité intellectuelle et de la jurisprudence que connut la société musulmane à l’époque de la décadence permit l’apparition de plusieurs courants et rites rigides et à leurs têtes des légistes portés à l’exagération qui émirent, à l’encontre des femmes, des fetwas, que Dieu n’a jamais ordonné, la mettant dans l’impossibilité de jouer entièrement son rôle après que toute les portes se soient fermées devant elle. Le professeur Yahia Berqa dans une de ses recherches, est arrivé à la conclusion que la femme a trouvé, dans le soufisme, un refuge et l’allègement de son fardeau après que la société l’ait enterrée vivante. Elle se dirige vers les zaouïas et les tombeaux des saints pour remplir le vide glacial dans lequel elle vit et ceci nous amène à nous demander quelle en est la cause. Est-elle rattachée à la période préislamique ou à une situation qui change de pratique d’une époque à une autre? Mais, en vérité, l’esprit puritain étouffa effectivement la femme par des procédés 15- Séminaire sur la recherche Alawiyya dans la philosophie islamique Mostaganem 1982


Samâ’ soufi Education, Ethique et Conduite

11

d’éloignement et de mise à l’écart alors qu’elle aurait dû être un élément actif dans le mouvement social et, à la même conclusion, sont arrivés les savants contemporains. La place qu’a donnée le soufisme à la femme, surtout dans le Maghreb où l’activité des Tariq’as soufies ne s’adresse pas uniquement aux hommes, , nous fait montrer qu’elle occupe plusieurs fonctions telles que guide; orientatrice, éducatrice, dirigeante, chantre ou autre. Le chant soufi eût, à son tour, un autre visage dans cette région et ne se restreignît pas à des gens de condition aisée mais se transmit au commun des gens dans les villes et les campagnes et devint une pratique dans les cérémonies, les noces; les funérailles et les fêtes religieuses. La femme joue, dans ce cadre, un rôle actif dans le développement de cet art soufi distingué. Les arguments en faveur de la licéité du Samâ’ de la femme nous ramène forcément à l’époque du Prophète (S.P.S.L.). Est-ce qu’il y existait ? Avait-elle une présence remarquée? Dans son épître sous le titre «La libération de la femme à l’époque du Prophète», le professeur Abdelhalim Mohamed Abou Cheka, après avoir donné comme preuve plusieurs hadiths sur la participation de la femme dans la vie publique en cette époque, il démontre d’une manière décisive que c’est une tradition prophétique. Il déclare ceci : «Si certains des prédécesseurs ont choisi de marginaliser les femmes de la vie active dans la societé et d’établir une tradition nouvelle contraire à celle du Prophète (S.P.S.L.), nous préférons ses faits et gestes aux leurs. Si la preuve nous a été donnée que la participation de la femme avec l’homme dans la vie en cette période est une tradition prophétique, cette Tradition est-elle supposée ou catégorique? Nous croyons fermement que la fréquence des écrits qui nous sont parvenus, et ils sont de trois cents à-peu-près, citent d’une façon catégorique les hadiths successifs qui mentionnent les dires, les faits et les gests du prophet et cela est confirmé


