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MARCH 2013

LTIFR OFF THE MARK Popular safety statistic questioned

INSIDE

• Industrial Safety: Online training on the rise • Oil & Gas Safety: BP and Transocean pay price • Construction Safety: Making slings safer • Mining Safety: Safety in Action trade show

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contents 17 06

Comfort and safety equals productivity

09

Inside the vital statistics

10

Meet Australia’s safety star

14

Oil giants slugged

16

Robots reducing hazards

19

Light up your site

21

Driven to distraction

04 cover

Essentially, LTIFR doesn’t actually measure safety. It’s a common misconception though and this presents an important problem for safety management.

Managing Editor: Michael Cairnduff (michael.cairnduff@aspermont.com) Production Manager: Mata Henry Senior Layout Designer: Diane Thornley Layout Designer: Catherine Hogan Chief Sub-Editor: Gerald Bradley Sub-Editors: Melanie Jenkins, Maxine Brown Contributing Editors: Noel Dyson, Richard Collins, Thomas Smith Contributing Journalists: Alison Middleton, Marion Lopez, Vetti Kakulus National Sales Manager: Angela Smith Advertising Sales Team Leader: Richa Fuller (richa.fuller@aspermont.com) Advertising Sales: Nigel D’Silva (nigel.dsilva@aspermont.com), Vanessa Monastra (vanessa.monastra@aspermont.com) Advertising Production: Isaac Burrows (adproduction@aspermont.com) Executive: Colm O’Brien – Chief Executive Officer, Trish Seeny – General Manager, John Detwiler – Chief Financial Officer Head Office: Aspermont Limited, 613-619 Wellington Street, Perth, Western Australia 6000 PO Box 78, Leederville, Western Australia 6902 Ph: (08) 6263 9100 Fx: (08) 6263 9148 Email: editorial@aspermont.com subscriptions@aspermont.com advertising@aspermont.com Website: www.industry-news.net COPYRIGHT WARNING: All editorial copy and some advertisements in this publications are subject to copyright and may not be reproduced in any form without the written authorisation of the managing editor. Offenders will be prosecuted.

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notebook

Editor’s

Statistics can tell any story The focus on having clean statistics, or at least being at the lower end of the statistical scale for safety performance, has developed a culture which is counter-productive to safety.

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t is not a new proposition to suggest that statistics can be manipulated to perpetuate a cause, which is why it is important to view reporting of statistics through a cynical filter taking into account what the individual entity is trying to articulate through their release. It is even more crucial to scrutinise statistics when it comes to measuring safety performance, as our cover story points out they often don’t tell the true story and in the case of Lost Time Injury Frequency Rate statistics, don’t do a very good job of measuring safety at all because the measure does not address the risk of injury (see page 4-5). What at its inception was quite a positive initiative to promote safety awareness in the workplace, common safety statistics have

been repurposed as promotional tools for companies seeking to compare themselves against peers in competitive situations such as project tender submissions. I believe the focus on having clean statistics, or at least being at the lower end of the statistical scale for safety performance, has developed a culture, within large contractors in particular, which is counter-productive to safety. The focus is not on people and providing them with a workplace where any latent risks are addressed, the focus is instead on keeping the number of reportable incidents per man-hours worked to a minimum in order to protect the reputation of the company and its ability to attract work from governments and tier-one clients. The energy and resources sectors have a significant role to play here, with all major

companies in this space having their own individual safety mantras with myriad slogans and acronyms to go along with them – plenty of them including the word “zero”, which of course in heavy industry is nothing but idealistic public relations spin. I spoke about behavioural safety on this page in the last edition of Inside Safety and I mention it again in this context because it concerns me that the drive to have a positive story to tell in terms of reportable statistics may outweigh the drive to ensure workers go home to their families in tact at the end of the day. I would like to think that safety managers go to work each day with the genuine drive and intent to provide a safe workplace, not just roll-out programs designed to put the best corporate foot forward in regards to safety. – Michael Cairnduff

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Cover Story

Losing faith in lost time injuries Lost time injury frequency rate is the gold standard in workplace safety reporting but analysis shows it’s masking a worrying trend. Inside Safety’s Richard Collins talks to researcher Sharron O’Neill. You believe lost time injury frequency rate (LTIFR) is not a good measure of workplace safety. Why? Essentially, LTIFR doesn’t actually measure safety. It’s a common misconception though and this presents an important problem for safety management. Safety is freedom from the risk of injury: it reflects the absence of danger rather than the absence of injury itself. LTIFR cannot measure safety because it does not address the risk of injury. It fails to capture the latent hazards that might be present in a workplace or to assess the risk they present to people at work. What the LTIFR does tell us is how many lost time injuries have actually been recorded (as a rate of hours worked). So you are saying LTIFR is a measure of injuries, rather than risk? Almost, although LTIFR isn’t what you could call a reliable measure of work-related injury either. There are two reasons for that. First, unlike the total recordable injury frequency rate (TRIFR), it only captures a subset of compensated injuries. Some of a firm’s most costly workplace health and safety failures might not be classified as LTIs because no lost time has been recorded – potentially even in those cases where a person sustains permanent damage (such as hearing loss) or requires long-term treatment for conditions such as musculoskeletal strain. These would be recorded as medical treatment injuries. Second, LTIFR primarily reflects trends in the routine injuries that lead to short absences from work while changes in infrequent, highconsequence outcomes are essentially hidden. As a result, an LTIFR will improve if fewer people are hurt – even if the reductions are

only in the most minor LTIs and those still being hurt are more severely damaged than ever before. Presumably your research supports this contention. What have you found? Yes it does. One of the International Governance and Performance Research Centre’s key agendas is work health and safety governance and performance and we have multiple projects exploring the way organisations assess and manage different aspects of WHS performance. The study best illustrating this particular aspect of LTIFR was undertaken with leading safety consultant Geoff McDonald and Professor Craig Deegan from RMIT University and involved a longitudinal analysis of 486,075 compensated workplace injuries. First, we used the data to graph fatality rates and LTIFRs. This showed what the trends looked like using measures typically reported to company boards and senior managers. Then the same injury data was recast into rates of permanent damage (class 1) and temporary impairment (class 2) and graphed. The results were fascinating. They illustrate how LTIFR can decrease even though the incidence of the most damaging injuries is actually rising. They also explained why injury rates appeared to be going down yet workers’ compensation costs were increasing dramatically. Are you saying organisations should stop using LTIFR? No, LTIFR definitely has its place in organisational reporting – just not as a safety measure. LTIFR is a productivity indicator.

“Lost time injury frequency rate can decrease even though the incidence of the most damaging injuries is actually rising.” – Sharron O’Neill

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It reflects the short-term, unplanned staff absences occurring due to work-related injury. It is best used to inform financial decisions, not safety ones. The old saying, “when all you have is a hammer, every problem is a nail” comes to mind. In our research we see LTIFR data being used to address so many different agendas. It is employed as a proxy for workplace safety, injury frequency, injury severity, workplace culture, WHS cost and individual performance. It is also used to inform decisions on everything from WHS strategy to financial and human resource allocation, hazard control initiatives, performance evaluation and executive remuneration. That’s part of the reason behind claims that LTIFR is so manipulated and produces dysfunctional outcomes – it’s like a square peg being forced into too many round holes. Basically then, evaluating injury is about the severity of injuries as much as their quantity. What framework do you propose for measuring that? If you want to understand compensated injury performance then an overall measure such as TRIFR gives you a basic starting point. Then it depends on who wants injury information and why they want it. The same injury data can be organised in various ways. Each different indicator looks at the injury results from a different perspective, so it is important to understand what decisions people are trying to make and then provide the data most relevant to their particular information needs. For example, those interested in the financial impact of poor safety on production, productivity and failure costs will look primarily to measures such as LTIFR, total lost days, duration rates, return to work and workers’ compensation data. Those interested in understanding how a firm’s safety systems impact workers – for example, to assess workforce sustainability, evaluate the effectiveness of WHS strategy or hazard control initiatives, or monitor compliance – are better served by measures that convey the severity profile of injuries

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Fatality

Fatality rate (per 100,000 workers)

12

24

Lost time injury (non-fatal) 10

20

8

16

6

12

4

8

2

4

0

0 1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

Lost time injury rate (per 1,000 workers)

Traditional (Lost time) WHS Analysis

2001

Year

Permanent disability (Class 1)

12

24

Temporary disability (Class 2) 10

20

8

16

6

12

4

8

2

4

0

0 1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

Temporary disability (per 1,000 workers)

Permanent disability (per 1,000 workers)

Alternate (Severity) WHS Analysis

2001

Year Recasting the data from 486,075 compensated workplace injuries shows permanent disabilities are actually on the rise.

and illnesses. These need to focus on the impairment to an individual – that is, the time to full recovery (or claim finalisation), not time lost from work. Typical indicators include the number and rate of those injuries falling into severity categories such as: • Severe – fatal and permanent disability; • Significant – partial permanent disabilities and long-term temporary impairment; • Moderate – short-term temporary impairment; and • Minor – incidents resulting in less than one day impairment. What guidance is available to help safety professionals and others do this?

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One of the issues we identified early in this process was the lack of consistent, high quality guidance on WHS measurement and reporting. There is a lot of information out there but much contradicts each other or lacks detail or scope. As a result, IGAP has been working closely with both the safety profession (Safety Institute of Australia) and the accounting profession (CPA Australia) on a number of major projects. One project due for completion this year is the development of a WHS reporting guide to assist organisations in capturing, organising and evaluating health and safety performance information and then communicating it to various internal and external users.

The guide identifies, defines and describes an array of performance indicators and summarises which indicators are most relevant to each user group. Other IGAP projects address WHS performance disclosures in annual reports, the role of accounting and performance information in WHS governance, the enactment of officers’ due diligence requirements post-harmonisation and the role of assurance and verification in WHS. Dr Sharron O’Neill is a research fellow at the International Governance and Performance Research Centre at Macquarie University. More information at http://tinyurl.com/ IGAPresearch

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News

Comfort and safety aid productivity The Council of Textile and Fashion Industries of Australia is looking to engage more closely with the resources sector to develop the next generation of safety material. Michael Cairnduff reports

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t might look a little left-field for Inside Safety to be featuring news from the Council of Textile and Fashion Industries of Australia – particularly when you view it in the context of other feature stories in this edition – but stop and think about it for a moment and it becomes clear that TFIA is intrinsically linked to industry’s most basic and essential safety requirements.

“We hope the activity will alert mining and resource companies to Australian made industrial textile and apparel solutions.” – TFIA general manager Kiri Delly The Victoria-based organisation was recently awarded two significant government project grants focusing on the textile, clothing and footwear (TCF) industry, as it relates to the mining and exploration sector. TFIA general manager Kiri Delly explained to Inside Safety that the first of these projects was the Victorian government’s collaborative networks pilot program. “This program is designed to support the commercialisation and adoption of new technologies through partnerships between Australian small to medium enterprises and researchers,” Delly said. “The program aims to translate recent research and technological innovations into commercial outcomes and build competitive advantages in business, manufacturing, innovation and research.” She said the second program involved the federal TCF mining resources exhibition project, which aimed to promote Australian textile, clothing and footwear manufacturers. “We will assist them in showcasing their capability and forging business relationships with the mining and resources sectors,” she said.

