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African Photography Auction 2021


Aspire X PLP – African Photography Auction 2021 Timed-online Auction | 20 to 27 July 2021 Public auction hosted by Aspire Art Auctions

V IE W ING AND E X HIB IT ION L OC ATI O N

37A Somerset Road | De Waterkant | Cape Town | 8001 V IE W ING B Y AP P OINT M E NT

Lots will be on view at our Cape Town gallery 19 to 27 July 2021 | 10 am – 4 pm AUC T ION C ODE AND NUM B E R

This sale is referred to as: AAA X PLP 21 C ONDIT IONS OF S AL E

The auction is subject to: Rules of Auction, Important Notices, Conditions of Business and Reserves AUC T ION R E S ULT S

+27 11 243 5243 View them on our website www.aspireart.net AS S IS TANC E W IT H B IDDING

bids@aspireart.net | +27 11 243 5243 GE NE R AL E NQUIR IE S

JHB | enquiries@aspireart.net | +27 11 243 5243 CT | ct@aspireart.net | +27 21 418 0765 Company Reg No: 2016/074025/07 | VAT number: 4100 275 280

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GLOSSARY O F CATAL O GU ING T E R M S AND P R AC T IC E Terms used in this catalogue have the following meanings and conventions ascribed to them. Condition reports are available on all lots by request, and bidders are advised to inspect all lots themselves.

ART I ST D E TA I L S If a work is by a deceased artist, the artist’s name is followed by their country of origin and birth–death dates. If an artist is still living, the artist’s name is followed by their birth date and country of origin. Attributed to … in our opinion, most likely a work by the artist in whole or in part. Studio of … / Workshop of … in our opinion, a work likely to have come from the studio of the artist or produced under their supervision. Circle of … in our opinion, a contemporaneous work by an unidentified artist working in that artist’s style. Follower of … in our opinion, a work by an unidentified artist working in the artist’s style, contemporary or near contemporary, but not necessarily by a student of the artist. School of … in our opinion, a work executed at the time and in the style associated with the artist. South African School, 18th century … in our opinion, a work executed at the time and in the style associated with that region. Manner of … in our opinion, a work by an unidentified artist working in the artist’s style but at a later date, although not of recent execution. Style of … in our opinion, a work by an unidentified artist working in the artist’s style and of recent execution.

C O N V E N TION S IN TITL ES For works where the title is known (i.e. given by the artist, listed in a catalogue or referenced in a book); where it is acknowledged as the official title of the work, these titles are in title case and italics – unless specifically stated by the artist as sentence case, lower case, upper case or any variation thereof. Where the title of an artwork is unknown, a descriptive title is given. This title is in sentence case and is not italicised.

PROVEN AN CE The history of ownership of a particular lot.

S IG N AT URE, DATE AN D IN S C R IP TION CON VEN TION S The term signed … /dated…and /or inscribed … means that the signature and/ or date and/or inscription is by the artist, in our opinion. The term bears a … signature/date/ inscription indicates our opinion that the artist’s name/date/inscription has been added by another hand (this is also applicable where the term ‘in another hand’ is used). Where a semi-colon is used, everything thereafter is on the reverse of the artwork.

ESTIMATE The price range (included in the catalogue or any sale room notice) within which we believe a lot may sell. Low estimate means the lower figure in the range and high estimate means the higher figure. The mid estimate is the midpoint between the two figures.

D IME NSION CON VEN TION S Measurements are given in centimetres (height before width) and are rounded up to the nearest half centimetre. In the case of prints and multiples, measurements are specific to one decimal place, and the dimensions will be listed as sheet size, plate size or print size. Sheet size: describes the size of the entire sheet of paper on which a print is made. This may also be referred to as ‘physical size’. Plate size: describes the size of the metal sheet on which an etching has been engraved and excludes all margins. Print size: describes the size of the full printed area for all other printmaking methods and excludes all margins.

F R A MIN G All works are framed, unless otherwise stated in the catalogue, or if they are listed as a portfolio, artist’s book, tapestry or carpet.

EXHIBITED The history of exhibitions in which a particular lot has been included.

L ITERATURE The history of publications in which a particular lot has been included.

L OT Is an item to be offered at auction (or two or more items to be offered at auction as a group).

RESERVE A confidential amount, below which we are not permitted to sell a lot.

SAL EROOM N OTICE A written notice regarding a specific lot(s), posted near the lot(s) in the saleroom, published on www.aspireart.net, and announced by the auctioneer prior to selling the lot(s).

CON DITION REPORT A report on the condition of the lot as noted when catalogued. [We are not qualified restorers or conservators. These reports are our assessment of the general condition of the artwork. Prospective buyers are advised to satisfy themselves as to the condition of any lot(s) sold.]

After … in our opinion, a copy by an unidentified artist of a work by the artist, of any date.

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CON TE N T S

Auction Information  v Glossary of Cataloguing Terms and Practice  vii Staff and contacts  xi Introduction xii Panel discussion details  xiv A World Without Llimit by Brenton Maart  xvi Buyers Guide  xix Online Bidding Guide  xx-xxi Artist Index  xxii Evening Sale Lots 1 to 130

1-219

Details used in prelim pages from: COVER

PAGE XIII

Lot 59  Lee-Ann Olwage Belinda

Lot 39  T. J. Lemon amaNtombazane

PAGE II

PAGE XV

Lot 70  Raïssa Karama Rwizibuka From the series Fashion as protection against Covid 19 (3)

Lot 68  Lamyne M 11 05 2020

PAGE IV

PAGE XVII

Lot 113  Alf Kumalo Miriam Makeba Performing in Lesotho

Lot 96 Ruth Seopedi Motau Gumboot Dancers

PAGE VI

PAGE XVIII

Lot 2 Etinosa Yvonne Like We Own It

Lot 93  David Goldblatt Woman Collecting Shellfish, Port St Johns, Transkei, 1975

PAGE VIII

PAGE XXIII

Lot 25  Kongo Astronauts Untitled [Facing the Past]

Lot 42  Brent Stirton Untitled (Inititiates at Dusk)

PAGE X

PAGE XXIV

Lot 62  Tamary Kudita African Victorian VII

Lot 127  Lindokuhle Sobekwa Bond

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ASPIRE J O H A NNESB UR G

CAPE TOWN

Ruarc Peffers Senior Art Specialist | Managing Director ruarc@aspireart.net +27 84 444 8004

Emma Bedford Senior Art Specialist | Director emma@aspireart.net +27 83 391 7235

Jacqui Carney Senior Art Specialist jacqui@aspireart.net +27 71 675 2991

Marelize van Zyl Senior Art Specialist marelize@aspireart.net +27 83 283 7427

Makgati Molebatsi Senior Art Specialist makgati@aspireart.net +27 82 801 2249

Garnett Ludick Logistics and Storekeeper garnett@aspireart.net +27 71 154 3299

Percy Mabandu Senior Art Specialist percy@aspireart.net +27 71 883 3512

Anna-Michelle Roux Intern: Arts Administrator anna-michelle@aspireart.net +27 76 766 8851

Carina Jansen Cataloguer & Researcher carina@aspireart.net +27 78 968 2476 Micaela Wentzel Cataloguer & Researcher micaela@aspireart.net +27 84 030 7397 Themba Ndzipho Store Keeper +27 11 243 5243

P L P C O N TA C T

A CCO U NTS

Paul Weinberg Cape Town https://www.plparchive.com/ info@plparchive.com +27 82 771 1656

Michelle Noble Financial Officer Johannesburg accounts@aspireart.net +27 83 273 8034

Nonhlanhla Kumalo Johannesburg https://www.plparchive.com/ info@plparchive.com +27 82 296 2074

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AFRICAN PHO TOG RA PHY CEL E B R AT E D... TAK E 2

Expanding on the theme Africa by Africans, the Photography Legacy Project (PLP) in partnership with Aspire Art Auctions is proud to present a second instalment of the largest auction of African photography on the continent. This year, there are a total of 140 photographs from 68 photographers, represented by 14 countries. African photography has had a troubled past. Art critic, curator and writer, Okwui Enwezor pointed out that the practice fluctuated between “Afropessimisim” and “Afroromanticism”, both intrinsically related, and yet flip sides of the same coin. The tropes of Africa as a warzone, famine-ridden, breadbasket or a place where its people continue to practice age-old traditions, devoid of any social or political context, as if time has stood still, have been well and truly disavowed – especially since the 1990s and the broad-based introduction and exposure of African photography to an international audience. What exactly is ‘African photography’, remains an elusive, multifaceted and engaging discourse. The enduring concept suggested by Sabrina Zanier that African photography is a laboratory of collective consciousness remains appealing. Added to this, author Ekow Eshun in his recent book, Africa State of Mind: Contemporary Photography Reimagines a Continent (2020), observes a new movement while speaking back to the colonial past, “…African photographers claim the creative freedom to look inwards”. Nearly three decades after photographers Seidou Keïta and Malick Sidibé emerged in the international arena, their work remains as relevant and vital as it was then. The recent retrospective of 91-year-old Ghanaian photographer, James Barnor at October Gallery in London, underlies the point that historical African photographers, once seen as a quaint, marginal curiosity, have claimed center stage. Today, photography from Africa – as evidenced in this auction — is alive, healthy and fertile. The PLP and Aspire Art Auctions are deeply invested in African Photography – the medium, and its market. 2020 was not a normal year. The Covid 19 pandemic presented many challenges, especially for cultural practitioners – including photographers. As a result, this year’s auction has a special resonance. A highlight is the creative responses of some photographers to the pandemic. The stark and innovative portraits of Lamyne M. and the theatrical performative imagery of Raïssa Karama Rwizibuka are tempered by the social documentary interventions of Jabulani Dlamini, Lindokuhle Sobekwa and Marc Shoul. The auction brings together an exciting array of Pan-African photographers whose subject matter ranges from social and physical landscapes to private interiors, from gender-based issues to contemporary beach culture. Established veterans like David Goldblatt, Ernest Cole, Alf Kumalo, Michael Meyersfeld, the Drum photographers and Mohamed Amin as well as a host of award-winning image makers, rub shoulders with an emerging group of young talent. The collection overall reflects the ingenuity and commitment of African photographers who continue to practice their craft under extreme challenges. Two young award-winning women photographers feature this year. Lee-Ann Olwage’s visual essay on transgender activists celebrates the LGBTQ communities while critically reflecting on the social difficulties they encounter. Collaborating with Belinda Qaqamba Kafassie and other individuals, she produced a World Press Award-winning xii


body of work. As Olwage explained, “The project was created to serve as a platform of expression for black queer individuals where they were invited to co-create images which they felt told their stories in a way that is affirming and celebratory”. Zimbabwean, Tamary Kudita’s project African Victorian won her the Open Photographer of the Year at the 2021 Sony World Photography Awards. Her work explores and disrupts stereotypical representations of African identity. “Subversion is implicit in my elected mode of practice and my choice of representation demonstrates a subject position congruent with that of Santu Mofokeng, who seeks to tell a transparent narrative about black lives by constantly unsettling the comfort zones of racial and cultural memory”, she told Contemporary Art magazine. We celebrate the photographers represented in this collection. Their commitment, effort and spirit underlie the vision of the PLP to continue the digital preservation of this photographic heritage so that African photographic collections and archives may remain on the continent, be accessible and researchable for future generations. The extraordinary quality and relevance of the artworks comprising this auction support Aspire’s vision and ongoing mission of broadening the market for African art, increasing global appreciation, and, by extension, value, for the incredible artistic production that emanates from this continent. Symbiotically these efforts are intrinsically connected to the commitment of collectors. We are truly grateful for your support last year and we extend the hand of friendship and comradery again this year. Let us together continue to build on our collective efforts to champion African Photography.

PLP (Paul Weinberg, Nonhlanhla Kumalo, David Brits) Aspire Art Auctions (Ruarc Peffers)

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PAN E L DISCUSSIO N

The African LENS-scape: Photography for Collectors

As the largest ever collection of African photography comes to market this winter – comprising the work of 68 photographers from 14 African countries – Aspire and PLP present a panel discussion that explores the rise of photography as a growing field of art collecting.

THURSDAY 22 JULY AT 7PM (South African Standard Time GMT +2) Register to join the conversation on zoom: https://zoom.us/j/91362069607?pwd=OUI1WEFlY0lWcE5veFc1VytYaHBVQT09 Passcode: 180782

Panellists include: N’Goné Fall Lekgetho Makola Gordon Massie Mfundi Vundla

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A WORLD WITH OU T L IMIT

How satisfying it is – within a contemporary world of disorder, ruination and distress – to be offered a compendium of images by the Photography Legacy Project that surges with positivity. Here is a list of words the artworks prompt: delight, joy and affection; comradeship, friendship and togetherness; pleasure, celebration and play; excitement; exhilaration; thoughtfulness and contemplation; reverence and serenity; beauty and splendour; magic and enchantment; majesty; fantasy, adornment and adoration; performance and pageantry; musical, lyrical, dreamy and poetic; delicate and intimate; hopeful; honour and pride; love. This collection of works can be described accurately as much by what it shows as by what it chooses not to. A more ‘photographic’ phrase might be that content (the immediately visible and identifiable) is as important as context (that nebulously mysterious ‘present but unseen’), and the world the photographs’ subject lives in, is the world that we, too, inhabit. It is thus doubly delightful that events, isolated within a frame, focus on joys that may, too, exist for us, the viewer, and be shared. It is within the dominion of the repercussive agency of the image – the power to implement a shift – where the joy that emanates from the subjects engages the world of the viewer. At the risk of being melodramatic, this is political agency of love. In countries in profound socio-cultural and political flux, artists are often advocates. However, these images are themselves activist objects. Via a process of sway from the emotive to the practical, they have the power to alter the environment of the viewer. Not merely a tangible output, the photographs here are as important as their human producers. It would not be a leap of logic, then, to apply the actor network theory to the work these images do in societies of their viewers. The actor network theory asserts that both human and non-human actors are part of the same intellectual framework within the context of technological processes. As such they have equal importance, value, and ability to influence the environment within which they operate. In his 2005 book Resembling the Social, Bruno Latour describes this phenomenon as “objects with agency – things that make something happen”. Contemporary sociology is a discipline where human actors are assumed to be the primary force of change, but Latour is incredulous that this discipline “remains without object”. A solution to negate this arrogance, he writes, is to ask in reference to an object, “Does it make a difference in the course of some other agent’s action?” By answering, inevitably, “Yes”, it implies that these images of hope and love are not only actors but also, “more precisely, participants in the course of action”. By linking the material and the social, Latour provides an understanding of how “a collective action is possible” by allowing the material objects to do their work. Love is thus political, and these photographs are its champions. Photography and visual culture theorist Ariella Azoulay, writes in her book, Civil Imagination: A Political Ontology of Photography, about this merger of the aesthetic, the political and the civil. She extends the agency from the artist, via the photograph, to the viewers of photographic images as citizens who are able to “imagine a political state of being that deviates significantly from the prevailing state of affairs”. Thus, in our aspirant decolonial world, these individual images have the capacity to create a collective ecosphere driven by imagination. xvi


Azoulay’s theory stands in stark contrast to the prevailing ontology of photography, and this collection from the Photography Legacy Project upholds her refutations of cultural philosopher Walter Benjamin’s assertion of the separation between the aesthetic and the political, and denounces political theorist Hannah Arendt’s divisions between the public and private worlds. By inference, the subjects in this collection of photographs are presented free of externally imposed status – uplifted beyond political, economic or social strata, transcending class, race and religion, shunning ethnicity and, sometimes, gender. Power relations dissolve; authority and ownership too. The images ask of us, the viewer, to imagine a world that is beyond the context of hardship, bidding us to extend the potential of the image into our world where, in the words of Azoulay, “photography is an event [that] is never over”, and which “can only be suspended, caught in the anticipation of the next encounter”. And the next encounter could be, if we choose, within the realm of joy and care and love. Brenton Maart Brenton Maart is an independent artist, writer, designer and curator of contemporary art. His projects include establishing the South African National Art Bank; curating the South African pavilion at the 55th Venice Biennale in 2013; directing the KZNSA Gallery; and curating and designing #i, a project awarded the Contemporary African Photography Award in 2019. He holds an MSc in Biotechnology achieved with distinction from Rhodes University, and an MA in Fine Arts from the University of the Witwatersrand.

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BUYERS GU IDE

The following information is designed to

of these factors. Each lot has a confidential

Once payment for the purchased lot is made

guide prospective bidders through the auction

reserve price agreed between Aspire and the

and cleared, you may take the lot or arrange

process and explains how to bid at an auction

seller of the lot. The reserve is the minimum

for collection. An Aspire representative will

by Aspire. Our staff are happy to assist with

price that will be accepted for a lot, any

contact you the day after the auction to assist

any queries.

amount below which a lot will not be sold. The

with logistics. If you are unable to collect the

reserve price will not exceed the low estimate

artwork within the allocated time – Aspire will arrange storage or delivery of the lot, which

1. Identify your potential acquisition Aspire holds four live auctions per annum.

4. Specialist assistance

You can subscribe to our printed catalogues

Our specialists are available to discuss any

to view all works coming up in an auction or

lot in further detail if you require additional

alternatively, our e-catalogues are posted

information. Please do not hesitate to contact

online approximately a month prior to each

us.

website and social media platforms where we will provide regular updates regarding sale information and when catalogues are available to view online. The auction preview is open to the public. 2. The catalogue The catalogue includes all information regarding the lot(s) being offered in an auction (including artwork details, date, medium, dimensions, quantity of items in the lot, and so forth). Condition reports are not included in the catalogue, but may be requested by emailing conditionreports@aspireart.net. However, as we are not qualified conservators, we advise that you view the lot in person to satisfy yourself as to the condition of a prospective purchase. Condition reports are not necessarily compiled by professional conservators unless otherwise stated. 3. Estimates

Aspire will store artworks purchased at the auction under Aspire’s insurance for a limited time only (see our Terms and Conditions of Business). Storage and handling costs will be

sale; these are free downloads and give a full overview of each auction. Keep an eye on our

will be for your account.

5. Timed-Online Auctions: Bidding New bidders to Aspire will need to supply us with their ID/Driver’s license and proof of address.

charged if the property is not collected within this time. 7. Commissions and fees payable Buyers premium

Online Bidding via www.auctions.aspireart.net See page xx for a guide to online bidding The estimates included in this catalogue are expressed in South African Rands, the conversion into foreign currency being made, for information only, on the basis of the rate of change in force on July 12, 2021.

Buyers will be liable for payment of the purchase price. The purchase price is the hammer price, the Buyer’s premium and VAT charged on the premium. Commission for all online bidding is 15% (plus VAT).

These conversions are for information only, and bidders are invited, if they wish, to check the rate of exchange in effect on the day of the sale. All invoices that will be issued after the sale, will only be expressed in South African Rands. All payments relating to the sale must be made in South African Rands.

Aspire assigns a low and high estimate to every lot. These estimates give our opinion of value, bearing the following factors in mind: the sales precedent of each artist, the subject matter, the importance of the work within the artist’s oeuvre, the condition of the work and assimilates the accumulative totality of all

6. Payments, collection and storage Payment must be made immediately after completion of the auction, as stated in our Terms and Conditions of Business, unless otherwise agreed with Aspire beforehand.

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ON LIN E BIDD ING GU IDE

HOW TO REGISTER ONLINE: STEP 1 Visit aspireart.net and select the ONLINE BIDDING tab Under the AUCTIONS tab, select UPCOMING AUCTIONS to view the current auction open for bidding Select EXPLORE AUCTION to view the lots FIRST TIME BIDDERS Once you have identified the auction of your choice, first-time bidders will need to create a bidding profile by clicking on Register to bid. You will be redirected to the Create An Account webpage where you can create and register your bidding profile. Once you have registered you will be able to sign in and can start biding in our online auctions. To register, you will need: 1. Contact information (phone, email) 2. Billing address RETURNING BIDDERS If you are a returning bidder, you are encouraged to click on the Register to bid button as well as this action will redirect you to the Sign In webpage. From here, you can sign into your profile and place your bids. Be sure to carefully note the date, times, commissions and taxes applicable to the auction that you wish to participate in. By participating in any of our auctions, you agree to our Terms and Conditions of Business.

STEP 2: IDENTIFY YOUR LOT AND PREVIEW CURRENT BIDS Once signed in, select the auction you wish to bid on by either clicking directly on the auction’s sale title or the EXPLORE AUCTION button located next to the auction’s sale title. You will then be presented with a list of lots consigned to the auction. Identify your desired lot and click on the item. You will then be able to preview current, real-time bidding information on a particular lot: · Current minimum bid – the lowest bid that you can submit for the lot. The lowest bid consists of the current winning bid plus the next bid increment. · Starting bid – the initial price set for the lot at the start of the auction. · Bid increment – the minimum increased amount that you must bid above the current minimum bid. · Auction ends – the date and time at which the auction will no longer accept new bids and winners are selected.

STEP 3: PLACE YOUR BID Ensure that you are successfully signed into your Aspire Art Auctions profile. To sign in, use the username and password that you used to complete your registration process. Next, identify your desired lot and select your bid amount via the drop-down box labelled Bid Amount. Bidding choices start with the current minimum bid and go up by the minimum bid increments. After having selected your chosen bid amount, click on the PLACE BID button.

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Once you enter a bid, you will be sent an email confirming your bid amount for each auction lot that you selected. Your bid will be included in the current Winning Bids table at the bottom of the bid page until your bid is out bid by a new winning bid from another auction registrant. The Winning Bids table provides auction visitors with the following real-time information on the current winning bids: · Bidder – the paddle number of the current winning or your name if you are the current winning bidder. · Bid time – the time at which the current winning bid was placed. · Bid price – the current winning bid plus the bid increment. · Quantity – the number of lots selected by the bidder in the current winning bid. ABSENTEE BIDS Please note that you can leave an absentee bid by entering the maximum amount that you wish to bid on a particular lot. When placing an absentee bid the bidding system will automatically and incrementally bid on your behalf up to your maximum absentee bid amount in the event that you are outbid by another auction registrant. When you are out bid, the bidding system will automatically bid one increment above the latest winning bid to ensure that you are the winning bidder and will do so until your maximum amount is reached. Once you are no longer the winning bidder, it means that your maximum absentee bid amount has been out bid by another registrant. When you are not the winning bidder, but your maximum bid amount is the same as the current winning bid, it means that you were outbid by another registrant whose maximum bidding amount either matches or exceeds your maximum bid amount and that the winning bidder placed their absentee bid prior to yours. The system gives sequential preference to bidders based on when they first entered their bid into the bidding system. TRACK AND UPDATE YOUR BIDS Before the auction closes, consult the current Winning Bids table on the bid page to see if your bid is still winning. If it is not, you can place another bid. Throughout the course of an auction, we encourage you to regularly consult the ongoing bidding information that relates to your particular lot. In the case of an auction that commences as an online auction and thereafter shifts to incorporate a live auction component, you will be able to place your bids online in advance of or during the live component of the auction. Once the live component of the auction has begun, all pre-existing online bids will be translated and transferred into the virtual auction environment as each successive lot is opened. The auction platform will open bidding on the lot at the highest CURRENT BID online. You can continue to bid online via our website and increase your maximum bid as the virtual auction is conducted, both on the current lot, as well as on later lots in the auction.

STEP 4 – NOTIFICATION OF FINAL WINNING BIDS If you are the winning bidder of a particular lot, you will either receive an automated email to inform you that you have won or Aspire Art Auctions will contact you upon the conclusion of the auction. ONLINE BIDDING DISCLAIMER Due to the technological nature of any online bidding environment, such an environment might be subject to related latencies or errors with regards to any form of data transfer. Accordingly, Aspire Art Auctions is hereby exempt from any liabilities resulting from such latencies or errors.

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ARTIST INDEX Ahmed, Hadeer Mahmoud 50 Amin, Mohamed 66, 110 Apawu, Misper 65 Astronauts, Kongo 24, 25 Balnéaires, Nuits 99 Blomkamp, Stephanie 102 Bob Gosani © BAHA 75, 77, 78, 79, 80 Brundrit, Jean 124 Buthelezi, Mandisa 43 Cole, Ernest 38 Dhlamini, Jabulani 16, 71 Diabaté , Fatoumata 28, 29 Djamil , Imane 10, 11 Edelstein, Jillian 12, 13 Godfrey, Ilan 48 Goldblatt, David 93 Han , Henion 6 Hatimi, Yasmine 51, 52 Hetherington, Pippa 101 Kay, Matt 21 Kazim, Ayesha 105, 106 Kefyalew, Eyoeal 55, 56 Kia Henda , Kiluanji 122 Kudita, Tamary 62, 63, 64 Kumalo, Alf 112, 113 Lemon, T. J. 39, 40, 41 Loots, Anke 20 Loukidis, Michelle 26 Lurie, David 119, 120, 121 M, Lamyne 68, 69 Marinovich , Greg 67 Marsh, Dillon 22, 23 Matlala, William 37 Maubane, Dahlia 118 Mbo, Paul-Marie 98 Meyersfeld, Michael 94, 95 Mohanlall, Bobson Sukhdeo 30, 31, 32 Monaheng, Tseliso 14 Motau, Ruth Seopedi 96 Ndawo, Ralph 44, 111 Ndongeni, Tshepiso Mabula 36, 49, 107 Ngigi, Margaret 97 Ngilima, Ronald 33 Nqaba, Nobukho 57 NwaNri, Nyancho 108, 109 Odhiambo, Gordwin 114, 115, 116 Olwage, Lee-Ann 59, 60, 61 Paul, Daylin 18 Qampi, Lindeka 9 Rajaonary, Miora 100 Rosenberg, Chris Dennis 125, 126 Rwizibuka, Raïssa Karama 3, 4, 70

Sadurni, Sumy Sahraoui, Fethi Serraf, Micha Shanan, Abdo Shoul, Marc Sobekwa, Lindokuhle Stirton, Brent Strydom, Clint © BAHA Unknown Marabastad Photographer van der Linde, Carl Van Gysen, Alan Vos, Jesse Navarre Weinberg, Paul Williams, Graeme Yvonne, Etinosa

35, 117 45, 46, 47 7, 8 5 73 72, 127 42 17, 58 74, 76, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92 34 27 15 103, 104, 123 19 53, 54 1, 2


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Aspire X PLP African Photography Auction 2021

Timed-Online 20 to 27 July 2021


1 Etinosa Yvonne Nigeria 1989-

This Bond Between Us (from the Colours of the North series) 2019 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 18 x 30 cm; sheet size: 30 x 42 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 4 + 2AP

The primary focus of her work is on exploring and expressing themes related to the human condition and social injustice. She was one of six photographers selected for the 2020 cycle of the World Press Photo 6*6 Africa talent, and has received grants from Women Photograph, National Geographic in partnership with Lagos Photo and Art X, as well as an award from the Royal Photographic Society for her project, It’s All In My Head. Her works have been shown in selected group exhibitions and featured in several international publications.