12

Samâ’ soufi Education, Ethique et Conduite

par ceux qui ont pris connaissance des livres des authentiques traditions. »16 La majorité des savants rejettent, dans sa totalité, le hadith attribué au Prophète (S.P.S.L.) selon lequel il aurait dit : «Dieu maudit le son élevé de la voix de la femme même quand elle invoque Dieu» et ils le considèrent comme apocryphe et rejeté par le verset coranique «Usez d’un langage convenable» et les hadiths successifs qui prouvent la conversation de la femme avec l’homme. L’Imam EnNawawi, dans son exégèse des hadiths authentiques de Mouslim, en commentant le hadith «Qu’elles témoignent le bien et exhortent au bien les musulmans» souligne la préférence de la présence féminine dans les réunions de bien et de prêche des musulmans et les cercles d’invocation. Ceci en ce qui concerne la voix de la femme. D’autres hadiths nous enseignent que faire avancer les chameaux en chantant et le chant lui-même est permis. Parmi ces hadiths, celui rapporté par El-baïhaqi, dans son livre «Les preuves de la Prophétie», quand les femmes des Ansars ont chanté pour marquer leur joie le célèbre poème «La pleine lune nous est apparue...» lors de l’arrivée du Prophète (S.L.S.P.) à Médine et qu’ il l’avait approuvé. Cela prouve une approbation de sa part pour le chant des femmes ou des hommes. Sayda Aïcha (Que Dieu l’agrée) rapporte que le Prophète (S.P.S.L.) était entré chez elle et il y avait deux servantes qui chantaient. Il s’étendit sur sa couche et détourna son visage. Abou-Bakr entra et lui dit en la réprimandant : «Comment! La flûte de Satan chez le Prophète ! Le Prophète se retourna et lui dit : «Laisse-les». Ce hadith est mentionné dans les Authentiques Traditions des deux Maîtres Une femme fût mariée à un Ansar. Le Prophète (S.P.S.L.) demanda à Aïcha (Que Dieu l’agrée) : «Est-ce que vous avez envoyé avec elle une servante avec un tambourin pour chanter? «. Dans une autre 16- Mohamed Abdelhalim Abou Cheqqa-Tahrir El-Maraa


Samâ’ soufi Education, Ethique et Conduite

13

version : «O’ Aïcha, est-ce qu’il n’y a pas de réjouissance ? Les Ansars aiment se réjouir». A’mer Ibnou-Saâd raconte : « Je suis entré chez Qardha Ibnou Kaâb et Abi Messaoud l’Ansari assistait à un mariage et j’y avais trouvé des servantes qui chantaient et je leur ai dit : «Comment que ceci se fait chez un Compagnon du Prophète (S.P.S.L.) et un participant à la bataille de Badr ? Ils me répondirent : «Assieds-toi ou parts. La réjouissance nous a été permise dans le mariage. Si les chants sont licites dans les réjouissances pourquoi le Samâ’ soufi ne le serait-il pas alors qu’il n’évoque que la perfection divine, les louanges, le salut sur le Prophète (S.P.S.L.), l’exhortation à la pureté des mœurs et la sagesse tout en respectant les limites de la pudeur et la bonne intention de l’homme et de la femme selon la parole du Prophète (S.P.S.L.) : «Les actions se valent par leurs intentions».


14

Samâ’ soufi Education, Ethique et Conduite

L’éthique du Samâ’ et ses règles Les cercles du Samâ’ chez les soufis sont des cercles d’invocation et du Dhikr , et comme Dieu (Qu’Il soit glorifié) est le compagnon de ceux qui se souviennent, il leur est fait obligation d’être bienséant en la présence de leur Seigneur. Les cercles des soufis connaissants se distinguent par leur décence et leur quiétude sinon il n’y aurait pas de différence entre eux et la cohue de la rue. L’Imam El-Djounaïd dit que les livres des soufis et leurs recueils de poésie (diwans) abondent en règles, éthique et exigences du chant soufi, leurs auteurs se sont mis d’accord pour affirmer trois choses : «le temps, le lieu et les frères».17 Le temps : Le choix favorable d’un moment qui ne coïncide pas avec celui des obligations et devoirs. (respecter le moment requis en évitant que cela coïncide avec une obligation ou retarde un devoir et on dit que c’est respecter les situations); Le lieu : choisir le lieu qui convient, tel que les zawiyas, les mosquées, les maisons des frères ou des sympathisants et la troisième condition : il n’ y a de Samâ’ sans frères, les gens de l’audition et leurs sympathisants, par eux, le chant sera «goûté» et l’audition appréciée même s’il a lieu sur une terre déserte ou sur les rivages des mers. Le reste des règles réside dans les particularités de la personne et exige deux conditions, l’une corporelle et l’autre spirituelle. Corporelle : la purification, la propreté des habits et du lieu, la bonne présentation, la belle voix, la bonne prestation, l’oreille musicale. Le chanteur doit connaître, même élémentairement, des airs, des modes, des rythmes pour garder et preserver l’harmonie du Samâ’ et ne pas avoir une voix rauque ou rocailleuse pour ne pas nuire à l’auditoire. Le disciple, s’il est sincère avec lui-même, sait, s’il est apte au chant ou non, qu’il se rappelle les propos du 17- Mu’djem as-Soufia.