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The TFIA’s engagement with safety apparel goes far beyond traditional high-visibility clothing.

Both programs are designed to link textile, clothing and footwear manufacturers with the mining and resources industry in order to develop and ultimately manufacture and supply relevant TCF products that meet the mining sector’s specific needs. “We hope the activity will alert mining and resource companies to Australian made industrial textile and apparel solutions that can help solve their occupational health and safety, personal protective equipment, mineral processing and site management challenges,” Delly said. TFIA engagement with the sector goes far beyond the traditional high-visibility clothing. It is looking at myriad aspects of safety and how they can be integrated into the next generation of safety apparel. Delly told Inside Safety that some of the aspects being looked at included improving

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fire retardant characteristics; the ability for clothing to help manage the impact of temperature extremes on the worker, both hot and cold, which could reflect productivity gains; and ultimately the development of intelligent clothing that could include integrated sensors to detect drowsiness, among other things. The TFIA projects also went beyond clothing, according to Delly, to look at other aspects of worker comfort, including material used in remote accommodation villages, bedding and even rope materials. To further its project development work and engagement with the resources sector, the TFIA will be arranging a “challenge workshop” in March, where it will invite a select group of mining company representatives to highlight any issues or ideas they may have in terms of improving existing safety apparel.

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News

Inside the hard rock mine series IV from MineARC.

The walk-in talking box MineARC Systems has released its latest refuge chamber, which can “talk” to its occupants. By Vetti Kakulas

S

afer mining is crucial, particularly for those working in dangerous environments such as an underground mine. The worst-case scenario for miners in such cases is being trapped at the mine face by fire or rock falls where no one can escape. Refuge chamber specialist MineARC Systems has acknowledged the importance of miner safety and continues to improve its products. Consequently, MineARC has launched its latest model of refuge chambers to the hard rock mining industry, the HRM series IV. The series represents the next generation of refuge chambers for the metalliferous mining industry and features the latest in safe-refuge technology. “It’s safer, smarter and easier to maintain and service,” MineARC general manager Mike Lincoln said.

aSm MARCH 2013

“We’ve also included a number of structural modifications that make it easier to position onsite.” A unique feature of the series IV is the “intelligent” voice audio navigation system.

“It’s safer, smarter and easier to maintain and service.” – MineARC general manager Mike Lincoln In an emergency, the iVAN system “talks” to the occupants through the operating procedures and alerts, notifying them when to change the scrubber chemicals and monitor gas levels. The iVAN system is multilingual. One of the upgrades of the series IV includes a carbon monoxide/carbon dioxide scrubbing system.

Using the scrubbing system eliminates the need for “free-pour” chemicals. Instead, the series IV uses pre-packaged chemical canisters that are easy to load and handle and can be stored for longer periods of time. MineARC’s HRM, extra-low voltage portable range of refuge chambers already uses the canister systems. Other features of the digital controller interface include 12 hours of selfmaintenance, a battery backup lasting a maximum 96 hours and an inverter. A remote system monitoring device has live internal video streaming and its internal LCD monitor incorporates a USB port, PC docking station and Ethernet connectivity. MineARC’s hard rock mining range is used in more than 100 underground mining operations in 35 countries.

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News

30 years of spill control evolution Spill Station marks a milestone in environment protection, after being the first to offer an all-in-one mobile bin spill kit.

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his year, Spill Station Australia celebrates three decades of providing environment, health and safety solutions to government and industry in Australia and around the world. When current chief executive Bruce Cartwright founded the business in 1983, Spill Station Australia was known as Corrosion Concepts and supplied chemical treatments such as rust prevention and fabric protection to the Australian Defence Force.

“This dynamic regulatory environment has seen the range of solutions supplied by Spill Station Australia expand to meet the demands of industry.” – Spill Station Australia managing director Nathan Cartwright This experience highlighted a need for a uniform spill response system to deal with the inevitable spills that occur when dealing with liquids in the workplace. After extensive field testing with the ADF, Cartwright launched the world’s first mobile bin spill kit containing personal protective equipment, absorbents, containment booms and waste disposal bags. This spill kit format is the template still used by spill control companies around the world. Nathan Cartwright is the managing director and second generation of the Australian company. Asked how Spill Station had maintained its leading position in a crowded marketplace, he said there had been constant changes in environment, health and safety legislation and regulation in the last 30 years. “This dynamic regulatory environment has seen the range of solutions supplied by Spill Station Australia expand to meet the demands of industry both in Australia and internationally,” Cartwright said. “Our desire to innovate and provide the

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Spill Station wrote the manual on mobile bin spill kits.

most cost-effective and complete solutions to our database of more than 7000 major customers around the globe ensures they keep on coming back to Spill Station for our tried and proven compliance solutions.” The comprehensive range of products includes safety showers and eyewash equipment designed to work in all climates and even where mains water supply is unavailable or overheated. The company’s range of secondary containment equipment is constructed to ensure safe and compliant storage of bottles, drums and tanks from 1 litre to 20,000L.

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Added to its wide array of spill response kits for all workplace environments, Spill Station also provides complete spill kit training programs and equipment maintenance solutions. “We are proud of the contribution we have made to protecting Australians and our environment over the last 30 years” Cartwright said. “Spill Station’s ability to constantly innovate and grow our range of solutions has maintained our position as market leader in this dynamic marketplace and we are looking forward to continuing our contribution in the years to come.”

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Industrial Safety

Deadly statistics Compared to the previous year, 26 more people lost their lives at work last year in Australia, while the monetary cost associated with work-related injury, illness and disease was put at more than $60 billion.

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t least 192 Australian employees were killed at work last year, up on the 166 deaths the year before. Safe Work Australia has released a swag of statistical reports in recent months. One, Work-related Traumatic Injury Fatalities Australia 2010–11, found that 220 workers died from injuries incurred at work that year, but another 154 died on the way to work or were bystanders to someone else’s work activity.

Workplace safety stifles business SATISFYING workplace health and safety (WHS) regulations was singled out as the most complex compliance task in the National Red Tape Survey of businesses. Safety regulators were the most burdensome state agencies. Some 53% of respondents to the inaugural Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry survey said WHS compliance was a high complexity issue, followed by wages and conditions of employment (49.6%) and employing workers (48.9%). “It is concerning that almost threequarters of businesses reported an increase in the overall time it takes to comply with regulation over the past two years,” noted the report. Of the 870 small and medium enterprises that responded, 44% spend 1-5 hours per week on compliance-related tasks, with 11.7% spending 20 hours per week. Almost a quarter cited state safety regulators as imposing a high red tape burden.Federally, the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations was the fourth most mentioned in the complexity stakes. Among the recommendations to reduce the burden were improving government communication, reducing the number of regulations and improving others, addressing fees and increasing compliance thresholds so low risk small business do not have to comply.

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Another report, Key Work Health and Safety Statistics Australia 2012, revealed there were 133,485 workers compensation claims for serious injuries or illnesses in 2008-09. Safe Work Australia CEO Rex Hoy noted that that year “the monetary cost associated with work-related injury, illness and disease was estimated at $60.6 billion. This represents 4.8% of GDP”. The highest incidence rates occur in the Industry of workplace

Worker deaths

transport and storage sector, manufacturing and agriculture, forestry and fishing, all with nearly double the rate for all industries combined. Construction ranked fourth, with mining sixth. Three mechanisms were responsible for 75% of serious workers’ compensation claims in 2009-10: body stressing, falls, trips and slips; and being hit by a moving object. Industry of workplace

Worker deaths

Transport, postal & warehousing

66

Retail trade

2

Agriculture, foresty & fishing

45

Education & training

3

Construction

21

Other services

2

Manufacturing

14

Financial & insurance services

1

Administrative & support services

7

Health care & social assistance

2

Public administration & safety

6

Professional, scientific & technical services

1

Arts & recreation services

5

Accommodation & food services

1

Mining

5

Electricity, gas, water & waste services

1

4

Government administration & defence

Wholesale trade

2

Industry unknown Total worker deaths

4 192

The number of workplace deaths, by industry, in 2012.

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Industrial Safety

Meet Australia’s safety star A holistic workplace safety program considers both single issue and systemic solutions, says the 2012 Safety Ambassador of the Year. By Richard Collins

W

e all know workplace health and safety is a systemic issue, but few working in the field would equal the breadth of perspective of Safe Work Australia’s 2012 Safety Ambassador of the Year. Last October, Jacinta Macaulay knocked off 699 nominees for the honour, presented by Employment and Workplace Relations Minister Bill Shorten. Until February, she wore three hats at Ron Finemore Transport in Wodonga, Victoria – OH&S officer, return to work officer and claims officer. “Wearing those different hats meant I saw

“I always use the analogy with the drivers that your body is your truck. You service your truck, so when do you want to think about servicing your body, what is your preventative maintenance routine?” – Jacinta Macaulay the injuries themselves and the claims data and was then able to trace the mechanism of injury back through the investigation on the OH&S side,” she said. Macaulay has sat talking with injured drivers in doctor and physio waiting rooms.

She’s pored over injury trends and claims. And she has developed solutions that address everything from specific problems to general workplace practices. The ambassador award singled out several targeted solutions but Macaulay – who

Jacinta Macaulay is honoured by Employment Minister Bill Shorten.

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unusually is a psychologist rather than a safety professional – is just as interested in the latter. For example, she commissioned an in-truck stretching program for drivers and won support to change the unhealthy snacks in workshops and offices for healthier options such as fruit and vegetable bowls. “I always use the analogy with the drivers that your body is your truck. You service your truck, so when do you want to think about servicing your body, what is your preventative maintenance routine?” she said. “You have built your lifestyle around a certain amount of dollars – and it is good money when they’re working – but you never factor in that you may be injured or unable to do it. When you say it from that perspective, they can see the sense.” Unsurprisingly, the drivers who have already had an injury are the ones who respond the best. Macaulay sees them as her ambassadors, both within the company and, for initiatives like the stretching program, the entire industry.

Driving safety solutions Ron Finemore Transport has around 300 drivers covering the eastern seaboard. It is small enough that Macaulay can analyse injury data from across the entire business

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and has the freedom to trial and implement solutions. One of the solutions cited in the national recognition was retro-fitting of chequer plating to truck access ladders. “We used to have a lot of falls off the ladders and when I did the investigation into the cause of injury I realised the steps were poorly designed, being round, and also that they had started to wear away,” she said.

“Being in OH&S is not always a job where you are well-liked, but you have to stand up.” – Jacinta Macaulay A project team of the workshop manager and several fabricators came up with several designs before they settled on the chequer plating as the best and most cost-effective. They’re retro-fitting tankers as they come in for service – and there hasn’t been a slip or fall since. Macaulay has also helped introduce the drivers to new technologies they might not otherwise trial. For example, she purchased a number of Air Hawk Truck Seats, an air-filled

cushion that helps prevent wear injury, and used the in-house newsletter to invite drivers to apply for a trial. If they like it they can buy their own, Shoulder injuries are a chronic problem in the sector due to coupling and uncoupling trailers. The workshop developed a more user-friendly coupling aid, with Macaulay asking for a design that could be folded into a bag so drivers could be issued their own as PPE rather than being left in the truck – and all too often lost. The workshop went through nine iterations of the aid before it was right, but anybody who works in workplace safety knows a key requirement is sticking to your guns until a problem is solved. “I came from a rehabilitation provider background and in my dual role at Ron Finemore I saw the consequences for an injured worker. So I am passionate about standing up to tell people they are not doing the right thing,” she said. “Being in OH&S is not always a job where you are well-liked, but you have to stand up. You are also a thorn in the side of the business, so you have to get that buy-in from senior managers about the importance of resources, staffing and training across the business.” Macaulay has just started as southern region rehabilitation manager with Linfox.