ZAR 12 000 – 15 000 USD 840 – 1050 GBP 600 – 750 EURO 708 – 885

“I began solo traveling in 2015. While I haven’t covered all 36 states in Nigeria, I have been to all the regions in the country. However, I am always in awe whenever I travel to the northern part of Nigeria – while Nigerians are quite colourful, there is an unmatched vibrancy that exists in the north. In June 2019, while in Zaria for an assignment and subsequently a vacation, I seized the opportunity to capture the beauty, joy and colours that come with the Sallah celebration.”

NOTES

To celebrate Black History Month, Colours of the North was used as a resource to teach photography to a group of young adults in the UK in 2020. The workshop was organised by Hundred Heroines.

For additional information on Etinosa Yvonne’s work, visit: http://www.etinosayvonne.me/

2

Etinosa Yvonne is a self-taught documentary photographer and visual artist based in Abuja, Nigeria.


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2 Etinosa Yvonne Nigeria 1989-

Like We Own It (from the Colours of the North series) 2019 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 18 x 30 cm; sheet size: 30 x 42 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 4 + 2AP

ZAR 12 000 – 15 000 USD 840 – 1050 GBP 600 – 750 EURO 708 – 885

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3 Raïssa Karama Rwizibuka Democratic Republic of the Congo 1997-

From the series Our Hair is Beautiful (1) 2020 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 30 x 45 cm; sheet size: 42 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 10

ZAR 9 000 – 10 000 USD 630 – 700 GBP 450 – 500 EURO 531 – 590

NOTES For additional information on Raïssa Karama Rwizibuka’s work, visit: https://www.hamajimagazine.com/inconversation-with-raissa-karama-rwizibuka-2/ https://www.lensculture.com/ projects/1467226-congo-s-innovativecoronaviru https://congoinconversation. fondationcarmignac.com/2020/12/21/congoembraces-traditional-hairstyles-amid-thepandemic-raissa-rwizibuka-bernadette-vivuya/ https://congoinconversation. fondationcarmignac.com/2020/08/20/congosinnovative-coronavirus-fashion-by-raissakarama-rwizibuka/ https://congoinconversation. fondationcarmignac.com/2020/05/27/masksward-off-police-harassment-and-coronavirus/

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Raïssa Karama Rwizibuka is a photojournalist and storyteller based in Bukavu, in South Kivu, Democratic Republic of the Congo. In 2015, photography became her passion: “With my photos I could finally express myself”, she says. “Being a photographer allowed me to become an independent woman who can be a role model and support other women and my family. Now, I can share the stories my fellow Congolese and I have experienced. For me, photography is an essential tool for the transformation of humans, and for the change of mindsets in society. Through it I want to show another image of African and Congolese youth.” She is a contributor to Fondation Carmignac’s Congo in Conversation, and her work has been featured in the French magazine, Le Monde, and on international television channels such as France 2, France 3, RFI, France 24, TV5 Monde. In 2020, she was selected for Afrique in Visu, and to participate in the Canon Student Development Programme. “The beautiful and black Congolese ladies have made a big step in regaining their self-esteem and valuing African culture, especially in terms of their hairstyle. For many years, Congolese women grew up with the perception that their hair was ‘not good enough’. Many women use chemical products to smooth or straighten their hair, often leaving their scalps burned – as the old saying goes ‘being beautiful requires suffering’. In recent years however, Congolese women began to take pride in their traditional braids again, and more and more of them are now braiding their hair and have stopped using dangerous skin lightening creams. My images explore the revival of Congolese culture, showing how we can use creativity and tradition to showcase natural hair as a symbol of pride and reclaiming ownership over our bodies, and that these traditions need to be preserved and passed on to the next generation.”


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4 Raïssa Karama Rwizibuka Democratic Republic of the Congo 1997-

From the series Our Hair is Beautiful (2) 2020 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 30 x 45 cm; sheet size: 42 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 10

ZAR 9 000 – 10 000 USD 630 – 700 GBP 450 – 500 EURO 531 – 590

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5 Abdo Shanan Algeria 1982-

Untitled (from the Diary: Exile series) 2015 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 30 x 45 cm; sheet size: 42 x 59.5 cm unframed open edition

ZAR 8 000 – 10 000 USD 560 – 700 GBP 400 – 500 EURO 772 – 590

NOTES For additional information on Abdo Shanan’s work, visit: https://www.abdoshanan.com/ https://www.theparisreview.org/ blog/2017/08/16/abdo-shanans-algerianphotographs/ https://www.madamasr.com/en/2019/07/08/ panorama/u/diary-of-exile/ https://www.1854.photography/2020/09/ appearance-and-identity-in-the-work-of-abdoshanan/ http://www.afriqueinvisu.org/abdo-shanan. html

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Abdo Shanan was born in Oran, Algeria. He studied Telecommunications Engineering at the University of Sirte, Libya, until 2006. In 2012, Shanan undertook an internship at Magnum Photos, which gave him the opportunity to reflect on his photographic approach and create his first story for the magazine, Rukh. His photographs have been published by several print and online magazines and newspapers. In 2015, Shanan received a nomination for the Magnum Foundation Emergency Fund; in the same year he co-founded the Algerian photographers’ collective, Collective220. A year later, his series Diary: Exile was selected for the Addis Foto Fest. He was awarded the 2019 CAP (Contemporary African Photography) Prize for his ongoing project, Dry. In the same year, he was selected for the World Press Photo Foundation’s Joop Swart Masterclass. In 2020, he won the Premi Mediterrani Albert Camus Incipiens award and co-curated Narratives from Algeria, together with Danaé Panchaud, at PasquArt Photoforum in Biel/Bienne, Switzerland. “Diary: Exile started spontaneously and without direction in 2014. When I started it, I thought I was documenting the life of my grandmother, who suffers from severe memory loss. But many months later, as I looked back at the photographs, I realised that I was creating a diary of myself and for myself. The spontaneous nature of the project kept it instinctive rather than premeditated. Exile has become a defence from the prefabricated reality, a shield that will protect who I am. Surrounded by solitude, disappointment, fears of the ticking of time, of growing old, of accomplishing nothing. The country has changed. Or perhaps it is just different from the image I created in my head while I was abroad to compensate for my feelings of nostalgia and homesickness while I was growing into a man. Reality hits hard. Accept it and change or refuse it. There may be another way around. A place where you can create your own path away from the expectations and predefined roles and identities.”


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6 Henion Han South African 1952–2018

Ma and Yoyo (from The Ma series) 1979 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 30 x 45 cm; sheet size: 42 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 10

ZAR 12 000 – 15 000 USD 840 – 1050 GBP 600 – 750 EURO 708 – 885

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7 Micha Serraf Zimbabwe 1994-

Kukura 2017 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 30 x 45 cm; sheet size: 42 x 59.4 cm unframed number 3 from an edition of 9

ZAR 20 000 – 25 000 USD 1 400 – 1 750 GBP 1 000 – 1 250 EURO 1 180 – 1 475

8 Micha Serraf Zimbabwe 1994-

Where Once 2016 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 30 x 45 cm; sheet size: 42 x 59.5 cm unframed number 9 from an edition of 9

ZAR 20 000 – 25 000 USD 1 400 – 1 750 GBP 1 000 – 1 250 EURO 1 180 – 1 475

NOTES For additional information on Micha Serraf’s work, visit: http://micha.co/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NB3uEfNLxU https://www.1-54.com/new-york/ritzau-artprize/

WATCH Foam Talent 2020 | Micha Serraf

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Micha Serraf is an award-winning commercial and fine art photographer whose work focuses on fashion, social consciousness, and conceptual portraiture. Currently based in South Africa, Serraf was born and raised in Zimbabwe. Observing foreign nationals in their navigation of post-apartheid South Africa, Serraf notes that they display an acute awareness of the safest shape they need to take to survive in particular contexts. This fluid presentation of self, and the ability to be malleable, are tactics used to access acceptance and camouflage. In this exposure to several ways of existing, Serraf has experienced and observed a variety of gender norms, enactments, and ideologies – seeking to dissect and dismantle the understanding of gender and belonging within this configuration, and demonstrate the evolutionary, fluid, and emotional entanglements related to the purpose, interpretations, and performance of gender, race, and origin. “Throughout my life, after fleeing Zimbabwe and as an artist, I have been searching for home. Over the last few years, I have decided to embrace being an alien (legal or otherwise). My work is informed by memories I have from when I was a child in Zimbabwe and my endeavour to understand the nostalgia I feel toward the unfamiliar. In an attempt to figure out what I am and where I belong, I will continue to make visual my memories, thoughts and narratives.” Serraf has participated in several international exhibitions and festivals, and is the recipient of the Ritzau Art Prize with ISCP & 1-54 Art Fair (2021); International Pride Photo Award for Best Single Image (2020); winner of the FastTrack 18 with the British Journal of Photography and 1854 Media (2021); Foam Museum top 20 talents (2020); and Africa Photo Awards Portraiture Finalist (2020).


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9 Lindeka Qampi Southt Africa 1969-

Usana Ilhoye (from the Inside My Heart series) 2015 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 30 x 45 cm; sheet size: 42 x 59.4 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 12

ZAR 8 000 – 12 000 USD 560 – 840 GBP 400 – 600 EURO 472 – 708

NOTES For additional information on Lindeka Qampi’s work, visit: https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=vx5anIuVVGw https://www.pafa.org/museum/exhibitions/ zanele-muholi-womens-mobile-museum https://www.artsy.net/show/jenkins-johnsongallery-pride-and-loss https://www.contemporaryand.com/fr/ exhibition/seeing-ourselves-themselvesnomusa-makhubu-lindeka-qampi/

WATCH ‘Life Framed’ the Lindeka Qampi

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Lindeka Qampi is a self-taught South African artist and photographer. She began taking photographs in 2006, when she met members of the Iliso Labantu (the eye of the people), a community-based photo collective. At the start she worked as a street photographer, photographing weddings, events, and portraits. Soon she moved on to exploring her community in different ways, documenting the lives of ordinary people. Her photographs express the poetry and politics of the ‘ordinary act’ and therein the potential of imagining new possibilities for the future. She has participated in numerous group exhibitions in South Africa and abroad. In 2011, Qampi developed a series of photographs for New York University master’s student, Shady Patterson, which featured township fashions – Clothing and Dress in South African Townships in the Post-Apartheid Era – which set out to “explore and interrogate the sartorial landscape of impoverished communities to reveal traditional influences in economically oppressed and media saturated societies”. Qampi went on to produce her own series of photographs, Material Culture, within the trajectory of ‘township fashion’ and ‘street culture’. Since 2012, and alongside developing her own career as a practicing photographer, Qampi has been the project facilitator for Inkanyiso, an activist platform founded by photographer, Zanele Muholi. One of their projects, Empathetic Eyes, led them to Benin where they presented photography workshops which focused on violence against women. In 2015, they participated in a Visual Activism Cultural Exchange Project. Muholi and Qampi were acknowledged for their outreach work with a Brave Award in 2016. In 2015, Lindeka Qampi decided it was time to turn her lens onto herself and her immediate family after she had penned a poem, Inside My Heart, to her late mother: “I have never written a poem before, but I knew I needed to say these words”. As the series developed through her exploration of self-portraiture, she also investigated other modes of expression. Inside My Heart also includes video work, drawings, and objects made by the artist. Usana luhoye was included in Qampi’s recent solo exhibition, Ukufa kusembizeni, at the Association for Visual Arts, Cape Town, 2021.


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Imane Djamil is a Casablanca-based artist whose practice spans photography, storytelling, and creative writing. Her work, located at the crossroads of fine art and documentary photography, straddles a fine line between reality and the sublime in what she calls ‘mental geographies’ and explores places in posttraumatic transition, where history engenders a metaphorical dialogue with personal anecdotes.

10 Imane Djamil Morocco 1996-

Tarfaya Buried Open Door (from the 80 Miles to Atlantis series) 2020 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 30 x 45 cm; sheet size: 42 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 2

ZAR 20 000 – 25 000 USD 1 400 – 1 750 GBP 1 000 – 1 250 EURO 1 180 – 1 475

Djamil has participated in several residencies including Escales liées at the French Pavilion of the Venice Architecture Biennale, Italy (2018); Mujeres yel Mediterráaneo at the Casa Mediterraneo in Alicante, Spain (2019); and most recently the Summer’s Lab at le Cube Independent Art Room in Rabat, Morocco (2020). Her work has been exhibited throughout Europe and Morocco, most notably as part of Le Maroc Contemporain at Institut du Monde Arabe in Paris, France (2014) and En un instante: Marruecos at Casa Árabe as part of PHotoESPAÑA’s official selection (2018). In 2021, she was awarded the New Narratives in Environmental Photography prize by Fisheye magazine and the La Gacilly Photo Festival for 80 Miles to Atlantis. “In 80 Miles to Atlantis, the second part of her work around the city of Tarfaya, Imane Djamil works closely with a group of friends born amongst the ruins, in search of a long-lost time they haven’t known, fantasised from a nostalgia point of view. Together, they reinvest in desolation as a playground and the ruin, as an element to reclaim in this collaboration. The series interrogates the multiple layers of symbolism in the built and natural landscape, colonial architecture’s redefinition over time, and the blurring of lines between reality and myth. The themes her work explores are of poignant relevance to today’s world – the quest for a symbiosis between urban development and the natural environment, the state’s failure to uplift communities at the margins, and negotiating relationships between the colonial past and a post-colonial present and future. Through her practice, Djamil never ceases to confront the complexity of people vis-à-vis their physical environment. The title of the series refers to Tarfaya not by its name, but rather its close proximity to Spain’s Canary Islands, the approximate location of where the mythical Atlantis is rumoured to be. The title also likens Tarfaya to the fictional island nation – a fitting relation given that, like Atlantis, it is shrouded in mystery and often described as ‘apocalyptic’ or ‘the abandoned world.’ Working in an environment where interest in street photography and its candid, unmediated images of Moroccan daily life have exploded in the past decade, Imane Djamil stands out from her peers for her use of ‘docu-fiction’ to capture reality while simultaneously introducing fictional scenarios to strengthen its representation through a form of artistic expression.” From 80 Miles to Atlantis catalogue text by Tina Barouti

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11 Imane Djamil Morocco 1996-

Armas Assalama (from the 80 Miles to Atlantis series) 2020 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 30 x 45 cm; sheet size: 42 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 2

ZAR 20 000 – 25 000 USD 1 400 – 1 750 GBP 1 000 – 1 250 EURO 1 180 – 1 475

NOTES For additional information on Imane Djamil’s work, visit: https://www.academia.edu/44912685/Introduction_ to_Imane_Djamils_Atlantide_Km_130_80_miles_to_ Atlantis https://elpais.com/planeta-futuro/2021-03-03/losotros-cuentos-que-cuenta-el-sahara.html?fbclid=IwA R14DP8DW4k7CDgi4lX9iW7EVRHWsnXLiBIZwaFeoLcJMflwsaY7jdXxMc https://www.diptykmag.com/expo-imane-djamilsublime-tarfaya/?fbclid=IwAR2Bo-pW-tP7O3_ HjoX8lTX7yQH1oD4T2hS5gcDXpguVumg5ITwI8uP9CBs https://www.fisheyemagazine.fr/decouvertes/actu/ et-voici-les-laureats-du-prix-nouvelles-ecritures-de-laphotographie-environnementale/ https://www.festivalphoto-lagacilly.com/en/ photographes/imane-djamil https://photo-letter.com/portfolios/imane-djamil/

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12 Jillian Edelstein South Africa 1957-

St James Beach & Bucket 1996 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 38 x 38 cm; sheet size: 42 x 42 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 12

ZAR 15 000 – 18 000 USD 1 050 – 1 260 GBP 750 – 900 EURO 885 – 1 062

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13 Jillian Edelstein South Africa 1957-

Beach Frolic 1996 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 45 x 30 cm; sheet size: 59.5 x 42 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 20

ZAR 15 000 – 18 000 USD 1 050 – 1 260 GBP 750 – 900 EURO 885 – 1 062

NOTES For additional information on Jillian Edelstein’s work, visit: https://www.jillianedelstein.co.uk/ https://hundredheroines.org/heroine/jilledelstein-honfrps/ https://www.singulart.com/en/artist/jillianedelstein-8 https://photovoice.org/ten-questions-withjillian-edelstein/ https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2979/ transition.107.79?seq=1 https://counterpointsarts.org.uk/life-seekersby-jillian-edelstein/ https://www.npg.org.uk/collections/search/ person/mp08147/jillian-edelstein https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=B4sxdecTUOA https://www.vam.ac.uk/event/pX1YWzXw/ counterpoints-arts-portraits-june-2019 https://photographyandresistance.wordpress. com/2019/01/23/jillian-edelstein-makingmemory-seeing-history/

WATCH Jillian Edelstein capturing icons from Mandela to Malkovich

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London-based photographer Jillian Edelstein began her career working as a press photographer in Johannesburg, South Africa. Edelstein’s award-winning portrait and documentary work has appeared in international publications such as The New York Times Magazine, The Sunday Times Magazine, TIME, The New Yorker, and Vanity Fair. She has exhibited internationally at venues including the National Portrait Gallery, The Photographers’ Gallery, The Royal Academy, and OXO Gallery in London; Rencontres d’Arles; Espace Muraille, Geneva; Sotheby’s Galerie Charpentier, Paris; Dali International Photography Festival, Yunnan Province, China; Bensusan Museum of Photography, Johannesburg; and the Robben Island Museum, Robben Island, Cape Town. Between 1996 and 2002 Edelstein returned to South Africa frequently to document the work of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC). Her book, Truth and Lies: Stories of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in South Africa (Granta / Mail & Guardian, 2003), won several awards including the Visa d’Or at the International Festival of Photojournalism Perpignan in 1997, and the John Kobal Book Award, 2002. In 2002 Edelstein was awarded a Royal Photographic Society Honorary Fellowship (HonFRPS), and in 2018 she was voted on the ‘Hundred Heroines’ list – an international campaign led by the Royal Photographic Society. She is a Hasselblad Heroine 2020. In the run up to the Olympics 2012 she was commissioned by The National Portrait Gallery to produce a series of portraits of those working to make the Olympic and the Paralympic Games happen. The Road to 2012: Aiming High was opened by the Duchess of Cambridge. She is currently working on her first feature documentary about the Academy Award nominated screenwriter, Norman Wexler. St James Beach & Bucket and Beach Frolic are personal works created while visiting South Africa after the artist published Truth and Lies: Stories of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in South Africa in 2003.


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14 Tseliso Monaheng Lesotho 1987-

Coffee Bae 2017 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 45 x 70 cm; sheet size: 59.5 x 81.5 cm unframed unique

ZAR 20 000 – 25 000 USD 1 400 – 1 750 GBP 1 000 – 1 250 EURO 1 180 – 1 475

NOTES For additional information on Tseliso Monaheng’s work, visit: https://www.okayafrica.com/documentingsouth-african-jazz/ https://ntsoana.com/category/featured-in/

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Tseliso Monaheng is a Maseru-born writer, photographer, and video artist. He moved to Johannesburg in 2013 after graduating with a degree in Computer Science from the University of Cape Town. Monaheng focuses on photographic work at the intersection of culture and technology, with a penchant for environmental and portraiture work. His images have been featured in print publications such as The Guardian (UK), Sunday Times (SA), Downbeat, and Le Monde; online platforms; and on album covers and sleeves such as Thandi Ntuli’s Exiled (2018), Nduduzo Makhathini’s Icilongo (2016), and Ndabo Zulu and the Umgidi Ensemble’s Queen Nandi: The African Symphony (2020). Monaheng’s transdisciplinary approach has seen him collaborate with street artists (Lisolomzi Pikoli, Man Like Mountain, 2016); social activists (Makhulu, In Context, 2016); and with academics (Pitika Ntuli, Azibuyele Emasisweni, 2020). One of his photographs forms part of Hugh Masekela’s permanent exhibition at the Apartheid Museum in Johannesburg. Though themes which run through Monaheng’s work are diverse, the lens through which it should be interpreted remains constant: a relentless love for African people, and a tireless desire to see Africans attain a greater level of visibility in the public and private sphere – a visibility which decentres the colonial gaze. “Coffee Bae is fraught. It is the image of a black man, a surfer based in Coffee Bay in the Eastern Cape, on the beach, facing the blue water. In this moment, permanently frozen in time, isolated from the traffic of beaches elsewhere, the history of a violence that continues to be directed towards black and brown people confronts us: the demands by mainly white Capetonians to have beaches opened during a pandemic; the push-back when black and brown people in Durban populate beaches during the summer season… The image invites us to think historically – to the segregated beaches of America; to the trans-Atlantic slave trade; to the many water-related myths across cultures.”


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15 Alan Van Gysen South Africa 1982-

Dropping In 2017 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 30 x 45 cm; sheet size: 42 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 10

ZAR 10 000 – 15 000 USD 700 – 1 050 GBP 500 – 750 EURO 590 – 885

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“Alan van Gysen is one of the world’s most respected surf photographers. With an inextinguishable drive and natural flair, he has spent the past twenty years carving his mark into the international scene. His dedication to his craft has captured the artistry of South Africa’s and the world’s top surfers.” – Brendon Bosworth As a surf photojournalist, he has travelled the planet to cover stories for major surfing magazines. His lens has also reached beyond the commercial and the wellknown surfing personalities and predictable narratives, to tell the story of lesserknown African surf culture. Van Gysen’s work offers surfers from the continent a voice and place in a highly commercialised industry, presenting a counter-vision to how surfing is generally projected. He is also involved in projects like The 9 Miles Project and Waves for Change that have been crucial in supporting at-risk youth to be part of a sport that is often considered exclusionary and elitist. At present he is working with the team from Mami Wata on AfroSurf – the first book of its kind to document African surf culture, which has already received international backing and interest. Dropping In - Godfather of Nigerian surfing, Godspower Pekipuma, dropping in at Lighthouse Left on Tarkwa Island, Lagos, Nigeria.


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16 Jabulani Dhlamini South Africa 1983-

Ngaphesheya, Réunion Island 2018 pigment inks on 280 fibre silk cotton rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist framed size: 120 x 120 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 5

ZAR 30 000 – 40 000 USD 2 100 – 2 800 GBP 1 500 – 2 000 EURO 1 770 – 2 360

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Jabulani Dhlamini lives and works in Johannesburg. Dhlamini majored in documentary photography at the Vaal University of Technology, graduating in 2010. From 2011-2012, Dhlamini was a fellow of the Edward Ruiz Mentorship and completed a year-long residency at the Market Photo Workshop in Johannesburg. Dhlamini’s work focuses on his upbringing, as well as the way he views contemporary South Africa. Dhlamini’s Umama series was exhibited as part of his Edward Ruiz award at the Market Photo Workshop in 2012, and at Goodman Gallery Cape Town in 2013. In Umama, Dhlamini pays homage to single mothers and explores the challenges faced by women raising children on their own in South African townships. For his Recaptured series, which was exhibited at Goodman Gallery in 2016, Dhlamini turned to the community of Sharpeville, asking people to bring objects that reminded them of the 1960 massacre. Over the course of several years Dhlamini interviewed and photographed a number of individuals who traced their movements and emotions on the day of the Sharpeville Massacre, relocating themselves within the collective memory. In 2018 Dhlamini’s work was featured in the Five Photographers: A Tribute to David Goldblatt group exhibition at the Gerard Sekoto Gallery at the French Institute. In his most recent exhibition at Goodman Gallery, iXesha!, Dhlamini explored how memory is created and archived within a community where the memory has been localised. This exhibition included images from Dhlamini’s recent series iQhawekazi documenting the events around Winnie MadikizelaMandela’s funeral.