Samâ’ soufi Education, Ethique et Conduite

15

Cheikh al-Alawi qui avait dit : «Je ne permettrai pas au disciple qui ne sait pas chanter de chanter et à celui qui sait chanter de ne pas chanter». Spirituelle : elles sont nombreuses mais les principales sont : l’humilité, la pureté du coeur qui devra être exempt de jalousie, de rancœur ou d’orgueïl. Pour l’éthique, nous retiendrons quelques citations dans les livres des soufis. El-Bakhirzi, dans son livre «Les oraisons des amis et les joyaux de l’éthique» dit :» La politesse des soufis est qu’ils prient avant d’assister aux cercles des chants, qu’ils s’y asseyent avec crainte et respect, quiétude et sincérité», par discipline, le chanteur ne commence à chanter que sur signe du Cheikh ou de son représentant et si on lui fait signe de s’arrêter il s’arrête et doit éviter de perturber l’assemblée. Sidi Ahmed Bena’djiba18 dit; dans son livre «Les illumination», en commentant un vers de Saraq’usti19 : «Il n’est pas permis de parler, ni se distraire ni sourire pendant le Samâ’ car, pour les Connaissants, c’est le moment de l’extase et de l’ivresse et le bavardage distrait le cœur, l’éloigne de la Présence et le dissipe. al-Soulami disait Celui qui rit ou se distrait ne doit pas assister aux cercles de chant». sauf s’il sourit par politesse envers ses frères ou rendre le salut. Il n’y a pas de mal en cela. L’Imam El-Ghazali a spécialement un chapitre à l’éthique du Samâ’ et nous retiendrons ce qui y convient. «Il est demandé du disciple l’écoute et la présence du cœur, l’inclinaison de la tête, qu’il évite de se retourner, qu’il ne fasse pas de geste qui perturbe ses frères, qu’il s’abstient de toussoter ou de bailler, ne hausse pas sa voix par des pleurs ou des cris sauf s’il est submergé par un etat d’extase sinon ce n’est que prétention et impolitesse surtout en présence du Maître. Par éthique il devra accorder son état avec celui de ses frères, se lever avec eux pour faire la Imara 18- Sidi Ahmed Ben Mohamed Bnou Adjiba al-Hassani.1747-1809. 19- As-Saraqousti


16

Samâ’ soufi Education, Ethique et Conduite

(danse sacrée), et harmoniser ses mouvements avec les leurs.20 Le Cheikh Khaled recommande au disciple de choisir les airs et les poèmes qui s’accordent avec les circonstances, comme chanter un air d’affliction alors que c’est l’état de grâce ou le contraire. Par discipline, l’écoutant ne doit pas fredonner avec le chanteur mais garder le silence et écouter les vers car, fredonner, perturbe l’assemblée. En conclusion, le respect et la preservation de l’ethique du Samâ’ par le chanteur et l’écoutant, ne fait qu’ajouter harmonie et crainte révérencielle à l’assemblée.

