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only have students and photo editors and researchers benefited (with the apparent ease we have in searching for high-quality images), but so, too, have minority groups seeking a visual “voice” in our nation’s historical chapters. In the short time that we’ve been digitizing, hundreds—probably more like thousands—of African American archives that would only have been available to remote communities have been made widely accessible by some wonderful libraries and historical institutions. The newest digitized African American archive is that of Leon K. Hughes, from the University of Kansas. “The Leon K. Hughes Photography Collection, acquired by the University of Kansas in 2009 from Mrs. Rosie Hughes, wife of Mr. Leon K. Hughes, consists of more than 2,700 images. 1100 of these photos have been digitized and are now available to viewers around the world. The collection is a chronicle of African American family and community life in Wichita, KS, from the late 1940s through the 1970s. Hughes (1913-1978) was the leading photographer of this community’s family, church, and civic events. A self-taught photographer, he established a home-based photography business in 1946 with the assistance of his wife, Mrs. Rosie Knight Hughes. After capturing the community’s fond memories for three decades, Mr. and Mrs. Hughes retired their enterprise in 1976.”

As Hughes was a documentarian of family and community celebrations, the collection includes a vast array of wedding portraiture in both color and black & white, complete with blushing brides and grooms and very serious in-laws. In a subset of the collection, you’ll find several photos marked Women with Children, depicting happy holidays and birthdays with mother and child. Some of my favorite photos, though, are those that capture large groups of women gussied up in heels and debutante hats—these photographs in particular feature mostly unidentified women, but the library is hoping that some helpful citizens may recognize someone from the photographs and fill in the blanks. Searching and downloading images was a breeze through the Luna site, and all necessary data was located beside each photo in an easy-to-use scroll menu. While the collection is only comprised of 1,100 digital images, we highly recommend taking a stroll through the photos. We guarantee that in addition to finding some great images, you’ll also find enough genuine smiles in there that you’ll be in a happy mood for at least a day. The Leon K. Hughes Collection was acquired by the Kansas Collection in the Spencer Research Library at KU and is one of the African American Experience Collections. The entire digital Hughes Collection is part of KU’s image repository and can be found at http://luna.ku.edu:8180/luna/servlet/ kuluna01kui~16~16. All images: © Leon K. Hughes Photography Collection, Kenneth Spencer Research Library, University of Kansas. American Society of Picture Professionals

The Wonderful World of Weddings from

Leon K. Hughes

The roller coaster from Casino Pier sits in the ocean in Seaside Heights, NJ, the day after Hurricane Sandy. ©The Star-Ledger / David Gard / The Image Works

IN THE PAST DECADE or so of digital archiving, not

Issue 4, 2012: ASPP's The Picture Professional Magazine  

The American Society of Picture Professionals is pleased to present the digital version of our quarterly publication, sponsored by Corbis Im...

Issue 4, 2012: ASPP's The Picture Professional Magazine  

The American Society of Picture Professionals is pleased to present the digital version of our quarterly publication, sponsored by Corbis Im...