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A Publication by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics

Pharmacologist Vol. 59 • Number 1 • March 2017

Typhus: War and Deception in 1940’s Poland

Inside: Election Results ASPET Annual Meeting Program SURF 25th Anniversary


The Pharmacologist is published and distributed by the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

Contents 1 Message from the President 3 Election Results 4 Award Winners 10 SURF 25th Anniversary 12 Commemorative Travel Awards 13 Strategic Planning Membership Survey Results 17 ASPET Annual Meeting Program 31 Feature Story: Typhus: War and Deception in 1940's Poland

40 Meeting News 43 Science Policy News 47 Education News 51 Journals News 54 Membership News 60 Members in the News 66 Division News 76 Chapter News The Pharmacologist • March 2017

THE PHARMACOLOGIST PRODUCTION TEAM Rich Dodenhoff Catherine L. Fry, PhD Dana Kauffman Judith A. Siuciak, PhD Suzie Thompson COUNCIL President David R. Sibley, PhD President-Elect John D. Schuetz, PhD Past President Kenneth E. Thummel, PhD Secretary/Treasurer Charles P. France, PhD Secretary/Treasurer-Elect John J. Tesmer, PhD Past Secretary/Treasurer Dennis C. Marshall, PhD Councilors Wayne L. Backes, PhD Carol L. Beck, PharmD, PhD Margaret E. Gnegy, PhD Chair, Board of Publications Trustees Mary E. Vore, PhD Chair, Program Committee Scott A. Waldman, MD, PhD FASEB Board Representative Brian M. Cox, PhD Executive Officer Judith A. Siuciak, PhD The Pharmacologist (ISSN 0031-7004) is published quarterly in March, June, September, and December by the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, 9650 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20814-3995. Annual subscription rates: $25.00 for ASPET members; $50.00 for U.S. nonmembers and institutions; $75.00 for nonmembers and institutions outside the U.S. Single copy: $25.00. Copyright Š 2017 by the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics Inc. All rights reserved. Periodicals postage paid at Bethesda, MD. GST number for Canadian subscribers: BN:13489 2330 RT. ASPET assumes no responsibility for the statements and opinions advanced by contributors to The Pharmacologist. Postmaster: Send address changes to: The Pharmacologist, ASPET, 9650 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20814-3995.


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Message from

The President Dear ASPET Members,

I hope that everyone’s 2017 is off to a great start! One of our most exciting events of the year is now just around the corner – Experimental Biology 2017 in Chicago, from April 22-26. ASPET programming this year offers over 40 symposia that span the entire field of pharmacology, including keynote lectures by Dr. Masamitsu lino from the Japanese Pharmacological Society and Dr. Emmanuelle Charpentier, the Tang Prize winner in Biopharmaceutical Science. Among this year’s special highlights are lectures from our scientific achievement award winners, including Drs. Samie Jaffrey, Joan Heller Brown, Paul Insel, Doo-Sup Choi, and Margaret MacLean. Award winners will be honored at our annual business meeting on April 22nd. Also on April 22nd, there will be three sessions of particular interest to educators and young scientists. The first, our Teaching Institute, will be chaired by Drs. Joey Barnett and Richard Okita and will provide advice on experimental design and rigor in graduate training. Second, Ashley McFalls will chair a symposium on using interprofessional education (IPE) competencies in educating health care professionals. And third, this year’s Graduate Student-Postdoctoral Colloquium will address effective scientific communication. A “BIG IDEAS” initiative led by Drs. Kan He, Tom Woolf, and Paul Hollenberg, Surmounting the Insurmountable: Obstacles in Drug Discovery and Development – Real World Case Studies, will debut at the meeting this year. Notably, throughout the meeting, there will be numerous opportunities for networking, including the EB-wide opening reception, the divisional mixers and several social events for students and postdoctoral fellows. Complete ASPET programing information can be found on pages 17-30 of this issue. The community service day at the annual meeting will continue for the ninth year in a row. This year on Friday, April 21st, the Behavioral Pharmacology Division will lead a day of service at Pacific Garden Missions, the oldest continuouslyoperating Gospel rescue mission in the country, providing food and shelter for individuals in need. If you want to volunteer, please contact Charles France at france@uthscsa.edu. I hope that all of you will join us in the Windy City for what will surely be one of our best ASPET meetings yet. This past December, ASPET was well represented at Pharmacology 2016, the annual meeting of the British Pharmacological Society, which was held in London. There were 54 posters presented by ASPET trainees, five of whom received ASPET travel awards to attend the meeting. ASPET also sponsored a symposium entitled The Long Reach of the Bowel: Translating Microbiome Science into Therapeutics for Systemic Human Diseases, organized by Drs. Pamela Hornby and Ross Corriden. A number of ASPET Council members were also in attendance at Pharmacology 2016 and had a chance to meet with their British counterparts to discuss topics of mutual interest. See page 40 for more information. This has been a busy winter for ASPET Council and several ASPET committees as they have worked on developing a new strategic plan for the Society. Last October, the ASPET Council convened a retreat during which an outline for a new strategic plan was formulated. Using results from a membership-wide survey (see pages 13-16), six major goals were identified along with associated objectives. Each goal has since been assigned to either standing committees or newly

March 2017 • The Pharmacologist


2 designated task forces in order to identify strategies for accomplishing these goals. The committees have met several times over the winter and have made excellent progress. This work will continue up to and through the annual meeting, with a reasonably detailed outline of the new strategic plan being presented during our business meeting on April 22. The election of ASPET Council and division officers was just recently completed, and I am pleased to announce that Drs. Edward Morgan, Margaret Gnegy, and Alan Smrcka will be joining the ASPET Council as your president-elect, secretary/treasurer-elect, and councilor, respectively. In addition, the names of our newly elected divisional officers can be found on pages 66-68. Please join me in congratulating them and also thanking those individuals who graciously agreed to stand for election. Finally, I want to welcome Yolan John, who joined the ASPET staff this last December. Yolan will serve as the point of contact for all communications related to the Executive Office. I very much look forward to seeing everyone in Chicago in April!

Warm regards,

David R. Sibley, Ph.D. President, ASPET

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2017 Election Results The 2017 ASPET election closed on February 10, 2017 with a great turnout. Congratulations to newly elected Council members Edward T. Morgan, Margaret E. Gnegy, and Alan V. Smrcka, who will begin their terms on July 1, 2017.

President-Elect

Secretary/Treasurer-Elect

Councilor

Edward T. Morgan, PhD Professor of Pharmacology, Emory University School of Medicine

Margaret E. Gnegy, PhD Professor and Associate Chair for Education, Department of Pharmacology, University of Michigan Medical School

Alan V. Smrcka, PhD Professor of Pharmacology, University of Michigan Medical School

The ASPET Nominating Committee requests nominations (including self-nominations) from our members for President-elect, Secretary/Treasurer-elect and Councilor for consideration in the 2018 ASPET Election. Nominations for the 2018 ASPET Election are open now through April 7th, 2017.

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2017 Award Winners ASPET presents several major awards on either an annual or a biennial basis. These awards are given to recognize accomplishments either in specific areas of pharmacology or contributions to the discipline in general. We are pleased to announce our 2017 Scientific Achievement Award winners. ASPET will present these awards on Saturday, April 22, 2017 at 5:30 PM at the Business Meeting and Awards Presentation at the ASPET Annual Meeting at Experimental Biology 2017 at the McCormick Place Convention Center, West Building, in Room W470.

John J. Abel Award in Pharmacology The John J. Abel Award in Pharmacology, presented annually, is named after the founder of ASPET. It was established in 1946 to stimulate fundamental research in pharmacology and experimental therapeutics by young investigators.

Samie R. Jaffrey, MD, PhD Weill Medical College, Cornell University Dr. Samie Jaffrey has been named the 2017 recipient of the John J. Abel Award in Pharmacology. ASPET recognizes him for his innovative research and development of new technologies that have led to the discovery of fundamental and transformative concepts regarding how ribonucleic acid (RNA) is regulated to control gene expression in health and disease. Dr. Jaffrey was nominated for the Abel Award by Dr. Solomon Snyder from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. Jaffrey received his MD and PhD in neuroscience from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1999. He then became a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Neuroscience at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, where he worked with Dr. Snyder. In 2001, Dr. Jaffrey joined Weill Medical College at Cornell University as assistant professor of pharmacology and currently holds the distinguished position of Greenberg-Starr Professor at Cornell University.

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Dr. Jaffrey’s work has fundamentally advanced our understanding of RNA biology and gene regulation. Most recently, he has helped to launch the field of “epitranscriptomics,” which has revealed that mRNA contains diverse nucleotide modifications that impact its fate and function in cells. Dr. Jaffrey’s transcriptomewide mapping of N6-methyladenosine (m6A) in 2012 revealed that m6A is a pervasive modification in the transcriptome, thereby identifying this modification as a fundamentally novel form of post-transcriptional mRNA regulation. Since this seminal study, Dr. Jaffrey mapped dimethyladenosine (m6Am) and established functions of m6A and m6Am as well as m6A and m6Am reader, writer, and eraser proteins. As a result of his early studies, epitranscriptomics is a rapidly developing area of molecular biology that is transforming our understanding of gene regulation in normal and disease states. Dr. Jaffrey will deliver the John J. Abel Award in Pharmacology Lecture titled, “The Dynamic Epitranscriptome: Encoding the Fate and Function of mRNA with Reversible Nucleotide Modifications” on Sunday, April 23 from 8:30AM – 9:20AM in Room W470b of the McCormick Place Convention Center in Chicago.


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Julius Axelrod Award in Pharmacology The Julius Axelrod Award in Pharmacology, presented annually, was established in 1991 to honor the memory of the eminent American pharmacologist who shaped the fields of neuroscience, drug metabolism, and biochemistry and who served as a mentor for numerous eminent pharmacologists around the world. This award is presented for significant contributions to understanding the biochemical mechanisms underlying the pharmacological actions of drugs and for contributions to mentoring other pharmacologists.

Michel Bouvier, PhD Université de Montreal Dr. Michel Bouvier has been named the 2017 recipient of the Julius Axelrod Award in Pharmacology. ASPET recognizes him for both his important contributions to the field of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and for the profound impact he has had as a mentor to his former students and postdocs. Having been mentored himself by a former postdoc of Julius Axelrod, Dr. Bouvier trained his associates in that same spirit. Dr. Bouvier was nominated for the Axelrod Award by Dr. Marc Caron from Duke University Medical Center. Dr. Bouvier earned his PhD in neurological sciences from Université de Montreal Faculty of Medicine in 1984. Afterwards, he was a postdoctoral trainee at Duke University Medical Center. Dr. Bouvier then moved back to Université de Montreal Faculty of Medicine, where he became assistant professor in the Department of Biochemisty. He is currently

chief executive officer of the Institute for Research in Immunology and Cancer (IRIC) and deputy vice-rector for Research, Discovery, Creation and Innovation at Université de Montreal. Dr. Bouvier and his laboratory have greatly impacted the field of GPCRs with inventive concepts of inverse agonism and biased signaling. His laboratory’s finding that pharmacologically selective small molecules can promote folding and restore trafficking and function to otherwise defective GPCRs led to the identification of pharmacological chaperones as potential treatment for genetic diseases, including a successful pilot clinical trial for treatment of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. Dr. Bouvier and his laboratory also pioneered the development of bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) approaches, leading to the development of more than 40 biosensors monitoring protein-protein interactions, post-translational modifications, and second messenger production. Dr. Bouvier will present the Axelrod Lecture at the 2018 ASPET Annual Meeting during Experimental Biology in San Diego, April 21–25, 2018.

Otto Krayer Award in Pharmacology The Otto Krayer Award commemorates the enduring legacy of Dr. Otto Krayer's ethical behavior, commitment to teaching, high standards of scientific scholarship, publication and editorship, promotion of interdisciplinary research to reveal the actions of drugs or other chemicals, and his guidance and support of younger scientists.

Joan Heller Brown, PhD University of California San Diego Dr. Joan Heller Brown has been named the 2017 recipient of the Otto Krayer Award in Pharmacology. With this

award, Dr. Heller Brown is being recognized for her interdisciplinary and pathfinding studies on G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), scientific scholarship, and strong commitment to the teaching and mentoring of younger scientists. Dr. Heller Brown was nominated for the award by Drs. Palmer Taylor and Paul Insel from the University of California San Diego (UC San Diego).

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Dr. Heller Brown received her PhD in pharmacology from Albert Einstein College of Medicine (AECOM). She was an NIH predoctoral trainee with the Department of Pharmacology at AECOM, where her first publication, demonstrating that the dopamine receptor couples to adenylate cyclase and is the target of antipsychotic drugs, was communicated to the PNAS by her department chair, Dr. Alfred Gilman Senior. Dr. Heller Brown was then an NIH postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Pharmacology at the University of Colorado Medical Center in Denver. After her postdoctoral fellowship in 1975, Dr. Heller Brown moved to UC San Diego where she has held many important positions. Since 2002, Dr. Heller Brown has served as chair of UC San Diego’s Department of Pharmacology and is currently distinguished professor of pharmacology. Dr. Heller Brown’s work has led to the discoveries that muscarinic GPCRs inhibit adenylate cyclase,

GPCRs that stimulate phospholipase C and CaM kinase II regulate cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, and GPCRs that activate RhoA contribute to neuroinflammation and aberrant cancer cell proliferation. Her research has been consistently funded by NIH and reported in 230 peer reviewed papers. She has served on multiple editorial boards, including five currently, and was editor of the ASPET journal Molecular Pharmacology. Dr. Heller Brown received the ASPET Benedict R. Lucchesi Distinguished Lectureship in Cardiac Pharmacology in 2009 and has served as a keynote speaker at past ASPET Annual Meetings. Dr. Heller Brown will deliver the Otto Krayer Award Lecture titled, “G Protein Signaling in Cardiac Growth, Protection, Inflammation and Failure” on Monday, April 24, 2017 from 2:00PM – 2:50PM in Room W470b of the McCormick Place Convention Center in Chicago.

Pharmacia-ASPET Award for Experimental Therapeutics The Pharmacia-ASPET Award for Experimental Therapeutics, presented annually, recognizes and stimulates outstanding research in pharmacology and experimental therapeutics, basic laboratory, or clinical research that has had, or potentially will have, a major impact on the pharmacological treatment of disease.

Craig W. Lindsley, PhD Vanderbilt Center for Neuroscience Drug Discovery, Vanderbilt University Dr. Craig Lindsley has been named the 2017 recipient of the Pharmacia-ASPET Award in Experimental Therapeutics. He is being recognized for his pioneering use of technology-enabled synthesis, which led to fundamental and transforming effects on medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, and drug discovery. Dr. Lindsley was nominated for the award by Dr. P. Jeffrey Conn from Vanderbilt University. Dr. Lindsley earned his PhD in chemistry from the University of California, Santa Barbara. He then did his postdoctoral fellowship at Harvard University.

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In June 2001, Dr. Lindsley went to Merck & Co. where he developed a streamlined approach for lead optimization. This resulted in the accelerated delivery of seven drug candidates for oncology, schizophrenia and cognition, in which three drugs entered human testing. In September 2006, Dr. Lindsley moved to Vanderbilt University, where he has served in multiple leadership roles, including director of the Vanderbilt Specialized Chemistry Center for Accelerated Probe Development. He is currently William K. Warren, Jr. chair in medicine, professor of pharmacology (with tenure), and director of medicinal chemistry for the Vanderbilt Center for Neuroscience Drug Discovery (VCNDD). Since 2008, Dr. Lindsley has licensed 8 programs to major pharmaceutical companies and several molecules developed within the VCNDD are in late-stage IND-enabling studies aimed at


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addressing major unmet CNS disorders through allosteric modulation. Dr. Lindsley serves on the executive committee of ASPET’s Division for Molecular Pharmacology. He has received numerous awards over his career, including

ASPET’s John J. Abel Award in 2014 and the ASPETAstellas Award for Translational Pharmacology in 2010. Dr. Lindsley is the founding Editor-in-Chief of ACS Chemical Neuroscience and currently serves on multiple editorial boards.

Robert R. Ruffolo Career Achievement Award in Pharmacology The Robert R. Ruffolo Career Achievement Award in Pharmacology, presented annually, was established in 2011 in recognition of the contributions made to drug discovery and development by Dr. Ruffolo. The award recognizes the scientific achievements of scientists who are at the height of their careers and who have made significant contributions to any area of pharmacology.

Donald P. McDonnell, PhD Duke University School of Medicine Dr. Donald McDonnell has been named the 2017 recipient of the Robert R. Ruffolo Career Achievement Award in Pharmacology. He is being recognized for his genetic and pharmacological dissection of steroid receptor signal transduction pathways and the development of novel estrogen and androgen receptor modulators with therapeutic applications. He was nominated for the award by Dr. David Mangelsdorf, the Alfred G. Gilman Distinguished Chair in Pharmacology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. Dr. McDonnell earned his BS in biochemistry from National University of Ireland Galway and his PhD in cell biology from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. During his PhD studies, he cloned the cDNA for the vitamin D receptor and demonstrated its relation to the classical steroid receptors. Dr. McDonnell subsequently spent a year as a postdoctoral fellow at Smith, Kline & Beckman, Inc., where he developed a further interest in studying the molecular pharmacology of nuclear receptors.

In 1990, Dr. McDonnell became assistant professor of cell biology at Baylor College of Medicine. The following year, he returned to drug discovery as director and head of molecular biology at Ligand Pharmaceuticals, Inc. In 1994, Dr. McDonnell moved to Duke University, where his work has since focused on the genetic and pharmacological dissection of steroid receptor signal transduction pathways and the development of novel estrogen and androgen receptor modulators, some of which are clinical candidates being evaluated as treatments for a variety of endocrinopathies. Dr. McDonnell is currently the Glaxo-Wellcome professor of molecular cancer biology and chairman of the Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology at Duke University School of Medicine. He serves as co-director of the Women’s Cancer Program, Duke Cancer Institute. Dr. McDonnell has received numerous investigator awards, including the Pharmacia-ASPET Award for Experimental Therapeutics in 2005 and ASPET’s John J. Abel Award in Pharmacology in 1999. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians, Ireland. Dr. McDonnell has published over 250 articles on the molecular pharmacology of nuclear hormone receptors. He was recently elected to the National Academy of Medicine.

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Reynold Spector Award in Clinical Pharmacology The Reynold Spector Award in Clinical Pharmacology was established in 2014 by ASPET in recognition of Dr. Spector’s dedication and contributions to clinical pharmacology. The Award recognizes excellence in research and/or teaching in clinical pharmacology. This award is made possible by an endowment to ASPET from Dr. Reynold and Mrs. Michiko Spector.

Margaret R. MacLean, MBE, PhD, FRSE, FBPhS, FRSB University of Glasgow Dr. Margaret MacLean has been named the 2017 recipient of the Reynold Spector Award in Clinical Pharmacology. She is being recognized for her excellence in research on pulmonary arterial hypertension and her dedication to postgraduate teaching. She was nominated for the award by Dr. Rhian Touyz from the University of Glasgow. Dr. MacLean earned both her BS in biological sciences and her PhD in pharmacology from Edinburgh University. After receiving her PhD, Dr. MacLean became a postdoctoral associate at the University of Florida and then Cambridge University. In 1989, she moved to Glasgow University, where she has held many significant positions. Dr. MacLean was dean of graduate studies in the College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, and is currently a professor of pulmonary pharmacology. Dr. MacLean’s research has focused on the pharmacology of PDE5, ET-1 and serotonin in the

The Pharmacologist • March 2017

pulmonary circulation and how this changes during the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). As PAH is more prevalent in females, her current work concentrates on sex effects and estrogen metabolism in PAH. This work has contributed to PDE5 inhibitors and ET-1 antagonists being used to treat PAH. More recently, her work has encouraged clinical trials of aromatase inhibitors and tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitors for PAH. Dr. MacLean has always had a passion for postgraduate student training, having attracted over £4M for PhD and MRes opportunities. Over her career, Dr. MacLean has been the recipient of numerous prestigious awards. She received an MBE in the 2010 Queen’s New Year’s Honours list for her career and public engagement. In 2013, she was elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (FRSE) and now sits on Council of the RSE. Dr. MacLean will deliver the Spector Award Lecture titled, “Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: From Bench to Bedside (Sex Matters)” on Sunday, April 23, 2017 from 2:00PM – 2:50PM in Room W470b of the McCormick Place Convention Center in Chicago.


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David Lehr Research Award The David Lehr Research Award is intended to extend funding for preclinical or clinical research directed towards improving human health. This award is made possible by an endowment to ASPET from Mrs. Lisa Lehr in honor of her husband, the late Dr. David Lehr, former chair of the Department of Pharmacology for New York Medical College.