20- Al-Ghazali meme reference


Samâ’ soufi Education, Ethique et Conduite

17

Les particularités du Samâ’ dans la Tariq’a Allawiyya et son éthique ainsi que celui de la «I’mara» et de la réunion (djem’) La naissance, en 1909, de la Tariq’a Allawiyya a donné un nouvel elant spirituel et une continuité naturelle de la Tariq’a Derkawiya - Shadhilya. Le Cheikh al-Alawi avait reçu l’initiation de son Maître Sidi Mohamed El-Bouzidi qui l’avait reçu de son Maître Sidi Kaddour El-Wakili (Que Dieu les agréent) puis de Maître en Maître jusqu’au Prophète (S.P.S.L.). Il dirigea les cheminants vers la voie Sublime et leur apprit les oraisons et orienta les disciples vers le droit chemin divin. Par illumination divine il établit les règles du chant soufi, organisa des cercles de réunion spirituelles et académiques qui conviennent à l’homme du nouveau siècle et anima des causeries intellectuelles sur les buts des poèmes soufis comme en témoigne le savant Cheikh Abdelhamid Benbadis21 (Que Dieu lui fasse miséricorde). A l’issue d’un dîner offert à son honneur par le Cheikh al-Alawi, il assista à une de ces réunions qu’il décrivit ainsi : «la réception du dîner se fît chez le Cheikh al-Alawi qui fît preuve d’une générosité et d’une amabilité extrêmes en servant lui-même ses invités et il remplit d’aise les cœurs et les yeux. Après le repas un de ses disciples récita quelques versets du Coran puis d’autres se mirent à chanter des odes d’Ibn El-Faridh avec des voix mélodieuses qui firent frémir les corps. Nous eûmes, par la suite, des discussions sur la signification des paroles de ce poème qui ajoutèrent de l’éclat à l’assemblée».22 Pour parler des caractéristiques du Samâ’ dans la Tariq’a alAlawiyya, il nous faut rappeler brièvement l’atmosphère artistique de la ville de Mostaganem. C’est une ville très ancienne qui a réuni 21- Cheikh al-Imam Abdelhamid Ibnu Badiss. 1889- 1940 22- Ath’ar Al- Cheikh Abdelhamid Ibnu Badiss. P 246.


18

Samâ’ soufi Education, Ethique et Conduite

plusieurs spécificités artistiques et accueilli beaucoup de sociétés musicales andalouses et gharnati (Ecole des techniques musicales d’Alger). L’art populaire local qui fût lui aussi marqué par la musique andalouse et son alter ego haouzi joua un important rôle dans la vie des habitants et c’est pour cela que l’on ne trouvera pas un mostaganémois qui ne penche pas vers l’art populaire ou andalou et on pourra trouver, parmi eux, qui ont appris et connaissent parfaitement quelques poèmes et leurs interpretation musicale (as-San’a). Il n’y a pas longtemps on ne pouvait trouver un quartier où il n’y avait pas de clubs musicaux, la plupart dans des cafés ou des commerces ou dans les maisons citadines des gens aisés. En 1912, l’association «Nadi El-Hilal» fût créée pour regouper les différents clubs musicaux de la ville. «Nadi El-Hilal Ethaqafi»,23 eût le soutien des notables et des cheikhs de la ville et, en particulier, du Cheikh Sidi al-Hadj El-Mehdi (Que Dieu sanctifie son âme) qui était un de ses membres d’honneur. Dans Sa jeneusse, Le Cheikh Khaled était un de ses adhérents ainssi qu’un groupe de jeunes de la Tariq’a Alawiyya ou ils ont reçus la première initiation a la musique andalouse. La présence de la Zaouïa dans ce cadre fît que le Samâ’ subit, naturellement, l’influence de la musique locale et, en particulier, andalouse. Les modes, les airs et les mesures ne sortiront pas de celles de la musique andalouse locale. Des cours de chants et de musique étaient dispensés, régulièrement, à la Zaouia de Mostaganem. Le disciple y apprenait les poèmes et les sept mesures essentielles : Mawel; Raml al-maya, Zidan, al-A’raq, Sika, Mezmoum, Djaharka et devait apprendre à les différencier et reconnaître les autres mesures, venues du chant bedoui, kabyle, maghrébin et oriental. 23- Abdelkader Ben Aissa. Mustaghamem Wa Ahwazouha. P239