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17 Clint Strydom South Africa 1973-

Battle of Isandlwana 2013 archival ink print on Hahnemühle paper accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist sheet size: 66 x 200 cm unframed number 8 from an edition of 15

ZAR 40 000 – 50 000 USD 2 800 – 3 500 GBP 2 000 – 2 500 EURO 2 360 – 2 950

NOTES For additional information on Clint Strydom’s work, visit: https://themelrosegallery.com/artists/50-clintstrydom/overview/ https://www.behance.net/gallery/63078653/ Joburg-Style-photo-essay-layout-Hiddenshadows

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Clint Strydom is a Johannesburg-based photographer, lens-based artist, and photo essayist. His self-taught lens-based artistry unravels the hidden perspectives of the overlooked or forgotten in society, resulting in work that is timeless, measured and still – visual narratives that permeate political, private, and commercial spaces. In his quest to re-balance historical narratives, Strydom created Hidden Shadows and Silent Voices of Prison Number 4 – a body of work captured inside the historic and notorious ‘Number Four’ prison at Constitution Hill. With this series, he wanted to communicate the great injustice and inhumanity of conditions in this infamous prison where numerous political prisoners, including Mahatma Gandhi, Robert Sobukwe, and Albert Luthuli, were incarcerated. Strydom’s experimental signature style has also resulted in collaborations with Aston Martin International, FIFA, the Mexican International Football Hall of Fame, Mbongeni Ngema, the City of Johannesburg, Constitution Hill, Mercedes, and many others. In 2016, he opened The Melrose Gallery, in Melrose Arch, Johannesburg, creating one of the few artist-owned galleries in South Africa.


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18 Daylin Paul South Africa 1985-

Horse grazing in field near Kriel Power Station – Kriel, Mpumalanga (from the Broken Lland series) 2018 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Baryta accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 42 x 59.4 cm; framed size: 53.5 x 73.5 cm number 1 from an edition of 10

ZAR 10 000 – 15 000 USD 700 – 1 050 GBP 500 – 750 EURO 590 – 885

NOTES For additional information on Daylin Paul’s work, visit: https://potd.pdnonline. com/2019/09/20/57224/ https://johannesburgreviewofbooks. com/2019/10/07/as-we-sleepwalk-evercloser-toward-climate-catastrophe-an-excerptfrom-broken-land-the-new-photobook-bydaylin-paul-winner-of-the-ernest-cole-award/ https://news.trust.org/item/201910251121491hqfq/ https://mg.co.za/friday/2020-01-16-brokenland-brooding-skies/ https://africasacountry.com/2017/09/thestory-is-always-more-important-than-thepicture https://www.yumpu.com/en/document/ read/63291183/book-reviews-in-africa-issueof-zeke

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Daylin Paul is an independent photographer, writer and educator. He is a graduate from Rhodes University, School of Journalism. After starting his career as a press photographer in Cape Town, he decided to work as an independent photographer and travelled to East Asia where he was a stringer for Penta Press photo agency (Seoul, South Korea), and a gallery assistant at Documentary Arts Asia (Chiang Mai, Thailand). After five years in Asia, Paul returned to South Africa and worked for various leading news organisations, both local and international. His work during the FeesMustFall protests in 2015 and 2016 drew critical acclaim and global recognition, and was published in The New York Times, The Guardian, and Foreign Policy. Subsequently, he was a regional finalist in the Vodacom Journalist of the Year awards (2017). It was during this time that he began moving away from photojournalism and into documentary photography. Paul was awarded the prestigious Ernest Cole Award in 2017 for his work on coal mining and burning in the Mpumalanga Highveld. This project was published as his debut monograph, Broken Land, and exhibited widely. He teaches in the Photojournalism and Documentary Photography program at the Market Photo Workshop, and is a writer and contributor to a number of local and international NGO’s and development agencies. This work is from Daylin Paul’s award winning series Broken Land. The series examines the coal-fuelled climate change and human rights crisis in Mpumalanga province, South Africa. As Paul comments, “These power stations, while providing electricity for an energy-dependable South Africa, also have a devastating and lasting impact on the environment and the health of local people. […] Vast tracts of fertile, arable land are being ripped up, the landscape scarred with the black pits of coal mines while coal-burning power stations are one of the biggest greenhouse gas emitters in the world.” Paul looks at both the micro and macro issues of coal with a documentarian’s eye: recording evidence and conducting interviews as a journalist would, but also interpreting landscapes and scenes as an artist. The photographs in this series look for traces of the subtle, paradoxical tragedy that haunts both the land and the people of Mpumalanga: blessed with unfathomable mineral wealth, but cursed by the industries that extract and burn it. Broken Land was exhibited at KZNSA Gallery, Durban; Wits Art Museum, Johannesburg; and FORMS Gallery, Cape Town. The monograph (Jacana, 2019) was longlisted for the 2021 National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences awards.


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19 Paul Weinberg South Africa 1956-

EarthSongs I Mik, cave church on the Orange River, that has been used by nomadic Nama communities as a place of worship for centuries, Pella, Northern Cape, 2021. 2021 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag signed image size: 40 x 57 cm; sheet size: 42 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 10

ZAR 20 000 – 25 000 USD 1 400 – 1 750 GBP 1 000 – 1 250 EURO 1 180 – 1 475

NOTES For additional information on Paul Weinberg’s work, visit: http://paulweinberg.co.za/ https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.108 0/23323256.2017.1375381 http://photographyanddemocracy. com/?portfolio=paul-weinberg https://archives.lib.duke.edu/catalog/ weinbergpaul

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Paul Weinberg is a photographer, curator, filmmaker, writer, educationist, and archivist. He began his career in the early 1980s by working for South African NGOs and photographing current events for news agencies and foreign newspapers. He was a founder member of Afrapix and South, the collective photo agencies that gained local and international recognition for their uncompromising role in documenting apartheid and popular resistance to it. From 1990 onwards, he increasingly concentrated on feature and in-depth projects. He has been published and exhibited widely over a period of 40 years. In his career he has produced 18 books as a photographer and author, and has been published in many other anthologies and group projects. He taught photography at the Centre of Documentary Studies at Duke University (Durham, USA) and holds a master’s degree from the same university. Weinberg lectured in Documentary Arts and Visual Anthropology at the University of Cape Town and is currently a research associate at the Centre for South African Art and Visual Culture, University of Johannesburg. Together with David Goldblatt, he founded the Ernest Cole Award for creative photography in southern Africa. He currently works as a curator, archivist, and photographer. “EarthSongs is a project that explores and celebrates spiritual connections to the land in South Africa. While ‘land’ is a very contested issue, the way people have marked, and celebrated the land remains a critically important, often muted engagement, signifying re-imagining of the land and what the land can mean for a variety of its inhabitants. In quiet ways beyond the news and headlines, people of all persuasions, faiths and spiritual engagements partake in rituals, formal and informal that mark the land in ways that align with their belief systems. Examples of this are spiritual sites of faith – pilgrimages, archaeological sites, natural wonders, and events where informally spiritual practice take place in the broadest way possible. This project also explores lesser-known, off the beaten track or unrecognised, unusual sites of spiritual practice and ritual. My project is to look at the landscape and its transformation with regard to spirituality. This is an amalgam of different and diverse connections, signifying spiritual connections to land in South Africa.” This project is a continuation of Weinberg’s work in Moving Spirit, which explored the spiritual practice of a variety of faiths in southern Africa.


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20 Anke Loots South Africa 1991-

Untitled, Garden Route 2020 archival pigment print on semi-gloss paper accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 40 x 27 cm; sheet size: 41 x 27.5 cm unframed number 2 from an edition of 5

ZAR 7 000 – 10 000 USD 490 – 700 GBP 350 – 500 EURO 413 – 590

NOTES For additional information on Anke Loots’ work, visit: http://ankeloots.com https://nataal.com/anke-loots https://bubblegumclub.co.za/photography/ anke-loots-self-exploration-into-ideas-offeminine-energies/ https://discocreatives.co.za/anke-loots/

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Anke Loots is a South African photographer based in Cape Town. She crafts a distinct visual language, investigating ideas around perception. Her work, ranging from intimate portraits to insentient objects, focuses on meditative modes of seeing. Using the world around her as raw material, Loots gravitates to a slowerpaced methodical approach – carefully bringing into focus subjects to muse on. Her inaugural solo exhibition, Everything in its Right Place, was shown at THK Gallery (Cape Town, 2019). She has also participated in AucArt’s Women Artists to Watch, and Oath magazine’s group exhibition House of Love (2021).


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21 Matt Kay South Africa 1985-

Cricket Nets 2013 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 30 x 30 cm; sheet size: 32.5 x 32.5 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 10

ZAR 2 000 – 3 000 USD 140 – 210 GBP 100 – 150 EURO 118 – 177

NOTES For additional information on Matt Kay’s work, visit: http://www.mattkayphotography.com/index. html

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Matt Kay is a photographer based in Cape Town, South Africa. Kay studied at the Market Photo Workshop in Johannesburg and is currently completing a fine arts master’s program through the University of the Witwatersrand. He was the recipient of the Ithuba Arts Trust and the Tierney Fellowship in 2014, during which he was mentored by David Goldblatt. Over the past few years, he has been nominated for several awards, including the Gabriele Basilico Prize in Architecture and Landscape Photography (2015) and PDN global top 30 emerging photographers edition (2016/2017). He was shortlisted for the CAP (Contemporary African Photography) Prize in 2021. Kay’s solo exhibition, The Front, was shown at the KZNSA Gallery in Durban; his work, Losing Ground, was included in the Biel/Bienne Festival of Photography in Switzerland (2016).


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22 Dillon Marsh South Africa 1981-

Afromontane Zone I (from the Rain Maker series) 2018 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 50 x 62.5 cm; sheet size: 58.5 x 70.5 cm unframed number 2 from an edition of 6

ZAR 15 000 – 18 000 USD 1 050 – 1 260 GBP 750 – 900 EURO 885 – 1 062

NOTES For additional information on Dillon Marsh’s work, visit: http://dillonmarsh.com/work.html https://www.thisiscolossal.com/2019/06/ hitchhikers-dillon-marsh/ https://www.thisiscolossal.com/2019/05/forwhat-its-worth/ https://www.fastcompany.com/1681923/12beautiful-photos-of-ridiculous-cell-phonetowers-disguised-as-trees

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Dillon Marsh is a Cape Town-based artist who uses photography to explore the tenuous relationship between humans and the world around us. He has held eight solo exhibitions and taken part in numerous group exhibitions both locally and abroad. His early work consists of photographic series constructed as typologies. Marsh uses this technique to isolate and emphasise specific features of particular landscapes, usually elements that show how we as a species engage both deliberately and unintentionally with our environment. He has also introduced computer generated imagery into some of his more recent series to reveal underlying features or dynamics that can’t be illustrated with photography alone. In his current work he continues to study the interplay between people and places, but his scope is now broader and his approach more figurative. In the middle of the African continent, close to the equator, a mountain range rises from the Great Rift Valley with peaks so high they are permanently covered in snow. The Rwenzori Mountains are made up of some remarkably varied landscapes, fed by year-round rain and glacial melt. From verdant forests to boggy valleys, up to the bare rocks and glaciers of its upper reaches, these slopes consist of five unique overlapping vegetative zones. At its core, the Rain Maker series is a celebration of the extraordinary beauty of the Rwenzori Mountains, but it also serves to highlight this precarious position of this World Heritage Site in the face of rampant climate change. Forty-three glaciers were recorded in this area when it was first surveyed in 1906, now less than half that number remain. At current rates, they are expected to disappear completely within a decade. The loss of the glaciers will in turn cause knock-on effects, disrupting all the ecosystems below.


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23 Dillon Marsh South Africa 1981-

Alpine Zone II (from the Rain Maker series) 2018 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 50 x 62.5 cm; sheet size: 58.5 x 70.5 cm unframed number 2 from an edition of 6

ZAR 15 000 – 18 000 USD 1 050 – 1 260 GBP 750 – 900 EURO 885 – 1 062

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24 Kongo Astronauts Democratic Republic of the Congo 1984- ; France 1966-

The jungle is my church 1 (from the Lusanga “ex:Leverville” series) 2015 archival ink print on Fine art, Canson Baryta 340 g accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by Axis Gallery on behalf of Kongo Astronauts image size: 52.5 x 70 cm; sheet size: 53.5 x 71 cm unframed number 2 from an edition of 5 + 2AP

ZAR 60 000 – 80 000 USD 4 200 – 5 600 GBP 3 000 – 4 000 EURO 3 540 – 4 720

NOTES For additional information on Kongo Astronauts, visit: https://axis.gallery/artists-kongo-astronauts/

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Kongo Astronauts is an artist collective founded by the Kinshasa-based duo Michel Ekeba and Eléonore Hellio. Their multi-media practice engages with Kinshasa’s alternative culture network and includes photography, film, sculpture, and performance. Kongo Astronauts’ Afrofuturist prism projects a reality that surmounts both the postcolonial chaos of their urban setting and the inchoate persistence of the jungle. At the same time, they shine a critical spotlight on the forces that have shaped this environment and continue to form it. In their images, we sense our own human fragility and catch our own reflections as we struggle with the crises of late capitalism and climate change. Kongo Astronauts’ images of travel – such as the astronaut in his golden suit, plastered with digital detritus made from minerals mined in the Congo, who stands in the belly of a cargo plane in their After Schengen series – “function as a platform for thinking through Earth’s decimation by an economic project rooted in the colonial project and amplified in the neoliberal era,” as Dominique Malaquais points out. European states that bonded together under the Schengen Agreement imposed a unitary visa system through which they now control the entry of African visitors – much less immigrants – to the colonial “fatherlands” that once exercised authority over them. Kongo Astronauts describe their practice as “crossing the vertiginous divide of worlds by responding with artist acts to the troubles and syncopations of the contemporary cyborg. A fluctuating collective, Kongo Astronauts is built on the confrontation of experiences and is an attempt to resist the psychic ghettos that cover multiple postcolonial realities. Kongo Astronauts manifests in the inter-zones of digital globalisation, where past, future, and present collide with the politics of privacy and the realities of urban and rural life. A player in postdiscipline, Kongo Astronauts’ cosmic apparitions and polysemous fictions engage us to take a multidimensional look at different forms of exile and survival tactics.” This work has been exhibited as part of Kinshasa 2050: La ville du Futur?, Institut Français (Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo, 2017) and Arte en Orbita, Centro de Arte Contemporaneo (Quito, Equador, 2015).


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25 Kongo Astronauts Democratic Republic of the Congo 1984- ; France 1966-

Untitled [Facing the Past], (from the After Schengen series) 2019 archival ink print on Fine art, Canson Baryta 340 g accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by Axis Gallery on behalf of Kongo Astronauts image size: 46 x 61 cm; sheet size: 84 x 39.5 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 5 + 2AP

ZAR 60 000 – 80 000 USD 4 200 – 5 600 GBP 3 000 – 4 000 EURO 3 540 – 4 720

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This work has been exhibited as part of Kinshasa Chroniques, Cité de l’architecture & du Patrimoine (Paris, France, 2020 – 2021) and Musée International des Arts Modestes (Sète, France, 2019).


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26 Michelle Loukidis South Africa 1969-

Klein Slangkop (from the December series) 2016 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by artist image size: 38 x 38 cm; sheet size: 40 x 40 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 10 +2AP

ZAR 3 500 – 5 000 USD 245 – 350 GBP 175 – 250 EURO 207 – 295

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Michelle Loukidis received her photographic training at Tshwane University of Technology, South Africa. She worked as a highly successful wedding photographer for over a decade. However, her keen interests in photographic development led her to the Market Photo Workshop, Johannesburg, where she has trained and mentored young photographers for over 15 years – many of whom have received important grants and mentorships through her guidance. Through this process, she has also helped train photographers from other African countries, facilitating workshops in Sudan, Democratic Republic of the Congo, and republic of Cabo Verde. Her photographs have been shown in various solo and group exhibitions, including a recent solo exhibition, Recesses, at Res gallery, and participation in group exhibitions at the Turbine Art Fair, The Fringe and the Association for Visual Arts in Cape Town. She also participated in the first Everard Read Photographic Mesh series (2018), which aimed at acquainting audiences with critical photographic practices. Loukidis prefers working in film, using analogue medium format cameras, where she feels a certain amount of the magic of photography is still retained. She works and lives in Johannesburg. “December is a series of images taken over consecutive family holidays in Cape Town, South Africa. From the busy metropolitan city of Johannesburg to the space and quiet that Cape Town has to offer, it has become a time of nature and reconnection. Family photographs are often taken in moments of happiness and become important markers of the passing of time. There is a desire to hold onto these moments in a concrete manner, so that we can look back on a time gone by and somehow relive an experience. The photographs are tied so precisely to a particular instant in time, that they remind us of a moment lost forever, a person no longer there.”


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27 Carl van der Linde South Africa 1993-

The Punisher (from the A day is short in Africa series) 2020 archival ink print on Hahnemühle paper accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by artist sheet size: 45 x 30 cm unframed number1 from an edition of 5 + 1AP

ZAR 10 000 – 15 000 USD 700 – 1 050 GBP 500 – 750 EURO 590 – 885

NOTES For additional information on Carl van der Linde’s work, visit: https://i-d.vice.com/en_uk/article/88aj35/ photographs-of-youth-culture-in-zanzibar-bycarl-van-der-linde https://suitcasemag.com/articles/seaweedmamas-zanzibar https://www.itsnicethat.com/articles/ carl-van-der-linde-a-day-is-short-in-africaphotography-120521 https://www.c41magazine.com/carl-van-derlinde-a-day-is-short-in-africa-c41magazinephotography/

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Carl van der Linde is a South African autodidactic photographer based in Cape Town. His work is a manifestation of his yearnings, bringing his stories and observations from far away destinations home in the form of photo projects and documentary commissions. He has a catalytic love for image-making and is drawn to the emotion and romanticism captured in a still image. His work has been featured in, amongst others, DAZED Magazine, i-D and on the cover of Suitcase Magazine. “A day is short in Africa was born from a harmonious culmination of random events whilst living in Zanzibar towards the end of 2020. With this series, I set out to explore what it means to be a young man living on the island. As I started researching the history of Zanzibar, I was amazed to learn how cultures from all over the world have congregated there for centuries. This resulted in Zanzibar developing into one of the most fluid nodes from the global south, as ideologies, people, and resources intermingled there. Many social, religious, and economic structures intersected at these ports, resulting in open-minded thought, worldviews, and opinions amongst the ethnically diverse inhabitants. With an open-ended narrative and pursuit of a mixture between showcasing local stories and experimenting with self-styled aesthetics, the series combines my own need for conceptual direction with observations.”


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Born in Mali, Fatoumata Diabaté’s photography career started at the PromoFemmes Audiovisual Training Center in Bamako. In 2002, she was one of the first women to join the Bamako Photography Training Promotion Center, which aims to professionalise Malian photographers. Diabaté has been invited to many international festivals and has received several awards, including the Africa Creation prize from the French Association of Artistic Action for her work, Touaregs, in gestures and in movements. She has participated in the Rencontres de Bamako (2005, 2009, 2011, 2019), La Gacilly Photo Festival (2017,) as well as the Voices Off festival of the Rencontres d’Arles (2018), and the Biennale de l’Art Africain Contemporain Dak’Art. Her work has shown in several group and solo exhibitions in Mali and internationally.

28 Fatoumata Diabaté Mali 1980

Bala Na Djolo 2013 archival ink print on Hahnemühle paper accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by artist image size: 30 x 45 cm ; sheet size: 42 x 59.5 cm unframed number 3 from an edition of 10

ZAR 25 000 – 30 000 USD 1 750 – 2 100 GBP 1 250 – 1 500 EURO 1 475 – 1 770

She has received several grants, including those from Blachère Foundation (2012) and the School of Fine Arts in Nancy (2014-2015). In her youth, she was Malick Sidibé’s assistant and in 2013 she designed the Street Photo Studio, a traveling photo studio which was invited to, amongst others, the Cartier Foundation in Paris (2018) and the Rencontres d’Arles (2019). Diabaté is president of the Association of Women Photographers of Mali, was an exhibition curator at the last Rencontres de Bamako, and was recently selected for the next UNESCO digital campaign among the ten women creators of West Africa, as well as the musée du quai Branly – Jacques Chirac 2020 photographic residency. She divides her time between Montpellier (France), where she lives, and Bamako. “The idea for the series L’homme en objet / L’home en animal (Man as an Object / Man as an Animal) is connected to the stories and tales I heard in my childhood and which still follow me everywhere today. These are stories designated for ‘the black child’, as Senghor put it. For these photographs, I am inspired by the stories that are in my head; I then create objects in the service of those stories. Ideas sometimes come to me at night, while I am lying in my room – before falling asleep, I sometimes dream with my eyes open. I am looking, I am always groping a little. They are fairly simple portraits, which symbolise one aspect of a story. My use of objects as accessories or costumes for men also relates to the African masks, so well made, now preserved in museums. I leave this context of the traditional African mask, linked to specific customs and beliefs, to move towards something that is more of the order of waste. Often, I even ask the model to make this mask object himself. I, as a photographer, set up this device to place the stories that I have heard behind masks, that the young people I photograph have tinkered with recovered things. These are stories I have never lived; these are stories I am told, stories like dreams. When we dream, we believe we are fully living something; and then when we wake up, we realise that it was not reality, and we no longer know what was deep and what was on the surface. […] these are stories like dreams, but they work as moral lessons, stories that teach us how to behave in life. Which helps us understand what lies ahead, what can happen. […] It is through stories that one can learn to gain affections towards objects, animals, trees, nature, and more.”

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29 Fatoumata Diabaté Mali 1980-

Le Vieux Sage (from the L’homme en objet / L’home en animal series) 2013 archival ink print on Hahnemühle paper accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by artist image size: 45 x 30 cm; sheet size: 59.5 x 42 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 10

ZAR 25 000 – 30 000 USD 1 750 – 2 100 GBP 1 250 – 1 500 EURO 1 475 – 1 770

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30 Bobson Sukhdeo Mohanlall South African 1928-2003

Untitled # V circa late 1960s - early 1970s C-print on Fujicolor Crystal Archive accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by Axis Gallery on behalf of the Bobson Sukhdeo Mohanlall Family Estate image size: 58 x 58 cm; sheet size: 59.5 x 59.5 cm unframed number 2 from an edition of 10

ZAR 70 000 – 90 000 USD 4 900 – 6 300 GBP 3 500 – 4 500 EURO 4 130 – 5 310

PROVENANCE Courtesy Bobson Sukhdeo Mohanlall Family Estate NOTES For additional information on this archive, visit: https://axis.gallery/artists/bobson-sukhdeomohanlall/

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Bobson Studio was founded in 1961 by Bobson Sukhdeo Mohanlall (1928 – 2003) in Durban, South Africa. The studio catered mainly to a Zulu clientele, who posed in their own beadwork and costumes for formal portraits that were also made into postcards, which could be sent to distant relatives and friends. Mohanlall used two cameras during this time, a Yashica Matt 120mm and a Rolliflex 120mm. The studio became the city’s most famous portrait studio and attracted clients countrywide, many of them from the broader KwaZulu-Natal region. In the late 1960s and early 1970s Bobson Studio began to offer colour portraits, which best captured the vivid dress of the clients. The Bobson Studio archive has immense social-historical value. In the field of African studio photography, this is one of South Africa’s finest examples and one of the earliest African studio archives in colour. The archive also forms a unique documentary record of the periurban beadwork in use at the time, and how African “tradition” coexisted with international, urban style. Such studios became sites of affirmative self-representation in the context of an oppressive apartheid era. Bobson Sukhdeo Mohanlall’s photographs have been exhibited widely, including Made Visible: Contemporary South African Fashion & Identity, Museum of Fine Arts Boston (2019); Contemporary Art/South Africa, Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven (2014); Bobson Sukhdeo Mohanlall, Axis Gallery, New York (2014); The Other Camera, University of Michigan Institute for Humanities Gallery, Anne Arbor (2014); Darkroom: Photography and New Media in South Africa since 1950, Virginia Museum of Arts, Richmond (2010); In the Studio: Portrait Photographs from Africa, Newark Museum (2004); and Towards-Transit: new visual languages in South Africa, Serge Ziegler Galerie, Zürich (1999). His work has been published in, amongst others, Tamar Garb’s edited volume Figures & Fictions: Contemporary South African Photography (Steidl, 2011).