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Industrial Safety

E-learning’s flexibility is not just in timing, but also location.

Online training on the rise The business case for moving safety training online is strong – for the right type of worker. Richard Collins reports on a growing trend.

O

ne of the buzzwords in the training world is “e-learning”, which uses everything in the online repertoire from static websites to full-blown gamification concepts in a bid to improve user engagement, ROI, data quality, timeliness and learning outcomes. Somewhat dated estimates from the European Commission put the global e-learning industry at over $US48 billion ($A46 billion). It is growing rapidly, particularly in compliance-related domains where broad penetration across the workforce is required. For Allan Maclean, the potential of e-learning crystallised over coffee in 2009. Representatives from a Latrobe Valley power generator asked if his safety training company offered online courses. It didn’t and the conversation petered out, but it planted a seed.

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Maclean is now national training manager with Draeger Safety Pacific, which offers courses including confined space, working at height and with breathing apparatus. One of the first things he did on joining the company was oversee development of an online capability, though he prefers a “blended learning” model where the theory is taught online the practical component face-to-face. For the right type of business – and that is an important caveat – there is a strong business case for moving to online safety inductions, training and certifications. “In the Latrobe Valley, for example, everyone is looking at cost reduction, but the other thing that comes into play is the flexibility. It can be done on night shift, in fact it can be incorporated into any shift,” Maclean told Inside Safety. “I was at [chemicals manufacturer] Qenos as a shift manager for most of my career. When I did an estimation of our guys, there

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were perhaps three to four hours per shift where they have downtime but have to be there to read the panel. Part of that window could be used for training, rather than running dedicated training days.” Under Maclean’s favoured blended model, it could cut face-to-face time from eight hours to just two. Not only does that reduce the need for a dedicated trainer and associated space, it minimises the shifts to cover while employees are training. Given backfilling probably means other employees are working extra hours, and therefore getting double time of, say, $60 per hour, Maclean figures the net saving in training 12 staff through blended learning is in the order of $6100, well over half of that by avoiding overtime. It’s a nice competitive advantage in a tightened economic climate.

E-learning in practice E-learning’s flexibility is not just in timing,

MARCH 2013 ASM


but also location. This is proving attractive to remote operations but also project-oriented firms such as Contract Resources, a specialist in industrial and mechanical services. “We do jobs all over Australia and our guys could be anywhere, so that availability is important to us,” said Garry Svensson, its HSET coordinator WA/NT. “We just had two guys who flew into WA and then were off to another job in SA. It was flagged annual B/A [breathing apparatus] refresher was due prior the SA job, so Draeger Elearning was set up immediately and has given us the flexibility in terms of availability.” The 300-strong national firm has its own in-house trainer, but Svensson also uses e-learning courses depending on factors such as the level of training and number of staff requiring it. In terms of learning outcomes, there is a lot to be said for online. Draeger claims training time can be as much as halved due to “higher retention resulting from enhanced visual and auditory learning and immediate, specific feedback”. Svensson sees pros and cons. It can be more rigid than face-to-face training but also ensures employees know the material as they have to complete a question before moving on.

Online training is made more flexible with the capabilities of modern tablet devices.

“A lot of companies say ‘our workforce is not ready for it’. We’ve found the best industries are oil and gas, mining and utilities, but something like the construction industry is not so suited to it as it is mostly hand-on” – Garry Svensson

One of the key questions for those considering e-learning is the computer literacy of the workforce and the dynamics of the job. With more companies adopting digital inductions for new staff, Svensson sees a growing comfort with e-learning, though it can still be a stretch for some. Maclean argues around 20% of his clients are candidates for online or blended

models, particularly those in operations roles where staff spend a lot of time monitoring computer screens. “A lot of companies say ‘our workforce is not ready for it’. We’ve found the best industries are oil and gas, mining and utilities, but something like the construction industry is not so suited to it as it is mostly hand-on. Still, it’s growing well,” he said.

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SUPPLIERS GUIDE Annual product and service suppliers guide dedicated to the Australasian Health, Safety and Environment (HSE) sectors

This comprehensive Suppliers Guide, published in May 2013, is built around listings of the companies supplying products and services to the health, safety and environment sectors.

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Oil & Gas Safety

Oil giants slugged It was one of the most high profile disasters to beset the oil and gas industry and BP and Transocean are paying dearly for their part in it. By Noel Dyson

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n April 20, 2010, a massive explosion wracked the Deepwater Horizon rig while it was working in the Gulf of Mexico. That explosion was the result of an uncontrolled blow-out. The Transocean-owned rig was ultimately destroyed by the blast and the conflagration that followed. Surprisingly, given what had occurred, only 11 of the 126 crew aboard the rig were killed. The lessons learnt from other disasters, such as Piper Alpha in 1988, were clearly heeded. There has been a cost though for the key players in the disaster. Oil giant BP has agreed to pay $US4.5 billion ($A4.36 billion) in criminal fines and to plead guilty to a raft of charges stemming from the Deepwater Horizon disaster in 2010. Two of its employees and a former executive face further charges. BP still faces civil action relating to the 2010 disaster. Deepwater Horizon owner Transocean also agreed to a deal with the US Department of Justice. Under its arrangement it will plead guilty to a misdemeanour and pay $1.4 billion in fines. The agreement is to resolve certain outstanding civil and potential criminal claims relating to the April 2010 accident involving the Deepwater Horizon in the Gulf of Mexico. BP has pleaded guilty to felony manslaughter, environmental crimes and obstruction of Congress charges and has also agreed to resolve securities claims with the Securities and Exchange Commission. In agreeing to plead guilty, the DoJ says, BP has admitted the two highest-ranking supervisors aboard the rig at the time, known as BP’s wellsite leaders, negligently caused the death of 11 men and the resulting oil spill. Those supervisors – Robert Kaluza of Henderson, Nevada and Donald Vidrine of Lafayette, Louisiana – each face 11 felony counts of seaman’s manslaughter, 11 felony counts of involuntary manslaughter and one violation of the Clean Water Act. The US government alleges that on the night of April 20, Kaluza and Vidrine observed clear indications that the Macondo well was not secure and that oil and gas were flowing into the well.

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Scenes from the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon rig explosion.

Despite this, it alleges, BP’s wellsite leaders chose not to take obvious and appropriate steps to prevent the blow-out and, as a result, control of the well was lost, resulting in catastrophe.

“The explosion of the rig was a disaster that resulted from BP’s culture of privileging profit over prudence.” – Assistant Attorney General Lanny Breuer If convicted, Kaluza and Vidrine each face a maximum potential penalty of 10 years in prison on each seaman’s manslaughter count, up to eight years in prison on each involuntary manslaughter count and up to a year in prison on the Clean Water Act count.

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Former BP executive David Rainey of Houston, who served as a deputy incident commander and BP’s second-highest ranking representative at Unified Command during the spill response – has been charged with obstruction of Congress and making false statements to law enforcement officials. Rainey, if convicted, faces a maximum penalty of five years in prison on each of the two counts he faces. The $4 billion BP agreed to pay is the largest criminal resolution in US history. Pursuant to an order presented to the court, about $2.4 billion is dedicated to acquiring, restoring, preserving and conserving the marine and coastal environments, ecosystems and bird and wildlife habitat in the GoM and surrounding states harmed by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. BP also agreed to pay $525 million to resolve the SEC counts. The company has agreed to retain a process safety and risk management monitor and an

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independent auditor. This person will oversee BP’s process of safety, risk management and drilling equipment maintenance with respect to deepwater drilling in the GoM. “The explosion of the rig was a disaster that resulted from BP’s culture of privileging profit over prudence,” Assistant Attorney General Lanny Breuer said. BP also has to retain an ethics monitor to improve BP’s code of conduct for the purpose of seeking to ensure the company’s future candour with the US government. US SEC enforcement director Robert Khuzami said good corporate citizenship and responsible crisis management meant a company could not hide critical information simply because it feared a backlash. “The oil spill was catastrophic for the environment but by hiding its severity BP also harmed another constituency – its own shareholders and the investing public who are entitled to transparency, accuracy and completeness of company information, particularly in times of crisis,” he said. BP chairman Carl-Henric Svanberg said the company believed the resolution was “in the best interest of BP and its shareholders”. “It removes two significant legal risks and allows us to vigorously defend the company against the remaining civil actions,” he added. Transocean’s deal means one of its subsidiaries will plead guilty to one misdemeanour violation of the Clean Water Act for negligent discharge of oil into the Gulf of Mexico.

It has agreed to pay $400 million in criminal fines and penalties and to continue its ongoing cooperation in the government’s criminal investigation. It will pay an additional $1 billion to resolve the Clean Water Act civil claim for the massive, three-month long oil spill at the Macondo well. “Transocean’s rig crew accepted the direction of BP wellsite leaders to proceed in the face of clear danger signs – at tragic cost to many of them,” Breuer said.

“Transocean’s rig crew accepted the direction of BP wellsite leaders to proceed in the face of clear danger signs – at tragic cost to many of them.” – Assistant Attorney General Lanny Breuer “Transocean’s agreement to plead guilty to a federal crime and pay a total of $1.4 billion in criminal and civil penalties appropriately reflects its role in the Deepwater Horizon disaster.” Under the civil settlement, the Transocean defendants also had to implement courtenforceable measures to improve the operational safety and emergency response capabilities at all its drilling rigs in US waters. These include certifications of maintenance and repair of blow-out preventers before each

new drilling job, consideration of process safety risks and personnel training related to oil spills and responses to other emergencies. The measures apply to rigs operated or owned by Transocean in US waters and will be in place for at least five years. The $1 billion CWA civil penalties are a record amount – significantly exceeding the $70 million paid by MOEX Offshore 2007 last year. MOEX was a 10% partner with BP in the Macondo well venture. As of September 30, Transocean had accrued an estimated loss contingency of $US1.5 billion, associated with claims made by the Department of Justice. According to Transocean, “the Department of Justice has agreed it will not pursue further prosecution of Transocean and certain of its subsidiaries for any conduct regarding any matters under investigation by the Deepwater Horizon Task Force relating to or arising out of the Macondo well blow-out, explosion, spill or response”. The DoJ says the guilty plea agreement and criminal charge announced are part of the ongoing criminal investigation by the Deepwater Horizon Task Force into the 2010 GoM oil spill. “In agreeing to plead guilty, Transocean Deepwater Inc has admitted that members of its crew onboard the Deepwater Horizon acting at the director of BP’s ‘wellsite leaders’ or ‘company men’ were negligent in failing to fully investigate clear indications that the Macondo well was not secure and that oil and gas were flowing into the well,” it says.