Samâ’ soufi Education, Ethique et Conduite

19

L’éthique du djem’ ou assemblée Nous avons parlé des cercles de réunion et du Samâ’ chez les soufis et il n’y a pas de mal à y ajouter d’autres règles d’éthique concernant les cercles de réunion (djem’) et du samâ’ dans la Tariq’a al-Alawiyya comme complément à ce qui a précédé sur l’éthique. Les disciples et les sympathisants se réunissent une ou deux fois par semaine à la Zaouia. Ils s’asseyent alignés comme l’alignement de la prière. Ceux qui le peuvent, au milieu, les plus agés appuyés le dos au murs. Le cheikh, les grands disciples, les moqadems, les personnalités, face à eux, au cœur de l’assemblée (photo). Les vêtements blancs et le parfum agréable sont recommandés suivant la parole du Très Haut (Qu’Il soit glorifié) : «O’ fils d’Adam ! Portez vos parures en tout lieu de prière (XII - 31). Remarque : les enfants s’alignent; dans les réunions locales, derrière le rang des chanteurs pour leur apprentissage alors que dans les grandes réunions il est préférable qu’ils s’asseyent à côté de leurs parents ou tuteurs. La réunion débute par le «ouird» (oraison) qui commence par la récitation de la sourate «El-waqi’a» (L’Evenement) (LXI) puis, «la repentance», ensuite le «Salut sur le Prophète (S.P.S.L.)», la formule de «l’Unicité» et se termine par «la louange et la reconnaissance» à Dieu et, après avoir terminé l’invocation, la récitation de la prière sur le Prophète (S.P.S.L.) dite «El-Machichia» et aussitôt après, la lecture de quelques fragments du livret d’invocations «Mounadjat» du Cheikh al-Alawi et, avant que les chanteurs n’entonnent une série de poèmes puis s’arrêtent pour réciter des versets du Coran. Une autre partie de poèmes est chantée et le thé est servi à l’assemblée ceci s’il n’y a pas de «I’mara» (danse sacrée) et dans le cas contraire il ne sera servi qu’après celle-ci et la moudhakara.


20

Samâ’ soufi Education, Ethique et Conduite

Pendant la durée du service du thé; les chanteurs ne doivent s’arrêter de chanter qu’après que les verres ne soient ramassés, le verre du Cheikh restant en dernier, ( dans la tradition le Cheikh, ou celui qui derige le Djam’ en son abscence, est le premier a etre servi et son verre le dernier a etre ramasser.) pour signifier la fin du service. ( remarque que le thé n’est jamais servi durant la recitation du Qoran ou la moudhakara) A la fin de ce service, sur un signal du Cheikh ou de celui qui dirige la réunion, les chants s’arrêtent. Le djem’ prend fin avec la récitation de la «Lotfia» (poème d’invocation du Cheikh al-Alawi (Que Dieu soit satisfait de lui) et, en clôture, la récitation en groupe de la Djelela puis les présents se lèvent pour se saluer. Celui qui dirige le djem’ doit faire attention au temps demandé par ce dernier. Il ne doit pas le faire durer trop longtemps, comme l’a recommandé le Prophète (S.P.S.L.), pour éviter que la lassitude ou l’ennui ne gagnent les participants. Il faut signaler que le Cheikh Khaled a insisté sur la nécessité de faire des séances de reflexion intellectulles ( Djem’ al-Fikr ) soit après le Djem’ hebdomadaire ou d’en choisir d’autre opportunités convenables. L’entrée au djem’ doit se faire en silence et avec piété et le participant devra s’asseoir là où s’arrête le dernier rang. S’il lui est demandé d’avancer, qu’il le fasse par le passage prévu à cet effet sur le côté des rangées et non enjamber les épaules des participants. Concernant l’ethique de servir le thé au Cheikh, as-Seqi (le disciple chargé de cette tache) doit porter le plateau sur sa main gauche et servir avec la main droite en posant un genou sur le tapis et déposer le verre de thé sur la soucoupe posée devant le Cheikh et servir les présents de droite à gauche. Le verre du Cheikh et la soucoupe sont ramassés de la même façon. En cas d’absence du Cheikh, celui qui dirige le djem’ est servi en premier.


