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Enbrel:

A biotechnology breakthrough Rebecca J. Anderson, PhD

Craig Smith

When they called her name, Elizabeth Petersen navigated her way to the microphone. The ballroom at the Holiday Inn in Gaithersburg, Maryland, was packed with researchers, industry executives, and government officials. Elizabeth, by contrast, was just an ordinary citizen, permitted a few minutes to speak during the open public hearing part of this meeting (1). The impressive thing was not that Elizabeth came as an unsolicited participant, nor that she had paid her own travel expenses from Chicago. The impressive thing was that she walked effortlessly to the microphone, free of the crippling and painful arthritis that she had suffered for 36 years. She had been taking an experimental drug, and she wanted to tell the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) officials—in person—that they should approve this drug for all rheumatoid arthritis patients. Enbrel’s success in treating patients like Elizabeth was all the sweeter because it had survived, despite skeptical experts and several serious setbacks. Enbrel vial

A New Era In 1980, the US Supreme Court ruled that genetically engineered microorganisms could be patented. Immediately, a generation of pioneering molecular biologists, full of bright ideas and entrepreneurial spirit, left academia and launched the biotechnology industry. Among them were Steven Gillis and Christopher Henney, immunologists who aimed to make immune-response-based

Reprinted from The Pharmacologist • December 2017

Profile for ASPET

2018 Special Compilation Issue of The Pharmacologist  

ASPET is pleased to present the second in a series of special editions of our quarterly news magazine, The Pharmacologist. This special com...

2018 Special Compilation Issue of The Pharmacologist  

ASPET is pleased to present the second in a series of special editions of our quarterly news magazine, The Pharmacologist. This special com...