Training blamed for supply base accident POOR training and management led to a dock worker at Mermaid Marine’s Dampier supply base having his arm crushed between a dock and a barge in December, according to the Maritime Union of Australia. The union has accused both Chevron and Mermaid Marine of trying to cut corners. “It’s becoming clearer and clearer that Chevron and their contractors, like Mermaid, are cutting corners to make up time and money on the Gorgon project,” MUA Western Australia secretary Chris Cain said. Chevron revealed a $A9 billion cost blow-out on the project earlier in December and confirmed front-end engineering on a fourth train at the project would be pushed back into next year. The union said it had warned Mermaid Marine and Worksafe WA that poor training and mismanagement at the base made such an incident inevitable. In fact, it said it had organised a visit

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for Worksafe inspectors just before the accident, with the inspectors dismissing the concerns of the MUA. “We’ve got a serious issue when the day after Worksafe says there’s no problem, ambulances are called to an accident of the type exactly predicted by health and safety representatives,” Cain said. “Worksafe is supposed to be the cop on the beat. We need a proper independent inquiry into this to make sure it never, ever happens again.” Mermaid Marine managing director Jeffrey Weber said the Worksafe visit was part of routine relations between Mermaid and Worksafe and was not made at the behest of the union. “The Worksafe thing ... we have an ongoing relationship with Worksafe, so they were there as part of that normal process,” he said. “We work with them quite closely and they came out and had a chat to the

manager and did the inspection ... it was a routine process.” He also lashed out at union suggestions that the incident was a result of Chevron cutting corners, adding that Mermaid Marine had launched a full investigation into the incident. “I think the comment that was made [about] Chevron cutting corners is unequivocally not true,” Weber said. “They set the highest of safety standards and we work in partnership with them and they help us improve our safety across the supply base. “They do not compromise on safety and they do not compromise on environmental. “They’ll be as interested in the outcome of the investigation as we are. To say they’re cutting corners is just not true.” He also denied the union brought up an issue with the company regarding the particular process which led to the man having his arm crushed. – James McGrath

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Oil & Gas Safety

Robots reducing hazards Western Australia-based specialised bolt manufacturer Donhad has teamed up with Robotic Solutions and ABB to achieve a safer and more efficent work process to remove flashing during bolt forging, without any job losses.

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A-based company Donhad is recognised internationally as one of the world’s leading manufacturers of specialised bolts and fasteners in plain carbon alloy and stainless steel for a wide variety of engineering disciplines including oil and gas. During the bolt forging process, flashing is produced which then needs to be removed as part of the manufacturing process, and in the past this was removed manually. In its quest for a more efficient operating process, Donhad investigated the feasibility of using new technologies – and in particular, robotics. Donhad forge plant superintendent Robert Meehan explained that workers’ compensation claims, injuries, near misses and hazards were issues being contended with during manual grinding.

“The Robotic Solutions WA team, led by David Woodhouse, came up with a viable robotic solution for Donhad that didn’t create staff redundancies, but instead improved their working environment and allowed employees to develop new skills,” Meehan said. Robotic Solutions and Donhad agreed upon a turn-key robotic system, which included everything within the robot cell plus safety fencing, robot programming, conveyors, installation and after-sales support. Robotic Solutions chose an ABB industrial robot – model IRB 6660 – specifically designed for machining, plus an ABB force control package. The force control package enables the operator to program a level of force that the robot will exert on each bolt as it is being ground. “During the grinding process, the force

control package allows us to automatically compensate for variations in flashing size or surplus metal on the bolt. If, for example, the robot detects extra flashing over a certain limit, the robot will slow down and remove material at a slower rate,” Woodhouse said. Meehan added that the benefit of the robotic system was two-fold: risk of injury was greatly reduced as the robot now performed the grinding tasks; and the quality of the final product was improved due to the repeatability that the robot provided. Employees now had a much safer working environment, with less physical exertion and relief from having to do repetitive work in proximity to potential hazards. Initially staff were apprehensive, but since the installation their learning opportunities had increased.

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MARCH 2013 ASM


Construction Safety

The Slingmax comes with armour wear pads for abrasion resistance, and a bulletproof Kevlar inner lining to prevent sling damage.

Making slings safer Damaged slings can compromise the safety of riggers but Robertsons believes it has the answer. Marion Lopez reports

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lings are a common component in the heavy lifting industry and riggers have no choice but to work with them to lift, transport and place heavy objects into position. Unfortunately, slings are not always 100% reliable and history shows they can sometimes break, letting tonnes of equipment slide off, crash to the ground or, worse still, crush those standing underneath. And you don’t need to look too far back in time to find an example of such a tragedy. In 2011, a crane operator-rigger in Karratha, Western Australia, was crushed to death after a large concrete soakwell lid fell while it was being lifted. When it happened the death was the second such incident in the region in less than a week. The sad news is these sorts of accidents are far from isolated. Mis-handling and wear and tear can go a long way towards weakening the slings,

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causing unexpected load failure. Lifting and rigging specialists Robertsons believes it has the answer to address safety in the lifting game, releasing the Slingmax twin path slings. Designed for towing and lifting applications of up to 600 tonnes, the Slingmax twin path slings aim to make riggers’ lives easier and safer when lifting heavy loads. Made from synthetic material, the slings reportedly provide riggers with the combined advantages of lightness and a tight grip. The company says the sling’s twin design means that they’re using two independent paths, each capable of carrying the rated working load limit. They reportedly offer back-up protection and ease the handling process, in turn improving safety and reducing rigging time by up to 80%. Made for durability, Robertsons believe the Slingmax technology eliminates the problems attached to slings made out of polyester

and nylon, such as cutting sharp edges. The Slingmax is made from the strongest material in the world: K-spec. Regarded in the lifting industry as the best fibre in terms of high strength and low stretch, the Slingmax twin path slings exhibits only 1% elongation when lifting at load limits. But as with all safety products, one barrier is never enough. The slings also come with armour wear pads for abrasion resistance, with a bulletproof Kevlar inner lining to prevent sling damage. The armour wear pads are removable, using Velcro; or they can be sewn directly on to the sling. Robertsons said the slings featured a Covermax outer cover that was four times more abrasion-resistant than polyester outer covers. Robertsons' sister company, Beaver Brands, said the Covermax was a double-layer of industrial strength, heavy-duty nylon. "The two layers are different colours,

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Construction Safety the outside is green and the inner is red,” Beaver national materials handling technical specialist Matt Mollross said. “This gives the operator an easy inspection criterion – if the inner red nylon is showing, the twin path needs assessment by Robertsons prior to its next use.” Mollross explained that the twin path slings offered other benefits, such as built-in overload protection comprised of optic fibre, Tell-Tails and fast check warning indicators.

"(It) gives the operator an easy inspection criterion – if the inner red nylon is showing, the twin path needs assessment by Robertsons prior to its next use." – Matt Mollross

The Slingmax twin path slings are suitable for special and heavy lift applications.

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© Aspermont Limited – courtesy Inside Safety Magazine

In regards to the optic fibre system, Robertsons said it allowed for an internal integrity check of the core yarn. If crushing or cutting, heat or chemical damage has occurred, the optical fibre will not transmit light from one end to the other. Shining a flashlight into one end of the optic fibre immediately alerts an operator of sling damage and heat exposure, according to the company. Tell-Tails provide continued monitoring of overload solutions. The system works by using an extension of the core fibre, which if constantly overloaded will have the Tell-Tails retract and warn the operator. In this instance, the sling should be taken out of service immediately and inspected by the manufacturer. According to Robertsons, the benefits are not limited to safety alone – handling features and cost efficiencies have also been incorporated into the design. In terms of handling, the slings are reportedly 80% lighter than wire rope and chain slings, and 50% lighter than polyester slings. Robertsons said this provided for better sling control, making rigging quicker and more manageable. When underwater, the slings reportedly does not absorb moisture and is neutrally buoyant, making them suitable for off-shore and salvage work. The slings can be rolled up and shelved after use, or tossed in the back of a car or van for transportation. The Slingmax twin path slings are suitable for special and heavy lifts applications as well as mining, towing, lifting, marine and power station applications. The slings are manufactured in Australia and are available through Robertsons dealer network.

MARCH 2013 ASM


Construction Safety

Light up your site There is a new heavy-duty, portable lighting solution available from CAPS Australia capable of producing 110,000 lumens per lamp and being transported by the humble ute.

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ransportable enough to fit in the back of any ute and offering a lighting range up to five times greater than quartz alternatives, the Allmand Port-A-Lite has been launched locally by CAPS Australia. “The Allmand Port-A-Lite is an affordable, heavy-duty lighting tower solution that offers a unique alternative for the Australian market,” CAPS Australia marketing manager - portabloe products Richard Sweet said. “They are not only highly compact with the height adjustable up to 3.65m, but they are easily transportable around job sites. “The direction of the light can also be adjusted in all directions without tools.” Powerful enough to provide safe working illumination for a large area, the Port-A-Lite comes in two models, with either one or two lamps.

“This gives users a best-in-class solution to effectively and efficiently illuminate most worksites.” – Richard Sweet The lamps feature high-output 1000-Watt metal halide lamps capable of producing 110,000 lumens each. “This gives users a best-in-class solution to effectively and efficiently illuminate most worksites, working from a standard 240 volt, 10 amp domestic powerpoint,” he said. The lighting towers complement the range of other portable equipment available from CAPS, which is marketing this product as a solution for companies requiring temporary lighting. CAPS anticipates the Port-A-Lite lighting towers will be most useful in work situations such as concrete finishing, paving, masonry, roofing, excavation, mining, refining, quarrying and demolition. CAPS believes the Port-a-Lites are also suitable for waterfronts, training sites, and special events. The heavy-duty units are made in the United States.

The Allmand Port-A-Lite.

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Construction Safety

Safety officers in frame Officers can no longer delegate authority on work health and safety following harmonisation of WHS law around the nation. Drake International marketing director Alexandra Tidy discusses the implications.

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afety first is a phrase most of us have heard throughout the years, often as a reminder to look both ways before you cross the street. However, never has this statement rung so close to home, as it does now. On January 1, 2012, Safe Work Australia implemented a new national law, known as the “Harmonisation Law” which, as it suggests, will create a national harmony in the Work Health and Safety Act across the country. What this means for companies is that any person who makes, or participates in making, decisions that affect their business, known as “officers”, now have a legal obligation to fully understand health and safety performance, and any safety issues – past, present, or

future. Officers who have these obligations must ensure Work health and safety (WHS) compliance is met across the business. Are you wondering what this means? You are not alone, so are most employers. The new legislation requires officers to identify, understand and control health and safety risks, assist in auditing and reviewing of WHS processes, and keep up to date with their safety knowledge. Most importantly, along with this additional responsibility come severe penalties for breaches by both the company and the officers. Breaches could result in penalties of up to a $3,000,000 fine for companies, as well as a $600,000 fine and five years in jail for officers. Best of all – or potentially worst of all

– ignorance is not a defence. Businesses and officers alike must be aware of their responsibilities. The focus of this change in legislation is to encourage a greater accountability for employees, not just the business. An effective WHS program will assist in protecting your people while reducing costs for your business. Research shows that organisations which have solid WHS programs in place maintain the best safety records while achieving the highest productivity, and ultimately deliver the greatest profit margins. After all, it’s not just your job on the line. Drake Safety is a division of Drake International and specialise in WHS management.