Samâ’ soufi Education, Ethique et Conduite

21

Le service du manger devra se faire en silence et dans le calme. Ceux qui en sont chargés ne doivent pas parler entre eux, surtout dans la salle prévue à cet effet et si l’un d’eux veux demander quelque chose qu’il le fasse par signes et il devra éviter de faire du bruit en déposant les plats et les cuillères.


22

Samâ’ soufi Education, Ethique et Conduite

Samâ’ : ses Procedures et ses Ethiques •

Le Samâ’ ne doit commencer que sur un signe du Cheikh ou du «moqadem» ou de celui qui les remplace.

la permission de commencer le Samâ’ est donnée par un signe des yeux ou un très léger geste de la main et non pas en jetant le «diwan» devant le chanteur qui ne devra pas commencer à chanter de son propre gré.

Le chanteur devra s’asseoir comme il le fait dans la prière et s’il ne peut le faire il pourra s’asseoir en tailleur, en croisant les jambes, et que sa main ne devra pas les dépasser.

Le Samâ’ ne doit être exécuté que par un chanteur ou deux et il n’y a pas de mal s’ils sont trois sans plus. S’ils sont nombreux ils devront se relayer.

Si c’est le Cheikh qui commence le Samâ’, nul ne doit chanter avec lui sauf s’il fait signe et on ne devra pas élever sa voix au dessus de celle du Cheikh.

Traditionnellement, le Samâ’ débute par la formule de l’Unicité (La ilaha ila allah) (Il n’y a de Dieu que Dieu) ou de celle qui a ce sens puis les formules de salutations sur le Prophète (S.P.S.L.).

Chaque partie du Samâ’ doit être divisée en trois rythmes : lent, intermédiaire et rapide. Les chanteurs débiteront les poèmes et les participants reprendront le refrain correspondant.

Lorsqu’un chanteur commence un poème avec un air il ne devra le changer que par un autre qui lui correspond. Un air qui ne convient pas au poème nuit à l’écoute, est désagréable et jette un froid sur l’assistance. et c’est pour cela que le chanteur doit connaître la différence entre un air et un autre comme il doit apprendre et connaître les modes musicaux. Comme


Samâ’ soufi Education, Ethique et Conduite

23

on reconnaît la différence des couleurs par la vue on doit reconnaître celles des modes musicaux par l’ouïe. •

Il devra respecter les circonstances en ne chantant pas des airs et des poèmes de ravissement et de joie lors de funérailles ou vice-versa.

Le chanteur doit posséder une certaine intelligence et sensibilité. S’il se rend compte que l’air qu’il chante ne convient pas au djem’ il devra le changer pour ranimer les assistants.

Il devra éviter l’intonation aiguë ou trop élevée car elle est pénible à l’écoute, fait perdre la douceur, trouble l’etat spirituel de l’assistance, la fatigue et ne pourra pas reprendre les refrains.

Des nouveautés blâmables se sont révélées et, parmi elles, l’excès de ténor (istikhbar). Le ténor se pratique lors des réunions de la Tariq’a Allawiyya, à l’occasion des mariages, au cours de la « I’mara «, si l’état de l’assistance le demande ou sur autorisation du Cheikh. Il n’est pas permis d’arrêter un chanteur au cours de son Samâ’ pour qu’un autre ténorise. Ceci est contraire à l’éthique du Samâ’ «qui, en réalité, est fait pour invoquer Dieu et pour la réflexion et non pas pour devenir des modes de divertissement et d’amusement et c’est pour cela qu’il doit être pratiqué avec quiétude, respect et douceur.