Paul A. Insel, MD University of California San Diego Dr. Paul Insel has been named the 2017 recipient of the David Lehr Research Award. He is being recognized for his continued efforts to discover and validate novel G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) as drug targets for diseases in need of new, effective therapies; in this case, for pancreatic cancer. Dr. Insel received his MD from the University of Michigan and subsequent clinical training in the Harvard Medical Service at Boston City Hospital. He then undertook research training at NIH (NICHD Gerontology Research Center and NCI Laboratory of Theoretical Biology) and at the University of California, San Francisco where he joined the faculty in the Department of Medicine. Later, Dr. Insel moved to the University of California San Diego (UC San Diego) where he has held many significant positions. Since 1989, Dr. Insel has been the director of the UC San Diego MD/PhD Training Program and is

currently distinguished professor of pharmacology and medicine. Dr. Insel’s major research efforts have focused on studies of GPCRs with respect to their expression, signaling mechanisms, regulation and roles in health and disease through the use of biochemical, cell biological and molecular biological approaches. He has also studied heterotrimeric G proteins, G protein-regulated effectors, compartmentation of signaling molecules in lipid raft/caveolin domains, mechanisms of cAMP-promoted apoptosis, and the use of “omics”/systems biology approaches to define GPCR expression and the cAMP-regulated transcriptome and proteome. Dr. Insel is a member of the Advisory Panel on Research of the American Association of Medical Colleges. He has also served as an editor or senior editor of numerous scientific journals, including ASPET’s Molecular Pharmacology. He is currently the editor of the Annual Review of Pharmacology and Toxicology and co-head of Faculty of the Faculty of 1000 Prime in Pharmacology and Drug Discovery.

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ASPET Celebrates the 25th Anniversary of the SURF Program

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n 1992, ASPET launched its Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF) program, designed to introduce pharmacology research to undergraduates through a 10-week summer laboratory experience. Since its inception, the SURF program has had two tracks: the institutional program, which offers groups of faculty from the same institution funding to support a summer research program on their campus, and the individual program, which provides funding to individual students who may lack access to an institutional program. The goal of the SURF program is to use authentic, mentored research experiences in pharmacology to heighten student interest in careers in biomedical research and related health care disciplines. We particularly encourage participation by students traditionally underrepresented in the biomedical sciences. Fellows have opportunities to: • Investigate the latest issues in biomedical research • Get hands-on experience with laboratory techniques • Collaborate with faculty and other students • Develop their professional skills, including communication, teamwork, and critical thinking • Build and expand their professional networks • Learn about careers in biomedical research and related disciplines ASPET’s SURF program now has a rich network of over 2200 alumni, with some former participants serving as mentors to the next generation of researchers. In celebration of SURF’s 25th anniversary, we will be sharing stories from SURF programs throughout the year to highlight their potential as transformative experiences.

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Donita Brady Participation year: 2002 Fellowship type and location: Institutional, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Current title: Assistant Professor of Cancer Biology, University of Pennsylvania My SURF story begins when I was given the opportunity to work as an undergraduate in the lab of Dr. Channing Der, in the Department of Pharmacology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNCCH). At the time I was an undergraduate pursuing a degree in chemistry at Radford University, a small liberal arts school in the southwest part of Virginia, so this was my first experience in biomedical science research at a research I institution. Over the course of the summer, I was intellectually challenged, mentored, and supported by Dr. Der himself, the postdoctoral fellow I worked alongside, and the various members of the very large Der lab group. The experience single-handedly jump-started my interest in biomedical science research and solidified my desire to pursue a PhD in pharmacology focused on cancer biology. I was also able to build a network of mentors that remains strong to this day. I went on to obtain my PhD in pharmacology from UNC-CH where I worked in the laboratory of Dr. Adrienne Cox, who was and is still a close collaborator and former trainee of Dr. Der.

Katie Collette Participation year: 2009 Fellowship type and location: Individual, University of North Dakota Current title: Postdoctoral Research Fellow, University of Michigan As a fellow, I performed research in the lab that would become my PhD lab. My SURF experience was my first introduction to fulltime research, and I found that I very much enjoyed it! It solidified my decision to attend graduate school and my then career goal of running my own lab. The research I completed during my tenure as a fellow was later published, with me as a middle author, in Molecular Pharmacology. A collaboration that began

during my fellowship resulted in that and another publication. The collaboration has continued into my postdoctoral research as well. Not only was the research side of being a fellow exciting and fruitful, but being a part of a lab environment with other undergraduate students and graduate students introduced me to what research is really like as well as what careers are available in science. In short, my SURF story put me on the path that I continue to this day.

Nikki Miller Participation year: 2011 Fellowship type and location: Institutional, University of Kansas Medical Center Current title: Medical Student, University of Kansas School of Medicine I was honored to work at the University of Kansas Medical Center as a fellow. As an intern in the Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Therapeutics Department, I performed research under the direction of Dr. Wen-Xing Ding. I examined the effects of acetaminophen on hepatic cells. This program placed my classroom skills into a working environment. This invaluable opportunity put science into action. It gave me a better understanding of what I learned in the classroom and how it applies to real life and medicine. I studied the properties of autophagy, apoptosis, and necrosis on mouse hepatocytes to determine their effects on the liver. This research led to publications in Hepatology and Toxicological Sciences. Working beside a motivating mentor taught me discipline and a valuable work ethic. The guidance and knowledge acquired from Dr. Ding and his laboratory was priceless in my journey to becoming a physician. Throughout medical school, I have used these skills and even have had lectures from the professors that taught me during my summer with SURF. The research done with SURF has inspired me to perform clinical research throughout my time in medical school to help advance the future of medicine. I will forever be grateful for my time with SURF and the way that it has shaped my future as a physician.

We thank these SURF alumni for sharing what the fellowship experience meant to them. Stay tuned for more stories throughout the year. March 2017 • The Pharmacologist


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Did you know that ASPET has commemorative travel awards? The Karl H. Beyer, Jr. Travel Award, initiated in 1997, the Steven E. Mayer Travel Award, initiated in 2010, and the Akira E. Takemori Travel Award, initiated in 1998, were established to recognize the contributions of these members to the field of pharmacology and their service to ASPET. Funds were provided by family, friends, and colleagues to help support young scientist travel to the ASPET annual meeting. ASPET is pleased to announce two new commemorative travel awards. The Atul & Jayashree Laddu Travel Award was initiated in 2016 by Dr. and

Mrs. Laddu. With a passion for research and teaching, Dr. and Mrs. Laddu set up a travel fund to encourage young scientists to participate in research and present their findings at the ASPET annual meeting. The Nancy Rutledge Zahniser Travel Award was established in early 2017 by an anonymous donor to honor the life and work of Dr. Zahniser. Dr. Zahniser was thoroughly committed to helping trainees advance their careers, and this award gives tribute to her lasting legacy. Read more about each of these awards and the members they honor at https://www.aspet.org/donate/ travel-award-funds/.

How to Donate to a How to Establish a Commemorative Travel Commemorative Travel Award Fund Award Fund Travel awards are made possible through the generosity of our members and are always open for donations. If you would like to donate to any of the commemorative travel award funds, please visit us online at https://www.aspet.org/donate/travelaward-funds/ and click the donate button. Your tax-deductible donation in any amount contributes to ASPET’s mission of supporting our young scientists.

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If you are interested in initiating a new ASPET commemorative travel award, please contact ASPET’s Executive Officer, Dr. Judy Siuciak, jsiuciak@aspet.org or (301) 634-7060.


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Strategic Planning Membership Survey Results

In an effort to guide ASPET’s strategic planning priorities, ASPET surveyed its members during the summer of 2016. The goal of the survey was to obtain input from and to better understand the needs of ASPET members. The results of the survey were used to help better identify and understand the main strategic issues and challenges that face ASPET and the field of pharmacology. The survey was sent to all members in August 2016 and generated 209 responses (14% response rate). Member respondents were presented with a variety of questions and asked to either prioritize the issues or provide an open-ended response. The results of the survey are below. What priority should ASPET give to these actions and outcomes?

What do you consider the most valuable work ASPET can do on behalf of the profession and discipline? Recurring themes from open-ended responses included: • Advocate for pharmacology in general (to the public and to the scientific community) • Journals • Meetings • Funding

• Provide networking opportunities • Science policy • Career • Training/mentoring young scientists/ pharmacologists

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14 What priority should ASPET give to understanding and addressing these issues in the changing identity of pharmacology?

In what other ways will the future identity of pharmacology be different than it is today? Recurring themes included: •  Embrace pharmacology as a multidisciplinary science • Maintain pharmacology as a unique science •  Personalized medicine What priority should ASPET give to helping you respond to these potential areas of change?

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15 What other drivers of change will affect the discipline of and profession of pharmacology? Recurring themes included: •  Technology • Reproducibility • Decreased or changing job opportunities/careers in pharmacology

• Big data • Public perception • Funding

If ASPET offered the following, how interested would you be in using these new or expanded member programs and services?

What other ways can ASPET support you through new and expanded programs and services? Recurring themes included: •  Networking • Online networking (webinars, communities, etc.) • Funding

To learn more about ASPET’s new strategic plan, attend the annual business meeting taking place at the McCormick Place Convention Center in Chicago, IL on Saturday, April 22 at 5:30 pm.

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16 How likely are you to take the following actions related to your ASPET membership?

What is the one thing ASPET can do to improve your membership experience? Recurring themes included: •  Reduce costs • Online communities and learning

• Networking • Diversify membership

How much do these factors influence your decision to submit for publication in ASPET’s scientific journals?

What factors would be important in your decision to elect to publish in an ASPET journal over another journal? Recurring themes included: •  Costs • Research/readership relevance • Quality of reviews

• Journal’s reputation • Impact Factor

Thank you to everyone who participated in this important strategic planning survey. The results of the survey provided meaningful and informative insight into our strategic planning efforts. Find out more about ASPET’s strategic planning efforts, goals, and strategies at the business meeting during the ASPET Annual Meeting at Experimental Biology 2017, Saturday, April 22. The Pharmacologist • March 2017


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ASPET Annual Meeting Program

Saturday, April 22 5:30 pm ASPET Business Meeting and Awards Presentation

Schedule subject to change. Check the EB2017 online program book and mobile app for final schedule. For speakers and full session descriptions, visit www.aspet.org/EB2017. All ASPET events will be held at the McCormick Place Convention Center unless otherwise noted. For full session descriptions and speaker information, visit https://www.aspet.org/ Annual_Meeting_EB_2017/Program/

7:00 pm New This Year! All Society EB Welcome Reception

Friday, April 21, 2017 Session/Event

Location

Give a Day of Service at EB2017 Pacific Garden Mission Contact Dr. Charles France to participate (france@uthscsa.edu or 210-567-6969) UG GS PD

Saturday, April 22, 2017 Session/Event

Room

Time

Teaching Institute: Supporting Experiment Design and Rigor in Graduate Training Chairs: J.V. Barnett and R.T. Okita

W474b

12:00 pm - 2:30 pm

IPE: Educating a New Generation of Healthcare Professionals Chair: A.J. McFalls

W476

2:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Graduate Student - Postdoctoral Colloquium: Effective Science Communication Chair: L.A. Devi

UG GS PD

W475ab

2:30 pm - 5:00 pm

ASPET Business Meeting and Awards Presentation

UG GS PD

W470ab

5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

All Society EB Welcome Reception New!

UG GS PD

Skyline Ballroom W375E

7:00 pm - 8:30 pm

■ = Lectures ■ = Networking Opportunity UG = Session of Interest for Undergraduate Students GS = Session of Interest for Graduate Students PD = Session of Interest for Postdocs March 2017 • The Pharmacologist


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Sunday, April 23, 2017 Session/Event

Room

Time

W476

7:30 am - 9:30 am

John J. Abel Award in Pharmacology Lecture: The Dynamic Epitranscriptome: Encoding the Fate and Function of mRNA with Reversible Nucleotide Modifications Keynote: Samie R. Jaffrey

W470b

8:30 am - 9:20 am

ASPET Presidential Symposium: Leveraging New Paradigms for GPCR Drug Discovery Chair: D.R. Sibley

W470b

9:30 am - 12:00 pm

Tools and Targets: Overcoming Challenges in Modern Drug Discovery Chairs: D.R. Mattison and C. Beeson

W470a

9:30 am - 12:00 pm

Novel Regulators of Platelet Function and Thrombogenesis: Multiple Trails Towards a Broadway Chairs: F.T. Khasawneh and M.A. Holinstat

W471a

9:30 am - 12:00 pm

Cytochrome P450 Structure in Human Health Chairs: P.R. Wilderman and J.R. Halpert

W474a

9:30 am - 12:00 pm

Behavioral Models of Age-Related Cognitive Decline Chairs: K.S. Murnane and J. Bizon

W474b

9:30 am - 12:00 pm

The Undergraduate Networking and Career Development Luncheon UG (by invitation only)

W476

12:15 pm - 2:00 pm

Exhibit Hall F

12:30 pm - 2:30 pm

W183ab

1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Diversity Mentoring Breakfast (by invitation only) Facilitator: Sharon Milgram

ASPET Poster Presentations

UG GS PD

UG GS PD

2016 Tang Prize in Biopharmaceutical Science Keynote: Emmanuelle Charpentier (All Society EB lecture)

ASPET Booth # 601 Visit the ASPET booth in the Experimental Biology exhibit hall! Items for sale at “Shop ASPET” include t-shirts, hats, plush donkeys, and much more. Plus, pick up some free giveaways and enter a raffle to win daily prizes!

■ = Lectures ■ = Networking Opportunity UG = Session of Interest for Undergraduate Students GS = Session of Interest for Graduate Students PD = Session of Interest for Postdocs The Pharmacologist • March 2017


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Download the EB App Before heading to Chicago, make sure to download the EB2017 app to keep yourself organized with up-to-the-minute event information and build your personalized schedule. Using feedback from attendee surveys and for environmental reasons, EB will not have a printed program book this year. Members will be able to access the full program in a PDF file online and through the EB mobile app. EB will be providing free wifi throughout the meeting space. The EB mobile app will be available for download in the Apple and GooglePlay store soon.

Sunday, April 23, 2017, continued Session/Event

Room

Time

Reynold Spector Award in Clinical Pharmacology Lecture: Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: From Bench to Bedside (Sex Matters) Keynote: Margaret R. MacLean

W470b

2:00 pm - 2:50 pm

Mechanistic Studies in Cholinergic Neurobiology: Focus on Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Chair: R.M. Drenan

W470a

3:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Cardiovascular Pathobiology of Inflammasomes Chairs: Y. Zhang and K.M. Boini

W470b

3:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Challenges and Opportunities for Childhood Cancer Drug Development Chair: P.J. Houghton

W471a

3:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Physiological Regulation of Drug Metabolism and Transport Chair: E.T. Morgan

W474a

3:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Delivering Innovative Solutions in Pharmacology Education: Leveraging Web-Based Technologies Chairs: J.L. Szarek and S. Maxwell

W474b

3:00 pm - 5:30 pm

ASPET Student / Postdoc Poster Competition

UG GS PD

W375d

6:30 pm - 8:30 pm

ASPET Student / Postdoc Mixer

UG GS PD

Skyline Blrm, Pre-Function

8:30 pm - 11:00 pm

■ = Lectures ■ = Networking Opportunity UG = Session of Interest for Undergraduate Students GS = Session of Interest for Graduate Students PD = Session of Interest for Postdocs March 2017 • The Pharmacologist


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Monday, April 24, 2017 Session/Event

Room

Time

ASPET - JPS Lecture: Imaging Ca2+ Signals in the Brain in Health and Disease Keynote: Masamitsu Iino

W470b

8:30 am - 9:20 am

Therapeutic Prospectives for Cannabinoids: Beyond Marijuana and Pain Chairs: H. Neelakantan and S.J. Ward

W470a

9:30 am - 12:00 pm

The CRISPR-Cas9 Revolution in Pharmacology Chairs: K. Tonsfeldt and L.A. Devi

W470b

9:30 am - 12:00 pm

Mitochondria: Guardians of the Cell Chairs: J.D. Schuetz and R.G. Schnellmann

W471a

9:30 am - 12:00 pm

Emerging Technologies for Characterizing Lead Optimization of Novel Biotherapeutics Chairs: L.C. Wienkers and D. Rock

W474a

9:30 am - 12:00 pm

3-D Biology in Cancer Pharmacology – Is Flat Biology Dead? Chair: M.A. Bjornsti

W474b

9:30 am - 12:00 pm

Journals Symposium: Hear It from the Editors Chair: M.E. Vore

UG GS PD

W475ab

9:30 am - 12:00 pm

ASPET Poster Presentations

UG GS PD Exhibit Hall F

12:30 pm - 2:30 pm

Otto Krayer Award in Pharmacology Lecture: G Protein Signaling in Cardiac Growth, Protection, Inflammation and Failure Keynote: Joan Heller Brown

W470b

2:00 pm - 2:50 pm

Game-Based Learning and Clinical Simulation for Pharmacology Chairs: M.J. Hernandez and K.M. Quesnelle

W475ab

3:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Thank you for being an ASPET member. Visit the ASPET member lounge! Visit the ASPET member lounge at the Convention Center where members can grab daily morning coffee, hold one-on-one meetings, network with colleagues, meet ASPET members and leaders, relax, or catch up on work using ASPET Wifi.

McCormick Place Convention Center, W471b Hours open: Saturday, 11:00 am – 4:00 pm Sunday, 7:30 am – 6:00 pm Monday, 7:30 am – 6:30 pm Tuesday, 7:30 am – 6:30 pm Wednesday, 7:30 am – 4:00 pm

The Pharmacologist • March 2017


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Monday, April 24, 2017, continued Session/Event

Room

Time

Targeting of GRKs and Beta-arrestins for Cardiovascular Therapy: Picking on Certain Siblings over Others in Some (Protein) Families Chairs: A. Lymperopoulos and G. Iaccarino

W474b

3:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Division for Drug Metabolism – Awards and Junior Investigator Platform Session UG GS PD Chairs: T.J. Carlson and N. Isoherranen

W474a

3:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Division for Molecular Pharmacology – Postdoctoral Scientist Award Finalists

W470b

3:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Division for Cardiovascular Pharmacology Trainee Showcase UG GS PD Chairs: K. Luther and I. Valiente-Alandi

W470a

3:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Division Annual Meetings for: • Cardiovascular Pharmacology • Drug Discovery and Development • Drug Metabolism • Molecular Pharmacology • Pharmacology Education

W470a W474b W474a W470b W475ab

5:30 pm - 6:30 pm

Hyatt Grant Park B Grant Park D Grant Park C

6:30 pm - 8:30 pm

Hilton Chicago; Continental Ballroom AB

9:00 pm - 11:00 pm

Room

Time

Julius Axelrod Award in Pharmacology Lecture: Lessons from Endogenously Expressed GPCRs: Nature Knows Best! Keynote: Paul A. Insel

W470b

8:30 am - 9:20 am

Julius Axelrod Symposium: Evolving Insights Regarding GPCRs: Compartmentation, Signaling and Clinical Utility Chair: P.A. Insel

W470b

9:30 am - 12:00 pm

Perinatal Therapeutics and the Programming of Adult Cardiometabolic Disease Chairs: S.L. Bourque and S. Goulopoulou

W470a

9:30 am - 12:00 pm

Quantitative Systems Pharmacology: Application to Cancer Drug Development and Personalized/Precision Medicine Chairs: J.L.S. Au and J.S.H. Lee

W471a

9:30 am - 12:00 pm

Emerging Technologies for Selectively Modulating the Tumor Immune Contexture Chairs: S. Sengupta and A.A. Kulkarni

W474a

9:30 am - 12:00 pm

Division Mixers for: • Cardiovascular Pharmacology • Drug Metabolism and Toxicology • Molecular Pharmacology Young Experimental Scientists Y.E.S. Mixer (All Society EB event for students and postdocs)

UG GS PD

UG GS PD

UG GS PD

UG GS PD

Tuesday, April 25, 2017 Session/Event

March 2017 • The Pharmacologist


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Tuesday, April 25, 2017, continued Session/Event

Room

Time

Mushrooming Potential of Psychedelics as Therapeutics Chairs: W.E. Fantegrossi and R. Griffiths

W474b

9:30 am - 12:00 pm

Science and Government: How to Make a Difference Through Advocacy Chairs: A.C. Marshall and N.K. Patil

W475ab

9:30 am - 12:00 pm

Exhibit Hall F

12:30 pm - 2:30 pm

Hyatt Adler BC

12:30 pm - 2:00 pm

David Lehr Research Award Lecture: Adenosine-Regulated Glutamate Signaling in Neuron-Glia Interaction and Alcoholism Keynote: Doo-Sup Choi

W470b

2:00 pm - 2:50 pm

Surmounting the Insurmountable: Obstacles in Drug Discovery and Development – Real World Case Studies Chairs: K. He and P.F. Hollenberg

W475ab

3:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Division for Toxicology - In Utero and Neonatal Exposure to Environmental Agents Chair: M. Valentovic

W470b

3:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Division for Behavioral Pharmacology – Team Science Forum: Scientist Crosstalk on Chemistry and Behavior Chairs: E. Jutkiewicz and B. Blough

W474b

3:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Division for Cancer Pharmacology – Young Investigators Symposium UG GS PD Chairs: S.P.C. Cole and J.C. Yalowich

W474a

3:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Division for Neuropharmacology Postdoctoral Scientist Award Finalists UG GS PD Chairs: B. Greenwood-Van Meerveld and M.W. Wood

W470a

3:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Division for Translational and Clinical Pharmacology – Young UG GS PD Investigator Awards Platform Session

W471a

3:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Division for Translational and Clinical Pharmacology - Early Career UG GS PD Faculty Showcase

W471a

5:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Division Annual Meetings for: • Behavioral Pharmacology • Cancer Pharmacology • Neuropharmacology • Toxicology • Translational and Clinical Pharmacology

W474b W474a W470a W470b W471a

5:30 pm - 6:30 pm

Hyatt Hyde Park AB Jackson Park D

6:30 pm - 8:30 pm

ASPET Poster Presentations

UG GS PD

Division for Translational & Clinical Pharmacology – Trainee Mentoring UG GS PD and Career Development

GS PD

UG GS PD

Division Mixers for: • Behavioral Pharmacology and Neuropharmacology •C  ancer Pharmacology, Translational and Clinical Pharmacology, Drug Discovery and Development, and Pharmacology Education UG GS PD

■ = Lectures ■ = Networking Opportunity UG = Session of Interest for Undergraduate Students GS = Session of Interest for Graduate Students PD = Session of Interest for Postdocs The Pharmacologist • March 2017


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Wednesday, April 26, 2017 Session/Event

Room

Time

Norman Weiner Lecture: Drug Discrimination Procedures and in vivo Pharmacological Analysis Keynote: Jack Bergman

W470b

8:30 am - 9:20 am

Chemical Biology and Drug Discovery in Epigenetics Chairs: D. Wang and C. He

W470a

9:30 am - 12:00 pm

Nonpharmacological Factors Influencing Drug Action Chair: M.A. Nader

W471a

9:30 am - 12:00 pm

Release and Processing of Extracellular ATP: New Insights and Therapeutic Targets Chairs: R. Corriden and A.S. MacLeod

W474a

9:30 am - 12:00 pm

Intestine-liver Crosstalk, New Frontier for Drug Metabolism, Liver Injury and Repair Chairs: G.L. Guo and L.M. Aleksunes

W474b

9:30 am - 12:00 pm

Skyline Ballroom

12:30 pm - 2:30 pm

ASPET Poster Presentations

UG GS PD

■ = Lectures ■ = Networking Opportunity UG = Session of Interest for Undergraduate Students GS = Session of Interest for Graduate Students PD = Session of Interest for Postdocs March 2017 • The Pharmacologist


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Wednesday, April 26, 2017, continued Session/Event

Room

Time

The Pharmacological and Therapeutic Legacy of Dr. Alfred G. Gilman Chairs: M. Toews and P.C. Sternweis

W470a

3:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Developing Novel Therapeutic Strategies to Modulate K+/Cl- Cotransporter 2 (KCC2) Function Chairs: P.A. Davies and T.G. Deeb

W470b

3:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Transporter Roles in Intracellular Drug Concentrations Chairs: Y. Lai and I. Tamai

W471a

3:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Stem Cells in Cancer Chairs: R.K. Guy and S. McKinney-Freeman

W474a

3:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Epigenetic Regulation of Toxicity and Implications for Risk Assessment Chairs: B.S. Cummings and D.C. Dolinoy

W474b

3:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Skyline Blrm, PreFunction

6:00 pm - 8:00 pm

ASPET Closing Reception

UG GS PD

Follow ASPET’s Official Meeting Blogger Tamara Escajadillo will be blogging the 2017 annual meeting on the PharmTalk blog. Also, be sure to follow her on Twitter @TamaraEsca for updates while the meeting is going on.