Get a CONTRACTOR’s team of specialist industry journalists will keep you informed on all the important projects, people and issues affecting the construction industry in 2013.

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MARCH 2013 ASM


Mining Safety

Driven to distraction Miners are being warned of the risks of using mobile phones onsite. By Alison Middleton

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iners in Queensland are risking accidents through the reckless use of mobile phones while driving and operating

machinery. The Queensland Mines Inspectorate has issued an all mines safety bulletin to remind miners of the dangers of using mobile phones, tablets and other social media devices when working. The inspectorate said there had been investigations after workers nearly caused an incident while operating vehicles or other equipment. Queensland chief inspector of coal mines Gavin Taylor warned of distraction and inattention due to using mobile devices. “Following several high potential incident investigations, the mines inspectorate is aware of mine workers using mobile devices while operating vehicles or other mobile plant,” he said. “There is concern at any causal factors, including human factors that may impair safe vehicle operation. “Any incident involving a vehicle or mobile plant can be fatal, with eight of the last 12 fatalities in Queensland mines involving vehicles or mobile plant.” Taylor said the inspectorate would “consider appropriate action” under its compliance policy if a miner acted recklessly with a mobile phone or other social media device while operating a vehicle or other mobile plant. “The safety bulletin aims to remind people of the risks of using mobile devices while driving or operating mobile plant,” he continued. “A mine’s risk management process has regard to the role of human factors in vehicle or mobile plant incidents by incorporating

Image courtesy of Ford Motor Company. A driver in Ford’s driver distraction testing facility.

known risk factors in site risk assessments, hazard management and control elements. “Driving while using a handheld mobile device can cause both physical and mental distraction which impairs driving performance. “According to the World Health Organisation, performance is impaired if using a mobile phone while driving, resulting in longer braking reaction times, slower reaction to traffic signals, an impaired ability to keep in the correct lane and shorter following distances.” Taylor quoted a WHO report that stated using mobile phones could cause drivers to take their eyes off the road, hands off the steering wheel, and minds off the road and the surrounding situation.

“Mobile phone text messaging while driving seems to have a particularly detrimental impact on driving behaviour, similar to other highly focused activities, such as using social media devices while driving,” he added. The safety bulletin said the risk of driver distraction or inattention should be considered when developing hazard management plans related to mobile plant and vehicles. Taylor urged minesite managers to review policies and procedures and also to consider the role of inattention or distraction when undertaking incident investigations related to mobile plant and vehicle operation. The warning was distributed to mines across the state and managers were urged to circulate the bulletin to mine staff. alison.middleton@aspermont.com

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Mining Safety

Learn about safety If you’re serious about safety, Melbourne’s Safety in Action trade show is an event you won’t want to miss. By Vetti Kakulas

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ow in its 15th year, the Safety in Action trade show will hosted by Melbourne this month. The event will showcase the latest safety products and technology across Australian industry, discussing health and safety legislation issues. “There is no other show with this level of commitment to safety,” Safety in Action event director Tony Francis said. “We’ll have a huge series of free seminars from top industry experts, a massive array of state-of-the-art technology and the chance for visitors to meet people and businesses who are leaders in safety.” Safety in Action will be held at the Melbourne Exhibition Centre from March 19 to 21.

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“There is no other show with this level of commitment to safety.” – Safety in Action event director Tony Francis On the first day of the safety event the seminars will focus on internal systems. Keynote speaker Adrian Manessis from software developer Myosh will speak about the benefits and risks associated with safety software. The second day will focus on problem solving and conflict management, with Pegasus Management business development manager Steven Craig delivering a seminar revealing hiring strategies, providing advice for businesses interested in managing risk from the beginning of contractor engagement.

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Sharpe & Abel founder and lawyer Melissa Kirby will discuss the stressful aspects of disaster management. Kirby will present case studies and practical steps on how to manage difficult and dangerous situations. On Thursday, the last day of the show, one seminar will focus on the importance of concentration as a safety tool. Performance Dimensions consultant and director Michael Adeny will discuss managing fatigue and tips for keeping miners alert and safe.

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A seminar from last year’s Safety in Action trade show.

“Michael is well-known for being an engaging speaker and his research into fatigue management, shift work, sleep, stress management and organisation wellbeing is relevant to workers in all sectors,” Francis said. To end the show there will be a talk by Mousa Sharifi, the regional manager at the International Standards Certifications group. Sharifi will tell delegates how to create a safer workplace using a management system and how to meet the requirements of health and safety legislations, including predicting, assessing and controlling hazards. Those interested in supply chain information can visit the Advanced Logistics and Materials Handling show. “If you’re looking for answers or to develop a network you can rely on for safety, you should definitely register and attend the seminars relevant to your industry,” Francis added. vetti.kakulas@aspermont.com

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Mining Safety

Ansell’s flame resistant ActivArmr 97-200 gloves.

Total protection Ensuring workers have flame resistant and arc flash protected gloves could boost a mining company’s bottom line. By Alison Middleton

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flame resistant glove manufacturer is urging companies to assess the personal protective equipment on minesites – to protect workers and operating costs. Ansell said opportunities for improvements could be identified through reviewing PPE processes and equipment. Based in Melbourne, Victoria, Ansell industrial marketing head Mitchell Mackey said worker productivity could be affected by apprehension about punctures or abrasions or whether the PPE would provide the necessary heat protection. “A walk-through of your mining operations to gain input from the workers can provide insight into the various processes involved and whether the PPE used is providing the protection and performance required,” he said. “By speaking to employees, management can learn about the critical factors associated

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with each task and any concerns that may impede worker productivity. “If, for example, employees don’t have hand protection that provides the level of protection they need, they may perform tasks more slowly because they lack confidence in their ability to safely do the job. “If their hand protection products do not provide sufficient grip to securely grasp wet or oily objects, their performance may be hampered by a concern about dropping and even breaking objects.” An assessment will also determine whether workers’ PPE is comfortable enough for them to perform their tasks to the highest level. Mackey said analysing the critical factors associated with each task enabled an assessor to make recommendations which would significantly reduce potential injuries and the improper use of PPE. “Ansell PPE specialists are able to assist with a glove assessment that involves the analysis

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of a mining site’s current hand protection environment and will deliver a best-practice recommendation,” Mackey said. “Productivity is directly impacted by the amount of waste a facility produces. Reducing waste in the form of defects or lost time can significantly drive down operating costs. “A PPE assessment can identify solutions that can substantially reduce the amount of waste and the associated costs that may be present in the current work environment.” The company’s wear and flame resistant products for the mining industry include ActivArmr 97-200 gloves. Ansell said the gloves were introduced to help protect mining workers from catastrophic events such as flash fires, as well as the daily concerns of impact and abrasion. Made with a flame-resistant fabric and designed to be highly durable, the gloves were constructed with high visibility palm padding and durable Kevlar stitching.

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A goat skin leather palm was included to provide optimal resistance from cuts, abrasions and punctures. “Flame-resistant clothing is important in the mining industry, but it’s not a standard for hands, even though they are often the first body parts to come into contact with potential dangers,” Ansell marketing manager David Nicholls said.

“Reducing waste in the form of defects or lost time can significantly drive down operating costs.” – Ansell industrial marketing head Mitchell Mackey “During the development of our ActivArmr 97-200 gloves, Ansell obtained feedback from many hundreds of mining professionals. “Based on these insights, and using our extensive experience, we developed gloves that provide superior hand protection while enhancing the comfort and tactility mining workers need to perform complicated tasks.” alison.middleton@aspermont.com

The ActivArmr 97-200 gloves are suitable for drillers working on minesites.

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Mining Safety

The excavator after it was destroyed in a fire.

Fire down below An excavator was destroyed in a fire caused by poor maintenance and where extinguishers were not accessible. By Alison Middleton

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nappropriate maintenance practices and a lack of effective fire protection systems led to a major plant fire at a New South Wales mine. An excavator operator had to jump 3.5m to escape a blaze after the machine caught fire while removing overburden from the ore body. The operator escaped injury but attempts to control the fire were unsuccessful and the excavator was destroyed. The NSW government’s mine safety operations branch said inappropriate maintenance practices led to the major plant fire, while hand-held fire extinguishers were not accessible to fight the flames. Its report noted that the excavator operator was competent, had completed mine excavator training and assessment three months prior to the incident and held over 2000 hours of operating experience. In addition, the report said, the excavator had recently been overhauled and fitted with a new engine and appeared to be well maintained and in good operational order. However, a detailed inspection of the excavator was conducted by a consulting forensic fire investigator, who concluded that “the fire originated from a cracked aluminium alloy hydraulic oil filter housing that allowed an escape of oil that ignited on contact with hot engine components”.

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Branch director Rob Regan said a waiting dump truck driver saw flames in the excavator engine bay and alerted the excavator operator by radio. “The fire erupted from the engine bay momentarily, engulfing the excavator cabin before retreating to the engine bay where it remained well alight,” he said. “The operator subsequently evacuated the excavator by jumping 3.5m to the ground and was not injured. “Attempts to control the fire with handheld extinguishers were unsuccessful and the excavator was destroyed.” The oil filter housing was designed to be installed with a socket or ring spanner applied to a cast nut at the bottom of the housing. But numerous sharp tool marks on the oil filter housing recovered from the excavator after the fire suggested the housing was installed with a stillson wrench or similar tool and most likely over-tightened. The fire investigator concluded that “cracking of the housing originated at the tool marks”. “The investigator also noted that an effective automatic fire suppression system would almost certainly have contained the fire at an early stage, and recommended that automatic fire suppression systems be fitted to all heavy mobile equipment at mines,” Regan added. He said: “Maintenance activities should

© Aspermont Limited – courtesy Inside Safety Magazine

always be undertaken in accordance with the manufacturer’s recommendations and maintenance people should be competent for the task they carry out and should always use the correct tool for the job. “Maintainers should not improvise by using inappropriate tools. Equipment components should be carefully inspected before being installed. Damaged or worn components should always be replaced.” He said mine operators should undertake a rigorous fire risk assessment to determine the appropriate fire risk controls, fire protection systems and means for emergency escape. Regan concluded: “Automatic fire suppression systems are strongly recommended for all mobile plant at mines, particularly heavy equipment that may carry large fuel and oil loads, and where access and egress may be difficult. “Fire extinguishers of a suitable type and capacity should be installed on all mobile plant at a location that is least likely to catch fire and that is readily accessible to the operator and to a person at ground level.” Details of the excavator fire were contained in a safety alert report by Regan, which was circulated to the mining industry across Australia. The identity of the company and minesite was withheld. alison.middleton@aspermont.com