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31 Bobson Sukhdeo Mohanlall South African 1928-2003

Untitled # XLI circa late 1960s - early 1970s C-print on Fujicolor Crystal Archive accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by Axis Gallery on behalf of the Bobson Sukhdeo Mohanlall Family Estate image size: 58 x 58 cm; sheet size: 59.5 x 59.5 cm unframed number 2 from an edition of 10

ZAR 70 000 – 90 000 USD 4 900 – 6 300 GBP 3 500 – 4 500 EURO 4 130 – 5 310

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PROVENANCE Courtesy Bobson Sukhdeo Mohanlall Family Estate


32 Bobson Sukhdeo Mohanlall South African 1928-2003

Untitled # L circa late 1960s - early 1970s C-print on Fujicolor Crystal Archive accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by Axis Gallery on behalf of the Bobson Sukhdeo Mohanlall Family Estate image size: 58 x 58 cm; sheet size: 59.5 x 59.5 cm unframed number 2 from an edition of 10

ZAR 70 000 – 90 000 USD 4 900 – 6 300 GBP 3 500 – 4 500 EURO 4 130 – 5 310

PROVENANCE Courtesy Bobson Sukhdeo Mohanlall Family Estate

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33 Ronald Ngilima South Africa 1914-1960

Portrait of a woman in front of her home, Wattville. circa 1950s archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by artist’s estate image size: 40 x 40 cm; sheet size: 42 x 42 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 10

ZAR 12 000 – 15 000 USD 840 – 1050 GBP 600 – 750 EURO 708 – 885

PROVENANCE Courtesy of the Ronald Ngilima Family. NOTES For additional information on Ronald Ngilima’s work, visit: http://historicalpapers-atom.wits.ac.za/ ronald-ngilima-photographs https://www.zammagazine.com/chronicle/ chronicle-36/600-ordinary-life-the-1950sngilima-photo collection https://artthrob.co.za/2015/09/18/how-dowe-look-vernacular-photography-in-the-artspace/ http://www.scielo.org. za/scielo.php?script=sci_ arttext&pid=S0259-01902012000100007 https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.108 0/02560046.2018.1457065

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Ronald Ngilima (1914 – 1960) was born in the Eastern Cape and moved to Gauteng in the early 1930s. Employed at Dinglers Tobacco Company, he dedicated his free hours to his trade as an ambulant photographer, cycling to various parts of Benoni. The present collection only starts in the 1950s, when he moved to a house in Wattville, big enough to set up his own photographic darkroom. After his sudden death in 1960, his eldest son Torrance took over the photography trade for another five years, before he committed himself to his political involvement with the ANC. In subsequent years, Ronald’s wife, Sarah Ngilima, carefully kept the 25 boxes of negatives locked up in a cupboard. They re-emerged some thirty years later, in 1999, when grandson, Farrell Ngilima, rediscovered them by chance. Realising the historical value of the collection, Farrell played a pivotal role in the establishment of the collection as a public archive. The original negatives are presently stored at Historical Papers, an independent archive based at Wits University, Johannesburg. These works are from the photographic archive of Ronald Ngilima, dating from the late 1940s until his death in 1960. In 2008, Farrell Ngilima was joined by Sophie Feyder, who was at the time a visual researcher and PhD student from Leiden University in the Netherlands. The Ronald Ngilima collection – a vernacular photographic archive – became the subject of Feider’s PhD study and several published journal articles. Ngilima’s work has been featured in Rise and Fall of Apartheid; Just Ask!, by Akinbode Akinbiyi, Chris Dercon and Simon Njami; Commonplace, by Tamsyn Adams and Sophie Feyder; and African Photographic Archive: Research and Curatorial Strategies, edited by Christopher Morton and Darren Newbury. The work offered on auction were included in The Other Camera exhibition and book (2014). The Other Camera was shown at the World Museum, Stockholm; Commune1, Cape Town; Centre for African Studies Gallery, University of Cape Town; and the Wits Origins Centre, Johannesburg.


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34 Unknown Photographer, Marabastad Studio portrait, Marabastad, Gauteng circa 1970 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Angus Gibson image size: 36 x 24 cm; sheet size: 42 x 30 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 10

ZAR 8 000 – 12 000 USD 560 – 840 GBP 400 – 600 EURO 472 – 708

PROVENANCE Courtesy Angus Gibson Collection.

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The collection emanates from research for a television series on street photography in the 1990s by filmmaker Angus Gibson. He found a photographic studio in Marabastad, Pretoria, an early township in South Africa, and the connecting point between a railway, a bus, and taxi stations. Gibson made his selection from negatives given to him by the photographer and on his return established that the photographer had passed away. He also established that the photographer’s entire archive of negatives had been discarded by the photographer’s family and that all that remained of this once popular studio were the images that Gibson had printed. Studios close to the commuter movements in the cities were a common feature in South Africa for much of the 20th century. Today they are seldom to be found. This photograph is from a rare collection of an excellent studio photographer. The images were featured in The Other Camera book and exhibition (2014), and exhibited at the Center for Humanities Gallery, University of Michigan; Wits Origins Centre, Johannesburg; and Commune 1, Cape Town.


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35 Sumy Sadurni Chile 1989-

Looking for answers (from the Reflections series) 2019-2020 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 30 x 45 cm; sheet size: 42 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 10

ZAR 12 000 – 15 000 USD 840 – 1050 GBP 600 – 750 EURO 708 – 885

NOTES For additional information on Sumy Sardini’s work, visit: www.sumysadurni.com

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Sumy Sadurni is a freelance journalist and documentary photographer based in Kampala, Uganda. Her work is primarily focused on international current affairs, human rights, gender issues, and conflict. She holds a bachelor’s degree in Journalism from Westminster University, London, and has lived and worked in Uganda, South Sudan, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, United Kingdom, Switzerland, Chile, Mexico, and Puerto Rico. She is a stringer for Agence France-Presse (AFP) and a certified Canon trainer, facilitating photography workshops across the region. Her work has been featured in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, Der Spiegel, Le Monde, Foreign Policy, The Economist, The Guardian, The Huffington Post, The Times, The Telegraph, Newsweek, TIME, and National Geographic. Sadurni was nominated for The Guardian’s Agency Photographer of the Year (2020), selected for The New York Times portfolio review (2019) and was a finalist at the International Women Photographers Awards (2017). “Reflections is a collection of photographs that show a type or reflection, whether it’s within, direct, or contextual. Through my work I explore identity, particularly with women, and what it means to be ‘from somewhere’.” Anita Mbabazi is a young British-Ugandan woman living in Kampala. Having grown up in London, she is now one of many Ugandans who have come back to their home country to reconnect with their roots, though at the same time facing challenges with their own identity as their sense of ‘belonging’ is not always so clear.


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36 Tshepiso Mabula ka Ndongeni South Africa 1993-

Ntate Makoti (from the Otata Bafel’ Emigodhini series) 2019 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 45 x 30 cm; sheet size: 59.5 x 42 cm unframed 3 from an edition of 3

ZAR 10 000 – 12 000 USD 700 – 840 GBP 500 – 600 EURO 590 – 708

NOTES For additional information on Tshepiso Mabula ka Ndongeni’s work, visit: https://www.afrourbansociety.com/zine/ tshepisomabula https://mg.co.za/article/2019-10-18-00-theportfolio-tshepiso-mabula/ https://marketphotoworkshop. co.za/2019/08/13/ukugrumba/

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Tshepiso Mabula ka Ndongeni is a photographer and writer based in Johannesburg. Her interest in photography sparked when, during a visit to a family member, she was introduced to award-winning South African photographer Santu Mofokeng’s body of work Rumours / The Bloemhof Portfolio. She completed her studies in photography at the Market Photo Workshop in Johannesburg in 2015 and was the recipient of the Tierney Fellowship in 2018. She was also awarded the 2021 Women Photograph and Getty Images inclusion scholarship, the 2021 Photo Works UK writer-in-residence, a commendation award at the 2020 Vodacom Journalist of the Year Awards, selected as one of the 2019 Mail & Guardian 200 Young South Africans, and participated in the class of 2018 Design Indaba Emerging Creatives. Exploring the small things through photography – exposing the humanity in oppositional, chaotic, or even boring environments – her work seeks to capture the dignity of ordinary people, far removed from the glamour of high-profile photography. Her work deals mostly with memory, loss, and the fleeting sense of what it means to truly belong. She creates works that use strong creative approaches to reconcile past and present, serving both as historical archive and critical account of humanity. Her work considers how history can be a precursor to past and future, and how the work we do today lays a solid foundation for future generations. “This image is from the body of work titled Otata Bafel’ Emigodhini – an isiXhosa saying which means “Our fathers died in the mine shafts”. The series seeks to look critically at the intersection of labour and immigration in South Africa. It documents the stories of 22 former coal miners who suffer from Pneumoconiosis, an incurable respiratory disease that causes the loss of blood vessels and air sacs in an individual’s lungs and makes it difficult to breathe and get enough oxygen in the body. The work documents the stories of mineworkers who served their former employee with a class action lawsuit, seeking compensation for their loss.”


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37 William Matlala South Africa 1957-

Photo shoot, greater Johannesburg, Gauteng, c. 1990 circa 1990 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag signed image size: 36 x 24 cm; sheet size: 42 x 30 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 10

ZAR 8 000 – 12 000 USD 560 – 840 GBP 400 – 600 EURO 472 – 708

NOTES For additional information on William Matlala’s work, visit: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.108 0/02560046.2018.1431299 http://www.specialcollections.uct.ac.za/ news/other-camera-exhibition http://www.historicalpapers. wits.ac.za/?inventory/U/ collections&c=A3359/R/91151 http://www.theheritageportal.co.za/files/ complete-worker-invite-photographs-williammatlalapng https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/ article/2018-09-04-the-complete-worker-acycle-of-work-and-the-evolution-of-the-labourmovement/

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William Matlala, a worker in the food industry and shop steward in the Food and Allied Workers Union (FAWU), started taking pictures for his union between 1980 and 1986. As the trade union movement became more actively embroiled in the political and economic front in South Africa, Matlala’s photography gravitated from portraiture to documentary, fo­cusing on labour movement activities. His training included several workshops at Photo Teach, Market Photo Workshop, and with the Afrapix photographers’ collective. He also ob­tained a diploma in photography by correspondence. In 1989, he became a full-time photographer with the Congress of South African Trade Unions (COSATU), and later worked for the South African Labour Bulletin (1992–1993). Since then, he has worked as a freelance photographer. “My work has moved from labour issues to include broader concerns that reflect commu­nity projects and development issues. I work day and night as a photographer to improve”, says Matlala. He has a meticulously organised archive that has recorded not just seminal events of the last three decades, but also his early years as a street photographer. It is one of the rare, comprehensive vernacular photographic collections. The image offered on auction is part of William Matlala’s archive, a rare collection of vernacular photography. The images were featured in The Other Camera book and exhibition (2014), and exhibited at the Center for Humanities Gallery, University of Michigan; Wits Origins Centre, Johannesburg; and Commune 1, Cape Town. In 2018, The Complete Worker was shown at the Apartheid Museum, Johannesburg. The exhibition covered over three decades of labour history in South Africa and drew from 250,000 photographs of workers in factories and trade union activities.


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38 Ernest Cole South Africa 1940-1990

Twelve works from the books House of Bondage and Ernest Cole: Photographer circa 1965; Estate Edition printed 2021 hand-printed Silver Gelatin prints on Ilford Fibre-based paper titled and numbered; signed on the reverse in pencil by Dennis da Silva and Leslie Matlaisane; embossed with Estate stamp image size: 37 x 55.5 cm; sheet size: 51 x 61 cm unframed Estate Edition of 12 images; number 3 from an edition of 10 + 2AP

ZAR 350 000 – 500 000 USD 24 500 – 35 000 GBP 17 500 – 25 000 EURO 20 650 – 29 500

PROVENANCE Courtesy Ernest Cole Family Trust NOTES For additional information on Ernest Cole’s archive, visit: https://www.plparchive.com/ernest-colemain-page/ https://www.wnyc.org/story/apartheidthrough-eyes-one-south-africas-first-blackphotojournalists/ https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/ article/2017-11-30-photographer-ernest-coleof-bondage-and-freedom-discovery-of-troveof-negatives-a-game-changer/ https://www.theguardian.com/world/2010/ nov/25/ernest-cole-david-goldblatt-apartheidphotography https://www.lensculture.com/articles/ ernest-cole-looking-at-power-the-relevanceof-apartheid-photography-today

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Ernest Cole was born in Eersterust, near Pretoria (Tshwane), in 1940 and died in New York in 1990. Cole worked for Drum Magazine, Bantu World and Sunday Times. On his own initiative, he undertook a comprehensive photographic essay in which he chronicled the horrors of apartheid. Out of this emerged the seminal book, The House of Bondage, which was published in New York in 1967. As Cole wrote in the book, “Three-hundred years of white supremacy in South Africa has placed us in bondage, stripped us of our dignity, robbed us of our selfesteem and surrounded us with hate”. He paid a price for his commitment and documentation – the book was immediately banned and so was he. Cole lived in exile until his death in New York in 1990, a week after Nelson Mandela and others were released from prison. There has been much speculation about what happened to his negatives and prints. Until relatively recently, it was thought all his negatives and many prints were lost. However, in 2017, 60,000 negatives which had been rediscovered in Stockholm, were handed to the Ernest Cole Family Trust by the Hasselblad Foundation. These include never-before-seen South African work, as well as his documentation on the American South and black life in the USA. The portfolio offered by the Ernest Cole Family is a part of this ‘lost’ archive and legacy. The PLP is working with the Ernest Cole Family Trust, Magnum Photos and Historical Papers, Wits University, to digitise and make this hidden work accessible for educational and research purposes. This Estate Edition of 20 x 24” silver gelatin prints, feature twelve iconic images from House of Bondage (1967) and Ernest Cole: Photographer (Hasselblad Foundation / Steidl, 2010). They have been printed from the lost negatives of Ernest Cole by Dennis da Silva, South Africa’s premier black and white photography printer, and produced through the Ernest Cole Family Trust in South Africa.


Children play with sprinklers, Gauteng [Transvaal], South Africa, c 1965. Cover of Ernest Cole: Photographer (Hasselblad Foundation / Steidl, 2010).

Rented cars are a status symbol at middle-class marriages. Expensive weddings can leave couples broke for a year, Gauteng [Transvaal], South Africa, c 1965

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Woman dancing. The atmosphere of shebeens is free, in contrast to that of regimented beer halls, Gauteng [Transvaal], South Africa, c 1965

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Old traditions from a modern wedding. Women greet the couple with symbols of the wife’s duties to the husband and family, Gauteng [Transvaal], South Africa, c 1965

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Shebeen with white and black patrons, Riverside, Pretoria [Tshwane], Gauteng [Transvaal], South Africa, c 1965

Driving lesson, Gauteng [Transvaal], South Africa, c 1965

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Domestic worker with white child. Servants not forbidden to love. “I love this child, though she’ll grow up to treat me just like her mother does. Now she is innocent.” Gauteng [Transvaal], South Africa, c 1965

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Traditional dancing on the mines, Gauteng [Transvaal], South Africa, c 1965

Revellers at a music festival, Gauteng [Transvaal], South Africa, c 1965

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Man playing guitar in shebeen, Gauteng [Transvaal], South Africa, c 1965

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Young white woman holds a black baby, Gauteng [Transvaal], South Africa, c 1965

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Bishop in mitre makes his yearly visit to Mamelodi parish, Gauteng [Transvaal], South Africa, c 1965

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39 T. J. Lemon South Africa 1959-

amaNtombazane prepare for the celebrations of a coming-of-age ritual (umemulo); esiPongweni, Keates Drift, KwaZuluNatal. (from the Homecoming celebrations [‘uKhisimus’], esiPongweni series) 1992 ink print on Ilford Gold Fibre Gloss cotton paper signed and inscribed with the title on the reverse image size: 28 x 38 cm; sheet size: 30 x 40 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 10

ZAR 15 000 – 20 000 USD 1 050 – 1 400 GBP 750 – 1 000 EURO 885 – 1 180

NOTES For additional information on the book, visit: https://www.dukeupress.edu/dust-of-the-zulu

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TJ Lemon began his career in photography in the 1980s as a student covering events at the small university town of Makhanda (then Grahamstown) in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. Lemon was a lecturer in Photojournalism at Rhodes University from 1988–1989. He had three exhibitions in Makhanda before moving to Johannesburg in 1990, where he was appointed as director and trainer at the newly formed Market Photo Workshop. Lemon was also a contributor to the photographers’ collective Afrapix. After the 1994 elections, he took a staffer position at Independent Newspapers and became chief photographer of The Sunday Independent. He pursued news and feature work as required but enjoyed the versatility a weekly publication offered. Lemon began writing for his picture features and went on to win a World Press Photo award (2001) for his photo-essay, Oswenka, the Jeppe Hostel Swankers. In 2010, he left Independent Newspapers to pursue freelance work and longterm photographic projects. Lemon taught in the Journalism department, Wits University, from 2013–2015. He collaborated with Louise Meintjes from Duke University on the book, Dust of the Zulu: Ngoma Aesthetics after Apartheid (2017), and an exhibition in Durham (2018). His exhibition, Comrades, Warriors and Volkstaat Kommandos, was shown at the National Arts Festival in Makhanda (2019). “I collaborated with Louise Meintjes on a dance project that resulted in the book, Dust of the Zulu: Ngoma Aesthetics after Apartheid (Duke University Press, 2017), which received two awards. In March 2018, the university sponsored an exhibition of my photographs at the Rubenstein Art Centre, Durham. While the book is published in black and white, the exhibition included large colour prints. Another public exhibition was held for the community in the esiPongweni Community Centre.”


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40 T. J. Lemon South Africa 1959-

Siqhandolo Mzila (from the Homecoming celebrations [‘uKhisimus’], esiPongweni series) 1992 ink print on Ilford Gold Fibre Gloss cotton paper signed and inscribed with the title on the reverse image size: 28 x 38 cm; sheet size: 30 x 40 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 10

ZAR 15 000 – 20 000 USD 1 050 – 1 400 GBP 750 – 1 000 EURO 885 – 1 180

41 T. J. Lemon South Africa 1959-

Sunlight, Keates Drift [Married women outside the trading store on the main road, Keates Drift, Kwazulu-Natal] (from the Homecoming celebrations [‘uKhisimus’], esiPongweni series) 1992 ink print on Ilford Gold Fibre Gloss cotton paper signed and inscribed with the title on the reverse image size: 28 x 38 cm; sheet size: 30 x 40 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 10

ZAR 15 000 – 20 000 USD 1 050 – 1 400 GBP 750 – 1 000 EURO 885 – 1 180

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42 Brent Stirton South Africa 1969-

Untitled [Initiates at dusk] (from the Xhosa Circumcision Ritual, South Africa series) 2003 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Baryta accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by Axis Gallery on behalf of Brent Stirton image size: 100 x 100 cm; sheet size: 105 x 105 cm unframed number 2 from an edition of 10 + 2AP

ZAR 50 000 – 70 000 USD 3 500 – 4 900 GBP 2 500 – 3 500 EURO 2 950 – 4 310

NOTES For additional information on Brent Stirton’s work, visit: http://www.brentstirton.com/ https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=MA0RBjx1IzM

WATCH Brent Stirton at Visa pour l’Image

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Brent Stirton studied journalism at Durban Technikon and began his career photographing conflict in KwaZulu-Natal while still a student. Appointed Chief Photographer for Scope in 1993 and later for Living, he shot features throughout Africa, and won an Ilford Press Photography Award for his documentary work in India and Borneo in 1997. Stirton went on to work with several photo agencies, and currently is Senior Correspondent with Getty Images. Deeply committed to conservation, environmental, and humanitarian causes, his photographs have been widely exhibited, and are in several museum and private collections. Among his numerous international awards, Stirton has received 12 World Press Photo awards, 13 awards from the Pictures of the Year International contest, and multiple Overseas Press Club and Lucie Awards, including International Photographer of the Year. His work has featured in leading publications including TIME, Newsweek, The New York Times Magazine, The Sunday Times (UK), Forbes, National Geographic, GEO, Stern, Der Spiegel, Vanity Fair, Elle, Cosmopolitan, Le Monde, Figaro, and Paris Match. He has worked with the World Wildlife Fund, CNN, Ford Foundation, Clinton Foundation, Gates Foundation, Nike Foundation, World Economic Forum, and Human Rights Watch. He was elected a member of the Young Global Leaders, an affiliate program of the World Economic Forum, and has been recognised by the United Nations for his work on environment and HIV/AIDS. Photographs from the series were exhibited as part of Circumcised, Circumscribed at Axis Gallery, New York, 2003; the World Press Photo award international touring exhibition; and published in Le Monde’s Sunday magazine, Le Figaro, GEO, and The Sunday Times Magazine (UK).


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43 Mandisa Buthelezi South Africa 1991-

UBhuku LukaMenzi 17 2019 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by artist image size: 30 x 45 cm; sheet size: 42 x 59.5 cm unframed number 2 from an edition of 25

ZAR 10 000 – 15 000 USD 700 – 1 050 GBP 500 – 750 EURO 590 – 885

NOTES For additional information on Mandisa Buthelezi’s work, visit: https://www.mandisabuthelezi.co.za/ https://asai.co.za/artist/mandisa-buthelezi/

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Born in Empangeni, KwaZulu-Natal, Mandisa Buthelezi is a photographer and filmmaker who was raised in the township of Umlazi in Durban, South Africa. Drawn to the rural life of KwaZulu-Natal, she began her journey as a self-taught photographer documenting the social and cultural landscape that exists within the rural and peri-urban areas of the province. With a vast portfolio that communicates rural voices and an appreciation and respect for the culture that has informed her perspective, Buthelezi provides photographic content that is country-life centred and explores the notions of culture, identity and spirituality. The importance of cataloguing and documenting African culture through visual art has become an important component of her work through assignments. This has shaped her notion of sustaining the culture that surrounds her. Buthelezi presently lives and works between Johannesburg and Durban, South Africa. “UBhuku LukaMenzi is a project about Mkabayi KaJama, the under celebrated Zulu princess who was the sister of King Senzangakhona KaJama and aunt to King Shaka Zulu. Through a combination of various visual metaphors, the project incorporates references to the Zulu people’s high regard for tradition. The work aims to celebrate the legacy of the nation the princess fought hard to help build.”


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44 Ralph Ndawo South African 1932-1980

Shembe Church, July festival ceremony, Kwa Zulu Natal, c 1977 1977 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by Rachel Ndawo on behlaf of the artist’s estate image size: 30 x 45 cm; sheet size: 42 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 10

ZAR 12 000 – 15 000 USD 840 – 1050 GBP 600 – 750 EURO 708 – 885

PROVENANCE Courtesy of the Ralph Ndawo Family

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South African photographer Ralph Ndawo (1932 – 1980) began his career as a darkroom assistant, also freelancing for the Golden City Post and Drum magazine. He rose to become Chief Photographer of Post after joining the paper in 1966 and, when it closed in 1971, was transferred to Drum. In 1972, he joined the Rand Daily Mail – working for the publication from 1978 until his untimely death. Ndawo covered important events in South African history during this period, including the 1976 protests, Steve Biko’s funeral, and the Mandela family. His legacy also reflects feature and social documentary work, some of which was published in Staffrider magazine. Ndawo’s work has recently been archived by the PLP.


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45 Fethi Sahraoui Algeria 1993-

Ismael and his friends inside a water Tower, Mascara, Algeria, 2016 (from the Escaping the Heatwave series) 2016 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Baryta accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by artist image size: 38 x 38 cm; sheet size: 40 x 40 cm unframed from an open edition

ZAR 7 000 – 10 000 USD 490 – 700 GBP 350 – 500 EURO 413 – 590

NOTES For additional information on Fethi Sahraoui’s work, visit: https://fethisahraoui.net/ https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/21/lens/ dreamlike-photos-reveal-the-spiritual-and-thecomic-at-algerian-festivals.html https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/29/lens/ finding-fraternity-and-politics-in-algeriansoccer.html https://www.worldpressphoto.org/programs/ develop/joop-swart-masterclass/2020/fethisahraoui https://wallach.columbia.edu/fethi-sahraoui please check link https://vimeo.com/402850748

WATCH Youthupia: an Algerian Tale

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Algerian photographer Fethi Sahraoui was born in the Southern town of Hassi R’Mel. He became a full time photographer after studying foreign languages at the University of Mascara, graduating in 2018. Sahraoui’s work has been exhibited at institutions like the Arab World Institute (Paris), Tropenmusuem (Amsterdam), and Museum of Modern Art of Algiers, and featured in publications such as the The New York Times. He is a member of the Everyday Projects and the Algerian photographers’ collective, Collective220, a Magnum Foundation fellow, and was selected for the last edition of the World Press Photo Foundation’s Joop Swart Masterclass. “Escaping the Heatwave documents the same demographic [as Stadiumphilia] in search of relief from the heat of the summer. Algeria has roughly 1000 miles of coastline, yet for those living even forty miles inland, the sea can feel inaccessible during the height of the season. Without public pools and other such amenities, children find abandoned water towers, irrigation channels, and streams of agricultural runoff to cool themselves in. If Stadiumphilia revolves around a collective experience that bears political fruit, Escaping the Heatwave traces the same generation’s ingenuity and willingness to invent solutions to systemic problems on a more quotidian level. This latter series centers on the body’s experience of the extremes of the Algerian landscape, and the inexorable range of responses of which this generation is capable.” – From Waiting for Omar Gatlato: Contemporary Art from Algeria and its Diaspora, catalogue text by Natasha Marie Llorens Images from Escaping the Heatwave have been exhibited at Contemporary African Photography (Basel, 2017); Sciences Po (Aix, 2018); Photoville (New York City, 2018); and the Tropenmuseum (Amsterdam, 2021).


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46 Fethi Sahraoui Algeria 1993-

Members of the Ultras Verdé Corazon performing one of their chants, 2017 (from the Stadiumphilia series) 2017 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Baryta accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by artist image size: 38 x 38 cm; sheet size: 40 x 40 cm unframed from an open edition

ZAR 7 000 – 10 000 USD 490 – 700 GBP 350 – 500 EURO 413 – 590

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“Stadiumphilia is about what the stadium contains in terms of affective and visceral levels of male experience. Football is wildly popular in Algerian culture. Since the Black Decade, the infrastructure for public mass entertainment has largely disappeared outside the major cities, with the exception of football stadiums, which have become one of the only places apart from religious services where large crowds are permitted to congregate for hours in public. Sahraoui is especially interested in unaccompanied minors, who are usually barred from entering the stadium but who come anyway, cheering from beyond its walls if they fail to find a way past the guards. Sahraoui sees the football supporters’ enthusiasm and fierce desire to participate as spectators as an allegory for social conditions in Algeria, rather than simply as an allegiance to the game itself. He also understands the public protests that took place in Algeria in the lead-up to the presidential elections as having been rehearsed in the stadium, born of the solidarity learned as fans.” From the Waiting for Omar Gatlato: Contemporary Art from Algeria and its Diaspora, catalogue text by Natasha Marie Llorens Images from Stadiumphilia have been exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art of Algiers (2017); Cité Internationale des Arts (Paris, 2017); L’uzine (Casablanca, 2018); Addis Foto Fest (Addis Ababa, 2018); Galerie de Thorigny (Paris, 2019); Völklinger Hütte World Heritage Site (Völklingen, 2020) and Photoforum PasquArt (Biel/Bienne, 2020).