24

Samâ’ soufi Education, Ethique et Conduite

L’éthique de la danse sacrée appelée «I’mara» ou «Hadhra» La «I’mara» est le balancement, debout, lors du dhikr. Elle envahit l’invoquant (disciple) lorsqu’il est submergé par l’extase. Le Cheikh al-Alawi la considère comme un des reflets d’une manifestation de la louange de Dieu lorsque le disciple se rappelle les bienfaits et la grâce de son Seigneur: La vue est devenue limpide Et la danse a mûri Est venue la bonne nouvelle Aux serviteurs de Dieu Ils se levèrent ivres à cette bonne nouvelle Ils firent un « I’mara « pour louer Dieu Dans son livre «Le discours connu ou la réfutation de ceux qui nient le soufisme», que l’on peut relire, il avait donné la preuve irréfutable de la licéité de la «I’mara». Abou Hamed El-Ghazali, dans son livre «La revivification de la foi» (l’ Ihya) - chapitre des chants et des extases - ainsi que Abi Nasr as-Serradj dans son livre «al-Luma’ Fi at-Tassa’uf», Sidi Abdelkarim al-Kattani dans son livre «Noujoum al-Mouh’tadine» al-Adhrou’i dans son livre «al-Imta’ Bi Ahkami as-Samâ’» et d’autres livres en ont eux aussi donné leurs témoignages sur cette licéité. Nous avons fait allusion, plus haut, au sautillement des Compagnons du Prophet ( S.S.L ) devant une bonne nouvelle. Ils levaient une jambe et posaient l’autre. La «I’mara» ne se fait pas sur commande mais à la suite d’un état ou d’une extase qui survient lorsque arrive un heureux évènement. Le Cheikh al-Alawi, dans un vers à la fin du poème précité, dit que celui qui n’est pas atteint par l’extase doit la susciter.


Samâ’ soufi Education, Ethique et Conduite

25

On peut arriver à l’extase ou avoir un état par un Samâ’ qui remue les âmes ou par la répétition de «La Parole de la Pureté» cent fois ou plus et terminer par l’invocation du Nom Suprême sans limite de nombre jusqu’à ce que l’on arrive à l’ivresse. Les disciples se lèvent pour former un cercle en se tenant la main dans la main, la paume de la main droite sur celle de la main gauche de son frère, légèrement sans serrer. Si les participants sont nombreux, ils formeront des cercles l’un dans l’autre (voir photo). La « I’mara» ne pourra se faire qu’en présence d’un chanteur, de danseurs et du Qotb. Le rôle du Qotb, assisté par an-Naqib, est de diriger la « I’mara», contrôler son éthique et régler l’ordre de ses rangs. Il seront les seuls (le Qotb ainsi que le Naqib et le mussam’een), durant la « I’mara», à ouvrir les yeux car le comportement de son ordre dépendra d’eux. Les chanteurs devront, quant à eux, s’arrêter de chanter de temps à autre au cours de la «I’mara» pour entendre «dhikr es-sadr» l’invocation du Soufle. Les cris et les lamentations y sont formellement interdits. Si cela survenait, le Qotb se met trés prés de la personne concerné lui chuchotant à l’oreil le Nom Allah Allah Allah S’il continue a crier, le Qotb devra faire sortir cette personne du cercle avec politesse et douceur pour éviter afinqu’il ne perturbe pas les autres disciples. La «I’mara» commence par le mode lent puis l’intermédiaire et enfin le mode rapide. Durant le premier cycle il ne pourra être changé de cadence qu’après être passé par les trois modes ainsi que pour les cycles suivants et ce n’est que vers la fin qu’il sera permis de changer de mode par ce que l’on appelle la «Zéroualia» et il n’est pas autorisé de commencer par elle. Au cours du début de la « I’mara» on commence par le chant citadin; c’est-à-dire andalou et si son ardeur se développe on passe au mode « bédoui». Cela est recommandé mais non obligé.