MARCH 2013 aSm


Inside Safety Suppliers Directory

2MT MINING PRODUCTS 0448 213 210 www.2mtminingproducts.com

ADT SECURITY 02 9947 7300 www.adtsecurity.com.au

3D CADWORKS 0409 200 678 www.3dcadworks.com.au

ADVANCE ANTI SLIP SURFACES PTY LTD 03 9560 4488 www.advanceantislip.com.au

3M AUSTRALIA 02 9498 9333 www.mmm.com 4CRISK NETWORK PTY LTD 07 3839 1556 www.4crisk.com.au A & D LIFTING EQUIPMENT & SERVICES 02 4966 8622 www.adlifting.com.au AUTO ELECTRICAL IMPORTS 07 3274 3077 A1 FIRE & SAFETY 07 4639 3818 www.a1fireandsafety.com.au AA SAFETY SERVICES 07 5593 7170 ABC CRANE HIRE P/L 08 9582 7000 www.abccranehire.com.au ABC PRODUCTS (ROCKY) PTY LTD 07 4927 7276 www.abcrocky.com.au ABERGELDIE COMPLEX INFRASTRUCTURE 02 8717 7777 www.abergeldie.com ABLAZE TOTAL SOLUTIONS 02 6262 2589 www.ablazetotalsolutions.com.au ABLE INSTRUMENT SERVICE 07 3801 1232 www.ableinstrument.com

ADVANCED BRAKING TECHNOLOGY LTD 08 9273 4800 www.advancedbraking.com ADVANCED ENGINEERING GROUP PTY LTD 07 3713 7744 www.advanced-eng.com.au ADVANCED HEIGHT SAFETY 03 9511 5552 www.ahsafety.com.au ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY PRODUCTS 08 9479 1266 www.atpwa.com

ALFABS MINING EQUIPMENT PTY LTD 02 4936 5000 www.alfabs.com.au ALFAGOMMA AUSTRALIA PTY LTD 07 4969 2700 www.alfagomma.com.au ALIMAK HEK PTY LTD 03 8795 6789 www.alimakhek.com.au

APPLIED MINING TECHNOLOGIES 07 3201 2663 www.appliedminingtech.com APS LIGHTING & SAFETY PRODUCTS 08 9248 4419 www.aps-supply.com

ALISTAIR BARTON & ASSOCIATES 07 3395 6750

AQUACRETE/WHITFIELD MINERALS 08 9535 9299 www.aquacrete.com.au

ALL CRANES & EQUIPMENT INSPECTIONS 0417 238 330 www.allcranes.com.au

ARMCO BARRIERS PTY LTD 03 9311 1312 www.armcobarriers.com.au

ALL THINGS SAFETY WEAR 03 9432 5255 www.safety-wear.com.au

ADVITECH PTY LTD 02 4924 5400 www.advitech.com.au

ALLENS INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTS PTY LTD 07 3255 6455 www.allensindustrial.com.au

AEGIS SAFETY PTY LTD 07 3865 1139 www.aegissafety.com.au

ALLIGHTSYKES 1300 ALLIGHT www.allightsykes.com

AFLO EQUIPMENT 03 9369 2020 www.aflo.com.au

ALLMINE GROUP 1300 255 646 www.allminegroup.com

AIE AUSTRALIAN INDUSTRIAL EYESAFETY 02 4958 7892 www.aieoptical.com.au

ALLSHELTER 02 6898 2244 www.allshelter.com.au

AIR & AUTOMATION EQUIPMENT PTY LTD 02 9743 1271 www.airautomation.com.au

APPLIED FILTERS 03 9584 3966 www.ariel-industries.com.au

ALLSTATE SAFETY PRODUCTS 08 9353 5515 ALRIC TRAINING LIMITED +64 6 752 3504

ARTCRAFT PTY LTD 03 8762 8900 www.artcraftpl.com.au ASK-US CONSULTANCIES PTY LTD 08 8326 7111 ASPEN MEDICAL www.aspenmedical.com.au ASSETIVITY PTY LTD 08 9474 4044 www.assetivity.com.au ASTRAL ELECTRONICS AUSTRALIA 02 9675 3911 www.astralelectronics.com.au ATD SERVICES PTY LTD 02 4285 6101 www.atdservices.com.au ATF HEIGHT SAFETY 08 9414 7223 www.atfguardrail.com.au

AIR & LIFT GEAR 07 5443 9633 www.airandliftgear.com.au

ALULITE ALUMINIUM SCAFFOLDING PTY LTD 08 9379 1400 www.alulite.com.au

AIR RADIATORS PTY LTD 03 5275 6644 www.airradiators.com.au

AMARE SAFETY PTY LTD 03 8542 0400 www.amare.com.au

ATM ENTERPRISES / ROPS 08 9398 6775 www.rops.com.au

AIR SPRINGS SUPPLY PTY LTD 02 9807 4077 www.airsprings.com.au

AMCOSH PTY LTD 03 9731 1744 www.amcosh.com.au

AIR-MET SCIENTIFIC PTY LTD 1800 000 744 www.airmet.com.au

AMMS GROUP 08 9373 0800 www.amms.com.au

ATMOS AUSTRALIA PTY LTD (ATMOS GLOBAL) 1300 692 866 www.atmos.net.au

AIRMET SCIENTIFIC PTY LTD 1800 000 744 www.airmet.com.au

AMOG CONSULTING 03 9542 3700 www.amogconsulting.com

AISAT INSTRUMENTS 08 9350 5545 www.aisat.com.au

AMPCONTROL PTY LTD 02 4961 9000 www.ampcontrolgroup.com

AITKIN CRANES SERVICES 03 9369 8906 www.aitkincranes.com.au

ANCHOR POINT SAFETY 1800 007 454 www.anchorpointsafety.com.au

ALBANY FILTRATION TECHNOLOGIES 02 8006 6200 www.albft.com

ANCHOR SAFE SYSTEMS PTY. LTD. 02 6021 7630 www.anchorsafe.com.au

ALBERFIELD PTY LTD 08 9221 4396 www.alberfield.com.au

ANNE STEWART MINING CONSULTANTS 0407 077 576

AUSSIE ELECTRICAL PTY LTD 1300 668 405 www.aussietradesupplies.com.au

ACUMINE PTY LTD 02 9351 7690 www.acumine.com

ALEGRA SAFETY 08 9418 5275 www.alegrasafety.com.au

ANSELL HEALTHCARE 1800 337 041 www.ansellasiapacific.com

AUSSIE SAFETY STICKERS 03 9786 8925 www.aussiesafetystickers.com

ADG GLOBAL SUPPLY 08 9329 5900 www.adgglobalsupply.com

ALERE AUSTRALIA 07 3363 7711 www.alere.com.au

AON HEWITT 02 9253 7100 www.aonhewitt.com.au

AUSTMAN PTY LTD 08 9370 5199 www.austman.com

ABRASION RESISTANT MATERIALS PTY LTD 07 3277 9630 www.arm.com.au ABTROV PTY LTD 02 4947 8133 www.abtrov.com.au ACCESS ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS 07 3881 3262 www.accessenv.com.au ACCESS UNLIMITED INTERNATIONAL 08 9248 4088 www.accessunlimited.com.au ACCIDENTAL FIRST AID SUPPLIES 1300 762 399 www.accidental.com.au ACQUIRE TECHNOLOGY SOLUTIONS 08 9316 6600 www.acquire.com.au ACTIVE ENVIRONMENTAL SOLUTIONS 03 9431 3500 www.aesolutions.com.au

aSm MARCH 2013

© Aspermont Limited – courtesy Inside Safety Magazine

ATLAS COPCO RENTAL 133 420 www.atlascopcorental.com.au

ATOM SUPPLY 1800 999 024 www.atomsupply.com.au ATS GLOBAL PTY LTD 03 9580 6783 www.atsglobal.com.au AUS E. PSYCH PTY LTD 07 3211 8919 www.ausepsych.com.au AUSDRILL LIMITED 08 9311 5666 www.ausdrill.com.au AUSPROOF PTY LTD 07 4978 4000 www.ausproof.com.au

27


Inside Safety Suppliers Directory AUSTRALASIAN COLLEGE OF HEALTH & SAFETY 07 3822 3228 www.austchs.com AUSTRALASIAN RESOURCE CONSULTANTS (AARC) 07 3217 8772 www.aarc.net.au AUSTRALIAN CENTRE FOR OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & SAFETY (ACOHS PTY LTD) 03 9875 6900 www.acohs.com.au AUSTRALIAN CONVEYOR ENGINEERING PTY LTD 02 4370 9500 www.conveyor.net.au AUSTRALIAN ELECTRICAL SERVICES PTY LTD 08 9317 5999 www.australianelectricalservices.com.au AUSTRALIAN HEALTH & SAFETY SUPPLIES 07 3209 5330 www.safetysupplies.com.au AUSTRALIAN HEIGHT SAFETY SERVICES 1300 850 121 www.vhss.com.au AUSTRALIAN INDUSTRY TRAINING PROVIDERS 9437 2502 www.aitp.com.au AUSTRALIAN RESCUE AND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 07 5445 6965 www.austrescue.com.au AUSTRALIAN SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS 08 8443 9844 www.ascs.com.au AUSTRALIAN SECURITIES INVESTMENT COMMISSION 08 9261 4142 www.asic.gov.au/fido AUSTRALIAN WORKPLace DRUG TESTING SERVICES 07 5572 4008 www.awdts.com.au

BAC SYSTEMS PTY LIMITED 02 9832 2777 www.bacsystems.com.au BAKER HYDRAULICS PTY LTD 08 8276 3188 www.bakerhydraulics.com.au BALLANTYNE SAFETY 07 3357 9503 www.ballantynesafety.com.au BAMBACH WIRES AND CABLES 02 9938 5622 www.bambachcables.com.au BARMINCO LTD 08 9416 1000 www.barminco.com.au BARRIER GROUP PTY LTD 1300 553 320 www.barsec.com.au BARROD PTY LTD T/A AIR SYSTEMS AUSTRALIA & SYLVAN WIRE 07 3816 0166 BASF AUSTRALIA LTD 02 8811 4200 www.basf-cc.com.au BASF AUSTRALIA LTD 03 8855 6600 www.basf.com.au BATA INDUSTRIALS 03 5970 8500 www.bataindustrials.com BEAVER BRANDS PTY LTD 02 9034 5444 www.beaver.com.au BEAVER TECHNOLOGY SERVICES / BEAVER GROUP 02 8811 3500 www.beavergrp.com.au BECKER MINING AUSTRALIA PTY LTD 02 4941 3388 www.au.becker-mining.com BELCUR PTY LTD 07 3820 2488 BELL DIES SYDNEY PTY LTD 02 9772 4477 www.belldies.com.au

AUSTREC INTERNATIONAL PROPRIETY LIMITED 02 9698 0177 www.austlighttower.com.au

BERENDSEN FLUID POWER PTY LTD 1800 814 411 www.hydraulic-repair.com.au

AUSWORKWEAR & SAFETY 03 5134 1478 www.ausworkwear.com.au

BEST PRACTICE MANAGED SOLUTIONS 07 4063 3855 www.bestpracticesolutions.com.au

AUTO CONTROL SYSTEMS 08 9258 4555 www.autocontrols.com.au AUTOMATED CONTROL PTY LTD 02 4964 4022 www.automatedcontrol.com.au

BETA SAFETY 08 6254 6900 www.betasafety.com.au BIG SAFETY 02 9481 4555 www.bigsafety.com.au