47 Fethi Sahraoui Algeria 1993-

The Cult of Souls 2017 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Baryta accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by artist image size: 38 x 38 cm; sheet size: 40 x 40 cm unframed from an open edition

ZAR 7 000 – 10 000 USD 490 – 700 GBP 350 – 500 EURO 413 – 590

A man who fainted after entering into a trance dance under the gasba music rhythms, Mascara, Algeria, 2017. The Cult of Souls has been exhibited at Photo Doc (Paris, 2019) and Photoville (New York City, 2019).

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48 Ilan Godfrey South Africa 1980-

Ritual offering, Vaal River, Maccauvlei area, Free State, 2011 (from the Legacy of the Mine series) 2011 chromogenic Print (C-type on Fuji Chrystal Archive Matte) signed on the reverse and embossed; accompanied by a certificate of authenticity image size: 66.5 x 84 cm; framed size: 70.5 x 88 cm numbered AP from a edition of 10 + 2AP

ZAR 12 000 – 16 000 USD 840 – 1 120 GBP 600 – 800 EURO 708 – 944

NOTES For additional information on Ilan Godfrey’s work, please see: https://www.ilangodfrey.com/ https://whynow.co.uk/read/far-flung-legacyof-the-mine/ https://www.leica-camera.blog/2015/03/09/ ilan-godfrey-legacy-of-the-mine/ https://www.anotherafrica.net/interviews/ the-cost-of-metal http://lenscratch.com/2018/07/south-africaweek-ilan-godfrey/ https://www.worldphoto.org/blogs/20-10-16/ legacy-mine-ilan-godfrey

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Ilan Godfrey’s work explores the diverse social, political, economic and environmental currents that shape contemporary South Africa – giving viewers a broader, and at the same time more deeply personal, understanding of the country they live in. His photographic practice includes extensive research. Through a process of investigative narration and long-term, multi-layered projects, Godfrey focuses on the constantly shifting landscape and reveals varied aspects of societal change across the country, documenting the country with an in-depth and intimate conscience. His work has been recognised by various international photography awards and grants, and exhibited in galleries and museums worldwide, including the National Portrait Gallery (London), Iziko South African National Gallery (Cape Town), Wits Art Museum (Johannesburg), and Musée du quai Branly (Paris). Godfrey’s photographs have been featured in leading international publications such as The New Yorker, Le Monde Magazine, ZEIT Magazine, The Sunday Times Magazine, Guardian Weekend Magazine and the Financial Times Magazine. Aside from his editorial work, he collaborates with institutions and organisations worldwide, regularly working on commissions for global brands, including the Open Society Foundation, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, MasterCard Foundation, Barclays Bank, VISA Card, Toyota Mobility Foundation and GlaxoSmithKline. He holds a BA (Hons) degree in Photography from the University of Westminster (London) and was awarded the David Faddy Scholarship to continue his studies, receiving an MA degree in Photojournalism from the same institution. Godfrey was awarded the Ernest Cole Award in 2012. “Jeremiah Stoaba and his wife Maria from the Apostolic Church of Zion perform an animal sacrifice on the banks of the Vaal River in the Maccauvlei area, on the periphery of the New Vaal Colliery. Two to three times a year they speak to the ancestral ‘river gods’ here. The banks of the Vaal River are rich in minerals, including coal, copper, gold, uranium and other associated minerals, yet are relatively unscarred by mining. There has been a lot of controversy around the award by the Department of Mineral Resources of prospecting rights to mining companies along the Vaal River. If the development of mining continues, it would have a major impact on the ecology of South Africa’s most important river.” This work is part of a larger project and book which evolved over two and a half years into the Legacy of the Mine – an unflinching series that set out to expose the unwanted and perhaps under-explored legacy confronting South Africa’s land and people by giving agency to those whose lives and livelihoods have been destroyed by mining processes and the long-term environmental ramifications. Godfrey received the prestigious Ernest Cole Award in 2012 to complete this project. Legacy of the Mine was published by Jacana (2013) and launched in conjunction with solo exhibitions across South Africa. Since then, the project has received multiple international awards and accolades including the CAP (Contemporary African Photography) Prize, Leica Oskar Barnack Award, and the OPENPhoto Award. Various works from the project have been exhibited at leading photography festivals, galleries and museums including the Völklinger Hütte World Heritage Site, Germany; Lagos Photo Festival, Nigeria; Image Afrique, Switzerland; and the South African Jewish Museum.


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49 Tshepiso Mabula ka Ndongeni South Africa 1993-

Lesedi Kganya (from the Inkonzo ne Mvuselelo series) 2016 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 30 x 45 cm; sheet size: 42 x 59.5 cm unframed number 2 from an edition of 3

ZAR 10 000 – 12 000 USD 700 – 840 GBP 500 – 600 EURO 590 – 708

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“Boitumelo More reads from her hymn book during Sunday mass at the St. Paul’s Anglican church in Jabavu. This image is part of Inkonzo ne Mvuselelo – a body of work documenting the guild of St. Agnes and St. Mary Magdalene, a group of young women within the Anglican Church in South Africa. The work examines the young women and the space they occupy, while questioning how the colonial reach of religion often seeps into the idea of womanhood for young women like myself – using photography, sound, and video to encapsulate the nuances of the space, while also reflecting on the ways in which the space is flawed.”


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50 Hadeer Mahmoud Ahmed Egypt 1991-

Prayer 2016 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 45 x 30 cm; sheet size: 59.5 x 42 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 3

ZAR 3 000 – 5 000 USD 210 – 350 GBP 150 – 250 EURO 177 – 295

NOTES

For additional information on Hadeer Mahmoud Ahmed’s work, visit: https://www.egypttoday.com/ Article/4/24582/In-depth-with-HadeerMahmoud-On-society-and-photography https://www.instagram.com/ hadeermahmoud1/

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Hadeer Mahmoud Ahmed is an Egyptian news and documentary photographer. She has covered many important stories related to the Egyptian revolution and her work has been featured by Amnesty International, The New York Times, Svenska Dagbladet, and the Robert Bosch Foundation. The recipient if several international scholarships and grants, in 2020 she was accepted into the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Hanover, Germany; in 2019, she had the opportunity to attend the Danish School of Media and Journalism (DMJX) in cooperation with Photopia Egypt; and in 2013, she participated in a workshop held by Contemporary Image Collective in cooperation with Pathshala South Asia Media Institute and Oslo and Akershus University. She has been a member of the Everyday Egypt Photo Project since 2015 and was selected for The New York Times portfolio review in 2018. Her book, Metro, was published in 2016 by Photopia Cairo as part of the Photobook Egypt series. In Prayer, Egyptians celebrate Palm Sunday in the Samaan el-Kharaz Church in the Mokattam district of Cairo.


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51 Yasmine Hatimi Morocco 1986-

Untitled 005 (from the Amarcord series)

Yasmine Hatimi works as a photographer in Casablanca. In 2004, she left Casablanca for Madrid to pursue degrees in cinematography and photography. After nine years, she returned to Morocco with the intention of rediscovering her country through her photographic work. Hatimi’s work lies between melancholy and poetry, and seeks to transmit an atmosphere inspired by her internal universe. Her latest work focuses on young Moroccan masculinity, which she approaches with a certain dreamlike romanticism. Her photographs have been shown at festivals and venues including PHotoESPAÑA, Festival Photo Saint-Germain, Alliance Française de Safi, and Musée Mohammed VI d’Art Moderne et Contemporain (Rabat); and featured in print and online publications such as El Pais, Mille World, Konbini, Float Photo Magazine, Nataal, and CNN Arabic.

2016 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 45 x 30 cm; sheet size: 59.5 x 42 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 5

Hatimi is a member of Koz, a collective of four Moroccan visual artists working on long term projects and sharing a passion for storytelling. Aware of the rise of a fast, and sometimes gappy global media landscape, they focus on hybrid and research-based work. Koz, meaning ‘four’ in Amazigh, is an obvious pun that highlights the very essence of the members’ visual work, which – from documentary to fiction – stands for a deeply rooted desire for making sense of current events.

ZAR 20 000 – 30 000 USD 1 400 – 2 100 GBP 1 000 – 1 500 EURO 1 180 – 1 770

Amarcord means ‘I remember’ or a ‘nostalgic memory’ in Italian. In this series, Hatimi depicts personal and collective recollections of abandoned houses – connecting past narratives to the present. Time passes, moments are only ephemeral, and what is left are only memories replaced by others. The abandoned and isolated spaces become a meditative journey – the smell of a room, objects remaining unchanged are traces of a past that once existed but is now forgotten.

NOTES

The rooms appear lifeless. She captures the empty spaces in colourful, poetic, and at times hazy representations of the visual memories. The photographs are presented among intimate testimonies appearing as handwritten notes alongside the photographs, as well as portraits of the protagonists, of which the viewer can only see one physical aspect: the back of their heads or hands, their identities and mystery of the abandoned homes we are invited to glance through remaining unrevealed. The project is an exercise in collective imagination for both the photographer and the viewer; an ode to remembering, resurrecting those who are no longer here.

For additional information on Yasmine Hatimi’s work, please visit: http://www.yasminehatimi.com/ https://nataal.com/yasmine-hatimi

This project has been exhibited at PHotoESPAÑA, Casa Árabe (2021); Alliance Française de Safi (2018); Galerie Photo Loft, Tanger (2018 ); and Rencontres Photographiques de Rabat (2018) .

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52 Yasmine Hatimi Morocco 1986-

Untitled 003 (from the Amarcord series) 2016 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 30 x 45 cm; sheet size: 42 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 5

ZAR 20 000 – 30 000 USD 1 400 – 2 100 GBP 1 000 – 1 500 EURO 1 180 – 1 770

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53 Graeme Williams South Africa 1961-

Thabong township, Welkom, 2005 (from The Edge of Town series) 2005 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag signed and numbered image size: 26 x 36 cm; sheet size: 27 x 37 cm unframed number 4 from an edition of 10

ZAR 12 000 – 15 000 USD 840 – 1050 GBP 600 – 750 EURO 708 – 885

54 Graeme Williams South Africa 1961-

Intabazwe Township, Harrismith 2007 (from The Edge of Town series) 2007 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag signed and numbered image size: 26 x 36 cm; sheet size: 27 x 37 cm unframed number 4 from an edition of 10

ZAR 12 000 – 15 000 USD 840 – 1050 GBP 600 – 750 EURO 708 – 885

NOTES

For additional information on Graeme Williams’ work, visit: https://www.all-about-photo.com/photo-articles/ photo-article/547/interview-with-graeme-williams https://unyarn.com/2012/03/27/graeme-williamsshooting-apartheid-part-1/ https://www.rfi.fr/en/africa/20191112-GraemeWilliams-photographing-apartheid-fine-art-projects https://www.all-about-photo.com/photographers/ photographer/840/graeme-williams https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IujzTRx_x6E http://photographyanddemocracy. com/?portfolio=graeme-williams http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-IlfQPrMQWw

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For thirty years Graeme Williams has worked on highly personal photographic essays, reflecting his response to South Africa’s complex evolution. Photographic assignments have taken him to fifty countries and his photographs have been featured in major publications, including National Geographic Magazine, TIME, Newsweek, and The New York Times Magazine. His work is housed in the permanent collections of, amongst others, the Smithsonian (USA), Duke University (USA), North Carolina Museum of Art (USA), Rotterdam Museum of Ethnology (Netherlands), University of South Africa, Iziko South African National Gallery, Apartheid Museum in Johannesburg, and the University of Cape Town. Williams’ work has been shown in solo exhibitions in New York, Paris, London, Cape Town and Johannesburg, and he has participated in many international group exhibitions, including the 2011 Figures and Fictions exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London. In 2013, he was awarded the CAP (Contemporary African Photography) Prize as well as the Ernest Cole Award for the series, A City Refracted. His work was included in a major exhibition showcasing South African photography at Huis Marseille Museum for Photography in Amsterdam, and in the Aperture Summer Open exhibition in New York in 2014. Images from his series, As the Grass Grows, were included in the Louis Vuitton Foundation’s Being There exhibition in 2017. “This work is from the series The Edge of Town. My initial motivation for the project was to capture a segment of South African life as the country’s struggled to find a new post-apartheid identity. My own reactions to the changes happening around me were mixed and often jarring. Instead of trying to construct a narrative about life in the country as a whole, I concentrated on fragments of life at the literal and figurative edges of town. It is a stream of consciousness that attempts to draw in the elements of both change and lack of change within this paradoxical country. This essay, like a mosaic, is made up of fragments that I have collected as I moved within the spaces occupied by South Africa’s marginalised communities. These fragments build a picture of the challenges, changes, frustrations and joys experienced by people who are attempting to move from the shadows into the centre stage of South African life. I wanted to avoid the conventional photographic documentary approach […] This meant deconstructing my habitual position of observing and photographing a subject from a strongly objective standpoint. The way I went about this was to make use of layers of visual information, and also to photograph from a position that would give a sense of my involvement, thereby communicating something more intimate. […] I constantly had to find a balance between achieving that sense of intimacy and objectivity.” The Edge of Town was published by Once-Off Publications, 2007.

WATCH Figures & Fictions

WATCH Graeme Williams


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55 Eyoeal Kefyalew Ethiopia 1994-

Kazanchis I (from the Lingering II series) 2018 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Baryta ccompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 30 x 30 cm; sheet size: 32 x 32 cm unframed number 3 from an edition of 20

ZAR 7 000 – 10 000 USD 490 – 700 GBP 350 – 500 EURO 413 – 590

INCLUDING For additional information about Eyoeal Kefyalew’s work, visit: www.eyoeal.com https://vimeo.com/476041132 https://www.photo-basel.com/ spotlihght-award-winning-africanphotography https://www.eyeshotstreetphotography. com/eyoeal-kefyalew/ WATCH Talk Talk Talkl - African Photography Conversations – Mobile Phone Photography

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Hailing from Ethiopia’s capital Addis Ababa, Eyoeal Kefyalew is passionate about photography and graphic design. Initially enrolled at Addis Ababa University’s School of Architecture, his true calling was in photography. Kefyalew’s work has been exhibited as part of the East African Photography Award (Kampala, 2019); Captured Addis (Addis Ababa, 2019); Streets of Addis I (Addis Ababa, 2018); Addis Foto Fest (Addis Ababa, 2018); Ethiopian Photographic Crossroad (Addis Ababa, 2018); the online exhibition Award Winning African Photography – photo basel Takes a Closer Look (2021); and published in Mobile Street Photography (Out of the Phone/Pierre Le Govic). “These images explore the multiple layers found in our surroundings, using light as a tool to identify the degree of visibility. The shadows in contrast with saturated images create a flattening in the images that encourages the viewer to consider a confrontation between the comfortable and the familiar, with the dark and heavy elements of the environment. The swiftness of street photography allowed me to capture gestures that recall intimacy in the conversations the figures carry with each other.”


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56 Eyoeal Kefyalew Ethiopia 1994-

Piassa II (from the Lingering II series) 2018 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Baryta ccompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 30 x 30 cm; sheet size: 32 x 32 cm unframed number 5 from an edition of 20

ZAR 7 000 – 10 000 USD 490 – 700 GBP 350 – 500 EURO 413 – 590

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57 Nobukho Nqaba South Africa 1992-

Ndinikezele 2016 archival ink print on Hahnemuhle German etching ccompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 57 x 40 cm; sheet size: 59.5 x 42 cm unframed number 3 from an edition of 8

ZAR 15 000 – 20 000 USD 1 050 – 1 400 GBP 750 – 1 000 EURO 885 – 1 180

NOTES For additional information on Nobukho Nqaba’s work, visit: https://nataal.com/nobukho-nqaba https://phmuseum.com/nobukho/story/ ndiyayekelela-a65de2ffac https://bubblegumclub.co.za/art/umnqwenosilence-and-invisibility-are-made-loud-andvisible/ https://artafricamagazine.org/izicwangcisozezethu-we-make-plans/

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Nobukho Nqaba was born in Butterworth in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. She is a graduate of the Michaelis School of Fine Art, University of Cape Town, where she majored in photography (2012). In 2012, she was awarded the Tierney Fellowship and was the recipient of reGeneration3, a photography focused initiative by the Musee de l’Elysee. Nqaba holds a Postgraduate Certificate in Education Visual Art and Theory (2013) from the University of Cape Town, as well as a Postgraduate Diploma in Library & Information Studies (2019). She has embarked on several teaching endeavours through her role as Visual Art and Digital Photography Educator at the Peter Clarke Art Centre, and is currently a Lecturer of Photography at the Red & Yellow Creative School of Business in Cape Town. Nqaba’s work explores the precariousness of home and opportunity. Using checked plastic bags commonly known as ‘China bags’, plain grey blankets, and worn overalls, she points to the fragility and impermanence of home. Her work reflects on personal memories of growing up in an informal settlement in Grabouw, Cape Town and the complexities of migration and labour. Ndinikezele was exhibited at Also Known as Africa (AKAA) art fair in Paris (2016); 99 Loop Gallery, Cape Town (2017) as part of the group exhibition Displacement; Red Hook Labs, New York (2017); Zeitz MOCAA, Cape Town (2019); and at BKhz, Johannesburg (2020) as part of the group exhibition Blue is the Warmest Colour.


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58 Clint Strydom South Africa 1973-

Red Shoes 2016 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist sheet size: 112 x 150 cm unframed number 4 from a edition of 10

ZAR 30 000 – 40 000 USD 2 100 – 2 800 GBP 1 500 – 2 000 EURO 1 770 – 2 360

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59 Lee-Ann Olwage South Africa 1986-

Belinda (from the #BlackDragMagic series) 2019 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 30 x 45 cm; sheet size: 42 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 10 + 2AP

ZAR 20 000 – 30 000 USD 1 400 – 2 100 GBP 1 000 – 1 500 EURO 1 180 – 1 770

NOTES For additional information on Lee-Ann Olwage’s work, visit: https://www.leeannolwage.com/ https://www.worldpressphoto.org/collection/ photo/2020/39649/1/Lee-Ann-Olwage https://globalhealth5050.org/if-we-dont-goto-these-spaces-and-we-dont-reclaim-themits-like-we-dont-exist-an-interview-with-leeann-olwage/ https://www.npr.org/sections/ goatsandsoda/2019/09/20/761990035/ photos-drag-queens-in-south-africa-embracequeerness-and-tradition https://www.yumpu.com/en/document/ read/63230211/zeke-magazine-spring-2020 https://www.wired.com/story/black-dragmagic-photo-gallery/ https://www.itsnicethat.com/articles/lee-annolwage-photography-160919

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Lee-Ann Olwage is a visual storyteller from South Africa. She is interested in using the medium of photography as a mode of co-creation and celebration. With her long-term projects, she aims to create a space where people with whom she collaborates can play an active part in the creation of images that they feel tell their stories in a way that is affirming and celebratory. In 2020, she was awarded a World Press Photo Award, Palm Photo Prize shortlist, CAP (Contemporary African Photography) Prize shortlist, Marilyn Stafford Fotoreportage Award shortlist, IPA Honorable Mention, and was selected for The New York Times portfolio review. She is a member of Native Agency, Women Photograph and African Women in Photography. Lee-Ann Olwage is a visual storyteller from South Africa. She is interested in using the medium of photography as a mode of co-creation and celebration. With her long-term projects, she aims to create a space where people with whom she collaborates can play an active part in the creation of images that they feel tell their stories in a way that is affirming and celebratory. In 2020, she was awarded a World Press Photo Award, Palm Photo Prize shortlist, CAP (Contemporary African Photography) Prize shortlist, Marilyn Stafford Fotoreportage Award shortlist, IPA Honorable Mention, and was selected for The New York Times portfolio review. She is a member of Native Agency, Women Photograph and African Women in Photography. Olwage and drag artist and activist Belinda Qaqamba Ka-Fassie, and other black, queer, gender non-conforming and transgender people collaborated in a project to decolonise drag culture and find a particularly African expression of drag. The aim was also to highlight the need for the African LGBTQ+ community to find their identities irrespective of their backgrounds, and to reclaim the public space in a community where they are subject to discrimination, harassment, and violence as part of everyday life. The project was created to serve as a platform of expression for black queer individuals where they were invited to co-create images that they felt told their stories in a way that is affirming and celebratory. This process of creating became a radical and progressive act of activism to reclaim the township and to stand up against the overwhelming climate of discrimination.

Belinda Qaqamba Ka-Fassie, a drag artist and activist, poses at a shisanyama – a community space where women cook and sell meat – in Khayelitsha, a township located on the Cape Flats, near Cape Town, South Africa. 4 August 2019. This image was exhibited in 45 countries as part of the World Press Photo Awards exhibition, 2020, and is currently part of the Pride Photo Award exhibition touring the Netherlands.


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60 Lee-Ann Olwage South Africa 1986-

Liyana (from the #BlackDragMagic series) 2019 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 30 x 45 cm; sheet size: 42 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 10 + 2AP

ZAR 15 000 – 20 000 USD 1 050 – 1 400 GBP 750 – 1 000 EURO 885 – 1 180

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Liyana Arianna Madikizela, a young drag artist and activist from Kayamandi, a township outside the university town of Stellenbosch. Madikizela wanted their portrait to challenge traditional gender roles. “I have decided to be myself. I am a gender non-conforming body and I want to be a role model to the future generations of queers to come. I want to become the role model I never saw in the streets of Kayamandi. Living in a township has taught me to be strong and strive. I have dealt with the stigma and hate, and now I am stronger.” 4 August 2019.


61 Lee-Ann Olwage South Africa 1986-

Thuli (from the #BlackDragMagic series) 2019 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 30 x 45 cm; sheet size: 42 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 10 + 2AP

ZAR 15 000 – 20 000 USD 1 050 – 1 400 GBP 750 – 1 000 EURO 885 – 1 180

Mthulic Vee Vuma, a trans woman from Lingelihle township in Malmesbury, is pictured in front of a shack in Khayelitsha dressed in traditional female Xhosa clothing. This is done to challenge binary thinking that strongly differentiates between masculine and feminine traditional clothing. “Here we use our own culture to frame our identity, even though this contests the societal norms and gendered dress codes that are set in our culture. We frame our identity by tying together our stories of subjectivity and culture”, Vuma says. Her family initially struggled to accept her as a trans woman, believing it was a curse, but she says they now give her total support. 4 August 2019

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62 Tamary Kudita Zimbabwe 1994-

African Victorian VII 2019 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 70 x 45 cm; sheet size: 84 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 25

ZAR 30 000 – 40 000 USD 2 100 – 2 800 GBP 1 500 – 2 000 EURO 1 770 – 2 360

NOTES For additional information on Tamary Kudita’s work, please visit: https://www.worldphoto.org/team-profile/ tamary-kudita-zimbabwe https://www.worldphoto.org/blogs/26-05-21/ interview-open-photographer-year https://www.npr.org/sections/ goatsandsoda/2021/05/31/995407888/ why-a-zimbabwean-photographer-asked-hersubjects-to-pose-in-victorian-garb https://thesoleadventurer.com/spotlight-onzimbabwean-photographer-tamary-kudita/ https://www.forbes.com/sites/ joanneshurvell/2021/04/15/powerful-imagesfrom-winners-of-sony-world-photographyawards-2021/?sh=53b84652c3cb

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A product of dual heritage, Tamary Kudita was born in Zimbabwe whilst her ancestry can be traced back to the former Orange Free State. She holds a bachelor’s degree in Fine Arts from the Michaelis School of Fine Art, University of Cape Town, South Africa (2017). Her investigation into the legacy of colonialism on the family structure has resulted in an exploration of post-colonial identity. Her first solo exhibition (PH Centre, Cape Town) explored notions of race and representation. Previous exhibitions include Maintaining Memories (Michaelis Galleries, Cape Town). Kudita continued her investigation of history with a touring solo exhibition, African Victorian, which was shown at the National Gallery in Harare and the National Gallery of Bulawayo (Zimbabwe). Her most recent work was included in a group exhibition at Ki Smith Gallery, New York City. She was awarded the Open Photographer of the Year prize at the 2021 Sony World Photography Awards; the VAW Journal most inspiring art piece award (2020); and the Voices of African Women cover book award. Her work has been featured by international media outlets and publications, including CNN International, The Independent, Huffington Post, TSA Contemporary Art Magazine and the British Journal of Photography. “African Victorian is an environmental portrait captured as a frozen moment from a series of images which explore a broader narrative. The idea behind the photo was to create a visual narrative about an individual and encourage a dialogue of who the individual is, beyond their physical appearance. I wanted to create a short biography by incorporating real African elements used by the individual in everyday life. This vignette was further elaborated by the individual’s attire which is woven seamlessly into the larger context of her identity. I also incorporate a minimalistic scene in the background, which allows the African hut and the individual to become one with the frame. All these distinctive choices were part of the tale that establishes the mood and creates a backdrop for the narrative to begin. In this photograph, you are looking at a portrait of a nuanced depiction of an African woman. The model is essentially an extension of myself as someone who has a dual heritage. This heritage consists of the Shona culture I was born into and the western culture into which I was assimilated. The African identity is multifaceted and I wanted to bring out her personality by exaggerating her adornments. Through posturing and gestures, I was also able to communicate the strength of her character. Through portraiture, I reimagine the African identity as one which is laced with hybridity and regality.”