Don’t forget to follow @ASPET on Twitter and Facebook for posts about the Annual Meeting at EB2017. Use the hastag #ExpBio.

Register Now for EB For one registration fee, you have access to 6 society annual meetings in one location. Check Pharmacology and ASPET when you register for EB To receive all relevant information for pharmacology programming, be sure to select "Pharmacology" as your discipline and "ASPET" as your membership society when you register.

Renew your membership to receive the deepest discounts! Renew today and encourage your colleagues to join ASPET!

https://www.aspet.org/Annual_Meeting_EB_2017/Registration/

The Pharmacologist • March 2017


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Division Meetings and Activities

Hyatt Burnham C

Tuesday, April 25

7:00 am – 8:15 am

BEH Executive Committee Meeting (invitation only)

Tuesday, April 25

3:00 pm – 5:30 pm

Division Programming – Team Science Forum: Scientist Crosstalk on Chemistry and Behavior

W474b

Tuesday, April 25

5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

BEH Annual Division Meeting

W474b

Tuesday, April 25

6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

Joint Mixer – BEH with Neuropharmacology

Sunday, April 23

7:00 am – 8:15 am

CVP Executive Committee Meeting (invitation only)

Hyatt Adler C

Monday, April 24

3:00 pm – 5:30 pm

Division Programming – Trainee Showcase featuring the Benedict R. Lucchesi Young Scientist Travel Awardee

W470a

Monday, April 24

5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

CVP Annual Division Meeting

W470a

Monday, April 24

6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

CVP Mixer

Sunday, April 23

7:00 am – 8:15 am

DCP Executive Committee Meeting (invitation only)

Tuesday, April 25

3:00 pm – 5:30 pm Division Programming – Young Investigators Symposium

W474a

Tuesday, April 25

5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

DCP Annual Division Meeting

W474a

Tuesday, April 25

6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

Joint Mixer – DCP with Translational and Clinical Pharmacology, Drug Discovery and Development, and Pharmacology Education

Monday, April 24

7:00 am – 8:15 am

DDD Executive Committee Meeting (invitation only)

Monday, April 24

Division Programming – Targeting of GRKs and Beta3:00 pm – 5:30 pm arrestins for Cardiovascular Therapy: Picking on Certain Siblings over Others in Some (Protein) Families

W474b

Monday, April 24

5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

DDD Annual Division Meeting

W474b

Tuesday, April 25

6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

Joint Mixer – DDD with Cancer Pharmacology, Pharmacology Education, and Translational and Clinical Pharmacology

Hyatt Hyde Park AB

Hyatt Grant Park B

Hyatt Burnham C

Hyatt Jackson Park D

Hyatt Adler C

Hyatt Jackson Park D

March 2017 • The Pharmacologist


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Sunday, April 23

7:00 am – 8:15 am

DM Executive Committee Meeting (invitation only)

Hyatt Adler B

Monday, April 24

3:00 pm – 5:30 pm

Division Programming – Awards and Junior Investigator Platform Session

W474a

Monday, April 24

5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

DM Annual Division Meeting

W474a

Monday, April 24

6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

Joint Mixer – DM with Toxicology

Sunday, April 23

7:00 am – 8:15 am

MP Executive Committee Meeting (invitation only)

Hyatt Adler A

Monday, April 24

3:00 pm – 5:30 pm

Division Programming – Postdoctoral Scientist Award Finalists

W470b

Monday, April 24

5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

MP Annual Division Meeting

W470b

Monday, April 24

6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

MP Mixer

Monday, April 24

7:00 am – 8:15 am

NEU Executive Committee Meeting (invitation only)

Hyatt Adler B

Tuesday, April 25

3:00 pm – 5:30 pm

Division Programming – Postdoctoral Scientist Award Finalists

W470a

Tuesday, April 25

5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

NEU Annual Division Meeting

W470a

Tuesday, April 25

6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

Joint Mixer – NEU with Behavioral Pharmacology

Monday, April 24

7:00 am – 8:15 am

DPE Executive Committee Meeting (invitation only)

Hyatt Adler A

Monday, April 24

3:00 pm – 5:30 pm

Division Programming – Game-Based Learning and Clinical Simulation for Pharmacology

W475ab

Monday, April 24

5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

DPE Annual Division Meeting

W475ab

Tuesday, April 25

6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

Joint Mixer – DPE with Cancer Pharmacology, Translational and Clinical Pharmacology, and Drug Discovery and Development

Hyatt Grant Park D

Hyatt Grant Park C

Hyatt Hyde Park AB

Hyatt Jackson Park D

BEH = Behavioral Pharmacology, CVP = Cardiovascular Pharmacology, DCP = Cancer Pharmacology, DDD = Drug Discovery and Development, DM = Drug Metabolism, MP = Molecular Pharmacology, NEU = Neuropharmacology, DPE = Pharmacology Education, TCP = Translational and Clinical Pharmacology, TOX = Toxicology

The Pharmacologist • March 2017


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TCP Executive Committee Meeting (invitation only)

Hyatt Adler A

Tuesday, April 25

7:00 am – 8:15 am

Tuesday, April 25

12:30 pm – 2:00 pm Trainee Mentoring and Career Development

Tuesday, April 25

3:00 pm – 5:30 pm

Division Programming – Young Investigator Awards Platform Session

W471a

Tuesday, April 25

5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

TCP Annual Division Meeting and Early Career Faculty Showcase

W471a

Tuesday, April 25

6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

Joint Mixer – TCP with Cancer Pharmacology, Drug Discovery and Development, and Pharmacology Education

Hyatt Jackson Park D

Monday, April 24

7:00 am – 8:15 am

TOX Executive Committee Meeting (invitation only)

Hyatt Burnham C

Monday, April 24

6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

Joint Mixer – TOX with Drug Metabolism

Tuesday, April 25

3:00 pm – 5:30 pm

Division Programming – In Utero and Neonatal Exposure to Environmental Agents

W470b

Tuesday, April 25

5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

TOX Annual Division Meeting

W470b

Hyatt Adler BC

Hyatt Grant Park D

Make sure to attend your Division’s Annual Meeting to learn how you can become more involved! March 2017 • The Pharmacologist


28

ASPET Meetings The following are invitation-only meetings. Schedule is subject to change.

Thursday, April 20, 2017 5:00 pm – 10:00 pm

Finance Committee Meeting

Hyatt Burnham AB

Friday, April 21, 2017 8:00 am – 6:00 pm

Council Meeting

11:00 am – 8:00 pm

Mentoring Network: Coaching for Career Development

2:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Council of Division Chairs

6:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Council Dinner

Hyatt Burnham ABC Hyatt Adler BC Hyatt Adler A See invitation for location

Saturday, April 22, 2017 Hyatt Adler BC

8:00 am – 12:30 pm

Mentoring Network: Coaching for Career Development

12:30 pm – 2:00 pm

Mentoring Network Lunch

Hyatt Burnham BC

8:30 pm – 10:00 pm

President’s Reception (by invitation only)

See invitation for location

Sunday, April 23, 2017 7:00 am – 8:15 am

Executive Committee - Div. for Cardiovascular Pharmacology

Hyatt Adler C

7:00 am – 8:15 am

Executive Committee - Div. for Drug Metabolism

Hyatt Adler B

7:00 am – 8:15 am

Executive Committee - Div. for Molecular Pharmacology

Hyatt Adler A

7:00 am – 8:15 am

Executive Committee - Div. for Cancer Pharmacology

7:30 am – 9:30 am

JPET Associate Editors Meeting

7:30 am – 9:30 am

Diversity Mentoring Breakfast

W476

12:15 pm – 2:00 pm

Undergraduate Networking and Career Development Luncheon

W476

12:15 pm – 2:15 pm

Board of Publications Trustees Meeting

7:30 pm – 10:00 pm

Board of Publications Trustees Joint Editorial Boards Dinner

The Pharmacologist • March 2017

Hyatt Burnham C Hyatt Burnham AB

Hyatt Burnham AB Hyatt Grant Park BCD


29

Monday, April 24, 2017 7:00 am – 8:15 am

Executive Committee - Div. for Pharmacology Education

Hyatt Adler A

7:00 am – 8:15 am

Executive Committee - Div. for Drug Discovery and Development

Hyatt Adler C

7:00 am – 8:15 am

Executive Committee - Div. for Neuropharmacology

Hyatt Adler B

7:00 am – 8:15 am

Executive Committee - Div. for Toxicology

7:00 am – 8:15 am

Science Policy Committee

7:30 am – 9:30 am

Molecular Pharmacology Editorial Board Meeting

Hyatt Burnham C W473 Hyatt Burnham AB Hyatt Burnham AB

12:30 pm – 2:30 pm Pharmacological Reviews Editorial Board Meeting 6:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Hyatt Burnham C

Past President’s Dinner

Tuesday, April 25, 2017 7:00 am – 8:15 am

Nominating Committee Meeting

W473

7:00 am – 8:15 am

Executive Committee - Div. for Translational and Clinical Pharmacology

7:00 am – 8:15 am

Executive Committee - Div. for Behavioral Pharmacology

7:30 am – 9:30 am

Drug Metabolism and Disposition Editorial Board Meeting

12:15 pm – 2:15 pm

Mentoring and Career Development Committee

3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Pharmacology Research & Perspectives Management Committee

Hyatt Adler A Hyatt Burnham C Hyatt Burnham AB W473 Hyatt Burnham C

Wednesday, April 26, 2017 7:00 am – 8:15 am

Young Scientists Committee

W473

12:00 pm – 3:00 pm Program Committee

W473

Special ASPET discounts for travel to Experimental Biology on Southwest and United Airlines. Visit https://www.aspet.org/ Annual_Meeting_EB_2017/Travel_Information/ for details. The hotel discount deadline is March 31, 2017. To book your hotel, please visit https://www.aspet.org/Annual_Meeting_ EB_2017/Hotel_Information/.

March 2017 • The Pharmacologist


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Ancillary Functions at EB2017 The following are affiliated events organized by groups other than ASPET but taking place during EB2017. Please contact the organizers for more information. Association of Medical School Pharmacology Chairs (AMSPC) Mixer

Sunday, April 23

Behavioral Pharmacology Society (BPS) – GUEST SOCIETY

Friday-Saturday April 21-22

Catecholamine Society Dinner

Tuesday, April 25

Global GI Club – GUEST SOCIETY

Sunday, April 23

Michigan State University Pharmacology and Toxicology Mixer

Monday, April 24

PhRMA Foundation Reception

Monday, April 24

Univ. of Michigan Dept. of Pharmacology and Dept. of Biological Chemistry Social Hour

Saturday, April 22

Give a Day of Service at EB2017 Join us for a day of volunteer service in Chicago on Friday, April 21, 2017. Since 2009, ASPET members attending Experimental Biology (EB) have given a day of volunteer service in the local communities where EB is held. Volunteer activities have ranged from home construction to painting, cleaning, stocking shelves, building maintenance, food preparation, and other services. ASPET’s Division for Behaviorial Pharmacology will again sponsor a volunteer opportunity at EB2017 in Chicago. On Friday, April 21, 2017 we will spend the day at Pacific Garden Mission, the oldest, continuouslyoperating, Gospel rescue mission in the country, providing food and shelter for individuals in need.

During EB2012, ASPET members spent the day volunteering at Father Joe’s Villages in San Diego.

The Pharmacologist • March 2017

If you plan to join us, please contact Charles P. France at france@uthscsa. edu or at 210-567-6969. Space is limited and further details will be provided to those who express an interest in volunteering.


31

Typhus: War and Deception in 1940’s Poland

copyright credit: Reprinted with permission from polishjews.org

Rebecca J. Anderson, PhD

In German-occupied Poland during World War II, life was harsh and uncertain. The Nazis considered Poles an “inferior race” and set out to exploit them and systematically demolish their society. Polish Jews and other “undesirables” were rounded up, sequestered in ghettos, transported to concentration camps, or simply shot (1). The remaining young adults were exploited as a free natural resource. Many thousands of them were deported to Germany and forced to work under abysmal conditions in support of the Nazi war machine (1, 2). Faced with these grim realities, one lucky Pole found himself in the right place at the right time, thanks to Stanislaw Matulewicz. At the time of the German invasion of Poland in 1939, Matulewicz was a physician in general practice in Rozwadow, a village on the marshy banks of the San River, about 125 miles southeast of Warsaw (3, 4). Among his duties, Matulewicz was required to comply with an ordinance imposed by the new Germanrun government to report all suspected and confirmed cases of epidemic typhus (2).

Map of World War II concentration camps and death camps

March 2017 • The Pharmacologist


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Bacteria Rickettsia (small red rods) inside human cell

The Pharmacologist • March 2017

Female body louse

Source: CDC/ Frank Collins, Ph.D. Photo Credit: James Gathany.

Until the mid-19th century, typhus and typhoid fever were indistinguishable (3). Both induce fever, headache, and a skin rash. But despite the similarity in names, the two diseases are distinctly different. Typhoid fever is an intestinal infection caused by Salmonella and is characterized by abdominal pain, intestinal lesions, and diarrhea. The infection spreads from person to person, most commonly through contaminated food or water. Some patients carry the bacteria without symptoms and can unwittingly infect others—Typhoid Mary being the most famous example. On the other hand, epidemic typhus (also known as trench fever, jail fever, or louse-borne typhus), is caused by Rickettsia prowazekii. Rather than direct human contact, typhus is transmitted by human body lice, which can live on clothes and thrive under poor hygienic conditions. Lice ingest rickettsial bacteria when feeding on the blood of an infected person. The bacteria multiply in the louse’s gut and spill into the louse feces. When infected lice defecate during their next blood meal, the new victim is infected through the bite wound or

Source: CDC/ Frank Collins, Ph.D. Photo Credit: James Gathany.

Epidemic Typhus

Male body louse

by broken skin from scratching. Even dead lice can harbor and transmit the disease (3). The typhus skin rash is not easily distinguished from measles and other rashes, but typhus patients go on to develop serious symptoms including muscle pain, mental confusion, kidney damage, gangrene, multiorgan failure, coma, and cardiovascular collapse. Death is due to dehydration and shock (4). In the era before antibiotics and vaccines, epidemic typhus could decimate populations (2-6). For thousands of years, epidemic typhus has thrived in prisons, refugee camps, military barracks, and anywhere that people are exposed to cold weather and confined in a densely-populated environment under unsanitary conditions (3, 6). During World War I, typhus plagued louse-infested soldiers in the trenches along the Western Front (3, 7). Post-war sanitation eliminated epidemic typhus in Germany. However, two decades without exposure lowered the natural immunity of the German population to typhus, compared to people in Poland


33

and Russia (2, 4, 6). Consequently, Germans in the occupied territories took extraordinary steps to protect themselves and prevent the disease from entering Germany (2, 5, 6). The occupation troops conscientiously screened Poles during mass deportations to identify those who might be carrying “infected� lice on their bodies (2, 5). After registration at Auschwitz, for example, concentration camp prisoners were sent to quarantine for 6-8 weeks. Those suspected of having typhus were killed to prevent spreading the infection (3). As the war progressed, precautions loosened and typhus spread rampantly through the camps. At Bergen-Belsen, it is believed that Anne Frank and her sister died of typhus. Polish physicians, including Matulewicz, were required to send blood samples of all suspected cases to the German State laboratories for analysis. If the results were positive for typhus, the lab promptly notified the German authorities as well as the physician who provided the specimen (1, 2). NonJews who tested positive were quarantined or sent to special hospitals. Infected Jews were shot and their homes burned (1). Matulewicz knew that a positive typhus test result amounted to a death sentence for his Jewish patients (1). He therefore set up his own typhus test so that he could diagnose patients. If the patient was Jewish or someone else who was hiding from the Germans, he did not send the blood sample to the German labs

(1, 7). The assay Matulewicz devised was the WeilFelix test, the same assay used by the German State laboratories.

Matulewicz knew that a positive typhus test result amounted to a death sentence for his Jewish patients

Weil-Felix Test In 1916, Edmund Weil, a Pole, and Arthur Felix, a Czech, discovered that a cell wall O-antigen of certain strains of Proteus vulgaris bacteria crossreacts with antibodies of Rickettsiae (2, 4). [Proteus vulgaris can cause urinary tract infections but is otherwise largely benign (4, 7).] The OX-19 strain of Proteus and Rickettsia prowazekii (the epidemic typhus organism) both trigger human antibodies that recognize the Proteus OX-19 cell wall antigen (3, 4, 7). Rocky Mountain spotted fever (Rickettsia rickettsii) also induces antibodies that cross-react with Proteus OX-19, but this rickettsial organism is not present in Europe (2). The reagent for the Weil-Felix test is a suspension of Proteus OX-19 bacteria that has been killed with formalin (2, 6). This reagent is mixed with a serum sample from an ill patient. If the patient is infected with epidemic typhus, the serum will contain rickettsial antibodies that have been generated to fight the typhus infection, and those antibodies will bind to the OX-19 polysaccharides on the Proteus cell surface (4). The antigenantibody complex clumps (that is, agglutinates), and the serum sample turns cloudy (7). This positive test result, along with the appropriate clinical symptoms, leads to a patient diagnosis of epidemic typhus. The Weil-Felix agglutination reaction was a simple lab test for epidemic typhus and was quickly adopted by both sides during the latter stages of World War I (2).

Microscopic view of lice in the hair

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During World War II, the Germans again employed the Weil-Felix test to confirm typhus in symptomatic patients in the occupied territories (2). Matulewicz’s only motive for using his homemade Weil-Felix assay was to intercept the blood samples of typhus-infected Jews and save their lives. But one day in 1942, a desperate young man came to see Matulewicz. He was among those who had been deported to Germany to work in the forced labor camps, but recently he had been granted permission to return to Poland to visit his family. His 14-day leave was almost up and if he did not return to Germany on time, he and his whole family would be hunted down, arrested, and sent to a concentration camp (2, 7).

A New Twist on an Old Test The laborer was looking for any excuse to escape the misery of slavery in Germany. He had even considered committing suicide, but even that would not spare his family from retaliation by the Gestapo (2, 7). Because the Germans feared epidemic typhus more than bullets and bombs, a typhus diagnosis would certainly allow the laborer to remain in Poland. He came to Matulewicz to request a physician’s certificate, an official document that was used to verify the medical diagnosis of a serious disease (2). Matulewicz hesitated, because falsifying the certificate was risky. If the German authorities discovered a deliberate misdiagnosis, the consequences would be dire for both him and his patient (2). Equally unacceptable was intentionally infecting the laborer. Medical ethics prevented Matulewicz from causing harm to any patient, especially propagating a disease like typhus, which was highly contagious and often fatal. But there was a third possibility. Matulewicz knew that the Weil-Felix test relied on cross-reactivity between the Proteus OX-19 antigen and typhus antibodies. A person who was infected with Proteus OX-19 would also produce antibodies, and those antibodies would obviously react with the Weil-Felix reagent—indistinguishable from the positive result of a typhus-infected patient (2, 4).