AUTOMATION IT 07 3299 3844 www.automationit.com

BIS INDUSTRIES LTD 02 4966 1544 www.bisindustries.com

AW WORKWISE 02 9687 7122 www.awworkwise.com.au

BISALLOY STEEL PTY LTD 02 4272 0444 www.bisalloy.com.au

B&R ENCLOSURES PTY LTD 08 9248 9744 www.brenclosures.com.au

BJ YOUNG EARTHMOVING 0419 847 988 www.bjyoung.com.au

B&R ENCLOSURES PTY LTD 07 3714 1000 www.brenclosures.com.au

BKT TYRES 1300 916 556 www.tfiearthmover.com.au

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BLACKSMITH JACKS INDUSTRIAL WAREHOUSE 07 4944 3200 www.blacksmithjacks.com.au

CAPITAL SAFETY 1800 245 002 www.capitalsafety.com.au

BLACKWOODS 13 73 23 www.blackwoods.com.au

CBC AUSTRALIA PTY LTD – CBC MOTION MINING & RESOURCES 02 9947 9293 www.conbear.com

BLH SAFETY SOLUTIONS 03 6383 4333 www.blhsafetysolutions.com

CCTV HIRE PTY LTD 02 9618 0444 www.cctvhire.com.au

BLUE GLUE 02 9620 7500 www.blueglue.com.au

CERAMABOND PTY LTD 08 9303 2777 www.ceramabond.com.au

BLUE HEELER BOOTS 07 3846 7101 www.blueheelerboots.com.au BOC INDUSTRIAL 02 8874 4400 www.boc.com.au BOC LIMITED 131 262 www.boc.com.au BOGS FOOTWEAR / FLORSHEIM AUSTRALIA 1800 426 466 www.bogsfootwear.com.au

CIRLOCK – ERIK LARSEN PTY LTD 07 5445 2910 www.cirlock.com.au CITYWIDE SERVICE SOLUTIONS PTY LTD 03 9261 5000 www.citywide.com.au COASTAL ENTERPRISES (WA) PTY LTD 08 9437 6688 www.coastalenterprises.com.au COBO OCEANIA 07 3807 4866 www.3b6.it

BOLLE SAFETY 03 8558 1000 www.bollesafety.com.au

COFFEY ENVIRONMENTS 03 9473 1300 www.coffey.com

BOMAC ENGINEERING 03 9796 5300 www.bomac.com.au

COLDMIST FINE PARTICLE WATER SOLUTIONS 1800 773 778 www.coldmistcooling.com.au

BOOM LOGISTICS LIMITED 1300 362 666 www.boomlogistics.com.au BRENNISTON FIRST AID & WORKPLACE SAFETY 1300 730 079 www.brenniston.com.au BRITAX AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT 07 3000 1900 www.britaxae.com.au

COMBINED SAFETY SERVICES 02 4968 4617 www.combinedsafetyservices.com.au COMPLETE FIRE DESIGN (CFD) 08 9371 2400 www.cfdonline.com.au COMPLETE RISK MANAGEMENT INTERNATIONAL PTY LTD 02 9548 6719 www.crmi.com.au

BROOKS AUSTRALIA 02 9684 1466 www.brooks.com.au

COMPRESSED AIR AUSTRALIA PTY LTD 1300 787 688 www.caasafety.com.au

BUCKAROO LEATHER WORKS 02 4225 9333 www.buckarooleather.com.au

CONNECT HEARING 08 9479 5630 www.connecthearing.com.au

BULLEX DIGITAL SAFETY 0400 822 271 bullexsafety.com.au

CONSOLIDATED TRAINING SERVICES 08 9417 9444 www.consolidatedtraining.com.au

BULLIVANTS 08 9091 1411 www.bullivants.com BULLIVANTS 02 9208 3698 www.bullivants.com BULLIVANTS – HANDLING SAFETY 08 9144 4577 www.bullivants.com BULLIVANTS PTY LTD 08 9451 8133 www.bullivants.com BUS 4X4 www.bus4x4.com.au CAIRNS SCUBA AIR 07 4035 5035 www.safeair.net.au

© Aspermont Limited – courtesy Inside Safety Magazine

CONSTRUCTION SKILLS TRAINING CENTRE (CSTC) 07 3373 8888 www.cstc.org.au CONTROLLED ENVIRONMENT 02 4566 8114 www.controlledenvironment.com.au CORPORATE MEDICAL OPTIONS 02 6282 1100 www.corporatemedical.com.au CORYS ELECTRICAL & EQUIPSAFETY LTD +64 6 759 5420 www.corys.co.nz CR KENNEDY & COMPANY PTY LTD 03 9823 1533 www.crkennedy.com.au

MARCH 2013 aSm


CRANES ASPHALTING & BITUMEN SEALING PTY LTD 03 5152 2941 www.cranesasphalting.com.au CRUSHING & MINING EQUIPMENT PTY LTD 08 9437 1477 www.crushingandmining.com.au CUBE CONSULTING 08 9442 2111 www.cubeconsulting.com.au

DUST CONTROL SOLUTIONS 1800 663 878 www.dustcontrol.com.au DYNAMIQ 02 9978 6600 www.dynamiq.com.au DYWIDAG-SYSTEMS INTERNATIONAL (DSI) 02 4948 9099 www.dsiminingproducts.com

CUMMINS SOUTH PACIFIC 07 3710 4700 www.cummins.com

E.W. COX INTERNATIONAL PTY LTD 02 9557 6400 www.ewcox.com.au

CUSTOM FLUIDPOWER 1300 781 178 www.custom.com.au

EASTERNWELL 08 6228 0000 www.easternwell.com.au

DANDO DRILLING AUSTRALIA 0412 257 724 www.dandodrillingaustralia.com

EASTERNWELL 07 4659 1587 www.easternwell.com.au

DANDY GAS & WELDING SUPPLIES 03 9794 6287 www.dandygas.com.au

EATON HYDRAULICS GROUP 03 9319 8222 www.eaton.com

DANTERE SAFETY 03 5023 2322 www.dantere.com.au DELTACOAT PTY LTD 08 9248 6355 www.mascoataustralia.com DELTASBD LIMITED 07 4957 0555 www.deltasbd.com.au DENRAY MARINE SERVICES LIMITED +64 9 274 8080 www.denray.co.nz DESIGNFIRE 08 6296 6301 www.designfire.com.au DITCHFIELD CONTRACTING PTY LTD 02 6555 9111 www.ditchfield.com.au DM BREAKER EQUIPMENT 08 9493 0588 www.dmbreaker.com DMF INTERNATIONAL 02 9636 5466 www.dmf.com.au DOWN UNDER SAFETY 1300 833 310 www.downundersafety.com DOWNING TEAL PTY LTD 02 9929 9666 www.downingteal.com DRAEGER SAFETY PACIFIC PTY LTD 1800 677 787 www.draeger.com DRAKE INTERNATIONAL 03 9559 8220 www.drakeintl.com DRILLSTRALIS PTY LTD 07 4992 1579 www.drillstralis.com.au DRS INDUSTRIES 02 9773 4116 www.drsindustries.com.au DUPONT AUSTRALIA LTD 1800 252 997 www.dupont.com.au DURATRAY INTERNATIONAL 03 8761 2800 www.duratray.com

aSm MARCH 2013

EBBE 07 3855 4004 www.ebbe.com.au ECOSPILL 07 3881 0554 www.ecospill.com.au ECOTECH 03 9730 7800 www.ecotech.com.au ELECTRIC CONTROL PRODUCTS 08 9249 1044 www.safe-t-products.com.au ELECTRICAL TESTING SERVICES / ETS 1300 304 959 www.electricaltesting.com.au ELECTRONIC POWER SOLUTIONS PTY LTD 07 3881 3666 www.electronicpowersolutions.com ELECTROPAR LIMITED +64 9 274 2000 www.electropar.co.nz ELEMENT14 02 9644 7722 au.element14.com ELLIOTT AUSTRALIA 07 3265 2944 www.elliottaustralia.com ELLTON CONVEYORS PTY LTD 02 4324 1900 www.conveying.com.au EMIL FORD & CO 02 9267 9800 www.emilford.com.au

ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS & SERVICES 03 8420 8999 www.esands.com ENWARE AUSTRALIA PTY LTD 02 8536 4000 www.enware.com.au EQUIP SAFETY +64 3 338 1009 www.equipsafety.co.nz EQUIPMENT SAFETY SYSTEMS 03 8770 6555 www.eqss.com.au ERIEZ MAGNETICS PTY LTD 03 9305 4099 www.eriez.com ESS ENGINEERING SERVICE & SUPPLIES 08 9370 3155 www.esseng.com.au EXECUTIVE HEALTH MANAGEMENT 02 9235 0700 www.ehm.com.au EXITKITS AUSTRALIA PTY LTD 1300 394 854 www.exitkitsaustralia.com.au EYRES OPTICS 1300 663 209 www.eyresoptics.com EZY-DRIVE 1300 137 742 www.ezydrive.com.au F WEBER AUSTRALIA PTY LTD 02 9673 4234 www.weber-mining.com FALLRIGHT INTERNATIONAL 08 9334 1000 www.fallright.com FANQUIP 1300 224 308 www.fanquip.com.au FERRIS MANAGEMENT CONSULTANTS PTY LTD 07 3236 4544 www.ferrismc.com.au FILTER TECHNOLOGY AUSTRALIA PTY LTD 02 4966 1833 www.filtertechnology.com.au FIRE AND SAFETY AUSTRALIA 1300 885 530 www.fireandsafetyaustralia.com.au FIRST AID INTERNATIONAL 1300 365 675 www.firstaidinternational.com.au

EMONA INSTRUMENTS 07 3275 2183 www.emona.com.au

FIRST AID MANAGEMENT & TRAINING CENTRE PTY LTD 03 9894 1013 www.firstaidmanagement.com.au