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63 Tamary Kudita Zimbabwe 1994-

African Victorian II 2019 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 70 x 45 cm; sheet size: 84 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 25

ZAR 30 000 – 40 000 USD 2 100 – 2 800 GBP 1 500 – 2 000 EURO 1 770 – 2 360

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64 Tamary Kudita Zimbabwe 1994-

Gladys 2021 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 70 x 45 cm; sheet size: 84 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 10 + 2AP

ZAR 30 000 – 40 000 USD 2 100 – 2 800 GBP 1 500 – 2 000 EURO 1 770 – 2 360

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65 Misper Apawu Ghana 1994-

The Jockey and His Horse (from The Horse Men series) 2020 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 30 x 45 cm; sheet size: 42 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 10

ZAR 7 000 – 10 000 USD 490 – 700 GBP 350 – 500 EURO 413 – 590

NOTES For more of Misper Apawu’s work, visit: https://www.instagram.com/misperlens/

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Misper Apawu is a photographer based in Accra, Ghana. Her photographic journey started in 2018 when she attended a mentorship program for six months. In 2019, she made the decision to pursue photography full time. She uses the medium to learn about communities, and focus on the social, physical, and emotional aspects of daily life. Apawu wants her photographs to reveal the similarities and differences in everyone’s world. She is a member of African Women Photograph and the African Photojournalism Database. She exhibited her work during the Nuku Photo Festival in Ghana, 2018. This photograph is part of an ongoing project, The Horse Men, which seeks to look at the bond between horse owners, grooms, jockeys, and their horses.


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66 Mohamed Amin Kenyan 1943-1996

Car Number 60, a Moskvitch 1500 04, driven by Aziz Tejpar Gharial & Natu Vadgama, races part a herd of elephants in Amboseli National Park, Kenya during the 1975 East African Safari Rally. 1975 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by AKKA Project on behalf of the artist image size: 45 x 70 cm; sheet size: 59.5 x 81.5 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 10

ZAR 40 000 – 60 000 USD 2 800 – 4 200 GBP 2 000 – 3 000 EURO 2 360 – 3 540

NOTES Photo London Magazine dedicated the entire 13th issue to Mohamed Amin’s work, it can be viewed online at: https://online.flippingbook.com/view/10037/ For additional information, visit: https://www.aljazeera.com/ features/2018/6/30/mohamed-amin-thekenyan-who-moved-the-world https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=gJQIuCSH5Jc&t=7s https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=kTCZhPtguW0 https://akkaproject.com/portfolio/mohamedmo-amin-kenya/

WATCH Mo and Me: African Image-maker Extraordinaire | Rewind

WATCH Faces Of Africa - Mohamed Amin – The man who moved the world

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Kenyan photojournalist Mohamed ‘Mo’ Amin (1943 – 1996) the son of a railway worker was from a poor family of Sunni Muslim immigrants in Nairobi and soon faced racism. He fought against prejudice for the rest of his life. From the time he acquired his first camera, a second-hand Box Brownie, he quickly learned photographic and darkroom skills – already applying them to commercial use when he went to secondary school in Tanganyika. By the time he was 20 years old, he was already a recognised force as a freelancer in Dar es Salaam, his work appearing in international print media. In a career spanning more than 30 years, he covered major events in Africa and the Middle East, braving 28 days of torture, surviving bombs, bullets, and even the loss of his left arm in an ammunition dump explosion in Ethiopia. One of the most decorated news cameramen globally, his remarkable life was tragically cut short in November 1996 when hijackers took over an Ethiopian airliner forcing it to crash in the Indian Ocean, killing 123 passengers and the crew.


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67 Greg Marinovich South Africa 1962-

FRISBEE: An African National Congress aligned Self Defence Unit member plays frisbee next to blankets on a line and a severely cut tree at a braai at a safehouse in Thokoza township, South Africa, 1995 1995 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 30 x 45 cm; sheet size: 42 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 10

ZAR 12 000 – 15 000 USD 840 – 1050 GBP 600 – 750 EURO 708 – 885

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Greg Marinovich is a highly regarded photojournalist, filmmaker and author who distinguished himself by photographing the fatal conflicts that preceded the first democratic elections in South Africa in 1994. He was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Spot News Photography in 1991 for a series of photographs of African National Congress supporters murdering a man they suspected of being an Inkatha Freedom Party spy. Marinovich co-authored a non-fiction book The Bang-Bang Club: Snapshots from a Hidden War (Basic Books, 2000) with João Silva that took readers beyond the photographs, giving context to that tumultuous time as well as many personal stories of those involved. He won the Sunday Times Alan Paton Award in 2017 for Murder at Small Koppie: The real story of the Marikana Massacre, an investigative account of the events leading up to the killing of 34 striking miners in South Africa on 16 August 2012. His book Shots from the Edge: A Journalist’s Encounters with Conflict and Resilience, in which he documents his experiences covering war and conflict throughout Africa and the world, was published in 2019 (Penguin Randomhouse). In 2009, Marinovich was the recipient of the Nat Nakasa award for courageous journalism; and from 2013-14 was a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University. “This Self Defence Unit was under the command of Bonga Nkosi and had some of the youngest child soldiers among their fighters in the most contested section of the so called ‘Dead Zone’ between the Inkatha Freedom Party controlled migrant workers hostels and some surrounding houses and the ANC aligned residential suburbs.” This is the first public showing of this image, shot as part of Marinovich’s work on the child soldiers at the front lines during the end of apartheid.


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68 Lamyne M Cameroon 1994-

11 05 2020 (from the Covid Curius series) 2020 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by Axis Gallery on behalf of Lamyne M image size: 70 x 45 cm; sheet size: 84 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 3 + 2AP

ZAR 40 000 – 60 000 USD 2 800 – 4 200 GBP 2 000 – 3 000 EURO 2 360 – 3 540

NOTES For additional information on Lamyne M’s work, visit: https://www.lamyne-m.com/ https://axis.gallery/artists/lamyne-m/ An interview with the artist by Axis Gallery curator Gary van Wyk can be accessed here: https://axis.gallery/lamyne-m-covid-curius/

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Lamyne M’s art reflects a sustained interest in how cultural, economic, and social issues are embedded in dress, and how African immigrants and African art and culture are received in the West. He addresses concepts and critiques ranging from gender imbalances in history to concern for the environment and for vulnerable populations. Lamyne M regards his own migrations, which have carried him from Africa to Europe, Asia, and Latin America, as having made him a ‘culture smuggler’ – shuttling between the worlds of contemporary art and other realms of knowledge, both popular and expert. Lamyne M’s The Corona Curius series began as a form of performance during the Covid pandemic, to make one mask every day to honour those who died because they did not have protection, and those who could not afford to isolate. Authorities in France faltered to supply protective masks, at first saying they were not necessary because there was insufficient supply. Lamyne M was struck at how vaunted Western systems of medicine, knowledge, and bureaucracy all failed, and laid Europe low. The endless discussion, debate, and ‘curiosity’ that ensued contrasted, for him, with the relative lack of concern for health challenges in the Third World. Lamyne M’s masks play on non-Western traditions of masking and making-do with what is at hand, at the same time emphasising the covering of the head – which is a political issue in France. 11.05.2020 from the Covid Curius series was selected for the cover of ArtAfrica, June 2020, Issue 19.


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69 Lamyne M Cameroon 1994-

30 03 2020 Premier ligne Dedier a ceux qui ont lutter dès les premier apparition du virus et le Docteur Ai Fan; 04 05 2020 le comptable; 27 03 2020 Macron (from the Covid Curius series)

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2020 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by Axis Gallery on behalf of Lamyne M image size: each 27 x 19 cm; sheet size: each 29.5 cm x 21 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 5 + 2AP

ZAR 35 000 – 50 000 USD 2 450 – 3 500 GBP 1 750 – 2 500 EURO 2 065 – 2 950


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70 Raïssa Karama Rwizibuka Democratic Republic of the Congo 1997-

From the series Fashion as protection against Covid 19 (3) 2020 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 30 x 45 cm; sheet size: 42 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 10

ZAR 9 000 – 10 000 USD 630 – 700 GBP 450 – 500 EURO 531 – 590

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“The Democratic Republic of the Congo, like the rest of the world, has faced the Coronavirus pandemic. Measures have been taken to not only limit the spread, but also reduce the number of cases – these include the mandatory wearing of protective masks. Masks have come to symbolise the virus itself, fear, and contamination, but the sapeurs choose to wear them to console, to give hope. In the streets of Bukavu, the sapeurs displayed their masks as one more element of their elegant clothing style. My images show the creative ways in which the La Sape culture has adapted to a new situation, using clothing style to motivate other people to remain positive during the lockdown period.”


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71 Jabulani Dhlamini South Africa 1983-

Tankiso Thulo, Phiri, Soweto 2020 Ilford textured silk 270gsm accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 60 x 60 cm; sheet size: 70 x 70 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 7

ZAR 20 000 – 30 000 USD 1 400 – 2 100 GBP 1 000 – 1 500 EURO 1 180 – 1 770

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72 Lindokuhle Sobekwa South Africa 1995-

After a protest related to continuous power cuts during lockdown level 5 in Thokoza 2020 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Baryta accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 45 x 30 cm; sheet size: 59.5 x 42 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 7

ZAR 25 000 – 35 000 USD 1 750 – 2 450 GBP 1 250 – 1 750 EURO 1 475 – 2 065

NOTES For additional information on Lindokuhle Sobekwa’s work, visit: https://www.magnumphotos.com/ photographer/lindokuhle-sobekwa/ For an interview on this body of work, produced as part of Magnum Live Labs in partnership with The High Museum of Art and The Hagan Family Foundation in Atlanta, please visit: https://www.magnumphotos. com/theory-and-practice/coronavirus-live-labhigh-museum-atlanta-lindokuhle-sobekwa/

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Lindokuhle Sobekwa is a South African photographer born in Katlehong, Johannesburg. He was introduced to photography in 2012 through his participation in the Of Soul and Joy Project – a photography project in Thokoza, a township in the southeast of Johannesburg. During this time, he studied with photographers Bieke Depoorter, Cyprien Clément-Delmas, Thabiso Sekgala, Tjorven Bruyneel and Kutlwano Moagi. Sobekwa began exhibiting his work in 2013 as part of a group show in Thokoza, organised by the Rubis Mécénat foundation. His photo essay, Nyaope, was published in the Mail & Guardian (South Africa) in 2014. Nyaope was also published in Vice magazine’s annual Photo Issue and the De Standaard (Belgium) in the same year and exhibited at the Turbine Art Fair as part of their new artist feature exhibition. In 2015, Sobekwa was awarded a scholarship to study at the Market Photo Workshop where he completed his Foundation Course. Nyaope was exhibited in the ensuing group show, Free from My Happiness, organised by Rubis Mécénat for the International Photo Festival of Ghent (Belgium); the exhibition toured to additional sites in Belgium and South Africa. A publication, edited by Tjorven Bruyneel, included a selection of the works. In 2017 Sobekwa was selected by the Magnum Foundation for Photography and Social Justice, New York, to develop the project I carry Her photo of Me. He received the Magnum Foundation Fund to continue with his long-term project, Nyaope, in 2018. Sobekwa’s work has been exhibited in South Africa, Iran, Norway and the USA, and was presented by several galleries at the 2019 edition of Paris Photo. His hand-made photobook, I carry Her photo with Me was included in African Cosmologies at the FotoFest Biennial Houston, curated by Mark Sealy. He joined Magnum Photos in 2018 and became an associate member in 2020.


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73 Marc Shoul South Africa 1975-

A young lady rolls her eyes as she gets teased by a patrolling army officer. Lock down level 5, Alexandra, Johannesburg, South Africa, 2020 (from the Time Betwen series) 2020 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Baryta 300gsm signed on the reverse image size: 33 x 50cm; sheet size: 42.5 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 5

ZAR 10 000 – 15 000 USD 700 – 1 050 GBP 500 – 750 EURO 590 – 885

NOTES For additional information on March Shoul’s work, visit: http://marcshoul.com/ https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/202012-29-marc-shouls-time-betweenphotographic-essay-part-four/ https://edgeofhumanity.com/2020/09/10/ marc-shoul-reporting-from-johannesburgsouth-africa-coronavirus-days/ https://asylum-arts.org/magazine/ feature/2020/08/time-between-by-marc-shoul https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/202011-19-marc-shoul-man-on-a-mission-tocapture-the-world/ https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/202011-26-marc-shouls-flatlands-photographicessay/

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Marc Shoul lives and works in Johannesburg. He works largely in portraiture and documentary photography that observes complex social issues. Shoul graduated from the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University with a BTech in Photography in 1999. He has had solo exhibitions at The South African Jewish Museum, Cape Town (2018); Musée Pierre Noël, Saint-Dié-des-Vosges, France (2017); Blue Sky Gallery, Portland, USA (2015); Extraspaszio Gallery, Rome, Italy (2013); Pretoria Art Museum (2012); Quai 1, Vevey, Switzerland (2010); and Atelier de Visu, Marseille, France (2013), where he also completed an artist’s residency. Shoul’s work has been featured at the screenings of Visa Pour L’Image, Perpignan, France and the Ankor Photographic Festival, Siem Reap, Cambodia. His series Landsman featured at Addis Foto Fest 2018, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Shoul won the WinePhoto photographic competition with Brakpan and received an honourable mention for Flatlands in 2011. His work is included in the collections of the Iziko South African National Gallery, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Museum, as well as The Memmo Foundation in Rome, Italy. He is represented by Panos Pictures in London, UK. “Anxiety and fear increased as a national state of disaster was announced in March 2020. Pressed into a morbid game of hide and seek we isolate. Soon after President Cyril Ramaphosa announced the procedures for a 21-day lockdown, the South African National Defence Force was deployed to enforce the new reality and rules. Socially distanced shopping queues snake out into mall parking lots. Trollies overflow with supplies. The banning of liquor and cigarettes sales opened up a massive black market to fill the demand. We stood masked, sanitised, confused and silent. Our hospital systems sat uneasily knowing that it was just a matter of time before the tsunami would hit. South Africa, already in a recession and freshly demoted to ‘junk status’ when the virus arrived, was told to stay home. For many this meant no income, no future. […] For many, the walls started closing in and hunger overcame Covid as the most pressing concern. In-between family duties I would traverse the city, and have found, and share, many stories of heartbreak and many visions of a nation at war, not only with a pandemic but also with itself. I needed to shoot life in this time of change. I looked at the dramas and the dramas spoke to me through the images they offered up. Does that mean that all the images are pictures of despair? Indeed, there is plenty of that. But the South African street remains a place of resilience and survival. It has always been that way, and I hope to show that ordinary life goes on, and will flourish, despite this global setback.” Time Between was selected for the Corona Call group exhibition, in association with Sana Sanaa, Fahrbereitschaft Haubrok, Berlin, 2020


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Drum magazine, founded by the son of financier Abe Bailey in 1951, modelled itself on the popular picture magazines so prevalent in that time, like Life and Picture Post. The magazine’s approach was based on the photo-essay, where photographs played a central role in the storytelling. Drum photographers and writers set a standard for picture magazines unparalleled in Africa. The magazine’s heyday was between the political bookends of the Defiance Campaign and the tragedy of the Sharpeville Massacre.

74 Unknown Photographer © BAHA Elkim “Professor” Kumalo 1968 non-fugitive pigment print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag Baryta paper’ stamped with the BAHA Stamp image size: 45 x 35 cm ; sheet size: 59.5 x 49 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 25

ZAR 3 000 – 4 000 USD 210 – 280 GBP 150 – 200 EURO 177 – 236

Drum captured the spirit of the urbanisation of African people in South Africa and the continent. Political stories of the time, music and cover girls, all coalesced together in a fascinating melting pot from cover to cover. Caught up in a postwar moment, the magazine reflected the influence of cinema, icons, fashion, and the spirit of liberation from the colonial past and apartheid. The photographers associated with Drum’s success were Jürgen Schadeberg, Bob Gosani, Peter Magubane, Alf Kumalo along with a host of brilliant writers like Henry (‘Mr DRUM’) Nxumalo, Can Themba, Todd Matshikiza, and Nat Nakasa. Lewis Nkosi, one of Drum’s staffers, described his talented colleagues as “the new African[s] cut adrift from the tribal reserve – urbanised, eager, fast-talking and brash”. A number of Drum writers went on to make significant contributions to African literature. The heart of the magazine was coverage on crime, investigative reporting, sex (especially if across the ‘colour line’), and sport. This was complemented by imaginative and excellent photography. Peter Magubane described the atmosphere in the newsroom: “Drum was a different home; it did not have apartheid. There was no discrimination in the offices of Drum magazine. It was only when you left Drum and entered the world outside of the main door that you knew you were in apartheid land. But while you were inside Drum magazine, everyone there was a family.” The spirit of Drum is symbolised by the mantra, “live fast, die young and have a good-looking corpse”. The collection assembled here also encapsulates a spirit of an era in its iconic imagery and covers. The Drum archive will also be represented on the PLP online platform.

Drum magazine, August 1964: “Moroka Swallows’ crack captain, Elkim “Professor” Kumalo, took a header into matrimony yesterday when he married 22-year-old twin, Miss Mabel Moagi, of 332 Dube Village. They met, appropriately, at a football match five years ago. Fifty wedding guests came to the Lutheran Church, Jabavu, to see the pretty bride walk down the aisle in a beautiful lace and taffeta dress. Her twin brother, Titus, gave her away, and the Rev. N.K Molope married them.”

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75 Bob Gosani © BAHA South African 1934-1972

Township Jazz 1956 non-fugitive pigment print on archival fiberbased Baryta paper stamped with the BAHA stamp image size: 40 x 40 cm; sheet size: 50 x 50 cm unframed number 1 of an edition of 25

ZAR 3 000 – 4 000 USD 210 – 280 GBP 150 – 200 EURO 177 – 236

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South African photographer Bob Gosani (1934 – 1972) started at Drum magazine in 1952 as a messenger, but became one of the magazine’s most outstanding and prolific photographers – documenting the political struggle, human rights abuses, as well as urban lifestyle. His work is featured in Tauza – Bob Gosani’s People, edited by Mothobi Mutloatse and Jacqui Masiza (Struik, 2005), which pays tribute to Gosani’s legacy. Drum magazine, August 1956: “Shanty Town In City Hall! - Backstage before the show. It all started with the huge, compelling party poster splashed magnetically over Johannesburg. ‘Township Jazz’ at the Selbourne Hall. The poster also carried a controversy, as sensitive as a winter blister. There would be shows for Euros only and shows for Non-Euros only. All this would take place at the Johannesburg City Hall. There the music, song and dance of the townships would be presented by the Union of South African Artists. This Union fights to get better and wider horizons for the Non-White artists. So if this Union claims to champion the cause of us blacks, why the hack should they go in for segregation and separate audiences and black dates and white dates. No man, you don’t see the point. The Union’s got somewhere if they’ve got the City Hall for this.”


76 Unknown Photographer © BAHA Kippie Moeketsi 1960 non-fugitive pigment print on archival fiberbased Baryta paper accompanied by a BAHA certificate of authenticity image size: 40 x 40 cm; sheet size: 50 x 50 cm unframed number 1 of an edition of 25

ZAR 3 000 – 4 000 USD 210 – 280 GBP 150 – 200 EURO 177 – 236

Drum magazine, September 1960: “What’s Happened to Jazz - Kippie Moeketsi - the ghost of Charlie Parker lives in him. The sad man with the sax. That’s Kippie ‘Charlie Parker’ Moeketsie, the 35 year-old son of a carpenter from George Goch. Kippie has had, and still has bouquets thrown at him from all angles. Most of the time he doesn’t care or know about them. Most of the time he is heading for the shebeen. Kippie, the fifth child in a family of six - five brothers and one sister who is now married - was introduced to music by one of his late brothers, Eziah. He sort of encouraged me to play the clarinet. Before he died he had been lonely for years. But Kippie continued, I don’t like people labelling me a hopeless drunk or an irresponsible musician.”

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77 Bob Gosani © BAHA South African 1934-1972

Louisa Emmanuel & Isaac Peterson 1957 non-fugitive pigment print on archival fiberbased Baryta paper accompanied by a BAHA certificate of authenticity image size: 40 x 40 cm; sheet size: 50 x 50 cm unframed number 1 of an edition of 25

ZAR 3 000 – 4 000 USD 210 – 280 GBP 150 – 200 EURO 177 – 236

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Drum magazine, March 1955: “Jazzing the Blues - Louisa Emmanuel and Isaac Peterson. Louisa, one hundred and twenty pounds of vocal dynamite packed in four yards of lace and taffeta. And Isaac, son of Peterson. Bound by ties of brotherhood to American clothes. Commanded by a little birdie inside of him to sing sing sing to save the sorrows of ten million black voices.”


78 Bob Gosani © BAHA South African 1934-1972

Dorothy Masuku 1955 non-fugitive pigment print on archival fiberbased Baryta paper accompanied by a BAHA certificate of authenticity image size: 40 x 40 cm; sheet size: 50 x 50 cm unframed number 1 of an edition of 25

ZAR 3 000 – 4 000 USD 210 – 280 GBP 150 – 200 EURO 177 – 236

Drum magazine, January 1955: “Everybody’s Dotty - Dorothy Masuka (Masuku), the sizzling hepcat ‘Nontsokilo’ singer from Bulawayo. She blew into Jo’burg from Rhodesia some two years earlier. Now, Jo’burg is a tough joint. It takes a tornado to make Jo’burg go nuts. So two years ago Dorothy was just another canary from far. Jo’burg couldn’t care less about her.”

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79 Bob Gosani © BAHA South African 1934-1972

The Great Cox 1955 non-fugitive pigment print on archival fiberbased Baryta paper stamped with the BAHA stamp image size: 40 x 40 cm; sheet size: 50 x 50 cm unframed number 1 of an edition of 25

ZAR 3 000 – 4 000 USD 210 – 280 GBP 150 – 200 EURO 177 – 236

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Drum magazine, February 1955: “King Force - Twenty years a King of Jazz and still not out! Wilson Silgee was leading the famous Jazz Maniacs. There’s too much of this cheap jazz flying about. Crude imitation American stuff. Just noise. There’s only one thing to do, break it! That’s what I do...Jazz is my life. I’ve learned the hard way, three diplomas at Trinity College of Music, London; Twenty years they begged him to put his music on disc. For twenty years he refused. He wanted to carry that message across personally. He has carried that message through more than 50,000 miles of jazz entertainment in South Africa. And now he’s put his music, his great sounds, down on Gallotone discs: ‘King Force and his Jazz Forces.”


80 Bob Gosani © BAHA South African 1934-1972

Darius Dhlomo 1958 pigment print on acid-free photographic paper stamped with the BAHA stamp image size: 40 x 40 cm ; sheet size: 49.2 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 of an edition of 25

ZAR 3 000 – 4 000 USD 210 – 280 GBP 150 – 200 EURO 177 – 236

Drum magazine, April 1958: “This Slick Night Club Singer is Really a...Boxer, Drummer, Ladies Man and Footballer - Meet Darius Dhlomo, the man some call Durban’s most eligible bachelor. Have you ever met one of those guys whose list of talents makes you feel you’re a hick from the jungle and have been wasting all your life? He’s Darius Dhlomo, the new South African Non-White light heavyweight boxing champion. He is also a national soccer player, a No 1 athlete, a drummer, a blues singer and a bachelor.”

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81 Unknown Photographer © BAHA Ballet Dance circa 1960s non-fugitive pigment print on archival fiberbased Baryta paper stamped with the BAHA stamp image size: 35 x 45 cm; sheet size: 42 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 of an edition of 25

ZAR 3 000 – 4 000 USD 210 – 280 GBP 150 – 200 EURO 177 – 236 Children doing ballet, District Six, c 1960

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82 Unknown Photographer © BAHA Let The People Drink circa 1950s non-fugitive pigment print on archival fiberbased Baryta paper stamped with the BAHA stamp image size: 35 x 45 cm ; sheet size: 42 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 of an edition of 25

ZAR 3 000 – 4 000 USD 210 – 280 GBP 150 – 200 EURO 177 – 236

Drum magazine, March 1956: “Let the People Drink...They are Drinking anyway - In the townships there are the handsome respectable shebeens...these make you feel at home, the atmosphere is friendly and sociable.” (The date of this specific picture is unknown - this could be a shebeen in Fietas (Vrededorp) or Sophiatown.)