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Matulewicz reasoned that an injection of the Proteus OX-19 reagent would cause a healthy person to develop antibodies that would most likely generate a positive Weil-Felix result. Because Proteus bacteria in the reagent suspension had been inactivated, the injection would not cause a urinary tract infection. Other possible side effects from the injection were unknown, but Matulewicz thought the risk was low. He proposed to test his idea, and the laborer gladly agreed to be his experimental subject (2). Matulewicz injected 1 ml of the Proteus OX-19 suspension intramuscularly (1, 2, 5, 7). The laborer, indeed, developed antibodies to the Proteus OX-19 inoculation, and subsequently, Matulewicz observed a Weil-Felix agglutination reaction in a sample of the laborer’s serum. Of course, it was a false positive. The laborer did not have typhus. The positive result simply reflected agglutination with Proteus OX-19 antibodies (2). To save the laborer, Matulewicz needed to get an official diagnosis. Now confident of the outcome, he sent the laborer’s blood sample to the German State laboratory for analysis. Soon, a telegram arrived with the official result: “Weil-Felix positive” (2, 3). The telegram was submitted to the local German authorities, and the laborer was officially released from his work in Germany. In addition, all of the laborer’s family members who had been in contact with him were excluded from future deportation (2). The Germans feared that “infected” lice might be carried by the family during the bacteria’s incubation period (2, 5). A short time later, Matulewicz confided his experiment and the successful ruse to Eugene Lazowski, a fellow physician in Rozwadow.

Lazowski’s Journey Eugene Lazowski came from a Catholic family who actively supported the Polish Underground (8). His parents hid Jewish families in their home and were later named Righteous Gentiles by Yad Vashem (9, 10). When the Germans invaded Poland, Lazowski had just finished medical school at the University of Warsaw. He became a soldier in the Polish army, served as a medic, and for a while, was held in a


copyright credit: Reprinted from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eugene_Lazowski under the Fair use Copyright law of the United States.

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prisoner-of-war camp (8). The camp was surrounded by a 10-foot wall topped with barbed wire (9). One night, seizing an opportunity, he ran toward a section where he saw a break in the barbed wire, scaled the wall, and leaped over (7, 9). On the other side, he spotted an unattended horse Eugene Lazowski and cart. He stopped and groomed the horse as if he owned it and then calmly walked away without attracting attention (9). After his escape, Lazowski settled in Rozwadow and worked as a doctor with the Polish Red Cross (1, 4, 7, 8). Although he did not shelter Jewish refugees like his parents, Lazowski supported the Polish resistance. He supplied information and provided medical care to bands of saboteurs and guerrillas who were hiding in the woods (1, 10). The rear fence of his home backed up to the Jewish ghetto in Rozwadow (1, 9, 11). Although it was against German orders and punishable by death, Lazowski provided medical care to many Jews in the ghetto (7, 9). To request his assistance, they would hang a white cloth on the back fence (9, 11). At night, Lazowski would sneak through the fence and treat them (7, 11). The German authorities closely monitored the drugs and medical supplies that physicians used. To reconcile the discrepancy caused by the supplies that Lazowski used in the ghetto, he devised a creative accounting scheme (1). His office was close to the town’s railroad station, and he was often asked to treat patients who were traveling through. In his inventory reports, he exaggerated the amounts of drugs and supplies that he used to treat the travelers, knowing that the Germans could not easily verify those entries (1, 7).

When Matulewicz told Lazowski about the laborer he had rescued, Lazowski immediately saw that the same procedure could be used to save others from deportation (2, 10).

The Grand Deception Deteriorating sanitary conditions in Poland had facilitated the spread of epidemic typhus. Hospitals became overcrowded, and most infected patients were cared for at home by family members (2). When the number of cases was concentrated in one area, the German Public Health Authority declared it to be an “epidemic area” (2). Germans tended to avoid such areas, and consequently, the quarantined population was relatively free from Gestapo atrocities (2, 4). Playing on the Germans’ fears, Lazowski and Matulewicz faked a typhus epidemic and used the Germans’ own laboratories to make it “official.” They called it their private immunological war—a war aimed at saving lives rather than causing deaths (1, 2, 6). Their only weapon was a syringe. They knew it was a dangerous undertaking. If their ruse was discovered, they would be considered conspirators in league with the Polish Underground and punished accordingly. So, they selectively administered their Proteus OX-19 injections, with a carefully planned strategy in mind. First, they injected only non-Jews, because they knew the Gestapo would kill Jews who tested positive for typhus (1). Second, they selected patients who already exhibited symptoms (e.g., fever, headache, skin rash) that were consistent with epidemic typhus (2). At that time, it was common for physicians to give sick patients intramuscular injections of pharmaceutical products to stimulate the patients’ immune system. Some vaccines and “protein suspensions” (e.g., bovine bile extract, lipids, and bacterial proteins) were used for this purpose (2). Matulewicz and Lazowski’s patients did not question the injection of the Proteus OX-19 suspension, because they assumed it was simply a routine shot to boost their immunity. The doctors never told them that the injection would induce a false typhus response (2). In fact, they kept their activities secret from everyone—including their wives (11).

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copyright credit: Reprinted from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Bundesarchiv_Bild_101I-134-0782-35,_Polen,_ Ghetto_Warschau,_Fleckfieber-Warnung.jpg under the Creative Commons-Share Alike 3.0 License.

Third, Lazowski and Matulewicz strictly controlled the number of injections and the number of patients they infected, so that the cohort reflected the wellaccepted seasonal variation of epidemics. They increased their injection schedule during the winter, diminished the number of patients during the spring, and increased their numbers again in the fall (2). Fourth, Matulewicz and Lazowski knew the Germans would naturally suspect that a Polish physician might try to “game the system” by mislabeling blood samples. A sneaky physician could use the blood from one actual typhus patient and relabel it as the blood of many other suspected cases.

Because of the cross-reactivity of the Weil-Felix reaction, Lazowski and Matulewicz were confident that the patients whom they had infected would biologically test positive for typhus (created by an artificial method). Consequently, they always submitted blood that corresponded to patients who had been injected with Proteus OX-19—no sample switching required (2). Fifth, to further deflect suspicion, Lazowski and Matulewicz referred some of their patients (after injecting them with the Proteus OX-19 suspension) to other doctors who were not aware of the scheme. These doctors would “discover” the typhus on their own and report it separately (1). Finally, when Lazowski and Matulewicz found a patient who really did have typhus, they publicized the case as much as possible, but only if the patient was not Jewish (1, 2). Within a few months, the number of reported cases was sufficiently large to declare the area, which consisted of about a dozen villages, an “epidemic area” (7). The local German authorities began posting “Achtung, Fleckfieber!” (Warning, Typhus!) signs in Rozwadow and the surrounding villages (1). Deportation of workers to Germany from these quarantined villages was stopped, and German troops kept their distance.

Facing Fear with Defiance Before the war, Jews accounted for at least 10% of the area’s population. By the time Matulewicz and Lazowski began their fake epidemic in 1942, most of them had already been rounded up by the Germans (1). However, many Jews were still hiding in the countryside, including a large contingent that had fled Warsaw and other urban areas (1). The area-wide typhus quarantine thus protected them, as well as the villages’ residents. Villagers began to feel more relaxed, but the doctors—knowing there was no actual epidemic— lived in constant fear. As Lazowski later explained, “I didn’t know if I would be arrested and tortured by the Gestapo. So I carried a cyanide pill in case I was arrested” (1). Typhus warning sign

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Jan Hryniewiezki, who was 15 at the time and later became a surgeon, remembered the injections. After a while, he said, people figured out what was going on because no one died. But to ensure continuation

I carried a cyanide pill in case I was arrested of the protective faux-quarantine, everyone kept quiet (1). When a patient asked why he recovered so quickly from such a serious disease, Lazowski said, “I just told him he was a lucky man” (1). After one year, Matulewicz moved away from the area. Lazowski stayed and continued his “private immunological war” for two more years (2). During this time, the greatest danger to Lazowski was the possibility that German doctors might conduct their own physical examinations of the fake typhus patients (2). Cross-reactivity in the Weil-Felix test ensured that the German labs would always report a typhus diagnosis. But the symptoms and extremely poor health of actual typhus patients could not be easily faked, and a direct physical exam of the fake typhus patients would most likely expose the ruse. The local Gestapo chief was closely watching Lazowski’s movements, and the young doctor walked a fine line, trying to stay in the good graces of the Germans at the same time he was deceiving them. He positioned himself as a sort of hero, because he bravely and selflessly provided medical care in a typhus-infested region—something their doctors were reluctant to do. “They needed me”(1). In late 1943, a Pole who was collaborating with the Nazis informed the local Gestapo chief that the typhus outbreak wasn’t what it appeared to be (1, 2, 4, 7). The Gestapo chief, in turn, notified the German health authorities, who dispatched an investigative commission and two carloads of soldiers to the quarantined area (1, 7). If the fake typhus patients were discovered, the Germans would kill them—and Lazowski, too (1). Fortunately, Lazowski was ready. He had gathered the oldest, sickest, and most unhealthy-looking people he could find and put them in filthy huts in

Rozwadow. They had all been injected with Proteus OX-19 (1). When the visitors arrived, Lazowski warmly greeted them at the edge of town and invited them to a big party hosted by the townsfolk. Vodka flowed, kielbasa was plentiful, and music played (1). The senior German doctors stayed at the party and sent their younger colleagues to conduct the investigation. Lazowski led them to the huts where the sick patients awaited their physical exams. But he cautioned the doctors “to be careful because the Polish are dirty and full of lice, which transfer typhus” (1). The young doctors rushed through their inspection and took blood samples from only a few patients— without checking for actual symptoms of typhus (1, 7). Of course, those blood samples later tested positive for typhus. Lazowski was not bothered by the German health authorities for the rest of the war (1).

The Big Reveal Near the end of the war, as the Soviet army approached from the east, the Germans began fleeing. One of them, a young military policeman, roared up on his motorcycle and stopped at Lazowski’s office. Lazowski had secretly treated him for venereal disease and as a gesture of gratitude, the policeman passed along a friendly warning that he was on the Gestapo hit list (1, 10). Lazowski had always been careful to display his loyalty to the Germans and assumed that he had nothing to fear. He was surprised when the policeman puckishly quoted a specific date and place where Lazowski had been seen treating members of the Underground (1). Lazowski fled from Rozwadow with his wife and daughter and lived for a while with relatives (11). When the German occupation ended, he settled in Warsaw and continued to practice medicine under communist rule (1, 11). But he kept his secret about the fake typhus “epidemic,” fearing retaliation from Poles who had collaborated with the Germans (1, 8). In 1958, he moved with his family to Chicago and only then did he confide everything to his wife (1). He studied to earn an American medical license and continued to practice until his retirement in 2004

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copyright credit: Reprinted from https://commons.wikimedia.org/ wiki/File:Real_Rozwad%C3%B3w_(4)_(4599330290)_(2).jpg under Krzysztof Dobrzański/Wikimedia Commons.

(8). In 1984, he became professor of pediatrics at the University of Illinois Chicago Medical Center, where he taught and published over 100 research papers in Polish and English (6, 8). Meanwhile, Matulewicz had resettled in Zaire, where he became a professor of radiology. Later, he Private War retired in Poland (1, 2). The Weil-Felix test has now been largely replaced by diagnostic methods that offer much better sensitivity and

specificity. Indirect immunofluorescence antibody testing is now the gold standard. But the WeilFelix test is still used in some developing countries because of its low cost (5). In 1977, Lazowski and Matulewicz finally broke their silence. They published their story for members of the American Society for Microbiology, detailing Matulewicz’s discovery and how they exploited it to save their patients (2). In 1993, Lazowski published Prywatna wojna (Private War), which became a bestselling book in Poland. During the 6 years of the German occupation, 6 million Polish citizens (one-fifth of the population and half of whom were Jewish) died as a result of mass executions, imprisonment, concentration camps, or other misfortunes of the occupation (2). In the last three years of that occupation, Lazowski and Matulewicz saved an estimated 8,000 Poles, including many Jews-in-hiding, and proved that sometimes the syringe is mightier than the sword (2, 7).

copyright credit: Credit: CiS

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A glimpse of Rozwadów, Poland today

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Biosketch: References 1. G  olab A (August 19, 2001) He duped Nazis, saved thousands. Chicago Sun Times. available from: http://www.stjoenj.net/lazowski/lazowski.html 2. L azowski E S and Matulewicz S (1977) Serendipitous discovery of artificial positive Weil-Felix reaction used in “Private Immunological War.” Am Soc Microbiol News 43: 300-302. 3. B  ennett J D C and Tyszczuk L (1990) Deception by immunisation, revisited. BMJ 301(6766): 1471-1472. 4. K  reston R (May 31, 2016) A sheep in wolf’s clothing: the “epidemic” that duped the Nazis. Discover Magazine. available from: http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/ bodyhorrors/2016/05/31/2157/#.WA5HMLAm6Uk 5. Editorial (1977) Deception by immunisation. BMJ 2(6089): 716-717. 6. G  oor Y (2013) When the test tube was mightier than the gun: a Polish doctor out-frightens the Nazis. Isr Med Assoc J 15(4): 264. 7. S  oniak M (September 22, 2015) How a fake typhus epidemic saved a Polish city from the Nazis. AtlasObscura. available from: http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/how-a-fake-typhusepidemic-saved-a-polish-city-from-the-nazis 8. Jewish Virtual Library. Dr. Eugene Lazowski (1913-2006). available from: http://www. jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/biography/lazowskibio.html 9. Holocaust Forgotten (2012) Fake epidemic saves a village from Nazis. available from: http:// www.holocaustforgotten.com/eugene.htm 10. Pekker M (December 6, 2014) Fake epidemic saves 8,000 Jews from extermination. Best hoaxes and pranks. available from: http://best-hoaxes.blogspot.com/2014/12/fake-epidemicsaves-8000-jews.html 11. American Medical News (July 5, 2004) Two doctors used typhus to save thousands in wartime. available from: http://www.amednews.com/article/20040705/ profession/307059953/6/

Rebecca J. Anderson holds a bachelor’s in chemistry from Coe College and earned her doctorate in pharmacology from Georgetown University. She has 25 years of experience in pharmaceutical research and development and now works as a technical writer. Her most recent book is Nevirapine and the Quest to End Pediatric AIDS. Email

rebeccanderson@msn.com.

In the next issue of The Pharmacologist… Dr. Anderson will share the story of the evolution of pharmacy compounding. Don’t miss the June 2017 issue.

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Meeting News ASPET Participates in the Annual British Pharmacological Society Meeting: Pharmacology 2016 With unseasonably mild weather, the United Kingdom set the scene for the British Pharmacological Society (BPS) annual meeting, Pharmacology 2016, in London during December 13-15. ASPET was pleased to participate as a guest society in this important international collaboration, which also included the American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics and the Chinese Pharmacological Society as guest societies. Among the over 1,000 attendees, a number of ASPET members and Council members were in attendance as invited speakers and poster presenters. To encourage our young scientists to attend this meeting, ASPET awarded five travel awards through a competitive application process.

ASPET Member and Young Scientists Committee Chair Karen Tonsfeldt was invited to speak at the BPS satellite conference, Shaping the Future of Pharmacology, hosted by the BPS Young Pharmacologists' Advisory Group. Her talk covered the formation and accomplishments of ASPET's new Young Scientists Committee (YSC), which was created in 2015 by Karen, Erin Bobeck, and Abigail Schindler. Dr. Tonsfeldt shared the process of proposing the committee to ASPET’s Council, including identifying and establishing the mission of the YSC to improve trainee experience within the society and at the annual meeting. She talked about some of the exciting accomplishments of the YSC during its first year: two accepted symposium proposals; newly

Travel Award Winners Joseph Lebowitz, Joshua Lorenz-Guertin, Angela Redmond, and Alaa Shahare, and Almaris Figueroa-Gonzalez (not pictured) with ASPET President David Sibley.

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Karen Tonsfeldt speaking at the Shaping the Future of Pharmacology satellite conference.

created postdoctoral liaisons with the Program Committee, Science Policy Committee, and Mentoring and Career Development Committee; and installing new writers on the PharmTalk blog. Overall, Dr. Tonsfeldt's talk underscored the importance of networking, teamwork, and advocacy for trainees. Ross Corriden (University of California San Diego) and Pamela Hornby (Janssen) from the division of Translational and Clinical Pharmacology organized and chaired an ASPET-supported symposium entitled “The Long Reach of the Bowel: Translating Microbiome Science into Therapeutics for Systemic Human Diseases.” Presenters included Niall Hyland (BPS Systems Pharmacology Affinity Group) and others from the UK, Ireland and the US. One of the first sessions opening on Tuesday morning, the meeting room was filled with an expectant audience, which included some ASPET Council members. The audience interacted with the speakers throughout the session and showed great interest in the emerging pharmacological science of the microbiome and its effects on multiple systems via bacterially derived signaling molecules. The therapeutic implications of the microbiome in health and disease opens up avenues for identifying targets but how does one begin to deconvolute the populations of bacteria into drug discovery? Jan Claesen (The Institute of Food Research, UK) illustrated one approach using informatics tools to identify novel bacterial bioactives, followed by potential chemical synthesis and assessment in vitro and in vivo. The next speaker, Helen Cox (King’s College London, UK), built on the theme of

testing bacterial derivatives in experimental mouse models to illustrate the effects of known bacterial metabolites on the mammalian intestine. She focused on the effects of short chain fatty acids and their characterization using novel agonists of the FFA2 (GPR43) receptors in obese mice. The ”long reach” of intestinal signaling was illustrated further by the next two speakers. Niall Hyland (University College Cork, Ireland) described how the gut microbiota produce GABA and other metabolites that modulate brain function and behavior. His examples exemplified the convergent signaling through immune, endocrine, and neural pathways of the brain-gut-microbiota axis. Similarly, Jennifer Pluznick (Johns Hopkins Medical School, US) described the control of blood pressure by renal and vascular sensory receptors in response to changes in the gut microbiome. The session wrapped up with Dean Falb’s (Synlogic, USA) presentation describing a potential therapeutic using engineered probiotic bacteria which is moving into Ph1 clinical trials for urea cycle disorder. A lively group discussion following the symposium focused on bringing the “microbiome” into the realm of pharmacology. It was agreed that this field needs to involve pharmacologists to deconvolute the health and pathologies driven by the bacteria and enable the discovery of therapeutics. This symposium was well received by both ASPET and BPS colleagues attending.

Ross Corridan speaking at the ASPET guest symposium, The Long Reach of the Bowel: Translating Microbiome Science into Therapeutics for System Human Diseases.

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At the ASPET booth, 16 meeting attendees signed up for new membership.

BPS attendee Laura Humphreys wins the ASPET booth raffle prize.

ASPET leaders and members at the BPS Annual Awards Dinner.

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Science Policy News

21st Century Cures Legislation Signed into Law Former President Barack Obama signed into law the 21st Century Cures Act (Cures) on December 13, 2016. This substantial legislation intends to accelerate “discovery, development and delivery” of medical therapies by encouraging biomedical research investment and facilitating innovation review and approval processes. Through National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding mechanisms, the Act

prioritizes certain areas of innovation and will likely steer both public and private funding priorities for years to come. The legislation also includes other provisions aimed at revamping NIH operations, streamlining research regulations, encouraging research collaboration, and expanding privacy protections for research subjects, among others.

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Key Authorizations • $4.796 billion of funding for the NIH (FY2017-2026) • $1.8 billion for cancer research (FY2017-2023) • $1.511 billion for the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies Initiative (BRAIN) (FY2017-2026) • $1.455 billion for the Precision Medicine Initiative (FY2017-2026) • $500 million of funding for the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (FY2018-2026) • $30 million for regenerative medicine research using adult stem cells (FY2017-2020)

Award of Research Grants The Act simplifies the application and approval process for researchers and reduces burdens on recipients. Specifically, the Act provides for the following provisions related to NIH grants: • Implement measures to reduce burdens on the monitoring of sub-recipients of grants, including an exemption from sub-recipient monitoring or the implementation of alternative grant structures which remove the need for such monitoring. • Establish considerations to modify the timelines for the reporting of financial conflicts of interest and ensure they are appropriate for the award. • Avoid duplication of procedures and requirements between the agency and the department, requiring the Secretary of Health & Human Services (HHS) and the Director of the NIH to evaluate expenditure reporting to minimize burdens on funding recipients. • Create the “Next Generation of Researchers Initiative” to foster a new crop of investigators. The Initiative will promote research independence and increase opportunities for funding and mentorship, and will enhance workforce diversity for young researchers.

Drug Approval Process The FDA is granted authority by the Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) to strengthen the nation’s response to chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN) threats through the use of unapproved medical products. 21st Century Cures clarifies this authorization by allowing the use of conditionally approved medications. It also expands

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the use of these unapproved countermeasures to animal drugs and animals.

Reduction of Regulatory Burden The Act aims to reduce administrative and regulatory burden for biomedical researchers. Two other bills (H.R. 5583 and S. 2742) were previously introduced in the 114th Congress to alleviate regulatory burden in research, but no action was taken. The language of the Cures Act states in Sec. 2034, page 69 that not later than 2 years after enactment, “the NIH Director shall collaborate with the Agriculture Secretary and Food and Drugs Commissioner to complete a review of the policies and regulations for the care and use of laboratory animals. As appropriate, they shall revise and reduce burden placed on investigators, while protecting research animals and maintaining the integrity and credibility of research findings.” The Director of the NIH shall seek input of experts and shall: • Identify ways to ensure such regulations and policies are not inconsistent, overlapping, or unnecessarily duplicative, including with respect to inspection and review requirements by federal agencies and accrediting associations; • Take steps to eliminate or reduce identified inconsistencies, overlap, or duplication among such regulations and policies; and • Take other actions, as appropriate, to improve the coordination of regulations and policies with respect to research with laboratory animals. The Act also provides for a review by research funding agencies regarding the policies covering the disclosure of financial conflicts of interest and makes any revisions necessary to harmonize these policies.