26

Samâ’ soufi Education, Ethique et Conduite

Tout fakir ( disciple ) qui voudrait se joindre au cercle de la danse doit le faire avec politesse et douceur et y entrer sans brutalité. Il devra rester derrière eux jusqu’à ce qu’on lui entrouvre un espace pour y pénétrer. Dans le cas contraire, il s’écartera avec douceur et ne persistera pas pour s’introduire. Il est préférable, pour lui, de chercher un espace libre entre les rangs pour le remplir. La «I’mara» prend fin par la formule «La illaha ilallah, Mohamadoun rassouloullah» ou «Chafi’ouna rassouloullah» (S.P.S.L.). Tous s’asseyent là où ils se trouvaient debout sans chercher à changer de place. Ils réciterons la salutation sur le prophète «Allahouma çali a’la sayidina Mohamadine a’bdika wa rassoulika ennabyi al oumi wa a’la allihi wa çahbihi wa salama taçlima bi qadri a’dhamati dhatika fi kouli waqtine wa hine» trois fois puis «Soubhana rabika rabou ali’zati a’ma ya çifoune wa çalamoune a’la almourçalina wa alhamdou lilahi raboul a’lamine». Une personne récitera quelques versets du Coran dans un temps court et il les choisira porteurs de bonnes nouvelles ou de belles promesses Il arrive, des fois, qu’au lieu de réciter le Coran selon l’état du «djam’ « on chante des poèmes puis tous récitent la «Lotfia» et on invoque Dieu. Une moudhakara est faite par le Cheikh s’il est présent ou sinon quelqu’un de qualifié pour cela. On chantera ensuite des chants de salutations sur le Prophète (S.P.S.L.) avec une voix basse car, après la vigueur de l’extase; le disciple a besoin d’apaisement et de quiétude. Au cours de ces derniers chants le thé est servi aux présents et ce moment leur permet de rester à leurs places, là où ils se trouvent, jusqu’à ce que la sueur sèche. Le « djam’ « prend fin, après la distribution du thé et quelques chants, par la formule de clôture.


Conclusion Le Cheikh Sidi Khaled recommande expressément aux disciples le respect de cette éthique du mieux qu’ils peuvent et qu’ils en fassent l’apprentissage dans leurs Zaouyias. Que Dieu nous guide dans la bonne direction. Amin. Le Salut et La Paix sur le sceau des Envoyés, sur sa Famille et sur tous ses Compagnons et Louange à Dieu, Seigneur des Mondes.

La Zaouyia Allawiyya -Mère - Mostaganem 28 Mars 2010


Sheikh al-Alawi for Education and Sufi Culture Association presse


This booklet deals with the importance fo Sama’ and its legitimacy from Qur’an , Sunna and what ulama said about add to its relation with the Sufis behavior. The relationship between Sama and Sufism is a matter of education and behavior, Sufis used to converse with Souls through listening and hearing. The Sama as Sheikh Khaled Bentounes always says,. Sama comes from the word sama’a (hear, listen). It is therefore a field related to the sense of hearing, a God Grace through which we can communicate, understand the many sounds around us, and differentiate between them. Sufis, possessors of mystical and subtle knowledge, knew the impact of the beautiful voices and the soft rhythms on the listeners, for that they used Sama as a mean of progression and as a tool to explore the inner of Souls. It has been said; these rhythms have an extraordinary effect on the souls. It is said that those who are not moved by the Spring and its flowers and the lute and its rhythms are definitely ill-tempered, with no hope of recovery.” Abu Hamid al-Ghazali continues until he says: “As you see, the influence of Sama on the hearts is very clear. Those who are not moved by Sama are incomplete, unbalanced, far from spirituality, and only heading for more roughness of being.”

Ce livre se veut une étude de l’importance du SAMAÂ (chant mystique) chez les Soufis selon le Coran, la Tradition, et la relation qui le noue avec le cheminant dans la pratique de la voie. Le SAMAÂ est une éducation, une éthique, et le moyen de communiquer avec l’Esprit grâce à l’audition. A cet effet, le Cheikh Khaled BENTOUNES dit que : l’action du SAMAÂ sur l’ouîe- son audition, par la grâce et la bonté Divine, est une véritable nourriture spirituelle permettant le dicernement des voies et la compréhension du language. Les Soufis par la finesse de leur sens, leur gôut sain, et un choix majestieux des belles voies et des mélodies harmonieuse; sont parvenus à la perception du pouvoir que détient le SAMAÂ sur l’audition, accéder au fond des coeurs, et à l’éxploration des profondeurs sombres de l’âme. Celui qui n’est pas sensible au SAMAÂ est distant de la spiritualité.

All right reserved

Zawia Alawiyya Mostaganem


Livre Samaa Fr Eng