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83 Unknown Photographer © BAHA Drum Magazine, February 1955: The Sky’s the Limit 1955 pigment print on acid-free photographic paper stamped with the BAHA stamp image size: 77 x 55.5 cm; sheet size: 88 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 of an edition of 250

ZAR 2 500 – 3 500 USD 175 – 245 GBP 125 – 175 EURO 148 – 207

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84 Unknown Photographer © BAHA Drum Magazine, March 1952: Boxing 1952 pigment print on acid-free photographic paper stamped with the BAHA stamp image size: 77 x 55.5 cm; sheet size: 88 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 of an edition of 250

ZAR 2 500 – 3 500 USD 175 – 245 GBP 125 – 175 EURO 148 – 207

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85 Unknown Photographer © BAHA Drum Magazine, April 1961: Linda Mhlongo & Ruth Nkonyeni 1961 pigment print on acid-free photographic paper stamped with the BAHA stamp image size: 77 x 55.5 cm; sheet size: 88 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 of an edition of 250

ZAR 2 500 – 3 500 USD 175 – 245 GBP 125 – 175 EURO 148 – 207

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86 Unknown Photographer © BAHA Drum Magazine, July 1960: Patience Gwcabe 1960 pigment print on acid-free photographic paper stamped with the BAHA stamp image size: 77 x 55.5 cm; sheet size: 88 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 of an edition of 250

ZAR 2 500 – 3 500 USD 175 – 245 GBP 125 – 175 EURO 148 – 207

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87 Unknown Photographer © BAHA Drum Magazine, April 1957: Dolly Rathebe 1957 pigment print on acid-free photographic paper stamped with the BAHA stamp image size: 77 x 55.5 cm; sheet size: 88 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 of an edition of 250

ZAR 2 500 – 3 500 USD 175 – 245 GBP 125 – 175 EURO 148 – 207

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88 Unknown Photographer © BAHA Drum Magazine, September 1963: Victor Ndlazilwane 1963 pigment print on acid-free photographic paper stamped with the BAHA stamp image size: 77 x 55.5 cm; sheet size: 88 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 of an edition of 250

ZAR 2 500 – 3 500 USD 175 – 245 GBP 125 – 175 EURO 148 – 207

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89 Unknown Photographer © BAHA Drum Magazine, June 1954: On The Moon 1954 pigment print on acid-free photographic paper stamped with the BAHA stamp image size: 77 x 55.5 cm; sheet size: 88 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 of an edition of 250

ZAR 2 500 – 3 500 USD 175 – 245 GBP 125 – 175 EURO 148 – 207

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90 Unknown Photographer © BAHA Drum Magazine, August 1973: Mzungu’s Paradise 1973 pigment print on acid-free photographic paper stamped with the BAHA stamp image size: 77 x 55.5 cm; sheet size: 88 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 of an edition of 250

ZAR 2 500 – 3 500 USD 175 – 245 GBP 125 – 175 EURO 148 – 207

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91 Unknown Photographer © BAHA Drum Magazine, April 1961: Dottie Tiyo 1961 pigment print on acid-free photographic paper stamped with the BAHA stamp image size: 77 x 55.5 cm; sheet size: 88 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 of an edition of 250

ZAR 2 500 – 3 500 USD 175 – 245 GBP 125 – 175 EURO 148 – 207

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92 Unknown Photographer © BAHA Drum Magazine, June 1956: Golden Notes 1956 pigment print on acid-free photographic paper stamped with the BAHA stamp image size: 77 x 55.5 cm; sheet size: 88 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 of an edition of 250

ZAR 2 500 – 3 500 USD 175 – 245 GBP 125 – 175 EURO 148 – 207

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93 David Goldblatt South African 1930-2018

Woman collecting shellfish. Port St Johns, Transkei, 1975 (from the Particulars series) 1975 silver gelatin print on fibre based paper accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by artist image size: 40 x 39.5 cm; sheet size: 43.5 x 43.5 cm unframed number 1 of an edition of 10

ZAR 250 000 – 300 000 USD 17 500 – 21 000 GBP 12 500 – 15 000 EURO 14 750 – 17 700

PROVENANCE Courtesy David Goldblatt Legacy Trust. NOTES For additional information on the David Goldblatt archive, visit: https://www.plparchive.com/david-goldblattmain/ https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=HQURhDwtkqY https://www.newyorker.com/culture/photobooth/david-goldblatts-particulars-southafrica?intcid=mod-latest

WATCH David Goldblatt - Particulars

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David Goldblatt (1930 – 2018) was born in Randfontein, a small mining town outside of Johannesburg. He began exploring the medium of photography after matriculating in 1948 but only formally made photography his profession after his father died in 1962 and the family business, a mining concession store, was sold. In the years that followed, while Goldblatt supported his family through photography commissions and magazine work, he produced more than ten major photographic series documenting the people, landscapes, and structures of South Africa. Goldblatt founded the Market Photo Workshop, a training institution in Johannesburg for aspiring photographers, in 1989. In 1998 he was the first South African to have a solo exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. A retrospective of his work, David Goldblatt Fifty-One Years, began an international tour of galleries and museums in 2001. Goldblatt was one of the few South African artists to exhibit at Documenta 11 (2002) and Documenta 12 (2007) in Kassel, Germany. He has held solo exhibitions at the Jewish Museum and the New Museum, both in New York. His work was included in the exhibition ILLUMInations at the 54th Venice Biennale in 2011, and has featured on shows at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and Barbican Centre in London. In 2017, Goldblatt installed a series of portraits from his photographic essay, Ex-Offenders, in former prisons in Birmingham and Manchester. The portraits depict men and women, from South Africa and the UK, at the scene of their crimes, with accompanying texts that relate the subjects’ stories in their words. In the last year of his life, two major retrospectives were opened at Centre Pompidou in Paris, and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Sydney. The Goldblatt Archive is held by Yale University, in New Haven, Connecticut. Goldblatt is the recipient of the 2006 Hasselblad award, the 2009 Henri Cartier-Bresson Award, the 2013 ICP Infinity Award, and was awarded the Commandeur des Arts et des Lettres by the Ministry of Culture of France in 2016. “In the early 1970s I photographed many people in our gold and platinum mines and in the townships and suburbs of Johannesburg. These were mostly portraits, quite formal encounters between the subjects and me, in which I was often intensely conscious of details: folds of flesh, the weight of limbs, roughness of hands, length of fingers, movement of a tendon in a foot, the drape of cloth on hip or breast, repose and tension. Such awareness was part of the making of portraits. But then I found that it was the thing itself. For about six months in 1975 I became completely absorbed in exploring something that I had possibly had since childhood – a certain way of knowing our bodies; a heightened awareness of our particulars. Since then, while that sense of our bodies is nearly always there, I have only occasionally tried to touch it in photographs.” The photographs in Particulars were taken beginning in 1975, and the first edition of the book was published by Goodman Gallery (2003). Goldblatt revised Particulars for a new publication by Steidl (2014).


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94 Michael Meyersfeld South Africa 1940-

Alex Singers (from the Dark City Dreams series) 2009 Innova Fiba print photo paper 280gms signed image size: 45 x 60 cm; framed size: 61 x 76 cm number 1 of an edition of 10

ZAR 20 000 – 30 000 USD 1 400 – 2 100 GBP 1 000 – 1 500 EURO 1 180 – 1 770

NOTES For additional information, visit: www.meyersfeld.com

Michael Meyersfeld lives and works in Johannesburg. After obtaining a degree in commerce at the University of the Witwatersrand, he entered the family steel merchandising business. During this period, he was an active member of the Camera Club of Johannesburg and contributed to many international photo salons and exhibitions. At the age of forty, he gave up the world of commerce and pursued advertising photography for several decades. His fine art work slowly took over and today remains his sole photographic pursuit. His work is notable for its stark, sometimes sombre, lonely and edgy imagery that has separateness from reality. He is not comfortable being drawn into giving explanations – his titles are deliberately obtuse, nudging the viewer to uncover what memory or emotion that particular image has stirred in them, moving them to reflect and respond in their own personal world. Meyersfeld’s photographic activities in the past decade have centred around exhibitions and refining of his approach to fine art photography. He has numerous awards, including a Gold at the London AOP Awards. Alex Singers When the children in their spirit and being play at the good things of the adults life must smile and laugh for the future is assured — Mongane Wally Serote

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95 Michael Meyersfeld South Africa 1940-

Drummer Boy (from the Dark City Dreams series) 2014 Innova Fiba print photo paper 280gms signed image size: 45 x 60 cm; framed size: 61 x 76 cm number 1 of an edition of 10

ZAR 20 000 – 30 000 USD 1 400 – 2 100 GBP 1 000 – 1 500 EURO 1 180 – 1 770

“Over lunch Poet Laureate Mongane Serote was discussing his childhood in Alex, describing his deprivations and hardships. I asked him whether there wasn’t also a brighter and carefree side to Alex at that time. With his inimitable chuckle he answered, ‘Of course, there is always some lightness even when things seem dark’. I countered, ‘I would like to do an exhibition of today’s Alex showing the celebratory side of this community’. ‘Wonderful,’ he said, ‘and I will write the poems’. This was the birth of Dark City Dreams, a title given by Mongane to express his childhood experience living in a community without services or electricity. Two years were spent walking the streets of Alexandra township with my friend and assistant, Benson Mokamo.” Dark City Dreams has been exhibited at the South African Jewish Museum (Cape Town, 2014); Toto Gallery (Johannesburg, 2014); Phutaditjaba Community Centre (Alexandra, Johannesburg, 2014); and the Pretoria Art Museum (2015). Drummer Boy The largest drum drums to pump the heart and the little ones know this and so they sing — Mongane Wally Serote

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96 Ruth Seopedi Motau South Africa 1968-

Gumboot Dancers Bapedi, Soweto, 1993 1993 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag image size: 35 x 45 cm; sheet size: 42 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 of an edition of 10

ZAR 20 000 – 30 000 USD 1 400 – 2 100 GBP 1 000 – 1 500 EURO 1 180 – 1 770

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Ruth Seopedi Motau was born in Meadowlands, Soweto. She is a South African social documentary photographer with over three decades’ experience, best known for her portraits and insightful documentation of South African social and political life. Motau was the first black female photo editor in South Africa. Having graduated from the Market Photo Workshop, she worked as a photographer and a photo editor for the Mail & Guardian. During her tenure at the Mail & Guardian, she was also given the opportunity to work for three international newspaper publications on an exchange programme. Motau is also the former photo editor for The Sowetan and City Press. Presently she is an independent photographic consultant, photographer, exhibitor, curator, photo editor, mentor, and educator. She has received numerous accolades, including a Freedom Forum Fellowship from Rhodes University and the SABC award for women who made a difference in the media. Motau’s work has been featured in over 50 exhibitions in South Africa and abroad, including exhibitions in France, Brazil, and China.


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97 Margaret Ngigi Kenya 1996-

Untitled (from the Bride Avenue series) 2020 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by AKKA Project on behalf of the artist image size: 45 x 70 cm; sheet size: 59.5 x 81.5 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 4

“Influenced by the great Kenyan photographers Osborne Macharia and Thandiwe Muriu, I fell in love with portraiture. And my initial fascination with beauty eventually turned into the deep need to address the pressing issues of society that directly involved me. It was exciting. I felt empowered.”

ZAR 15 000 – 18 000 USD 1 050 – 1 260 GBP 750 – 900 EURO 885 – 1 062

Women have been, and continue to be, the centre of most of Ngigi’s projects. By taking these images, not only does she bring issues affecting women to the limelight – their social roles and challenges – but also creates an image of herself. As part of a personal journey, her work allows her to explore and reflect on her own position as a woman in contemporary Kenya.

NOTES

Ngigi was shortlisted for Photo London’s Emerging Photographer of the Year Award (2020) and was a winner of the pan-African MASK Creativity Awards (2019).

For additional information on Margaret Njeri Ngigi’s work, visit: https://akkaproject.com/portfolio/margaretngigi-kenya-2/ https://www.doylewham.com/murky-waters-1

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Margaret Njeri Ngigi lives and works in Nairobi, Kenya. She is a passionate photographer, filmmaker, and film production student at the United States International University-Africa. While she has been an artist in many forms since she was young, her journey with the camera began in 2017.


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98 Paul-Marie M’Bo Cote d’Ivoire 1993-

Philautia 1 2019 giclee print on Hanhemuhle paper accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by artist image size: 57 x 40 cm; sheet size: 59.5 x 42 cm umframed number 2 from an edition of 8 + 2AP

ZAR 8 000 – 12 000 USD 560 – 840 GBP 400 – 600 EURO 472 – 708

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Paul-Marie M’Bo, working under the artist’s name Akoh (meaning ‘bird’ in Attié), is a self-taught image maker from Abidjan, Cote d’Ivoire. M’Bo’s visual stories explore masculinity and gender issues. “Artists are guides’’, he says. “They represent the eyes of society, the eyes through which it could perceive its own ills.” Through his photography, he is committed to showing what people fail to put into words, evoking feelings that help people understand what their lives mean to them. Working at the intersection of fashion and art, styling is very important in his creative process and surreal, poetic aesthetic. Philautia is about self-love. Portraying vulnerability and tenderness, it was inspired by the photographer’s previous work, S.O.S From an Earthling in Distress. This image is part of a series of photographs commissioned for Oath Volume II (2021) around the theme of love, and included in the House of Love exhibition (Cape Town, 2021). MB’o collaborated with local creatives in Abidjan to make this work in celebration of both photography and love.


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99 Nuits Balnéaires Côte d’Ivoire 1994-

Apparat (from the Rédemption series) 2021 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by artist image size: 45 x 70 cm; sheet size: 59.5 x 81.5 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 5

ZAR 15 000 – 20 000 USD 1 050 – 1 400 GBP 750 – 1 000 EURO 885 – 1 180

NOTES For additional information on Nuits Balnéaires, visit: www.nuitsbalneaires.com

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Nuits Balnéaires is a visual artist based in Grand-Bassam, Côte d’Ivoire. His practice is articulated between photography and film, and he plays a key role in the emerging Ivorian art scene. After completing his studies in Business Management, he decided to devote himself to fashion photography and collaborated with brands such as Lagos Fashion & Design Week and Vlisco & Co. In 2019, Balnéaires settled in Grand-Bassam to focus on his art. During the same year, his documentation of the floods in Grand-Bassam earned him a oneyear visual journalism scholarship with the World Press Photo Foundation. He is the first Ivorian to be selected for this coveted award. In 2020, he was one of the winners of the Cultural and Environmental Responses for Environmental Change initiated by the Prince Claus Fund and the Goethe Institute. Balnéaires is part of the collection of Foundation Donwahi and his work has been exhibited in Côte d’Ivoire, New York, Toronto, Montreal, Melbourne, and Amsterdam. From the time he moved to Grand-Bassam, Balnéaires took an interest in the many environmental challenges that existed there. Discussions on the issue with the inhabitants of the village as well as with specialised NGOs opened his eyes to the complexity and depth of the problem. Between the waste that arrives from the Atlantic Ocean and that dumped by the population for lack of alternatives, the surrounding nature bears the after-effects of human impact. In Rédemption, objects found on beaches are the raw material. Balnéaires collects objects along the coast, sculpts forms and dresses them up, as if to show solidarity with a distressed nature.


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100 Miora Rajaonary Madagascar 1984-

Hanta (from the LAMDA series) 2017 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by artist image size: 80 x 80 cm; sheet size: 83 x 83 cm unframed number 2 from an edition of 8

ZAR 20 000 – 30 000 USD 1 400 – 2 100 GBP 1 000 – 1 500 EURO 1 180 – 1 770

NOTES For additional information on Miora Rajaonary’s work, visit: https://miorarajaonary.photoshelter.com/ https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/ in-sight/wp/2019/01/07/voices-of-africanphotography-finding-the-answer-to-the-mostpersonal-question-who-am-i/ https://photoville.com/2020/02/11/aninterview-with-jurors-choice-winner-miorarajaonary/

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Born and raised in Madagascar, documentary photographer Miora Rajaonary is currently based in Mauritius. Through her work, she focuses on social issues and identities in contemporary Africa, striving to find new angles and stories on the continent. Rajaonary studied Photojournalism and Documentary Photography at the Market Photo Workshop, Johannesburg. She is a National Geographic Explorer and was awarded the Juror’s Choice of the 2019 edition of THE FENCE; the First Prize of the Addis Foto Fest’s portfolio review in December 2018; and was one of four winners of the inaugural Getty x Array Grant in July 2018. In 2016, she was selected to participate in the World Press Photo Masterclass East Africa. Her work has been exhibited at The Fence Photo Festival (USA); Pen and Brush (New York City, USA); Addis Foto Fest (Addis Ababa, Ethiopia); the Museum of Contemporary African Diasporan Arts (New York City, USA); Stanford University (CA, USA) and the Alliance Française Network, Southern Africa. She has received commissions from The Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, BBC/PRI, WOZ Die Wochenzeitung, Causette Magazine, The Africa Report/Jeune Afrique Group, Deutsche Press Agentür, and Marie Stopes International. Hanta, a Sakalava woman from Antanimalandy in Northwest Madagascar, in her lamba garment in December 2017. She wears the Malagasy traditional mask, the Masonjoany, made from the same tree that grows on the west coast of Madagascar. “This is my favourite outfit, I feel proud and empowered when I wear it.” A lamba is the traditional garment worn by men and women in Madagascar. The textile, highly emblematic of Malagasy culture, consists of a rectangular length of cloth wrapped around the body. Through the series LAMBA, Rajaonary explores the ways in which this Malagasy garment serves as a valued symbol of the island’s cultural heritage, beyond its role as elegant and ornamental clothing – cloth is offered in return for blessings, or to demonstrate ethnic identity, status and ties of mutual respect, love and loyalty. For example, men offer cloth to their brides at marriage; bride and groom are encircled in a single cloth to symbolise their union; and descendants honour their ancestors by wrapping their remains in a lambamena, the silk burial shroud, during traditional rites. The project takes form as a portrait series inspired by the tradition of African studio portraiture, shot with a medium-format film camera. For each photograph, a lambahoany (printed cotton lamba typically featuring a proverb on the lower border of the design, presently the most commonly worn type of lamba) is used as a backdrop. The LAMBA project was awarded the inaugural Getty x Array Grant, as well as Juror’s Choice of The Fence Photo Festival in 2019. The series has been exhibited at Pen and Brush, New York City (2019, 2021); Photo Vogue Festival, Milan (2019); Photoville (New York City) and The Fence Photo Festival (multiple locations in the USA).


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101 Pippa Hetherington South Africa 1971-

Nomonde Mthandande (from the Cuttings 18202020 series) 2019 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by artist image size: 45 x 30 cm; sheet size: 59.5 cm x 42 unframed number 2 from an edition of 20

ZAR 8 000 – 12 000 USD 560 – 840 GBP 400 – 600 EURO 472 – 708

NOTES For additional information on Pippa Hetherington’s work, visit: http://www.pippahetherington.co.za/project/ cuttings-1820-2020-collaboration/ http://gfiartgallery.com/project/ cuttings-1820-2020/ https://www.thephotographiccollective.com/ artists/pippa-hetherington https://twyg.co.za/exhibition-of-wearableart-sews-together-parallel-stories-of-settlerhistory/ https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=ZykDY4bl1Ic https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=n_9LoUDOhRQ

WATCH Studio Tour

WATCH Nozeti Artist Talk | Cuttings 1820 - 2020

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Pippa Hetherington is a South African photographer who has been working as an independent photojournalist with a human rights focus. She is co-founder of Behind the Faces – a pan-African women’s storytelling project, launched at Constitution Hill, Johannesburg, in 2013. Her work has been published in international and national publications. Hetherington’s work has been shown in solo and group exhibitions in Cape Town, Johannesburg, Bloemfontein, Durban, and Gqeberha (South Africa); London (UK); Dublin (Ireland); and New York City and Washington, DC (USA). She graduated with an MFA from ICP-Bard, New York, in May 2019. “Cuttings 1820 – 2020 is an enquiry into the difficulty of disentangling our histories through visual storytelling pivoting around the relationship between female descendants of the Eastern Cape Xhosa and the 1820 British Settlers in South Africa. Using clothing and portraiture as a metaphor to symbolise power and identity, this body of work marks 200 years since the 1820 British Settlers landed in South Africa. Two centuries later, female descendants from Xhosa and 1820 Settler families made dresses and sat for portraits, wearing their histories. The dresses indicate how fabrics represent tangled post-colonial complexities and identity, disrupting the notion that fine art and refined arts and craft were typically associated only with white Europeans. Stylistically informed by carefully composed portraits by Malick Sidibé and Seydou Keïta, the work speaks to the democratic camera and the relevance of vernacular photography. This is a tribute to grief, loss and mourning, woven around family, history, displacement and memory. The thread and fabric connect us to what we have lost, bonding us to the past and the present. We can’t disentangle ourselves from the history of where we come from. Memory is a tapestry of relationships. This work is about heritage, history, kin and remembrance.” Cuttings 1820 – 2020 was exhibited at the GFI Art Gallery, Gqeberha (former Port Elizabeth) in August 2020.


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102 Stephanie Blomkamp South Africa 1987-

Unseen 2019 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by artist image size: 45 x 30 cm; sheet size: 59.5 cm x 42 unframed number 2 from an edition of 8 +2AP

ZAR 10 000 – 15 000 USD 700 – 1 050 GBP 500 – 750 EURO 590 – 885

NOTES For additional information on Stephanie Blomkamp’s work, visit: https://www.stephanieblomkamp.com https://www.thkgallery.com/exhibitions/15stephanie-blomkamp-i-shroud/works/ https://blog.ormsdirect.co.za/conversationstephanie-blomkamp-2/ https://bubblegumclub.co.za/photography/ stephanie-blomkamp-making-a-self-portrait/ https://www.timeslive.co.za/sunday-times/ lifestyle/2021-05-02-new-mag-oath-gives-aface-to-unseen-african-photographers/

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Born in Johannesburg, Stephanie Blomkamp is a photographer, editor, and curator based in Cape Town. She focuses on portraiture and conceptual work, staging her images to create surreal and imagined narratives that play with perception and have a distinct cinematic edge. She has participated in exhibitions in the UK and South Africa, including the Royal Academy of Art Summer Exhibition (London, 2016) and a solo exhibition, Shroud, at THK Gallery (Cape Town, 2018). Blomkamp started her photography career in the film industry, working as an on-set photographer in North America. When she returned to South Africa, she founded Oath, a print publication and platform for photographers in South Africa and beyond. The central mission of Oath is to champion new talent, celebrate the art of photography, and shine a light on overlooked archives. Unseen is part of an ongoing portraiture project which focuses on the act of seeing. This photograph was created for Oath Volume I (2019) to celebrate the immense talent on the African continent that has yet to be seen and celebrated globally. Blomkamp’s pledge to photography is to provide a physical, printed space for photographers around her to be seen and celebrated.


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103 Jesse Navarre Vos South Africa 1991-

Untitled II 2020 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag framed size: 70 x 60 cm number 1 from an edition of 5 + 1 AP

ZAR 8 000 – 12 000 USD 560 – 840 GBP 400 – 600 EURO 472 – 708

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104 Jesse Navarre Vos South Africa 1991-

Untitled I 2020 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag framed size: 70 x 60 cm number 1 from an edition of 5 + 1 AP

ZAR 8 000 – 12 000 USD 560 – 840 GBP 400 – 600 EURO 472 – 708

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105 Ayesha Kazim South Africa 1999-

Mirage 2019 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Baryta accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 45 x 30 cm; sheet size: 59.5 x 42 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 10

ZAR 15 000 – 20 000 USD 1 050 – 1 400 GBP 750 – 1 000 EURO 885 – 1 180

NOTES For additional information on Ayesha Kazim’s work, visit: https://www.ayeshakazim.com/ https://phmuseum.com/news/10-blackfemale-photographers-to-watch-in-2021 https://www.aint-bad.com/ article/2021/03/29/in-conversation-withayesha-kazim/ https://www.nowahalamag.com/post/thishome-of-ours-ayesha-kazim https://home.camerabits.com/2021/03/01/ ayesha-march-black-women-photographersshowcase/

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Ayesha Kazim uses analogue and digital media to capture intimate, candid moments of everyday life. After completing her studies in Photography and Imaging at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts, she now works as a freelance photographer – dividing her time between New York City and Cape Town. Kazim was awarded the Gordon Parks Foundation Scholarship for her documentary work in 2018 and 2020. In 2021, she was recognised as one of the ‘10 Black Female Photographers to Watch’ by the PHMuseum. Her multicultural background as a British, Nigerian-South African living abroad motivates her to use photography as a mechanism for storytelling in an effort to unite communities through art. Mirage is an experimental fine art portrait that blurs the line between dreamscapes and reality. It speaks to Kazim’s growing desire to incorporate themes of femininity and the divine within her photographic practice.


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106 Ayesha Kazim South Africa 1999-

Divination 2019 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Baryta accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 45 x 30 cm; sheet size:59.5 x 42 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 10

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Divination explores the role of destiny, capturing the tension between one’s sense of creative control and a predetermined universal path. It motivates viewers to explore what occurs when we relinquish our imposed authority over our chosen craft, instead allowing external energies to play a role in the cultivation of our beliefs, creations, and value systems.


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107 Tshepiso Mabula ka Ndongeni South Africa 1993-

Notes to Phila Ndwandwe 2020 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 45 x 30 cm; sheet size: 59.5 x 42 cm unframed number 2 from an edition of 4

ZAR 10 000 – 12 000 USD 700 – 840 GBP 500 – 600 EURO 590 – 708

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“Ukugrumba, which means ‘to exhume’ or ‘dig up’ in isiXhosa, is a recollection of memory, loss, and the internalised trauma that most South Africans harbour because of our country’s volatile history. This image is a homage to Phila Ndwandwe, a former uMkhonto we Sizwe operative who was abducted, tortured, and killed by apartheid security police. Stripped naked during her interrogation, it is said that she used plastic bags as underwear to preserve her dignity. The image was created to bring to light stories like Ndwandwe’s which are often silenced and erased from the history books.”