Research Policy Advisory Board One year after enactment, a research policy board will be established to advise government officials about the effects of regulations on researchers. The board will consist of the Administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs of the Office of Management and Budget, the Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy, the Secretary of HHS, the Director of the National Science


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Foundation, and other secretaries and directors that support or regulate scientific research, as well as members from nonprofit scientific organizations. The board will conduct assessments of regulatory

policies and offer suggestions for improvement. The board will then submit a report to selected federal offices and congressional committees containing their formal recommendations.

ASPET Responds to Passage of 21st Century Cures ASPET President David Sibley, PhD, issued a statement applauding the legislation as an additional investment in biomedical research: “The passage of this legislation is a victory for the biomedical research community, not just within the United States, but world-wide, and will have a significant impact on

Council

For Immediate Release Contact: Susanna Aguirre 301-634-7062 saguirre@aspet.org

David R. Sibley

President Bethesda, Maryland

John D. Schuetz

President-Elect St. Jude Children's Resea rch

public health. We look forward to continued support from legislators in the appropriations process,” Sibley said. The statement emphasizes, however, that the funding should supplement, but not supplant, regular NIH appropriations.

Hospital

Kenneth E. Thummel

Past President University of Washington

ASPET Applauds Passage of st 21 Century Cures Act as Add itional Investment in Biomedical Research

Charles P. France

Secretary/Treasurer The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antoni o

John J. Tesmer

Secretary/Treasurer-Elect University of Michigan

Dennis C. Marshall

Past Secretary/Treasurer Ferring Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Margaret E. Gnegy

Councilor University of Michigan Medica l School

Wayne L. Backes

Councilor Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center

Carol L. Beck

Councilor Thomas Jefferson University

Mary E. Vore

Chair, Board of Publications Trustees University of Kentucky

Brian M. Cox

FASEB Board Representativ e Bethesda, Maryland

Scott A. Waldman

Chair, Program Committee Thomas Jefferson University

Judith A. Siuciak

Executive Officer

BETHESDA –The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics (ASPET) commen ds legislators and President Oba ma for the final passage of the 21st Century Cure s Act, which has now been sign ed into law. We commend legislators for their bipartisan, bicameral supp ort and vision in recognizing the critical impo rtance of funding for medical research as a national priority. In particular, we are deeply grateful for the provision providing $4.8 billion over ten years in new funding for the National Insti tutes of Health (NIH) and $500 million for the Food and Drug Administration (FDA ). “The passage of this legislatio n is a victory for the biomedic al research community, not just within the United States, but world-wide, and will have a significant impact on public heal th. We look forward to continue d support from legislators in the appropriations process,” said Dr. David Sible y, ASPET President. NIH’s contribution to the well -being and health of its citizens is a critical investment for the nation that will yield far greater returns throu gh new discoveries and therapies. With enhanced and sustained funding, NIH can continue to address the most promising scientific opportuni ties and critical healthcare need s of our country. ************* ASPET is 5,000 member scien tific society whose members conduct basic and clinical pharmacological research and work for academia, governmen t, large pharmaceutical comp small biotech companies, and anies, even non-profit organizations. ASPET members work in a varie different fields and include neuro ty of scientists, toxicologists, chem ical biologists, pharmacists, cardiovascular scientists, and many more. These research effort s help develop new medicines therapeutic agents to fight existi and ng and emerging diseases.

9650 Rockville Pike | Beth esda | MD | 20814-3995 P: (301) 634-7060 | F: (301 ) 634-7061 | E: info@aspe t.org | www.aspet.org

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Continuing Resolution Funds the Government through April The 114th Congress adjourned in December after submitting a Continuing Resolution (CR) to President Barack Obama that will keep the government running through April 2017. After weeks of negotiations, Obama signed H.R. 2028, funding federal programs through April 28, 2017. The Senate had voted 63-36 on December 9, 2016 to approve the measure, which includes $872 million to fight opioid abuse and support cancer research, among other provisions affecting biomedical research efforts. Additionally, the measure provides the full $352 million made available to the NIH in FY2017 through the Innovation Account established in the 21st Century Cures Act. House Appropriations leaders report the current $1.07 trillion budget cap level is still maintained by funding operations at a

rate 0.1901 percent below fiscal year 2016 levels. The stopgap measure allows work on the FY2017 spending bills to be completed in the current 115th Congress. Resuming work on that legislation will be critical for agencies such as the NIH, which will not be able to begin spending on new projects until it has a permanent budget. Of particular concern to ASPET members is the $2 billion increase for biomedical research that was approved by the Senate Appropriations Committee in June. ASPET reached out to newly-elected President Donald Trump and congressional leadership in late January urging legislators to quickly pass a budget bill that includes this proposed funding for NIH.

President Donald J. Trump The White House Washington, DC 20500

Council David R. Sibley

President Bethesda, Maryland

John D. Schuetz

President-Elect St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Kenneth E. Thummel Past President University of Washington

Charles P. France

Secretary/Treasurer The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

John J. Tesmer

Secretary/Treasurer-Elect University of Michigan

Dennis C. Marshall

Past Secretary/Treasurer Ferring Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Margaret E. Gnegy

Councilor University of Michigan Medical School

Wayne L. Backes

Councilor Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center

Carol L. Beck

Councilor Thomas Jefferson University

Mary E. Vore

Chair, Board of Publications Trustees University of Kentucky

Brian M. Cox

FASEB Board Representative Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences

Scott A. Waldman

Chair, Program Committee Thomas Jefferson University

Judith A. Siuciak Executive Officer

The Honorable Mitch McConnell Majority Leader US Senate S-230, The Capitol Washington, DC 20510 The Honorable Nancy Pelosi House Democratic Leader H-204, The Capitol Washington, DC 20515

January 30, 2017 Dear President Trump, Speaker Ryan, Leader Pelosi:

The Honorable Paul Ryan Speaker US House of Representatives H-232, The Capitol Washington, DC 205156 The Honorable Charles Schumer Minority Leader US Senate S-221, The Capitol Washington, DC 20514

Leader Schumer and Minority Majority Leader McConnell, Minority

) appreciates this and Experimental Therapeutics (ASPET The American Society for Pharmacology leadership in championing ration and to thank Congress for their a final opportunity to welcome the new administ you to enact, without further delay, urge to and funding; research Committee-approved sustained growth in medical that includes the Senate Appropriations priority in a remains fiscal year (FY) 2017 spending package NIH that ensure to s of Health (NIH), and $34.1 billion for the National Institute FY 2018 and beyond. programs is of great concern. g temporary funding for government The current continuing resolution providin process disrupts NIH’s ability to of regular order of the appropriations For the NIH, the continued breakdown scientists that the agency supports. research cal biomedi and ns institutio meet funding obligations to the to improving patient health and medical research enterprise is critical States in scientific A robust, reliable investment in the ing the global preeminence of the United strengthening the economy while maintain in all 50 states at medical schools, research supports budget NIH’s the employers in their largest innovation. More than 80 percent of the among are often research institutes, which teaching hospitals, universities, and respective communities.

process to mitigate years of bipartisan effort in the appropriations We are grateful to Congress for their the 21st Century Cures Act; over inflation for NIH and by passing ions, a stagnant funding by providing real growth efforts. Aside from the budget implicat key these ne undermi to s threaten a flat FY 2017 appropriation is already under stress. that system a to nty uncertai add ncies and long-term CR would create inefficie

to continuing the ful growth in the NIH budget is essential Your commitment to reliable and meaning urges the passage of a final in FY 2016. To that end, ASPET strongly the bipartisan budget momentum of the investment made g providin 2017, FY for federal government spending package to fully fund the America’s continued sly approved for the NIH. To ensure y for increases the House and Senate previou ent, we must prioritize a budget trajector environm on innovati tive competi leadership in an increasingly d you for continuing to recognize ble growth. Once again, we commen NIH that advances sustainable, predicta action. te immedia and look forward to your the critical importance of research funding Sincerely, David R. Sibley, Ph.D. President esignate of Health and Human Services; Director-designate cc: The Honorable Tom Price, Secretary-D House Office of Management and Budget The Honorable Mick Mulvaney, White

s Transforming Discoveries into Therapie · aspet.org , Maryland 20814 · Office: 301-634-7060

ASPET · 9650 Rockville Pike · Bethesda

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Education News Pills, Potions, and Poisons: A Pharmacology Summer Camp for High School Students At the Ohio State University College of Pharmacy, rising 10th – 12th grade students interested in the biomedical sciences can apply to attend a six-day summer day camp called “Pills, Potions, and Poisons.” This interactive program provides an overview of pharmacology and its relationship to health, disease, and society. Broad topic areas serve as the focus for the first five days of active and team-based learning, which include experiments, simulations, games, role-play, and discussion. The sixth and final day includes a student showcase for participants to present highlights of the week to parents and teachers. A recent study of program outcomes found that participants demonstrated gains in science knowledge and in confidence and motivation toward science careers [Downing MN, Rooney KE, Turner AN, and N Kwiek (2016) The impact of a shortterm pharmacology enrichment program on knowledge and science attitudes in precollege students. Inov Pharm 7(2): article 3]. Catherine Fry, Director of Education at ASPET, interviewed Nicole Kwiek, Director of Undergraduate Studies and Clinical Assistant Professor of Pharmacology at the Ohio State University College of Pharmacy, about this unique program.

Q: What was the motivation for creating this program? A: This all started while I was still a graduate student at Duke University. When

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I realized I wanted to pursue education rather than a traditional bench career, Dr. Rochelle Schwartz-Bloom was a wonderful mentor to me. Together, we created and offered a pharmacology-focused high school science enrichment program through Duke’s Talent Identification Program. Nicole Kwiek, Director of It was a fairly intense Undergraduate Studies and crash course in Clinical Assistant Professor of Pharmacology, Ohio State pharmacology adapted University College of Pharmacy for young audiences. We did this for several years, eventually adapting it into a nonresidential camp that focused on students from underrepresented groups. When I came to Ohio State University as a new faculty member, my dean was very interested in setting up a program like this locally. To make it more cost-effective, we adapted it into a one-week day camp, and it’s been running in this format since 2009.

Q: How were you able to get institutional buy-in for a program like this? A: We have a few things working in our favor. One is that we’re a land grant institution, and we’re encouraged to do outreach like this. Within

our College of Pharmacy, this program added a strong youth-targeted educational component to our outreach. Further, my administration was very supportive, offering both in-kind and monetary resources to make this a reality. We have access to some really motivated and talented TAs (undergraduate, graduate, and/or PharmD students) who are looking for leadership experience and a competitive edge on their graduate/professional school applications. Finally, we have faculty for which this is part of their teaching load, and research around this program is part of their scholarship effort. Overall, we have made pretty efficient use of our available resources at the College and institutional level.

Q: Have you found that TAs who may not have considered teaching as a career become interested as a result of participating? A: Yes, we have. The experience positively motivates TAs into thinking more about teaching and academic careers. In our paper, we also show that it improves their ability to communicate science topics and makes them more interested in other outreach. We do have to interpret that data in context, though, as these were students with an established interest in education from the start. One of my first TAs, now Dr. Katie Summers, began helping with the program as an undergraduate student; subsequently, she completed her PhD in pharmacology, did postdoctoral training in pharmacology education, and just recently accepted a teaching-focused faculty position. This experience was really important for her in defining her career path.

Q: How did you decide on the topical focus areas and the activities that go along with them? A: The power of pharmacology is that it is interdisciplinary, bridging topic areas in chemistry, biology, genetics, and others. It’s also relevant – everyone knows about drugs. High school students aren’t often exposed to relevant, interdisciplinary science content, and so they have limited chances to see how these concepts all come together to influence living systems. To narrow topics down to one week, we tried to focus on overarching principles: how do drugs get in, around, and out of the body, how do they interact with their targets, how do we

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measure drug response? We also discuss careers in pharmacology. Many students arrive thinking that they’re only learning about pharmacy, and they often have an “a-ha” moment when they realize the differences between pharmacology and pharmacy.

Q: What are some examples of activities that have been successful or that students find really engaging? A: The basic principles we teach haven’t really changed since 2009, but we’re always finding ways to improve upon how they’re delivered. For example, our current instructors, Dr. Molly Downing and Dr. Summers, have developed a great drug discovery simulation activity where the students work in teams as pharmaceutical companies. As they work to “develop” a new drug, they analyze clinical trial data, strategically invest their money, and make decisions to ensure that their drug is approved. They’ve since adapted this into a “Chutes and Ladders” type of game that covers the same concepts, but it brings in more of the unknowns that go along with drug discovery. They might land on an obstacle that sets them back several steps. Students really love anything competitive, so game-based learning is very popular. Another example is a “drug mystery” activity where they are confronted with a mystery and they only have some pieces of the information. We often have them act in skits to work together and solve the pharmacological mystery for example, that the patient’s drinking of grapefruit juice with his anti-arrhythmic drug caused his death. Additionally, the hands-on experiments we do are always impactful, since the students have to devise and test their own hypotheses.

Q: Have you been able to follow up with the students after they participate?

Q: Do you have any advice for other faculty looking to start up a similar program? A: First, you cannot lecture for an hour to high school students. The movement toward active learning has helped more faculty embrace student-centered activities. But with high schoolers, you don’t even need an academic argument for not lecturing to them excessively. They just won’t sit still that long. Since you have them for 8 hours a day, you have to keep the day varied. So you need to consider how to plan engaging activities, and we have plenty of resources we could share. Something that’s been crucial for us is leveraging the interest and creativity of the TAs, who have lots of good ideas for activities. Making good connections with K-12 schools in the area is also important. Most universities have an outreach office that oversees summer programs, and it’s been valuable to be plugged into that as a PR avenue. We also made a listserv of guidance counselors and high school teachers in our region so we could communicate directly with them. We now get applicants from all over the nation, with many more applicants than we can accept. We thank Nicole for taking the time to tell us about the “Pills, Potions, and Poisons” program. For additional information, please visit: http://www. pharmacy.ohio-state. edu/outreach/pillspotions-and-poisons.

A: Yes, we do see a lot of them coming to Ohio State University, and even enrolling in our Bachelors of Science in Pharmaceutical Sciences program. That’s not unintentional–this is a chance to encourage interest in pursuing pharmacology programs at our school. We have some data to suggest that it’s been a good recruiting tool, although we don’t have robust data on every cohort. Some participants come full circle, acting as program TAs in subsequent years.

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ASPET Mentoring Network Commences its Second Year at EB2017 The ASPET Mentoring Network: Coaching for Career Development was established by the BIG IDEAS initiative in 2015 as a means to promote diversity in the scientific workforce through career coaching. This program follows a mentoring model that matches mid- to late-career scientists with cohorts of young scientists to help guide them in their development and career advancement. The activities of the program are designed to complement, not replace, scientific mentors at participants’ home institutions. The year-long program includes both one-on-one and group discussions that align with the interests and needs of the participants. We are pleased to launch the second iteration of the ASPET Mentoring Network at Experimental Biology 2017 with in-person activities, followed by virtual interactions throughout the year. Activities at EB2017 will encourage relationship building across coaching groups, near-peer mentoring between graduate students and postdoctoral scientists, and networking. The program will lay the groundwork for the rest of the year’s activities, with a special emphasis on deconstructing the skills needed to succeed scientifically, professionally, psychologically, and socially. Led by Lynn Wecker, Susan Ingram, and members of the Mentoring and Career Development committee, the program has adapted a coaching model developed by Rick McGee and his colleagues at Northwestern University. Coaches for 2017 include Michelle Baladi (Jazz Pharmaceuticals), Jan Clark (National Institutes of Health), Lakshmi Devi (Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai), and Michael Jarvis (AbbVie). Lynn Wecker (University of South

The Pharmacologist • March 2017

Florida) and Myron Toews (University of Nebraska Medical Center) will also be providing support to the coaching groups throughout the program. Rick McGee will be facilitating the training during EB2017, and we are grateful to him and his team at Northwestern for their continued involvement and expertise. We congratulate the following young scientists who were chosen to participate in the second year of the ASPET Mentoring Network:

Postdoctoral Scientists Oreoluwa Adedoyin, Univ of Alabama at Birmingham Michael Berquist II, Univ of Arkansas for Med Sciences Patrick Garcia, Univ of Alabama at Birmingham Martha Gay, Howard Univ T. Lee Gilman, Univ of Texas HSC at San Antonio Joy Guedia, Univ of British Columbia Iuliana Popescu, Univ of Kentucky Luc Rougee, Eli Lilly and Company

Graduate Students Rondine Allen, Univ of Iowa Jugajyoti Baruah, Univ of Illinois at Chicago Alexa Hendricks, Wake Forest Sch of Med Joseph Jilek, Univ of California, Davis Anthony Jones, SUNY, Buffalo Shrinidh Joshi, North Dakota State Univ Molly McGinnis, Wake Forest Sch of Med Anastasia Robinson, Howard Univ William Rodemer, Lewis Katz Sch of Med at Temple Univ Olufisayo Salako, Florida A&M Univ Souvarish Sarkar, Iowa State Univ Mark Shaaya, Univ of Illinois at Chicago Sarah Sottile, Southern Illinois Univ Sch of Med Venkata Ramana Vaka, Univ of Mississippi Med Center Ana Vergara, Washington State Univ Jaydeep Yadav, Temple Univ Sch of Pharmacy


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Journals News PDF Manuscript Submission In late December, ASPET began offering PDFonly submission for all of its wholly owned journals: Drug Metabolism and Disposition, Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Molecular Pharmacology, and Pharmacological Reviews. This new feature provides authors with a simpler method of submitting new and revised manuscripts through our online submission system. All components (manuscript, tables, and figures) should be compiled into one PDF file and uploaded to the manuscript submission system. When a paper is accepted for publication, authors will be required to provide source files such as a Word file for the text,

figure captions, and tables and individual image files for the figures. Submitting one PDF file at initial submission and for revisions should make the process easier and faster for authors. As always, Dianne King-McGavin, Cassie Wood, and Mary Blackwood-Naecker in ASPET’s Journals Department are available to help authors through the submission process. Just email journals@aspet.org. Manuscripts submitted prior to December 21, 2016 will continue to be processed under the old system using separate files for text and graphics through all stages of the peer review process.

Search Opens for Next DMD Editor Dr. Edward T. Morgan’s term as editor of Drug Metabolism and Disposition will come to a close at the end of 2017. He has served as editor since 2012 and, per ASPET’s bylaws, cannot be renewed for another term. ASPET’s Board of Publications Trustees must begin the search for his successor. The deadline for nominations is 5:00 PM EDT on April 28, 2017. Self-nominations are welcome. ASPET editors serve for a three-year term that can be renewed for one additional three-year term. The position includes an honorarium. The peer-review process is managed at the ASPET office using an online manuscript submission and peer review system. Nominees must be an ASPET member in good standing and should have served on an editorial

board. Before nominating a candidate, please make sure the person is willing to serve. Nominations should include a brief statement supporting the candidate and the candidate’s CV. The selection process will include telephone interviews with the top candidates and is expected to be completed no later than August 2017. The incoming editor will begin working with the outgoing editor and ASPET staff during the fall and will assume all of the responsibilities of the editor effective January 1, 2018. Nominations, including a supporting statement and the candidate’s CV, should be sent to Rich Dodenhoff, ASPET Journals Director, at rdodenhoff@ aspet.org. You will receive confirmation of receipt of the nomination. For more information, please contact rdodenhoff@ aspet.org.

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ASPET Meets New Wellcome Trust Requirements The Wellcome Trust announced new requirements related to the payment of article publication charges (APCs) for open access publications last September. The deadline for compliance is April 1, 2017. Journals that do not meet the requirements will not be eligible for the payment of APCs. ASPET met most of the requirements since the Society’s open access option was launched in December 2015. The additional criteria dealt with information that has to be included on invoices and making certain information clearer on manuscript submission sites and in instructions to authors.

Working with the Copyright Clearance Center, which collects APCs for ASPET’s journals through its RightsLink system, the Society’s journals met all of the requirements before the end of 2016. ASPET is included on Wellcome’s list of compliant publishers at http://bit.ly/2gIt5RX. All authors who are funded by the Wellcome Trust must select the option to publish under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license and cite their Wellcome funding in a footnote. More information is available from the Instructions to Authors for each ASPET journal.

Journals Symposium at Annual Meeting

Following on last year’s success, the Board of Publications Trustees will present the second “Hear It from the Editors” journal symposium at ASPET’s Annual Meeting on Monday, April 24, 2017 from 9:30 AM to noon. This year, the session is designed as a workshop. The editors of ASPET’s journals will address major issues regarding the review process, both from the perspective of authors who submit a manuscript and those who want to learn how to become an excellent reviewer. The workshop will also cover ethics and copyright in scientific papers, as well as how to write an effective review article. Brief presentations by the editors will be followed by small group discussions using case studies as guides. The new format allows participants to interact directly with the editors and associate editors as they facilitate conversations. A final question and answer period will close the session.

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Join ASPET’s editors and associate editors for this interactive workshop designed for everyone from graduate students through established researchers to tackle real-life publishing issues.

Speakers of the ASPET Journals Symposium: Hear It from the Editors, at EB2016 in San Diego, California.


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New Editorial Board Members The Board of Publications Trustees is pleased to welcome the following new editorial board members. Dr. John Tesmer (University of Michigan) is now the deputy editor for Molecular Pharmacology. He previously served the journal as an associate editor from 2014 through 2016. Joining him on that journal are Dr. Sridhar Mani (Albert Einstein School of Medicine) and Dr. Andrew Morris (University of Kentucky) as new associate editors. New Members of the Editorial and Advisory Board include: Dr. Lakshmi Devi (Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai), Dr. Miwako Kato Homma (Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine), Dr. Philip Lazarus (Washington State University), Dr. Lina Obeid (SUNY Stony Brook),

Dr. Mary-Ann Bjornsti (University of Alabama at Birmingham) and Dr. Wendy Bollag (Medical College of Georgia). Drug Metabolism and Disposition welcomed the following new members to its Editorial Board: Dr. Kazuya Maeda (University of Tokyo), Dr. Raju Subramanian (Gilead Sciences), Dr. Jan Wahlstrom (Amgen), and Dr. Michael Sinz (Bristol-Myers Squibb). Dr. Lori Isom (University of Michigan Medical School) is the newest associate editor for Pharmacological Reviews. The BPT is grateful to all for their willingness to serve the journals in these important positions.

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Membership News New Members REGULAR MEMBERS Dolapo Adedeji, Elizabeth City State Univ, NC Reheman Adili, Univ of Michigan Shailesh R. Agarwal, Univ of Nevada – Reno Aamir Ahmed, King's Coll London, UK Yasutada Akiba, CURE/UCLA & WLA VAMC, CA John A. Allen, Univ of Texas Med Branch Teita Asano, St. Marianna Univ Sch of Med, Japan Nicole Beard, Univ of Canberra, Australia Koganti Bharathi, Inst of Pharmaceutical Tech, Sri Padmavati Mahila Visvavidyalayam, India Kate Blease, Celgene, CA Inger Lise Bogen, Oslo Univ Hospital, Section of Drug Abuse Res, Norway Wendy B. Bollag, Augusta Univ, Med Coll of Georgia Alessandro Cannavo, Temple Univ, PA William K. Chan, Univ of the Pacific, CA Jae H. Chang, Genentech Inc, CA Mitali Chatterjee, Inst of Post Graduate Med Education & Res, India Peng Chen, Lanzhou Univ, China Shujuan Chen, Univ of California San Diego Wing-Tai Cheung, Chinese Univ of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Fedelis P. Ching, Niger Delta Univ, Nigeria Julia Yue Y. Cui, Univ of Washington Deborah A. DeManno, Takeda Pharmaceuticals, IL Rakesh K. Dixit, King George Med Univ - Lucknow, India Rhonda Dzakpasu, Georgetown Univ, DC The Pharmacologist • March 2017

David F. Estrada, Univ at Buffalo, NY Michael E. Feigin, Cold Spring Harbor Lab, NY Patricia D. Fernandes, Federal Univ of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Marxa L. Figueiredo, Purdue Univ, IN Joseph F. Foss, Cleveland Clinic, OH Kathleen M. Frey, Long Island Univ Pharmacy, NY Yu Fukuda, St. Jude Children's Res Hospital, TN Kalpana Ghoshal, Ohio State Univ Comprehensive Cancer Ctr Daniel L. Gustafson, Colorado State Univ Yasser Heakal, D’Youville Coll Sch of Pharmacy, NY Brandon J. Henderson, Marshall University - Joan C. Edwards Sch of Med, WV Bradford G. Hill, Univ of Louisville, KY Suttira Intapad, Tulane Univ Sch of Med, LA Lauren L. Jantzie, Univ of New Mexico Martin O. Job, National Inst on Drug Abuse, MD Anushree N. Karkhanis, Wake Forest Sch of Med, NC Prasad V. Katakam, Tulane Univ Sch of Med, LA Dimitrios E. Kouzoukas, Loyola Univ Chicago, IL Panjamurthy Kuppusamy, Univ of Maryland, Baltimore Hyunwoo Lee, Univ of Illinois at Chicago Minghua Li, Oregon Health & Science Univ Hock-Kean Liew, Tzu Chi General Hospital, Taiwan Jack M. Lipman, Nevakar, LLC, NJ Ashim Malhotra, Pacific Univ, OR

Samson Mathews Samuel, Weill Cornell Med-Qatar Leslie Matuszewich, Northern Illinois Univ Jane A. Mitchell, Univ of Toronto, Canada Thomas Nathaniel, Univ of South Carolina Kristen E. Pleil, Weill Cornell Med, Cornell Univ, NY Joseph H. Porter, Virginia Commonwealth Univ Huma Rasheed, NY Lourdes Rodriguez-Fragoso, Univ Autonoma Del Estado de Morelos, Mexico Witchuda Saengsawang, Mahidol Univ, Thailand Paul Soto, LA Robert M. Straubinger, Univ at Buffalo, NY Raju Subramanian, Gilead Sciences, CA Dodoala Sujatha, Inst of Pharmaceutical Tech, Sri Padmavati Mahila Visvavidyalayam, India Suman Suman, Univ of Louisville, KY Xioahan Tang, Weill Cornell Med Coll, NY Zhe Wei, Augusta Univ, GA Wenkuan Xin, Southwest Univ, China LiLian Yuan, Des Moines Univ, IA Qing Zhong, St Matthews Univ, Cayman Islands

POSTDOCTORAL MEMBERS Emmanuel O. Akano, National Inst of Neurological Disorders & Stroke, MD Anusha Ande, Univ of Florida


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Christopher K. Arnatt, Saint Louis Univ, MO Maria E. Avila-Munoz, Univ of Illinois at Chicago Deebika Balu, Univ of Illinois at Chicago Owais M. Bhat, Virginia Commonwealth Univ Deepak Kumar K. Bhatt, WA Shannon J. Clough, Univ at Buffalo, NY Simon G. Comerma Steffensen, Aarhus Univ, Denmark/Central Univ of Venezuela-Maracay Stephanie M. Davis, Univ of Kentucky Coll of Med Titilope M. Dokunmu, Covenant Univ, Nigeria Zhijian Duan, Univ of California, Davis Chunying Gao, Univ of Washington Martha Gay, Howard Univ, DC T. Lee Gilman, Univ of Texas HSCat San Antonio Malika P. Godamudunage, Univ of Michigan Fokhrul Hossain, Louisiana State Univ HSC Tao Hu, Univ of Washington Emily J. Johnson, Washington State Univ, Spokane RaMi Lee, Virginia Commonwealth Univ Thorsten M. Leucker, Johns Hopkins Univ, MD Runping Liu, Virginia Commonwealth Univ Lindsay M. Lueptow, Icahn Sch of Med at Mount Sinai, NY Erin Madeen, Johns Hopkins Univ Sch of Med, MD Onakpa M. Monday, Univ of Abuja, Nigeria Mark R. Nilges, Louisiana State Univ HSC Karuppasamy Packiyam, Tamilnadu Agricultural Univ, India Jian Shi, Univ of Michigan Katherine E. Summers, Ohio State Univ Sameer S. Udhane, Med Coll of Wisconsin Prasanna K. Vaddi, Univ of Iowa Jin Wang, CA Kyoung-Jae Won, Univ of Illinois at Chicago Jennifer C. Wong, Emory Univ, GA Rahul Yadav, Univ of Michigan

AFFILIATE MEMBERS Ronald C. Atanacio, Univ of California San Diego Elisabeth E. Garland-Kuntz, Purdue Univ, IN Natalie R. Harker, Tocris Bioscience, UK Behirda Karaj, Michigan State Univ Bor-Chian Lin, Taiwan Luis Tume, Univ Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Peru

GRADUATE STUDENT MEMBERS Roberto A. Abbiati, Inst of Quantitative Systems Pharmacology, CA Caleb M. Abshire, Tulane Univ, LA Tope A. Adeoye, Univ of Ibadan, Nigeria Samantha Adler, Univ of Texas HSC San Antonio Jeremiah M. Afolabi, Univ of Ibadan, Nigeria Ali A. Alghamdi, Long Island Univ, NY Zahrah A. ALHamar, MCPHS Univ, MA Javier Allende Labastida, Univ of Texas Bandar S. Almutairy, MCPHS Univ, MA Mohammed A. Alqinyah, Univ of Georgia Samia M. Alsubhi, MCPHS Univ, MA Diego F. Alzate Correa, Ohio State Univ Eden M. Anderson, Northern Illinois Univ Aleena Arakaki, Univ of California San Diego Reem T. Atawia, MedColl of Georgia, Augusta Univ Issam M. Awwad, Univ of Arizona Coll of Med – Phoenix Syeda Maryam Azeem, Long Island Univ, NY Aaron G. Bart, Univ of Michigan Sara A. Benerofe, New York Inst of Technology Coll of Osteopathic Med Mackenzie C. Bergagnini-Kolev, Univ of Washington Tyler Beyett, Univ of Michigan Ranjana Bhandari, Panjab Univ, India Gerald B. Billac, Louisiana State Univ HSC Melodi A. Bowman, Univ of Texas HSC, San Antonio

Abigail G. Boyd, Univ of South Alabama Stevie C. Britch, Washington State Univ Collis A. Brown, Howard Univ, DC Mark A. Bryniarski, Univ at Buffalo, NY Jonah S. Burke-Kleinman, Queen's Univ, Canada Jessica Cao, Univ of Washington Giovanna Casili, Univ of Messina, Italy Lucy Catteau, Univ Catholique de Louvain, Belgium Aswathy Chandran, Purdue Univ, IN Vishal K. Chavda, Inst of Pharmacy, India Po-Yi Chen, Taiwan Yan-Wei Chen, Inst of Molecular Med, Taiwan Renee A. Chen, A.T. Still Univ, MO Pavan Kumar Chityala, Univ of Houston, TX Vivek K. Chowdhary, Ohio State Univ Justin B. Collier, Med Univ of South Carolina/Univ of Arizona Rose M. Cooper, Univ of Arkansas for Med Sciences Natalia D. Cordeiro, Federal Univ of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Da'Quan D. Craven, Univ of Michigan Med Sch Christine N. Daniels, Duke Univ, NC Joseph L. Dempsey, Univ of Washington Kshiti H. Dholakia, Long Island Univ, NY Christopher J. Donaldson, Univ of Sheffield, UK Jennifer L. Duong, Tulane Univ, LA Clare Edwards, Med Coll of Georgia Sara T. Elazab, Iowa State Univ Ahmed El-Sherbeni, Univ of Alberta, Canada Laura L. Erwin, Louisiana State Univ HSC Candi M. Esquina, Purdue Univ, IN Rafael S. Fais, Ribeirao Preto Med Sch, Brazil Taleah C. Farasyn, Univ of Oklahoma HSC Claire L. Feerick, National Univ of Ireland, Galway Andrew Flores, Univ of Arizona Uma Fogueri, Univ of Colorado Roberta Fusco, Univ of Messina, Italy

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Valentina R. Garbarino, Univ of Texas HSC, San Antonio Brittney R. Garner, Univ of Arkansas for the Med Sciences Anjali Ghimire, Dalhousie Univ, Canada Enrico Gugliandolo, Univ of Messina, Italy Jingjing Guo, Rutgers Univ, NJ Yukuang Guo, Univ of Illinois at Chicago Nimish Gupta, India Innovation Res Center, India Alexander J. Hamers, William Harvey Res Inst, Queen Mary Univ of London, UK Tiffanie L. Hargraves, Univ of Arizona Nakyo Heo, Roosevelt Univ, IL Elizabeth Hernandez Marin, Philadelphia Coll of Osteopathic MedGeorgia Campus Yapei Huang, Creighton Univ Sch of Med, NE Brianna N. Hudson, Purdue Univ, IN Emeka C. Ifediba, Nnamdi Azikiwe Univ, Nigeria Appalaraju Jaggupilli, Univ of Manitoba, Canada Pharavee Jaiprasart, Univ of Oklahoma HSC Kristina Jonsson-Schmunk, Univ of Texas at Austin Radhika Joshi, Univ of Houston Jessica L. Jurmain, Virginia Commonwealth Univ Nicholas A. Kalogriopoulos, Univ of California San Diego Claire M. Kaplan, Univ of Maryland Roma Kaul, Univ of Texas HSC at San Antonio Yun Seok Kim, Seoul National Univ, South Korea Aspen E. King, Univ of Northern Colorado Emily Klatt, Univ at Buffalo, NY Camila Kochi, Univ of Houston Ramya T. Kolli, Univ of Georgia

Moritz Konkel, Univ of Amsterdam, Academic Med Center, Netherlands Matthew Korber, Temple Univ, PA Zimple Kurlawala, Univ of Louisville, KY Jaturon Kwanthongdee, Mahidol Univ, Thailand Theresa A. Lansdell, Michigan State Univ Caitlin V. Lewis, Monash Univ, Australia Lakeisha Lewter, Univ of Buffalo, NY Cindy Yanfei Li, Univ of Washington Fengyuan Li, Univ of Louisville, KY Ao Li, Wayne State Univ, MI Guangbi Li, Virginia Commonwealth Univ Cai Liang, Chinese Univ of Hong Kong Sherry Liang, Western Univ of Health Sciences, CA Howard Lin, National Cheng Kung Univ Med Coll, Taiwan Yeong Hann Ling, Monash Univ, Australia Qinglan Ling, Univ of Houston, TX Paia Lor, California Northstate Univ Coll of Pharmacy Ryan S. MacLeod, Univ of Arkansas for Med Sciences Jerry Madukwe, Univ of Rochester, NY Belinda Y. Mahama, Brown Univ, RI Jennifer Maning, Nova Southeastern Univ, FL Renjith R. Maracheril, New York Inst of Tech Coll of Osteopathic Med Juliany Marrero Vega, Univ at Buffalo, NY Corina Marziano, Univ of Virginia Madelyn I. Mauterer, Wake Forest Univ Sch of Med, NC Samantha J. McClenahan, Univ of Arkansas for Med Sciences James W. McCormick, Southern Methodist Univ, TX Mercedes L. McWaters, Northern Illinois Univ Andrew J. Milewski, Temple Univ Sch of Pharmacy, PA

Congratulations to Patrick Finn on being the winner of the $50.00 AMEX gift card. Thank you for renewing early and participating in our 2017 Renew to Win raffle.

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Molly Minkiewicz, Wake Forest Univ, NC Brittany L. Moyce, Univ of Manitoba, Canada Amila K. Nanayakkara, Southern Methodist Univ, TX Deven V. Narke, Long Island Univ, NY Caitlin M. Nealon, Penn State Univ Aaron M. Neely, Univ of Louisville, KY Huong T. Nguyen, Wayne State Univ, MI Hye-Jin Oh, Yeungnam Univ, South Korea Olasunkanmi S. Olawuwo, Univ of Ibadan, Nigeria Oluwatobiloba Osikoya, Univ of North Texas HSC Vincent E. Pair, Univ of Florida Coll of Pharmacy Madeline M. Pantoni, Univ of California, San Diego Beverly M. Pappas, Univ of the Pacific, CA Erickson M. Paragas, Washington State Univ Ji Eun Park, Seoul National Univ, South Korea Yadira X. Perez-Paramo, Washington State Univ Rupasree Peruru, Sri Padmavati Mahila Visvavidyalayam, India Hannah E. Petrek, Univ of California Davis Sch of Med Elizabeth Pitts, Emory Univ, GA Stephanie Proano, North Carolina State Univ Cara C. Rada, Univ of California, San Diego Suchi Raghunathan, Coll of Pharmacy, Univ of Houston Puneet Raman, Univ of Arizona College of Med - Phoenix Sabina Ranjit, Univ of Tennessee HSC Pawan K. Raut, Yeungnam Univ, South Korea Derion F. Reid, Northeastern Univ, MA Cosette M. Rivera Cruz, Purdue Univ, IN William C. Rodemer, Temple Univ, PA Ngango Yvon Rugema, Purdue Univ, IN Douglas Saforo, Univ of Louisville, KY Ankita A. Salvi, Univ of Houston, TX


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Amanda O. Salzwedel, Univ of Minnesota Danielle Sambo, Univ of Florida Rajesh Kishore Kumar Sanku, Temple Univ Sch of Phar, PA Kiran Sapkota, Univ of Nebraska Med Ctr Caitlin R. Schlagal, Univ of Texas Med Branch Jennifer A. Schreiber, Loyola Univ Chicago, IL Erica Sequeira, Creighton Univ, NE Soroush Shahrokh, Rowan Univ Schof Osteopathic Med, NJ Tuo Shao, Univ of Louisville, KY Lauren Shapiro, Emory Univ, GA Vincent S. Shaw, Michigan State Univ Stephen Shrum, Univ of Arkansas for Med Sciences Justin N. Siemian, Univ at Buffalo, NY Monita Sieng, Purdue Univ, IN Yaprak D. Simay, Gazi Univ, Turkey Sierra L. Slade, Mayo Clinic, MN Taylor A. Stowe, Wake Forest Sch of Med, NC Priyanka Swami, North Dakota State Univ Vidhi Thakkar, Georgia State Univ Nehaben D. Thakkar, Long Island Univ, NY Dinesh Thapa, Dalhousie Univ, Canada Janet A. Thompson, National Inst for Occup Safety and Health, WV Ngoc Tran, Cold Spring Harbor Lab, NY Ashutosh Tripathi, Univ of Illinois at Chicago Nguyen T. Truong, Michigan State Univ Taylan Turan, Gazi Univ, Turkey Alicja J. Urbaniak, Univ of Arkansas for Med Sciences Guru R. Valicherla, CSIR-Central Drug Res Inst, India Michelle M. Van Camp, Purdue Univ, IN Elizabeth Vargas, New York Inst of Technology Coll of Osteopathic Med Ana G. Vergara, Washington State Univ Samara Vilca, Florida Atlantic Univ Rashidra R. Walker, Florida A&M Univ Chuan Wang, Auburn Univ, Harrison Sch of Pharmacy, AL Weicang Wang, Univ of Massachusetts - Amherst

Moritz V. Warmbrunn, Univ of Amsterdam, Netherlands Kelin L. Wheaton, Ohio State Univ Ruixiang Xu, Sch of Pharmacy, Lanzhou Univ, China Dan Yan, Univ of Hong Kong Hong Yang, Sch of Pharmacy, Univ of Maryland, Baltimore Chalen Yang, A.T. Still Univ, MO Lucia Zhang, Univ of Toronto, Canada Di Zhang, Michigan State Univ Hae Young Zhang, Univ of Washington Xuhuiqun Zhang, Illinois Inst of Technology

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT MEMBERS Ramakrishnan Sivasanikaran, Kasturba Med Coll - Manipal, India Joao C. Eusebio, Univ of Hertfordshire, UK Varishma Makwara, Univ of Hertfordshire, UK Chelsea A. Limboy, Texas Tech Univ Michael B. Robinson, Purdue Univ, IN Hayley C. Moyer, Emory Univ, GA Raphael F. Lopes, MCPHS Univ, MA Brianna L. Scharrer, Loyola Univ Chicago Health Sciences Division Giuliana M. DiMarco, Texas Tech Univ Casey M. Moffitt, Univ of South Carolina Hallie M. Spooner, Tulane Univ Sch of Med, LA Cathaerina N. Appadoo, Univ of Florida Hayley R. LeBlanc, KS Akhila R. Padi, Univ of South Carolina Safiyya T. Zaidi, Univ of Houston, TX Rebecca Harlow, Texas A&M Univ Caroline Hernandez-Casner, Univ of Texas at El Paso Ashwini Krishnamurthy, Emory Univ, GA SooWan Lee, Univ of Washington Brittney McCormick, Univ of Arizona Coll of Med - Phoenix Daniel A. Rodriguez, Univ of Texas Chrysta C. Andrade, Univ of Arizona Gian C. Molina-Castro, Univ of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus Alyson C. Williamson, Drake Univ, IA

In Sympathy Carl F. Gessert Donald Green Shoji Shibata Laura C. Winalski, Georgia Inst of Technology Meghna D. Mehta, Univ of California San Diego Ryan D. Paulukinas, Philadelphia Coll of Pharmacy-Univ of the Sciences Khadija D. Wilson, Brooklyn College, NY Brianna E. George, Texas Tech Univ Christian I. Corrales, Univ of California, Los Angeles Thomas J. Fernandez, Univ of Michigan Jessica J. Shaklee, Univ of Minnesota Twin Cities Kyung Hyun K. Chung, Massachusetts Coll of Pharmacy & Hlth Sci Univ, MA Kristen L. Woodhouse, Univ of Minnesota - Twin Cities Valerie M. Hollimon, Paine Coll, GA Sophia M. Villiere, Medgar Evers Coll, NY Christina N. Camilleri, Franciscan Univ of Steubenville, OH Ronald S. Wang, Johns Hopkins Univ, MD Andrea T. Lee, Washington State Univ Vancouver, WA María T. Morales Colon, Univ of Puerto Rico at Cayey Tiara V. Hinton, Morgan State Univ, MD Sapna Basappa, Univ of Maryland, Baltimore Diego Cortes, Oberlin Coll, TX Ya El Courtney, Kent Univ, OH Sonia Dermer, Coll of William & Mary, VA Prince Neequaye, North Carolina Central Univ Vladyslava Rybka, George Mason Univ, VA Swarna Shil, Univ of Michigan Taylor Spoon, Temple Univ Sch of Pharmacy, PA Donovan Tucker, Augusta Univ, GA

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Dr. Ronald J. Tallarida—A Mentor and Friend Remembered (1937-2016) Submitted by Rodney B. Murray, PhD and Tom J. Parry, PhD, MBA Last fall, we learned that Dr. Ronald J. Tallarida, an esteemed colleague and friend of ASPET, passed away at his home in West Deptford, NJ on Friday, September 23, 2016. As two of his former students, we wanted to say a few words to reflect on the man who contributed so much Dr. Ronald J. Tallarida to pharmacology research, teaching, and the lives of students he mentored. Ron was born and raised in Philadelphia, where he would take his academic training and spend his professional life. He earned his bachelor's degree in physics and mathematics in 1959 and a master’s degree from Drexel University. It was during the early 1960’s that Ron turned his skills in mathematics to the area of pharmacology. It was then he began an enduring relationship with Temple University School of Medicine (TUMS, now the Katz School of Medicine, Temple University) that would last the rest of his career. His newly found love for theoretical and experimental pharmacology would lead him to obtaining a PhD from Temple in 1967. After completing graduate work at Temple, Ron would join the Pharmacology Faculty at Temple, where he would ultimately attain the status of professor over an exceptional career that would span over four decades. He would also continue an adjunct relationship with Drexel University, where he taught in the area of biomedical engineering for many years. We remember and cherish professors who inspired us. Ron was more than inspirational. As Ron’s students within Temple’s Pharmacology Graduate Program, we had a

Dr. Tallarida speaking at Temple University.