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108 Nyancho NwaNri Nigeria 1988-

Hoist The Flag #EndSARS 2020 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 30 x 45 cm; sheet size: 42 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 10

ZAR 15 000 – 20 000 USD 1 050 – 1 400 GBP 750 – 1 000 EURO 885 – 1 180

Nyancho NwaNri was born in Lagos, Nigeria and holds a bachelor’s degree in Digital Animation and Production at the University of Greenwich (London, UK). As a lens-based artist and documentary photographer, she explores African history, traditions, spirituality, ethnic and cultural identity, as well as social and environmental issues. Her work has been shown at various festivals and exhibitions locally and internationally, including Eyes On Main Street Festival (North Carolina, USA, 2021); The Oceans and Its Interpreters (Hong-Gah Museum, Taiwan, 2020); VideoEX Festival (Switzerland, 2018); and Nvidia Women’s Film Festival (Ghana, 2017). As a freelance press photographer, NwaNri’s work has been featured in online publications by Reuters, The Guardian, and The New York Times. She was awarded the 2021 Reuters Yannis Behrakis Grant for Photojournalism and shortlisted for the 2020 Wellcome Photography Prize. NwaNri is also an educator and has conducted film and photography training in various countries across the African continent. A protester hoists different flags that read “Reform the Police”, “SARS SWAT We Don’t Want” and “Buhari #ENDSARS SWAT” at a protest in Alausa, Lagos State Nigeria, during the #End SARS movement. 11 October 2020. “In this photograph, a protester hoists a flag while standing atop a truck, in an electric moment of national pride and solidarity.”

109 Nyancho NwaNri Nigeria 1988-

For the Trumpet Shall Sound #EndSARS 2020 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 30 x 45 cm; sheet size: 42 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 10

ZAR 15 000 – 20 000 USD 1 050 – 1 400 GBP 750 – 1 000 EURO 885 – 1 180

Protesters dance to the sound of trumpets and drums at the Muritala Muhammed International Airport Toll Plaza during the #EndSARS movement in Lagos, Nigeria. 17 October 2020. “This image captures a delicate moment where activism meets celebration, where radicalism meets musicality. In October 2020, Nigerian youth came together to stand in solidarity against police brutality and bad governance under the #EndSARS movement. Protests took on multiple forms from marching, chanting, music, dance and performance, to live painting – creating an ebb and flow that powered the youth through almost two weeks of demonstrations as they fought for their lives and their future.” Both works were exhibited at Art X Lagos, 2020.

NOTES For additional information on Nyancho NwaNri’s work, visit: https://nataal.com/this-is-lagos https://shado-mag.com/see/going-under/ https://geographical.co.uk/nature/geophoto/ item/3762-in-pictures-wellcome-photographyprize-2020-shortlist https://artxlagos.com/New-Nigeria-Studios https://news.artnet.com/art-world/nigeria-artlagos-photography-protest-1920849

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110 Mohamed Amin Kenyan 1943-1996

Cuban President Fidel Castro (left) with his younger brother Raul Castro (right), accompanied by President Julius Nyerere of Tanzania (centre) during a visit to a Cuban-funded agriculture school in Tanzania, 1977 1977 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by AKKA Project on behalf of the artist image size: 45 x 70 cm; sheet size: 59.5 x 81.5 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 10

ZAR 30 000 – 50 000 USD 2 100 – 3 500 GBP 1 500 – 2 500 EURO 1 770 – 2 950

111 Ralph Ndawo South African 1932-1980

Steve Biko funeral, King William’s Town, Eastern Cape, South Africa, 1977. 1977 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by Rachel Ndawo on behlaf of the artist’s estate image size: 30 x 45 cm; sheet size: 42 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 10

ZAR 15 000 – 20 000 USD 1 050 – 1 400 GBP 750 – 1 000 EURO 885 – 1 180

PROVENANCE Courtesy the Ralph Ndawo Family.

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112 Alf Kumalo South African 1930-2012

Dancing Ladies – Dance is music in motion (phataphata!) circa 1960 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist’s estate image size: 45 x 30 cm; sheet size: 59.5 x 42 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 10

ZAR 30 000 – 50 000 USD 2 100 – 3 500 GBP 1 500 – 2 500 EURO 1 770 – 2 950

PROVENANCE Courtesy Alf Kumalo Family Trust. NOTES For additional information on the Alf Kumalo archive, visit: https://www.plparchive.com/alf-kumalo-mainpage/

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“Alf Kumalo, an internationally recognised photographer, was on the spot to capture many key dramatic moments in South Africa’s liberation history, both tragic and joyous. In this collection Kumalo demonstrates his unique access to diverse iconic figures, not only in the South African struggle, but also in the global spotlight.” – From Through My Lens: A Photographic Memoir Born in Utrecht, KwaZulu-Natal, Alf Kumalo (1930 – 2012) came to Johannesburg as a young boy. A largely self-taught photographer, he worked at Bantu World and Golden City Post in the 1950s, freelanced for Drum magazine in the 1960s, and Sunday Times in the 1970s. Kumalo joined The Star in Johannesburg in the 1980s. His work has been published in leading international newspapers such as The Observer, The New York Times, New York Post and The Sunday Independent, and exhibited at the United Nations General Assembly, New York City. Kumalo’s books include Mandela: Echoes of an Era; Alf Kumalo: South African Photographer; Through My Lens: A Photographic Memoir; and 8115: A Prisoner’s Home. Kumalo was awarded the Presidential Order of Ikhamanga in Silver in 2004 and the Nat Nakasa Award for Media Integrity in 2005. Despite increasing oppression, the local cultural scene in townships flourished. Here, a jazz show hits a high note at the Orlando Stadium in Soweto.


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113 Alf Kumalo South African 1930-2012

Miriam Makeba Performing in Lesotho 1981 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist’s estate image size: 45 x 30 cm; sheet size: 59.5 x 42 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 10

ZAR 40 000 – 60 000 USD 2 800 – 4 200 GBP 2 000 – 3 000 EURO 2 360 – 3 540

PROVENANCE Courtesy Alf Kumalo Family Trust.

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Miriam Makeba sweats with emotion at a stage performance in Lesotho, 1981. Makeba, living in exile at the time, attended the event which Kumalo had organised with businessman Blowie Moloi.


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Born and raised in Nairobi, self-taught documentary photographer and visual storyteller Gordwin Odhiambo’s work critically explores the lives of young people and how they navigate the realities around them in the low-income urban communities of one of Africa’s largest and fastest-growing cities.

114 Gordwin Odhiambo Kenya 1993-

Mtaa Humble (from the Kibera - A Changing Community series) 2018 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by artist image size: 30 x 45 cm; sheet size: 42 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 10

ZAR 5 000 – 8 000 USD 350 – 560 GBP250 – 400 EURO 295 – 472

NOTES For additional information on Gordwin Odhiambo’s work, visit: https://gordwinodhiambo.com/site/index.php https://www.catchlight.io/news/2020/2/12/ behind-the-lens-with-gordwin-odhiambo

Raised in the informal settlement of Kibera, Odhiambo’s experiences and photographic practice would be shaped by this dynamic community. After high school, he participated in a study and volunteer programme by Voluntary Service Overseas and International Citizen Service on topics related to international development in Africa. After finishing the programme, more aware of the challenges of his community and how the community has been seen through other lenses, he wanted to explore these issues from an insider’s perspective and challenge mainstream representations and reductive stereotypes. Odhiambo was part of the 2017 World Press Photo Foundation workshop in Nairobi, moderated by Kenyan activist and photojournalist Boniface Mwangi. In 2018, he was awarded a scholarship to the VII Photo Foundation masterclass in Nairobi, moderated by photojournalists Nichole Sobecki and Danny Wilcox Frazier of VII Photo Agency. He is a member of the African Photojournalism Database – a group of professional African photographers telling the stories of the communities in which they work and live. He has received several accolades, including the East African Photography Awards organised by the Uganda Press Photo Association. “Kibera is a dynamic place that has its challenges, but joy, connection, and purpose forms a huge part of this community. As a young man, growing up through the challenges, I had to improvise and adapt to life situations and I found it very interesting.[…] Amidst all these, it was not all that gloomy. The things that I did and continue to do have and are shaping me into the person I am today. My current projects intentionally and thoughtfully explore the activities of young men in Nairobi’s low-income communities and how they go about navigating the tough economic realities. Buoyed by the desire to feel recognised, these young men are creating a unique cultural movement that is driving Nairobi’s art scene. Amidst the dynamism and vibrancy, existence among low-income communities in Nairobi, how do the youth dream? I believe that the way you make your hair, dress and present yourself within the community have a lot to do with what you’d like to be in the future. My photography puts faces to a place I call home and creates a sense of existence and belonging through art and culture.” The work was part of the project that received the East African Photography Award by the Uganda Press Photo Association in 2020, and explored how amidst a pandemic, a community came together to stop the spread of the Coronavirus. It has been exhibited in Oldenburg, Germany, with the World Press Photo and African Photojournalism Database.

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115 Gordwin Odhiambo Kenya 1993-

Ballet in Kibera (from the Kibera - A Changing Community series) 2020 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by artist image size: 30 x 45 cm; sheet size: 42 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 9

ZAR 5 000 – 8 000 USD 350 – 560 GBP250 – 400 EURO 295 – 472

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Valentine Ayuma, 10, a member of Project Elimu, practises dancing during a remote ballet lesson via a mobile phone due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Kibera in Nairobi, Kenya, 22 May 2020. Project Elimu is a Kenyan nonprofit organisation founded by former professional Kenyan dancer, Mike Wamaya, to provide a wide range of extracurricular activities to schools within informal settlements, empowering children and teachers. Over 400 children from 25 different schools participate.


116 Gordwin Odhiambo Kenya 1993-

From the series Kibera - A Changing Community 2021 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by artist image size: 30 x 45 cm; sheet size: 42 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 9

ZAR 5 000 – 8 000 USD 350 – 560 GBP250 – 400 EURO 295 – 472

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117 Sumy Sadurni Chile 1989-

Mirror mirror on the Nile (from the Reflections series) 2020 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by artist image size: 30 x 45 cm; sheet size: 42 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 10

ZAR 12 000 – 15 000 USD 840 – 1050 GBP 600 – 750 EURO 708 – 885

Women from Kampala take a small holiday and head to Jinja, by the Nile River. Here they shop for hats.

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118 Dahlia Maubane South Africa 1988-

Untitled (from the On Seeing and Being Seen series, Johannesburg) 2020 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by artist image size: 45 x 70cm; sheet size: 59.5 x 84 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 5 + 1AP

ZAR 7 000 – 10 000 USD 490 – 700 GBP 350 – 500 EURO 413 – 590

NOTES For additional information on Dahlia Maubane’s work, visit: https://marketphotoworkshop. co.za/2021/01/25/on-seeing-and-being-seena-solo-exhibition-by-dahlia-maubane/ https://mg.co.za/article/2018-11-23-00-wozasisi-tracks-the-ways-of-street-hairstylists/ https://marketphotoworkshop. co.za/2018/08/17/woza-sisi-an-exhibition-byalumnus-award-recipient-dahlia-maubane/ https://medium.com/dave-mann/profilecreativity-at-work-photographer-dahliamaubane-8d4610eb6058 https://www.sabcnews.com/sabcnews/wozasisi-exhibition-showcases-women-hairstylists/

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Dahlia Maubane is a photographer and multimedia designer. She completed a Bachelor of Technology in Multimedia at the University of Johannesburg in 2009 and went on to study at the Market Photo Workshop. In 2014, her on-going body of work, Woza Sisi, was one of the 10 open call projects selected for the Joburg Photo Umbrella. The third culmination of Woza Sisi was exhibited in Mafikeng, with the support of the National Arts Council, in 2017. Maubane is the recipient of the inaugural Market Photo Workshop Alumnus Award and has participated in numerous Market Photo projects and exhibitions. She expanded on Woza Sisi with a new chapter of photographs which were showcased at The Photo Workshop Gallery in 2018. In 2019, Maubane’s first international solo exhibition was part of the inaugural Dialogue Vintage Photography Festival in Amsterdam. She was awarded the 2019/2020 Ampersand Foundation Fellowship and Residency where she was based in New York for six weeks. Maubane is currently pursuing her master’s studies (Visual Arts) and is an Applied Photography facilitator at the Market Photo Workshop. “On Seeing and Being Seen’’ is a body of work that explores the role of participatory photography as a tool to investigate how a group of women street-hairstylists utilise, navigate and shape urban spaces whilst plying their trade. Starting my master’s study in early 2019, I have been collaborating with four hairstylists – Squeeza, Rose, Beauty, and Phumzile. My own photographic work juxtaposes multiple viewpoints of the inner-city of Johannesburg with the participants’ daily work environment to foreground the city’s complex realities. It explores ways to reflect on the continually shifting nature of the city. I have been navigating this part of the city over the past eight years, from the time I first developed my on-going photo series, Woza Sisi, as a student at the Market Photo Workshop.”


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David Lurie lives and works in Cape Town. He studied economics, politics and philosophy, taught philosophy, did research in international political economy at the London School of Economics, and worked as a consultant economist before turning to photography. Lurie lived for many years in London, where he began doing documentary projects part-time in 1990 and full-time from 1995, following the publication of his first book, Life in the Liberated Zone. He moved back to Cape Town permanently in 2011.

119 David Lurie South Africa 1951-

Gugulethu, Cape Town (from Images of Table Mountain) 2005 pigment ink on Hahnemühle Fine Art Baryta (Fibre base) Paper 325 gsm accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by artist image size: 38 x 47 cm; sheet size: 42 x 59.5 cm unframed number 4 from an edition of 8

ZAR 10 000 – 15 000 USD 700 – 1 050 GBP 500 – 750 EURO 590 – 885

His work has been widely published and exhibited in the United Kingdom, Europe, the United States, Australia, South Africa, and the Middle East. He is the recipient of several awards including Pictures of the Year International, the World Understanding Award for Cape Town Fringe: Manenberg Avenue is where it’s Happening; Nikon (UK); Ilford Pro Photo (SA); and Arts Council of Great Britain Grant Awards. His monographs are Karoo – Land of Thirst (Hatje Cantz Verlag, 2019); Daylight Ghosts (Hatje Cantz Verlag, 2018); Undercity – the other Cape Town (Hatje Cantz Verlag, 2017); Images of Table Mountain (Bell-Roberts, 2006); Cape Town Fringe: Manenberg Avenue is where it’s Happening (Double Storey Books, 2004); and Life in the Liberated Zone (Cornerhouse, 1995). Dreaming the Street will be published by Skira in 2022. “This shadow of guilt, of fear and denial – a shadow shadowed in turn by a bounteous and hysterical glee – is revealed in a strategic yet strikingly unmotivated way in David Lurie’s photographs. By unmotivated, I mean that Lurie does not intend to reveal to us the monstrosity of life lived at the foot of a mountain […] It is therefore a photographic project which does not appeal to the viewer’s conscience, but to a certain ethical nerve that is not wholly a matter of mind […] Lurie’s black and white photographs are shadow works, or, works caught in the physical and darkly mythic shadow of Table Mountain. […] None of these images are posed or stately. Rather, as if seen through a rearview mirror, at once backwards and forwards, they quicken a nerve, combust a settlement, allowing the viewer a state of seeing that is neither that of the flaneur or the voyeur, but rather that of Iggy Pop’s passenger: ‘I am a passenger / and I ride and I ride…’ […] Sometimes the mountain appears as a mere sliver on the distant horizon, sometimes it appears in fragments in the urban thicket. Never is the mountain memorialised. When the mountain dominates the frame it also engulfs it. As a long shot or close up the mountain invariably disturbs the frame. Never is the mountain steadied in a medium shot, and, as a consequence, never is the mountain naturalised or perceived as a normative framing register. This decision is not merely a perverse one. Rather, what this decision suggests is the complexity and the uncertainty of human habitation in relation to the mountain.” – From ‘Shadow of the Mountain’ by Ashraf Jamal, Images of Table Mountain (Bell-Roberts, 2006). Exhibitions of Images of Table Mountain include Bell Roberts Gallery, Cape Town; Standard Bank Gallery, Johannesburg; Hereford Photography Festival, UK; and Bonani Africa, Johannesburg.

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120 David Lurie South Africa 1951-

District 6, Cape Town (from Images of Table Mountain) 2002 pigment ink on Hahnemühle Fine Art Baryta (Fibre base) Paper 325 gsm accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by artist image size: 38 x 47 cm; sheet size: 42 x 59.5 cm unframed number 4 from an edition of 8

ZAR 10 000 – 15 000 USD 700 – 1 050 GBP 500 – 750 EURO 590 – 885

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121 David Lurie South Africa 1951-

Nolungile Station, Khayelitsha, Cape Town (from Images of Table Mountain) 2005 pigment ink on Hahnemühle Fine Art Baryta (Fibre base) Paper 325 gsm accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by artist image size: 38 x 47 cm; sheet size: 42 x 59.5 cm unframed number 4 from an edition of 8

ZAR 10 000 – 15 000 USD 700 – 1 050 GBP 500 – 750 EURO 590 – 885

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122 Kiluanji Kia Henda Angola 1979-

Expired Trading Product Untitled 2008 digital print on found synthetic hessian bag signed, dated 08 C.T. and inscribed P/P in ink along the bottom 120 x 130 cm

ZAR 30 000 – 50 000 USD 2 100 – 3 500 GBP 1 500 – 2 500 EURO 1 770 – 2 950

Select solo exhibitions include Something Happened on the Way to Heaven, Museo d’Arte Provincia di Nuoro (2020); The Isle of Venus, Museum of Leuven (2020); A City Called Mirage, International Studio and Curatorial Program in New York (2017); In the Days of a Dark Safari, Galeria Filomena Soares, Lisbon, and Goodman Gallery, Cape Town (2017); and Self-Portrait As A White Man, Galleria Fonti, Naples (2010).

EXHIBITED Expired Trading Products was exhibited at blank projects, Cape Town, 2008. The work is featured in Kiluanji Kia Henda: Travelling to the Sun through the Night (Steidl, 2016).

Kia Henda has participated in numerous international group exhibitions, including Barbican Art Centre, London (2020); Migros Museum, Zurich (2020); Zeitz MOCAA, Cape Town (2019); Tate Modern, London (2019); MAAT, Lisbon (2018); Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris (2016); the National Museum of African Art – Smithsonian Institute, Washington D.C. (2015); and the Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao (2015). His work was shown at the Gwangju Biennale (2018), Bergen Assembly (2013); São Paulo Biennale (2010); Venice Biennale (2007); and the Luanda Triennale (2007).

NOTES For additional information on Kiluanji Kia Henda’s work, visit: https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artists/kiluanjikia-henda-23100/introducing-kiluanji-kiahenda https://nataal.com/kiluanji-kia-henda https://www.mleuven.be/en/kiahenda

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Kiluanji Kia Henda is an autodidact for whom a profound springboard into photography was growing up in a household of photography enthusiasts. His conceptual edge was sharpened by immersing himself into music, avant-garde theatre, and collaborating with a collective of emerging artists in Luanda’s art scene. In his practice, he explores photography, video, performance, installation, and object-sculpture to materialise fictitious narratives – dislocating the facts to different temporalities and contexts.

In 2017, he received the Frieze Artist Award. He was awarded Angola’s National Culture and Arts Award in 2012. His work is held in private and institutional collections, including Tate Modern (London); the Museum of Modern Art (Warsaw); Centre George Pompidou (Paris); FRAC Grand Large – Hauts-deFrance (Dunkerque); and Pérez Art Museum (Miami).


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123 Jesse Navarre Vos South Africa 1991-

Oath on Love 2020 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag sheet size: 84 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 5 + 1 AP

ZAR 18 000 – 24 000 USD 1 260 – 1 680 GBP 900 – 1 200 EURO 1 062 – 1 416

NOTES For additional information on Jesse Navarre Vos, visit: https://www.itsnicethat.com/articles/jessenavarre-vos-photography-250320 https://www.thursdayschild.global/talent/ jesse-navarre-vos https://imaonline.jp/imagraphy/202105jessenavarre-vos/#img4 https://www.booooooom.com/2020/11/20/ photographer-spotlight-jesse-navarre-vos/ https://bubblegumclub.co.za/photography/ jesse-navarre-vos-portraiture-places-processequal-to-product/

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Jesse Navarre Vos wants to slow things down. While his early work is a sling of momentary exchanges, as his focus is pulled evermore toward portraiture, he seeks authentic connection with his subjects before drawing his camera. For him, photography is a way to understand the world and the different ways of living in it. “Often the interaction is more important than the photograph itself,” he comments. This approach results in images where perfect strangers feel familiar and we are granted access into their space. Shooting on medium and large format film allows Vos time to interact with his collaborators, including the person in front of the lens. The lengthy postproduction process (he does his own scanning) offers up time to reflect on the images. The expense also means he has to be selective about how many shots he takes. “I have to make sure that every photograph has purpose. My pledge to photography is to be slow, intentioned, and to honour the process of what it is to take a photograph, and how amazing it is that we can.” Oath on Love was Oath Magazine Volume 2 cover image commission, also shown in the House of Love exhibition (PH Centre, Cape Town, 2021),


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124 Jean Brundrit South Africa 1966-

Valued Families 1995 handprinted by the artist on glossy Ilford Multigrade Fibre photographic paper; double weight signed on the reverse; accompanied by a certificate of authenticity image size: 27 x 27.5 cm; sheet size: 40.5 x 30.5 cm unframed number 14 from an edition of 20

ZAR 10 000 – 15 000 USD 700 – 1 050 GBP 500 – 750 EURO 590 – 885

NOTES For additional information on Jean Brundrit’s work, see: Art in South Africa: The Future Present, edited by Sue Williamson and Ashraf Jamal (David Philips, 1997) http://www.michaelis.uct.ac.za/fin/people/ academic-staff/brundrit

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Jean Brundrit teaches photography in the Michaelis School of Fine Art, University of Cape Town, and is a National Research Foundation rated researcher. Her research interests are primarily concerned with exploring the environment and identity – her work pertaining to identity is concerned with exploring lesbian identity and strategies of representation within a South African context. As a visual artist, she has exhibited extensively in South Africa and contributed to a number of international exhibitions. “Valued Families comprises two images overlaid. Beneath is a pinhole photograph of two women’s bodies close together; laid over this is a diagram of a ‘family’ tree of connecting names. The artwork speaks to how we construct our non-biological families and support networks. It inverts the phrase ‘a return to family values’, which is often cited as the answer to all ‘deviation’ and problems in the world by the popular press and conservative leaders.” Valued Families has been included in numerous exhibitions, including Gay Rights Rites Re-writes, curated by Joan Bellis and Wessel van Huyssteen (Martin Melkhuis, Cape Town; Oliewenhuis Art Museum, Bloemfontein; Gertrude Posel Gallery, Johannesburg; University of Witwatersrand, 1995-1996); Lifetimes: an exhibition of Southern African art, curated by Ruth Sack and Nina Jacobson, as part of the Out of Africa Cultural Festival (Art Bureau, Munich, 1997); Holdings: refiguring the archive, curated by Jane Taylor (University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, 1998); Regards Croises, as part of the 9th Aubenades de la Photographie (Le Château d’Aubenas, Aubenas, 2001); Ten years of Pinhole Photography, a solo exhibition invited by the association La salle d’attente (SaintExupery Cultural Centre, Reims, 2002); 40 years: artists and designers from the University of Stellenbosch, curated by Victor Honey (Sasol Art Museum, University of Stellenbosch, 2004); and Out of Site, a solo exhibition (Association for Visual Arts, Cape Town, 2013).


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125 Chris Dennis Rosenberg Uganda 1997-

Gyre 2021 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 30 x 18 cm; sheet size: 42 x 30 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 8

ZAR 8 000 – 12 000 USD 560 – 840 GBP 400 – 600 EURO 472 – 708

NOTES For additional information on Chris Dennis Rosenberg’s work, visit: https://www.chrisdennisrosenberg.com/

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Chris Dennis Rosenberg Kimbugwe is a photographer based in Kampala, Uganda. His creative practice seeks to explore the idea of identity and the complexity of a minoritised existence. Through portraiture and visual storytelling about people, nature, and wildlife, he aims to highlight the importance of coexistence in its many forms. He holds a Bachelor of Science in Multimedia and Animation from ISBAT University Kampala (Uganda, 2019) and is a graduate of the Market Photo Workshop’s Advanced Programme in Photography (South Africa, 2020). His work has been recognised at the Uganda Press Photo Awards (2018 and 2019); Future Africa Visions in Time, Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung & GoetheZentrum Kampala photography competition (2019); and the Alexia Student Grant (2019). In 2020, he was selected by acclaimed photographer Andrew Tshabangu as an apprentice for the fourth Kampala Art Biennale, and he received the Adobe Creative Residency Community Fund in 2021. He is also a mentor for the UPPA Emerging Photographers Mentorship Programme as well as a juror for the Young Photographer Award. “Gyre, 2021 is part of a long-term project exploring my interactions and relationships with a diverse group of artists encountered on my journey to selfactualisation as an artist.”


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126 Chris Dennis Rosenberg Uganda 1997-

Cyan 2020 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 30 x 18 cm; sheet size: 42 x 30 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 8

ZAR 8 000 – 12 000 USD 560 – 840 GBP 400 – 600 EURO 472 – 708

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“Cyan, 2020 is part of an on-going body of work, Homosajja, which explores queerness, fetishes, sexuality and the performance of gender.”


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127 Lindokuhle Sobekwa South Africa 1995-

Bond 2020 archival ink print on Hahnemühle Baryta accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist image size: 30 x 45 cm; sheet size: 42 x 59.5 cm unframed number 1 from an edition of 7

ZAR 25 000 – 35 000 USD 1 750 – 2 450 GBP 1 250 – 1 750 EURO 1 475 – 2 065

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Aspire X PLP African Photography Auction 2021 e-catalogue  

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