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front row seat to a show where the lead was a reallife genius with a caring and humble spirit. We saw a beautiful mind in action—one which successfully communicated complexity with clarity and ease. In addition to an uncanny ability to make the complex seem simple, Ron was profoundly teachable, a great learner indeed. Ron’s collaborative spirit was at the heart of his academic career, contributing to and learning from diverse therapeutic areas. This is exemplified in the array of topics covered by his publications across various therapeutic areas including cardiovascular, analgesic, cancer, gastrointestinal, metabolic disease/endocrine, neuro-, drug abuse, anti-infective pharmacology. Further, his numerous contributions to basic theoretical pharmacology spanned a variety of areas including drug combination theory and synergism (linear and nonlinear isobolography), dose-response analysis, drug-receptor binding (mass balance, thermodynamics, chaos/control theory, and kinetics), epidemiology, and biostatistics (for those of us not mathematically gifted, this is the genius part). Ron was widely regarded for his unique expertise in theoretical and quantitative pharmacology and was a pioneer in drug-receptor theory.


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Ron’s impressive body of work is represented in nearly 300 articles, multiple patents, and eleven textbooks, including the seminal works: The DoseResponse Relation in Pharmacology, Manual of Pharmacologic Calculations with Computer Programs, and Drug Synergism and Dose-Effect Data Analysis. He also authored the Pocketbook of Integrals and Mathematical Formulas, the widely used Pocketbook of Electrical Engineering Formulas, and The Top 200: The Most Widely Prescribed Drugs in America. He was a widely sought-after speaker and consultant to government research agencies (including the Department of Defense, where he consulted on treatments for traumatic brain injury) and the pharmaceutical industry. Alongside his academic work, his mathematical expertise led him to develop a board game. The game wasn’t a hit, but he was awarded a patent (US3618952) for it in 1971. Along with his duties at Temple as professor of pharmacology, Ron served as chair of the Department of Pharmacology, was appointed vice provost for faculty affairs and served on numerous committees. He also served as a senior investigator in Temple's Center for Substance Abuse Research and a coinvestigator in its Integrative Pharmacology Core. Ron was also a member of ASPET and served as president of the Mid-Atlantic Pharmacology Society. On a personal level, we consider our first meeting Ron as young students to be a crucial turning point in our lives. We couldn’t have asked for a better mentor. Ron was famous for holding court with his students over coffee, and lunched with us as often as he did with his colleagues. In fact, it was at those lunch encounters that we as graduate students would meet and develop rich relationships with faculty from across the medical school. Our friendships with Ron blossomed alongside our mentorship. Ron became like a second father, guiding us throughout our professional careers and personal life. It was typical to find Ron deeply engaged in his students’ lives. He could be found singing at a fellow student’s wedding, entertaining us at his home, attending our family functions, guiding our family members interested in careers in medicine and other fields, writing countless letters of recommendation, corralling us at national meetings for group dinners, encouraging our spouses, entertaining our children, and much more. Knowing him was to recognize that he was a warm, caring gentleman with a tremendous sense of humor.

With that came a sense of humility, grace and a certain selflessness that made us feel that his interest in us as students and friends was genuine. In remembering Ron’s life, we need to remember that his family was his pride and joy. We students were privileged to enter that deeply personal space he considered so precious. Ron was an incredibly dedicated husband, father, and grandfather who loved the life he shared with his wonderful family. Ron is survived by his wife of 37 years, Theresa (nee Valera), his daughters Karen (Ed) Marshall, Diane (Dave) Heggan, Valerie (Michael) Moffa, and sons R.J. (Kelly) Tallarida and Chris Tallarida. In addition to his accomplishments in mathematics and pharmacology, Ron leaves a rich legacy for his family and generations of students, postdocs, young faculty, and industry professionals whom he generously supported over the years. He was one of a kind, and we will forever cherish our time with him. Dr. Tallarida was a member of ASPET since 1970.

This portrait of Dr. Tallarida will hang in the Katz School of Medicine, Temple University.

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Members in the News Achievements, Awards, Promotions, and Scientific Breakthroughs Margarita L. Dubocovich, PhD Margarita L. Dubocovich, PhD, SUNY distinguished Professor and senior associate dean for diversity and inclusion at the University at Buffalo (UB), received the 201516 Excellence in Graduate Student Mentoring Award, in recognition of her support and development of graduate students through mentoring activities. The award is given annually to a member of the graduate faculty who has demonstrated “truly outstanding and sustained support and development of graduate students from course completion through research and subsequent career placement.” Since being recruited to UB from Northwestern University in 2008, Dubocovich has served as primary thesis advisor to five PhD students and eight MS or combined BS/MS students, and has been sought out as a research mentor by 26 postdoctoral fellows. Her accomplishments in mentoring and student professional development are remarkable. She developed the CLIMB (Collaborative Learning and Integrated Mentoring in the Biosciences) programs that provide mentoring experiences for STEM and health science students at the undergraduate, graduate, postdoctoral, and junior faculty levels. She is co-principal investigator of the Institute for Strategic Enhancement of Educational Diversity (iSEED), a UB consortium dedicated to building a culturally diverse community of graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and

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faculty. In addition, as of August 2015, she has been the PI of the KL2 Mentored Career Development Award, and Director of the Workforce Development Core of the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) to provide research training, mentoring, and professional development to the clinical and translational workforce particularly to outstanding junior faculty in health science professions. In addition to Dr. Dubocovich’s recent award, she also stepped down as chair of the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology as of December 2016 to devote her full administrative efforts to her role as the school’s inaugural senior associate dean for diversity and inclusion, a post she has held since 2012, and more time to her research program. Under Dr. Dubocovich’s leadership, the department has recruited eight outstanding junior faculty, grown its National Institutes of Health (NIH) research funding, and expanded its graduate student programs. At the same time, she has implemented many innovative professional and career development and research programs, including the ASPET SURF program. As previously mentioned, Dr. Dubocovich is the director of the Workforce Development Core of the NIH funded UB-Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA), and the principal investigator/ program lead of the CTSA-linked KL2 Mentored Career Development Award to mentor junior faculty in clinical and translational research. The Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Science (JSMBS) wishes to expand these inclusion programs to their faculty and staff to ensure they achieve their goals of excellence in education, research, clinical care, and service to their community. Success of these


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programs and the ongoing accreditation of the JSMBS require that Dr. Dubocovich devote all of her administrative effort to the Office of Inclusion and Cultural Enhancement, and to the CTSA and KL2 award’s initiatives and programs. Dr. Dubocovich has been an ASPET member since 1983 and is a member of the Divisions for Neuropharmacology, Behavioral Pharmacology, Drug Discovery and Development, Pharmacology Education, and Molecular Pharmacology.

Kenneth A. Jacobson, PhD Kenneth A. Jacobson, PhD, senior investigator and chief of both the Molecular Recognition Section and the Laboratory of Bioorganic Chemistry at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, MD, is the recipient of the 2017 BristolMyers Squibb Smissman Award. The recognition is given every two years by the Division of Medicinal Chemistry of the American Chemical Society to a living scientist whose research, teaching, or service has had a substantial impact on the intellectual and theoretical development of the field of medicinal chemistry. In addition, Dr. Jacobson has been named the first winner of the Tu Youyou Award, named in honor of the co-recipient of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. His research has led to the development of over three dozen chemical probes that are commercially available as research tools and are used widely for the study of purine receptors, other GPCRs and ion channels, and some are in clinical trials as potential treatments for cystic fibrosis, cancer, degenerative diseases, and autoimmune inflammatory diseases. Dr. Jacobson has been an ASPET member since 1988 and is a member of the Division for Molecular Pharmacology.

J. Andrew McCammon, PhD J. Andrew McCammon, PhD the Joseph E. Mayer chair of theoretical chemistry and professor of chemistry, biochemistry, and pharmacology at the University of California San Diego (UC San Diego), won the 2016-17 Joseph O. Hirschfelder Prize in Theoretical Chemistry, the most prestigious university-based prize in the field. Dr. McCammon has been a faculty member at UC San Diego since 1994, is a fellow of the San Diego Supercomputer Center, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, member of the National Academy of Sciences, and an elected fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, American Physical Society, Biophysical Society, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is one of the pioneers of biosimulation, and his work has been cited over 43,000 times. Dr. McCammon has been an ASPET member since 1996 and is a member of the Divisions for Molecular Pharmacology, Drug Discovery and Development, and Neuropharmacology.

Kelly Karpa, PhD, RPh Kelly Karpa, PhD, RPh, along with colleagues Casey N. Pinto, PhD, NP-C, MPH and Jason A. Dos Santos, MSPAS, PA-C, DFAAPA, representing nursing, public health sciences, and the physician assistant program at Penn State College of Medicine, were recently awarded a Scholarship in Education Award for their work developing, implementing, and studying outcomes of a large scale interprofessional simulation activity involving standardized patients. Dr. Karpa has been a member of ASPET since 2010 and is a member of the Division for Pharmacology Education.

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Sarah Lindsey, PhD Dr. Sarah Lindsey of Tulane University received a National Institutes of Health/ NHLBI R01 Award to study the role of the recentlydiscovered G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) in postmenopausal arterial stiffness. Dr. Lindsey is a faculty member in the Department of Pharmacology at Tulane University School of Medicine. Her team will investigate the effect of smooth muscle cellspecific GPER deletion on pulse wave velocity and biaxial vascular mechanics. Lindsey said “arterial stiffness increases dramatically after menopause, and our preliminary data suggest that GPER may be the mediator of estrogen’s protective effects. We think that this receptor’s nongenomic estrogen signaling preserves the elastic properties of central arteries. We also find that vascular GPER expression decreases during aging, which may promote adverse responses to menopausal hormone therapy.” This work is an interdisciplinary project between Dr. Lindsey and Dr. Prasad Katakam in her department, as well as with cardiac anesthesiologist Dr. Leanne Groban (Wake Forest) and biomedical engineers Dr. Kristin Miller and Dr. Carolyn Bayer (Tulane). Dr. Lindsey moved to Tulane in 2012 after receiving an NIH K99/R00 pathway to independence award.

Dr. Sarah Lindsey's lab members: Dillion Hutson (undergrad and ASPET SURF), Jen Duong (master’s student), Shreya Kashyap (former undergrad pursuing MD/PhD), Sarah Lindsey (PI), Hallie Spooner (undergrad), and Margaret Zimmerman (postdoc)

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Her lab is full of trainees, from undergraduate to postdoctoral. One of her current undergraduate students was an ASPET SURF participant this past summer, and a former undergrad is currently in the NIH Medical Scientist Training (MD/PhD) Program at the University of Alabama. Dr. Lindsey received her training in cardiovascular pharmacology and has expertise in vascular smooth muscle cell function and vascular reactivity. Her research investigates the role of estrogen in cardiovascular health and the regulation of blood pressure, and includes projects on estrogen receptor signaling, interactions with the renin-angiotensin system, and the influence of environmental estrogens. Dr. Lindsey has been a member of ASPET since 2003. She is a member of the Division for Cardiovascular Pharmacology and is currently serving as secretary/treasurer.

Prasad V.G. Katakam, MD, PhD Dr. Prasad Katakam of Tulane University School of Medicine received a National Institutes of Health/NINDSNIGMS RO1 Award to study the impact of the expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase isoform (nNOS) in the brain microvascular endothelial cells on ischemic brain injury. Dr. Katakam is a faculty member in the Department of Pharmacology and his research group will characterize the distinct function of endothelial nNOS compared to all known NOS isoforms. In addition, his team will examine the role of the endothelial nNOS in the experimental stroke-induced injury to the blood-brain barrier and overall brain. The studies are expected to advance our understanding of the specific role played by the various NOS isoforms, the most important regulators of the neurovascular unit, and are likely to provide breakthrough findings to target endothelial nNOS for treating microvascular dysfunction in stroke. Dr. Katakam has also received a promotion to associate professor with tenure at Tulane University. He has been a member of the Division for Cardiovascular Pharmacology of ASPET since 2016.


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Dr. Katakam lab photo (from left to right): Dr. Siva Sakamuri (Postdoctoral Fellow), Wesley Evans (PhD Student in Neuroscience), Monica Dholakia (Master’s Student in Pharmacology), Venkata ‘Ram’ Sure (PhD Student in Pharmacology), Christen Brown (Master’s Student in Pharmacology), Sufen Zhen (Laboratory Assistant), Jared Sperling (Master’s Student in Pharmacology), Mohummed Kazmi (Undergraduate Student). Not pictured: Daniel Gottlieb (Undergraduate Student) and Brooke Hamling (PhD Student in Neuroscience)

Boyd Rorabaugh, PhD Dr. Boyd Rorabaugh of Ohio Northern University received a National Institutes of Health/NHLBI R15 AREA Award to study the impact of an animal model of posttraumatic stress disorder on the ischemic heart. Dr. Rorabaugh is a faculty member in the Department of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences at the Ohio Northern University Raabe College of Pharmacy. He and his team will investigate the effect of an animal model of posttraumatic stress disorder on myocardial ischemic injury. Rorabaugh said “our preliminary data suggest that people who have a heart attack and also have PTSD may be at risk for more extensive myocardial ischemic injury than people who have a heart attack and do not have PTSD. We are trying to understand the mechanism by which PTSD may worsen the extent of ischemic injury. A second goal is to determine whether drugs that are clinically used to treat the psychological symptoms of PTSD can reverse this detrimental cardiac effect. The final goal of the project addresses the fact that traumatized women are more likely to develop PTSD

than traumatized men. We are trying to understand why females are more susceptible.” This work is an interdisciplinary project between Rorabaugh and psychologist Dr. Phillip Zoladz. As a new principal investigator of an R15 award, Dr. Rorabaugh has already spearheaded efforts to provide research opportunities for undergraduate students. Some of his former undergraduate research students

Dr. Rorabaugh's lab members: (Clockwise from Left to Right) Dr. Boyd Rorabaugh, (Ohio Northern University College of Pharmacy), Thorne Stoopes (Ohio Northern University College of Pharmacy, PharmD student), Dr. Phillip Zoladz (Ohio Northern University Department of Psychology, Co-investigator), Sarah Hebble (Ohio Northern University College of Pharmacy, PharmD student), and Sarah Seeley (Ohio Northern University College of Pharmacy, Research Technician)

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are currently enrolled in PhD programs at Duke University, the Ohio State University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dr. Rorabaugh’s work is primarily focused on understanding factors that contribute to myocardial ischemic injury. He recently reported in the American Journal of Physiology that prenatal exposure to methamphetamine causes female rats to develop myocardial hypersensitivity to ischemic injury when they become adults. He also recently published a study in the Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics investigating the role of regulation of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins in the ischemic heart. The latter study was coauthored with ASPET members Rory Fisher (University of Iowa College of Medicine), Rick Neubig (Michigan State University, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology), and Stephanie Watts (Michigan State University, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology). Dr. Rorabaugh has been a member of ASPET since 2000. He is a member of the Division for Cardiovascular Pharmacology.

Jia “Joe” L. Zhuo, MD, PhD Jia “Joe” L. Zhuo, MD, PhD, a professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology at The University of Mississippi Medical Center (UMMC), was just elected a 2016 Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the world's largest general scientific society and publisher of the journal Science. Dr. Zhuo was elected for his “seminal contributions to the localization of peptide receptors in kidneys and elucidation of the intracrine roles of kidney angiotensins in the development of hypertension.” Dr. Zhuo has been at UMMC since 2010 and has received many other awards including the American Society of Nephrology M. James Scherbenske Award, the Robert M. Hearin Foundation Medical Research Scholar Award, the Gold Medal Excellence Award in Research from the UMMC, and the American Physiological Society Physiological

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Genomics Group Distinguished Service Award. Dr. Zhuo has been an ASPET member since 2011 and is a member of the Divisions for Molecular Pharmacology, Cardiovascular Pharmacology, and Translational and Clinical Pharmacology.

Merrie Mosedale, PhD Merrie Mosedale, PhD, research assistant professor in the Division of Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, was recently awarded the 2017 Sternfels Prize for Drug Safety and Innovation. Dr. Mosedale received the Prize for her scholarship and work on HLA-based mechanisms of drug-induced liver injury (DILI). Dr. Mosedale is also the assistant director of the Institute for Drug Safety Sciences at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, where she leads the Translational Pharmacogenomics Research Program. Through partnerships with pharmaceutical companies and academic scientists, she is working to solve safety problems by integrating cutting-edge omics approaches with novel in vivo, in vitro, and in silico platforms. Dr. Mosedale’s current research focuses on the application of mouse genetics to identify individual susceptibilities to adverse drug reactions in humans, organotypic culture models to understand mechanisms of drug toxicities, and exosome biology to predict toxicity liabilities earlier in drug development. Findings from her research highlight the potential for these novel approaches to improve human risk assessment in drug-safety testing as well as to provide mechanistic insights into drug toxicity. Dr. Mosedale was a recipient of the 2013 ASPET Integrative Research in Pharmacology Postdoctoral Award. Dr. Mosedale has been an ASPET member since 2008 and is a member of the Divisions for Toxicology and Molecular Pharmacology.


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Jayne S. Reuben, PhD Jayne S. Reuben, PhD, clinical associate professor in the biomedical sciences and current chair of the Division for Pharmacology Education, was recently selected as a member of the Board of Grants for the American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education (AFPE). AFPE's mission is to "advance and support pharmaceutical education at US schools and colleges of pharmacy" through fellowships and grants, awards to support students and faculty, and support for pharmaceutical research and education. Dr. Reuben has been an ASPET member since 1998 and is a member of the Divisions for Pharmacology Education, Drug Discovery and Development, Drug Metabolism, Translational and Clinical Pharmacology, Neuropharmacology, and Toxicology.

Amy Arnold, PhD Amy Arnold, PhD has been appointed as tenuretrack assistant professor in the Department of Neural and Behavioral Sciences at Penn State College of Medicine. She has a start date of April 1, 2017. Her work is currently funded by an R00 grant entitled Autonomic: Angiotensin-(1-7) Interactions in Hypertension. Dr. Arnold has been a member of ASPET since 2007 and is a member of the Divisions for Cardiovascular Pharmacology, Pharmacology Education, and Translational and Clinical Pharmacology.

Adam Lauver, PhD Adam Lauver, PhD recently accepted the position of assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology at Michigan State University. Dr. Lauver most recently held the title of research assistant professor at the University of Michigan and his position at Michigan State University will be his first tenure-track position. Dr. Lauver has been a member of ASPET since 2004 and is a member of the Divisions for Cardiovascular Pharmacology, Drug Discovery and Development, and Translational and Clinical Pharmacology.

Fadi Khasawneh, PhD Fadi Khasawneh, PhD recently moved from Western University of Health Sciences in Pomona, CA after 8.5 years of service, to the University of Texas at El Paso’s new School of Pharmacy as chair of the Pharmaceutical Sciences Department. Dr. Khasawneh has been a member of ASPET since 2016 and is a member of the Divisions for Cardiovascular Pharmacology, Drug Discovery and Development, Pharmacology Education, and Molecular Pharmacology.

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Division News 2017 Division Elections The following Divisions held elections for 2017 and received an enthusiastic response from ASPET members: • Division for Behavioral Pharmacology • Division for Cardiovascular Pharmacology • Division for Drug Discovery and Development • Division for Drug Metabolism

• Division for Molecular Pharmacology • Division for Pharmacology Education Please join us in welcoming all newly elected chairs and secretary-treasurers to their respective Division’s executive committee. The new officers will take office on July 1, 2017.

Division for Behavioral Pharmacology Secretary/Treasurer-Elect

Chair-Elect

Susan K. Wood, PhD Tenure-Track Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmacology, Physiology & Neuroscience, University of South Carolina School of Medicine

Jun-Xu Li, MD, PhD Associate Professor, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University at Buffalo

Division for Cardiovascular Pharmacology Chair-Elect

Secretary/Treasurer-Elect David W. Busija, PhD Regents Endowed Professor and Chair, Department of Pharmacology, Tulane University School of Medicine

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Amy C. Arnold, PhD Assistant Professor, Department of Neural and Behavioral Sciences, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine


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Division for Drug Discovery and Development Chair-Elect

Secretary/Treasurer-Elect Craig Beeson, PhD Associate Professor, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina

Alvin V. Terry Jr., PhD Regents Professor and Chair, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta University; Associate Vice President for Basic Science Research, Augusta University

Division for Drug Metabolism Chair-Elect

Secretary/Treasurer-Elect Xinxin Ding, PhD Professor of Nanobioscience, Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, State University of New York Polytechnic Institute

Hyunyoung (Young) Jeong, PharmD, PhD Associate Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice, University of Illinois Chicago

Division for Molecular Pharmacology Secretary/Treasurer-Elect

Chair-Elect Tracy Handel, PhD Professor, Department of Pharmacology, and Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences (SSPPS); Chair, Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, SSPPS, University of California San Diego

Yang Kevin Xiang, PhD Professor, University of California, Davis

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Division for Pharmacology Education Secretary/Treasurer-Elect

Chair-Elect

Shafiqur Rahman, PhD Professor of Pharmacology, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, South Dakota State University

Laurel Gorman, PhD Associate Professor, Pharmacology and Medical Education, University of Central Florida College of Medicine

ASPET Division Sponsored Awards Division for Drug Metabolism Early Career Achievement Award The ASPET Division for Drug Metabolism sponsors the Early Career Achievement Award to recognize excellent original research by early career investigators in the area of drug metabolism and disposition.

Hyunyoung (Young) Jeong, PharmD, PhD University of Illinois at Chicago Dr. Hyunyoung Jeong has been named the 2017 recipient of the ASPET Division for Drug Metabolism Early Career Achievement Award. She is being recognized for her pioneering work to elaborate the mechanisms of regulation of drug metabolism enzymes and to understand the molecular basis of interindividual variability in drug metabolism. Dr. Jeong is an associate professor in the Departments of Pharmacy Practice and Biopharmaceutical Sciences at the College of Pharmacy, University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). She received her PharmD and PhD in pharmacokinetics from UIC, followed by

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postdoctoral training in molecular pharmacology at UIC. Since joining the faculty at UIC in 2006, she has established a very strong research program in drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics (DMPK), funded by multiple agencies including the NIH [R21 (2008-2011), K12 (Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women’s Health; 2008-2011), and two R01s (20112017, 2015-2019)]. Her research has significantly advanced multiple areas in DMPK. Most importantly, she has studied the effects of complex physiological changes accompanying pregnancy on P450 expression and elucidated underlying mechanisms using innovative models including CYP-humanized mice. Her studies revealed previously unknown, important roles of pregnancy-related hormones in the regulation of hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes. Dr. Jeong’s research team has identified potential mechanisms underlying the induction of CYP2D6mediated drug metabolism during pregnancy,


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a clinical finding that has intrigued the DMPK community as CYP2D6 was considered to be a noninducible gene. This study provided novel insights into the regulation of CYP2D6 expression, as well as into the interindividual variability in CYP2D6-mediated drug metabolism. Additionally, she identified a molecular basis for the association between novel genetic polymorphisms in CYP2C9 and warfarin dose, and has participated in multiple NIH-funded

drug discovery and development projects providing expertise in DMPK. The division will present this award at the ASPET Annual Meeting at EB2017. Dr. Jeong will give a short lecture titled “Interindividual Variability in Drug Response and Toxicity” on Monday, April 24 during the Division for Drug Metabolism session from 3:00PM - 5:30PM in Room W474a of McCormick Place Convention Center in Chicago.

Division for Neuropharmacology Early Career Independent Investigator Award The ASPET Division for Neuropharmacology annually sponsors the Early Career Independent Investigator Award to honor a young investigator working in neuropharmacology.

Carrie R. Ferrario, PhD University of Michigan Medical School Dr. Carrie Ferrario has been named the 2017 recipient of the ASPET Division for Neuropharmacology Early Career Independent Investigator Award. She is an assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacology at the University of Michigan Medical School. Dr. Ferrario has developed expertise in a number of areas ranging from molecular pharmacology to nutrition and behavior. She has used her impressive arsenal of skills to investigate brain mechanisms mediating reinforcement, including excessive food consumption and drug taking. Her group has discovered rather astonishing long-term changes in brain function and behavior caused by eating

“junk food.” The implications of her research in rats are significant for human health insofar as they underscore the overlapping neurobiology of food addiction and drug addiction and provide clear evidence that eating certain types of food might profoundly impact vulnerability to abuse drugs. Thus, her work is highly relevant to the current obesity epidemic and to the ongoing challenges of drug and alcohol abuse. In addition to her research, Dr. Ferrario teaches a number of courses and has received mentoring awards at her university for her work with undergraduates, graduate students, and postdocs. The award will be presented during the ASPET Annual Meeting at EB2017 at the Division for Neuropharmacology’s Annual Division Meeting on Tuesday, April 25 from 5:30PM – 6:30PM in Room W470a of the McCormick Place Convention Center in Chicago.

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Division for Toxicology Career Award The ASPET Division for Toxicology annually sponsors the Career Award to recognize outstanding original research contributions to toxicology by an established investigator.

Curtis D. Klaassen, PhD University of Washington Dr. Curtis Klaassen has been named the 2017 recipient of the ASPET Division for Toxicology Career Award. Dr. Klaassen is an affiliate professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences in the School of Public Health at the University of Washington in Seattle. He was previously the chair of the Department of Pharmacology and a university distinguished professor at the University of Kansas Medical Center. While Dr. Klaassen has left a significant mark in the field of heavy metal toxicity, his most significant accomplishments have been in the field of ADME and the effect of so-called microsomal enzyme inducers to alter the disposition of xenobiotics. He began more than 45 years ago to demonstrate that certain environmental chemicals which cause altered pharmacokinetic properties can have significant health

consequences. Drugs such as the cardiac glycosides and acetaminophen were excellent examples of potentially toxic agents in certain individuals depending on their age or exposure to other xenobiotics. These observations that were made in the ‘60s and ‘70s were later expanded by mechanistic studies made possible by the incorporation of newer technologies in the ‘90s and 2000s. The discovery and sequencing of drug transporters allowed him to connect pharmacokinetic observations to their molecular mechanisms, which included activation of nuclear receptors for gene transcription and competing substrate specificities of sinusoidal and canalicular efflux transporters. In addition to his personal commitment to science, Dr. Klaassen has been a constant advocate for the discipline of toxicology and the training of toxicologists. The award will be presented during the ASPET Annual Meeting at EB2017 prior to the start of the Division for Toxicology symposium on Tuesday, April 25 at 3:00PM in Room W470b of the McCormick Place Convention Center in Chicago.

Division for Toxicology Junior Investigator Award The ASPET Division for Toxicology annually sponsors the Junior Investigator Award to recognize excellent original research by early career investigators in the area of toxicology.

Elaine M. Leslie, PhD University of Alberta Dr. Elaine Leslie has been named the 2017 recipient of the ASPET Division for Toxicology Junior Investigator Award. She is an associate professor in the Department of Physiology at the University

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of Alberta. She received her PhD from Queen’s University in Ontario, Canada. The focus of her laboratory is to understand how MRPs and GSTs are involved in the detoxification of the human carcinogen arsenic. Understanding how arsenic is detoxified is extremely important since millions of people world-wide are exposed to unacceptable levels of arsenic in drinking water. Her laboratory uses recombinant human proteins and primary human cell models to identify and


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characterize arsenic biotransformation and transport pathways. The long-term goal of this research is to understand how genetic variation in human MRPs and GSTs influence the interindividual susceptibility to arsenic-induced carcinogenesis. She believes that ultimately these results will lead to the development of strategies to prevent and treat arsenic-induced carcinogenicity and toxicity. Dr. Leslie has made important research contributions in four areas: 1) the role of transport

proteins in tissue defense; 2) arsenic transport by human MRP1 and MRP2; 3) establishment of the physiological and toxicological relevance of the sandwich cultured hepatocyte (SCH) model; and 4) hepatobiliary disposition of arsenic. The award will be presented during the ASPET Annual Meeting at EB2017 at the Division for Toxicology mixer on Monday, April 24 from 6:30PM – 8:30PM at the Hyatt Regency McCormick Place in Chicago.

Division for Cardiovascular Pharmacology Benedict R. Lucchesi Young Scientist Travel Award in Cardiac Pharmacology The Benedict R. Lucchesi Young Scientist Travel Award in Cardiac Pharmacology was established by the ASPET Division for Cardiovascular Pharmacology to honor Dr. Lucchesi’s lifelong scientific contributions to our better understanding and appreciation of the pharmacological treatment and prevention of cardiovascular disease and for his mentoring of countless prominent cardiovascular pharmacologists in translational approaches.

Laurel A. Grisanti, PhD Temple University Dr. Laurel Grisanti has been named the 2017 recipient of the Benedict R. Lucchesi Young Scientist Travel Award in Cardiac Pharmacology. She is a postdoctoral fellow in the Center for Translational Medicine at the Louis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University. She received a PhD in pharmacology, physiology, and therapeutics from the University of North Dakota. Dr. Grisanti’s long-term research focus has been on the pharmacology of G protein-coupled receptors. Her PhD work focused

on the modulation of innate immune responses by adrenergic receptors. Expanding her interest of G protein-coupled receptors into cardiovascular disease, Dr. Grisanti’s early postdoctoral work examined cardioprotective signaling mechanisms initiated by -adrenergic receptors during heart failure. More recently, her focus has been on how -adrenergic receptors alter immune responses following cardiac injury. The division will present this award at the ASPET Annual Meeting at EB2017 and Dr. Grisanti will give a short lecture on Monday, April 24 during the Division for Cardiovascular Pharmacology Trainee Showcase from 3:00PM - 5:30PM in Room W470a of McCormick Place Convention Center in Chicago.

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Division for Pharmacology Education Travel Award for Pharmacology Educators The ASPET Division for Pharmacology Education sponsors two travel awards for pharmacology educators. The primary goal of these travel awards is to promote participation in the ASPET Annual Meeting by pharmacology educators and to foster career development in pharmacology education. The awards will be presented during the ASPET Annual Meeting at EB2017 at the Division for Pharmacology Education’s Annual Division Meeting on Monday, April 24 from 5:30PM – 6:30PM in Room W475 of the McCormick Place Convention Center in Chicago.

Ashim Malhotra, PhD Pacific University School of Pharmacy

Helen Kwanashie, BSc, MSc, PhD Ahmadu Bello University

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On P450s and Advice for Young Scientists: Q & A with Dr. Guengerich By Lindsey Henderson and Yurong Lai

The Guengerich Lab - January 2017.

The work of Dr. Frederick Peter Guengerich greatly contributed to our understanding of human cytochrome P450s (P450s), redefining the way in which drug metabolism could be studied. The P450 enzymes function to eliminate drugs and toxins from the body as well as metabolize endogenous compounds. Through oxidation reactions, P450s transform drugs into more polar metabolites for excretion. These biotransformation processes are very important to the field because P450s are responsible for about 75% of total drug metabolism. The knowledge we possess today about P450s enables better predictions of drug-drug interactions, interindividual variability, and adverse reactions. Dr. Guengerich is the Tadashi Ingami Professor and Chair of Biochemistry in the School of Medicine at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. He received his BS in agricultural sciences from the University of Illinois in 1970 and earned his PhD in biochemistry from Vanderbilt University in 1973. After completing a two-year fellowship at the University of

Michigan, he returned to Vanderbilt University as an assistant professor of biochemistry and has been a faculty member since. In the 1980s, Dr. Guengerich’s group published three impactful papers about the purification and characterization of four P450s involved in drug metabolism. Today, Dr. Guengerich is an author of over 800 peer-reviewed scientific articles, establishing himself as an expert in the fields of biochemistry, drug metabolism, and toxicology. Dr. Guengerich kindly agreed to share his story with us. We wanted to know more about his path to success, thoughts on where the field is headed, and advice he has for young investigators. Q: At the time you were entering the field, P450s were not well understood, especially in humans. Why did you choose to investigate P450s? What was known about P450s at the time that made you think they would influence drug metabolism? A: I had done my postdoctoral training in the area of cytochrome P450 (P450) research with Professor Jud Coon at Michigan and decided to stay in the general field. My plan was to identify which P450s were involved in activation of toxic chemicals and then study the chemistry of those reactions. At that time, the field recognized the existence of about 4 liver P450s in rats and rabbits (each). No one was sure how many there really would be. We continued to purify more rat liver P450s. Scientists did know that the rat and rabbit P450s that had been isolated could oxidize some drugs. Pharmacologists were certainly aware of the concept of induction of drug metabolism, even in humans. The only information regarding human P450s was raw pharmacokinetic information and some simple in vitro assays with autopsy and biopsy liver samples. One thing that impacted my work was Professor Bob Smith’s work with debrisoquine, in which he showed genetic polymorphism of 4-hydroxylation in people.

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The results told me that a single P450 could dominate the in vivo metabolism of a drug. Accordingly we began to purify P450s from human liver microsomes using assays for the oxidation of specific drugs, which was technically demanding. Q: Your work characterizing rat and human P450s really paved the way for future research in the field of drug metabolism. Could you tell us what you think contributed to your success? Do you have any stories you would be willing to share about times your work was frustrating? A: Several things contributed to our success. For example, the time I had spent learning about P450 as a postdoc and the lesson I learned from Bob Smith. We had some very good postdocs who really believed we could do this work. Part of it was luck. Getting good liver samples was hard then. With a serendipitous link set up from my postdoc Phil Wang’s wife Peggy, a nurse, we were able to get livers from the Nashville Regional Organ Procurement Agency. They always seemed to become available in the middle of the night. Purifying enzymes from tissues is not an easy way to make a living, especially P450s, which needed tricky detergent combinations. Few people are trained in this type of research today, when chromatography only seems to mean His-tags and NTA to people. We even had to make some of our chromatography resins ourselves and also did all our own work raising antibodies in rabbits and goats. Was it frustrating at times? Sure. Not all preps worked. Purifying enzymes de novo requires long hours and odd schedules—it’s a young person’s business, or so it was then. I had grown up on a farm, though, so much of that did not faze me. I really thought we were going to be able to succeed and that this work could be important. Fortunately, the NIH and the study sections seemed to like us (although in retrospect I am not sure we had much of a hypothesis; mainly we wanted to characterize P450s). I also began to get to know people in the pharmaceutical industry, which was fun. It would be remiss to say that we were alone with these goals; some of the competition did pretty good work, too. Q: What are your current research interests with P450s? What are your thoughts for where the field is heading - do we need to characterize more P450s or focus on tissue specificity?

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A: Our interests have shifted with time (they always should in science!). When I started my lab, I focused on relating our work on the P450s to toxicology. This led us into the field of chemical carcinogenesis and the roles of P450s in cancer, where I think we made some useful contributions. (I am dismayed that the cancer field seems to have lost much of their interest in this area today.) The metabolism of drugs, in general, has always been an important component of our work. Due in part to some interesting questions about the chemistry of P450 reactions (and my colleague Emeritus Professor Mike Waterman), we have been doing more with steroidogenic P450s (19A1, 17A1, 11A1, 51A1…), including their interactions with drugs. We have also gotten into the structural business with my colleague Professor Martin Egli. What is important today? Well, we do know what all the (human) P450s are (57 genes), but we do not know what many of them do. We are interested in these “orphans.” More structures are still needed. There is considerable opportunity in defining the contributions of P450s in disease areas other than cancer and endocrinology, for example in hypertension and neurological diseases. In nonhuman systems, there is much yet to be done in veterinary pharmacology. Toxicology and safety assessment continue to be challenging, and P450s contribute. Interestingly, many of the touted high-throughput toxicity screens are being run without any provision for metabolism. Q: Do you have any advice or words of encouragement for young investigators pursuing a higher degree in the field of drug metabolism? What do you find to be the most rewarding part of your job? A: I have been blessed to be able to contribute in many ways and to enjoy several aspects of my job. I love being able to discover new things, and in this case some of our results made a difference in how we develop and use medicines. However, I have considered teaching and mentoring an equally important part of my career. I have had 20 graduate students and over 130 postdocs train in my lab. Many are doing very well. Advice to young people: although some things have changed since I was a student, they have not really changed. Work hard. Try to learn as much as you can in your courses and elsewhere as you can; never stop learning. Find a good mentor(s). Don’t


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obsess with concerns about funding. People have been complaining since I first entered a lab 49 years ago, and I’ve lived through a lot of different situations. Learn to communicate, both through writing and

speaking. Finally, have fun! Never lose the excitement that you sensed when you first came to love experimental science.

An Introduction to the NDOGS Meeting The biennial meeting of the National Directors of Graduate Studies (NDOGS) in Pharmacology and Physiology is a collaboration between ASPET and the American Physiological Society (APS). Approximately 100 professors, scientists, and professionals from across the country create a unique forum that promotes the exchange of information and ideas among pharmacology and physiology faculty responsible for training graduate students. The meeting grew out of informal discussions among faculty members regarding the challenges faced by training programs, a decline in training programs related to these disciplines, and the innovative techniques and methodologies successfully employed by others to combat these challenges. The overarching goals of the meeting are to highlight common pitfalls, but also opportunities, that face pharmacology and physiology graduate training programs and to identify and implement best practices for PhD programs that will facilitate translational research that more quickly advances discoveries into therapies for human disease.

Since the initial meeting in 2005, different themes and topics have been covered at the meeting, ranging from learning objectives for graduate students to the needs and opportunities associated with drug development in biotech. For the upcoming meeting, topics range from rigor and reproducibility in research to curricula for graduate and undergraduate pharmacology programs. The 2017 meeting is being held at Stony Brook University in Stony Brook, NY from Wednesday, June 28th to Friday, June 30th. Two keynote speakers, Dr. George Yancopoulos, president and CEO of Regeneron Inc. and Dr. Laura Lindenfield-Sher, director of the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science, will discuss science careers and issues related to science communication. This year's meeting will close with an NIH panel discussion focused on T32 training grant reviews and outcomes. If you are interested in attending the 2017 NDOGS meeting, you can find information on registration, meeting logistics and the agenda at this link: https:// www.aspet.org/knowledge/NDOGS-in-Pharmacology/. The registration deadline is June 21, 2017.

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Chapter News New York Pharmacology Society 6th Annual Scientific Meeting - Functional Selectivity: From Theory to Reality

Dr. Richard Mailman

Dr. William P. Clarke

The New York Pharmacology Society (NYPS) Chapter of ASPET will hold its 6th Annual Scientific Meeting on Saturday, May 6th, 2017 at the University at Buffalo Center for Arts in Buffalo, NY. The theme of the scientific meeting is “Functional selectivity: from theory to reality”. The plenary symposium will include talks from Drs. Richard Mailman, professor of pharmacology, Penn State University, William P. Clarke, Maharaj Ticku professor of pharmacology, University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio, and Jonathan A. Javitch, Lieber professor of experimental therapeutics, Columbia University Medical Center

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Dr. Jonathan A. Javitch Functional selectivity has introduced a new level of complexity which requires significantly greater understanding of receptor dynamics and the interaction with transduction mechanisms. Further, this has clear impact on modern drug discovery and development. This topic is timely and will be of great interest to the chapter and the greater scientific community. Information about the 6th annual NYPS meeting including program, registration, abstract submission, and map links for the University at Buffalo Center for Arts can be found at the chapter’s annual meeting website: https://www.aspet.org/NYPS/.


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Great Lakes Chapter 30th Annual Meeting, June 23rd, 2017 The Great Lakes Chapter (GLC) of ASPET will hold its 30th Annual Scientific Meeting on Friday, June 23, 2017 at the University of Illinois, Chicago, Moss Auditorium, College of Medicine Research Building. The goal of the 2017 meeting is to highlight major advances in the pharmacological understanding and treatment of immune diseases and provide an opportunity for students, postdoctoral fellows, and scientists working in related areas to learn about the field. The annual symposium of the Great Lakes Chapter of ASPET also provides a forum for learning and exchanging ideas in all fields of pharmacological sciences and is a major networking event for biomedical scientists in the area. The meeting schedule includes: • Poster Session (8:30 – 10:30 AM) • Vendor Exhibit (8:30 AM – 12:00 PM) • Young Investigator Symposium (10:45 – 11:45 AM) • Lunch & Learn Career Workshop (12:00 – 1:30 PM) • Symposium (1:30 – 5:00 PM): Advances in Pharmacoimmunology Keynote: Dr. Stephen Miller (Northwestern University) From bench to bedside: Translation of a novel nanoparticle approach for tolerogenic therapy of autoimmune and allergic diseases Speakers: Dr. Jochen Salfeld (AbbVie)  Dr. Anne Sperling (University of Chicago)  Dr. Dolly Mehta (University of Illinois at Chicago)  Dr. Gustavo Martinez (Rosalind Franklin University) • Poster Awards & Business Meeting (5:00 – 5:30 PM) Check the GLC website www.aspet.org/GLC for more information about the 30th annual GLC meeting. Abstracts are due by June 9th, 2017.

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VISIT THE ASPET CAREER CENTER TODAY! WWW.ASPET.ORG/CAREERCENTER/

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ASPET is committed to your success: The ASPET Career Center is the best resource for matching job seekers and employers in the pharmacology and related health science fields. Our vast range of resources and tools will help you look for jobs, find great employees, and proactively manage your career goals. The Pharmacologist • March 2017

9650 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20814-3995 Main Office: 301.634.7060 www.aspet.org

The Pharmacologist March 2017  

Vol. 59, Number 1, March 2017

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