EMTIVAC ENGINEERING PTY LTD 03 9768 3240 www.emtivac.com

FITSENSE AUSTRALIA 02 6161 0810 www.fitsense.com.au

ENGINECARE SYSTEMS AUSTRALASIA 1300 774 662 www.enginecare.com.au

FLINDERS SAFETY SUPPLIES 08 8632 6490 www.internode.on.net

ENRETECH AUSTRALASIA PTY LTD 02 4869 3261 www.enretech.com.au

FLIR SYSTEMS AUSTRALIA PTY LTD 1300 729 987 www.flir.com

ENVIROHEALTH CONSULTING PTY LTD 07 3390 5344 www.envirohealth.com.au

FLSMIDTH KREBS AUSTRALIA PTY LTD 07 5519 5700 www.flsmidthkrebs.com

© Aspermont Limited – courtesy Inside Safety Magazine

FLSMIDTH LUDOWICI 07 3121 2900 www.ludowici.com.au FMEDGE TRAINING INSTITUTE 02 9981 2489 www.fmedge.com.au FOOTWEAR INDUSTRIES PTY LTD 08 9209 3322 www.steelblue.com.au FREUDENBERG FILTRATION TECHNOLOGIES 03 9587 9488 www.microfreshfilters.com.au FSE GLOBAL AUSTRALIA PTY LTD 1300 794 280 www.fse-global.com FUTUREMEDIA 02 9279 4499 www.futuremediagroup.com.au GAZAL – BISLEY WORKWEAR 1300 247 539 www.bisleyworkwear.com.au GBI MINING INTELLIGENCE 07 3147 8300 www.gbimining.com GE INDUSTREA MINING TECHNOLOGY 02 4336 1800 www.industrea.com.au GECKO SPECIAL COATINGS PTY LTD 08 9477 5299 www.geckospeco.com.au GENERAL SIGNS 07 3299 4599 www.generalsigns.com.au GEOBRUGG AUSTRALIA 03 9398 5925 www.ust.com.au GEOCONSULT PTY LTD 07 3851 7400 www.geoconsult.com.au GEOHART CONSULTANTS PTY LTD 03 9574 8377 www.geohartconsultants.com.au GERARD DANIELS 08 9322 0888 www.gerard-daniels.com GET SMART PROMOTIONAL PRODUCTS 1300 889 986 www.gspromo.com.au GILBERT GRAY & CO PTY LTD 02 9638 1077 www.gilgray.com.au GLOBAL SPILL CONTROL PTY LTD 03 9335 5366 www.globalspill.com GLOBAL STEAMEXFIRE INERTISATION SERVICES 07 3711 5268 www.steamexfire.com GNORTOP AND ASSOCIATES 08 8942 1978 www.gnortop.com.au GOLDER ASSOCIATES PTY LTD 07 3721 5400 www.golder.com GOLDING CONTRACTORS PTY LTD 07 3510 3400 www.golding.com.au GONAR AUSTRALIA PTY LTD www.gonar.com.pl

29


Inside Safety Suppliers Directory GOODWIN CONSULTING SERVICES PTY LTD 07 3868 3988 www.passaust.com.au GPS INNOVATIONS 1300 438 477 www.gpsinnovations.com.au HARD METAL INDUSTRIES PTY LTD 07 3714 5700 www.hardmetalindustries.com.au HARDY SPICER AUSTRALIA 03 9794 1900 www.hardyspicer.com.au HARTAC SALES AND DISTRIBUTION PTY LTD 08 9373 3700 www.hartac.com.au HASTINGS DEERING (AUSTRALIA) LTD 131 228 www.hastingsdeering.com.au HAULMAX (AUST) PTY LTD 03 6442 7777 www.haulmax.com HAZCON PTY LTD 1800 429 266 www.hazcon.com.au HBA LEARNING CENTRES 1300 721 503 www.hbalearningcentres.com.au HEALTH BY DESIGN 1300 304 068 www.healthbydesign.com.au HEALTH ON THE MOVE 08 9485 0700 www.healthmove.com HEALTHWORKS 02 9954 1888 www.healthworks.com.au HEARING BIZ 08 9592 1003 www.hearingbiz.com.au HECS FIRE 08 9331 3966 www.hecsfire.com HEDWELD GROUP OF COMPANIES 02 6574 0000 www.hedweld.com.au HEIGHT DYNAMICS 07 3862 2533 www.heightdynamics.com.au HELLA AUSTRALIA PTY LTD 03 9581 9299 www.hella.com.au HES 08 9452 6500 www.hes1.com.au HETRONIC AUSTRALIA PTY LTD 02 4966 1281 www.hetronic.com.au HI-WEIGH AUSTRALIA PTY LTD 02 9605 3500 HI-CRAFT SAFETY 1300 088 089 www.hicraftsafety.com.au HI-VIS SIGNS & SAFETY 1300 857 500 www.hivis.com HIBBS & ASSOCIATES PTY LTD 02 9746 3244 www.hibbs.com.au

30

HIGH POINT SAFETY 07 4035 1755 www.hpsqld.com.au

INDUSTROQUIP (QLD) 07 4152 7631 www.industroquip.com

KINYUN AUSTRALIA PTY LTD 02 9981 3899 www.kinyun.com.au

HIGHPOINT ACCESS & RESCUE 07 4927 2722 www.haar.com.au

INDUSTRY PATHWAYS 07 5559 6666 www.industrypathways.com.au

KONEKT 02 9650 5111 www.konekt.com.au

HIMA AUSTRALIA PTY LTD 08 9323 2100 www.hima.com.au

INJURY & OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH (IOH) 02 4210 7200 www.ioh.net

KOOLAT SAFETY 07 5665 6777 www.koolatsafety.com.au

HIP POCKET WORKWEAR & SAFETY 07 4034 1170 www.hippocketworkwear.com.au HOLISTIC SERVICES GROUP (AUST) 1300 889 073 www.holisticservices.com.au HONEYWELL ANALYTICS ASIA PACIFIC CO www.honeywell.com HONEYWELL SAFETY PRODUCTS 1300 139 166 www.honeywellsafety.com HSE PLUS PTY LTD 07 3277 5305 www.hseplus.com HYDEN ENGINEERING 02 4932 0111 www.hydeneng.com.au HYVA PACIFIC PTY LTD 02 4964 8489 www.hyva.com IAC COLPRO PTY LTD 02 8781 0400 www.colpro.com.au IAN LUFF MOTIVATION AUSTRALIA PTY LTD 02 9622 5424 www.ianluff.com.au

INSPIRE EDUCATION PTY LTD 07 3054 5400 www.inspireeducation.net.au INTERCHEM PTY LTD 03 9270 9600 www.interchem.com.au INTERSAFE GROUP PTY LTD 07 3895 8111 www.intersafe.com.au ISNZ – INTRINSICALLY SAFE NZ (HAZARDOUS AREA EQUIPMENT SUPPLIERS) +64 9 9477 2808 www.isnz.co.nz J & R TRAINING SERVICES 08 9172 2282 www.jrtraining.com.au JJ SAFETY 03 9484 7778 www.jjsafety.com.au JK TECH PTY LTD 07 3365 5842 www.jktech.com.au JOHN T BOYD 07 3232 5000 www.jtboyd.com JONCRIS SENTINEL SERVICES 07 4921 4407 www.joncris.com.au

IB INTERNATIONAL PTY LTD 07 3348 8300 www.ibinternational.com.au

JONKER PLANT HIRE 07 3373 8737 www.jonkerhire.com.au

ICOM AUSTRALIA PTY LTD 03 9549 7500 www.icom-australia.com

JURALCO 1800 888 527 www.capral.com.au

IDASAFETY PTY LTD 07 5450 1407 www.idasafety.com.au

KADOR ENGINEERING 07 3376 4455 www.kador.com.au

IDENTEC SOLUTIONS AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND 03 9396 8900 www.identecsolutions.com

KD FISHER & CO PTY LTD 08 8277 3288 www.kdfisher.com.au

IFAP 08 9333 9999 www.ifap.asn.au IM CONCEPTS PTY LTD 08 8941 3211 www.imconcepts.net.au IMAGCO 03 5572 1685 www.imagco.com.au IMMERSIVE TECHNOLOGIES 08 9347 9000 www.immersivetechnologies.com INDICO PTY LTD 08 8351 5955 indico.net.au INDIGO VISION 04 4925 5063 www.indigovision.com INDUSTRIAL SCIENTIFIC CORPORATION 03 9644 7777 www.indsci.com

KELLS TRAINING CENTRE & SAFETY SUPPLIES 02 9834 1391 www.kellstraining.com.au KEMPPI WELDING MACHINES AUSTRALIA LTD 02 9605 9500 www.kemppi.com KENNARDS CONCRETE CARE 1300 662 599 www.concretecare.com.au KENNARDS LIFT & SHIFT 02 9898 3300 www.liftandshift.com.au KIDDE AUSTRALIA PTY LTD 03 9518 5588 www.kidde.com.au

L&H GROUP 03 9243 3555 www.landhgroup.com.au LASERBOND LIMITED 02 4631 4500 www.laserbond.com.au LAWRENCE & HANSON – AUSLEC 08 9451 3433 www.landhgroup.com.au LB WIRE ROPES 02 9631 8833 www.lbwireropes.com.au LIFE & RESCUE INTERNATIONAL 02 4927 6240 www.lri.com.au LIFTCO INDUSTRIAL SUPPLIES PTY LTD 02 9829 4411 www.liftcoindsup.com.au LIGHTFORCE LIGHTING SYSTEMS 08 8440 0888 www.lightforce.com LINE MANAGEMENT PTY LTD 1800 222 140 www.lmit.edu.au LITHGOW FIRE SERVICES 0417 437 236 www.fireprotectionandsafety.com.au LSM TECHNOLOGIES 07 3225 8100 www.lsmtechnologies.com.au LUMIN8 PTY LTD 03 9243 8880 LUNAGAS PTY LIMITED 02 4963 3913 members.ozemail.com.au/~lunagas MACDONALD MINING SERVICES PTY LTD 0402 217 555 MANAGEMATE 02 9756 2622 www.managemate.com.au MANDURAH SAFETY AND TRAINING SERVICE 08 9581 8333 www.msts.com.au MCA BUSINESS EDUCATION & TRAINING 02 9521 3422 www.mcabusiness.com.au MCDONALD & COMPANY (AUSTRALASIA) PTY LTD 08 6389 0020 www.resourceshr.com MDR CERTIFICATION ENGINEERS PTY LTD 08 9437 2007 www.mdr.net.au

KINETIC GROUP 07 3872 8500 www.miskillscentre.com.au

MEASUREMENT DEVICES (AUSTRALIA) PTY LTD 03 9318 9666 www.mdlaustralia.com.au

KINGGEE 1800 658 791 www.kinggee.com.au

MECAL PTY LTD 03 9314 0144 www.mecal.com.au

© Aspermont Limited – courtesy Inside Safety Magazine

MARCH 2013 aSm


MECHANICAL ENGINEERS AUSTRALIA 07 4979 3200 www.mecheng.com.au MEDIBANK HEALTH SOLUTIONS 02 6269 2100 www.medibank.com.au MEDILIFE PTY LTD 1300 130 385 www.medilife.com.au MEGABOLT AUSTRALIA PTY LTD 03 8359 6300 www.megabolt.com.au MEN @ WORK TRAINING SOLUTIONS 07 4622 2300 www.maw.net.au

MSA AUSTRALIA PTY LTD 02 9688 0333 www.msa.net.au MSS POWER 1800 769 370 www.cabacpower.com.au MTI GROUP 08 9302 3999 www.mtigroup.com.au NARVA AUTOMOTIVE LIGHTING & ELECTRICAL 1800 113 443 www.narva.com.au

ORAFOL REFLECTIVE SOLUTIONS AUSTRALIA P/L 07 3376 6511 www.orafol.com

PRENCO ENVIRONMENTAL SPILL CONTROL 08 8294 7711 www.prenco.com.au

OSHEM SOLUTIONS PTY LTD 1300 657 279 www.oshemsolutions.com.au

PRESTIGE LOGISTICS 08 9356 5900 prestigelogistics.com.au

OSP SAFETY PRODUCTS & SIGNS 07 4939 5835 www.osp.net.au

PRESTON AUSTRALIA PTY LIMITED 02 9748 4677 www.prestonaustralia.com

OTB PRODUCTS 07 5525 2523 www.otbproducts.com.au

PRIORITY SUPPLIES AUST 03 6430 3400 www.prioritysupplies.com.au

NAVMAN WIRELESS AUSTRALIA 1300 GPS FLEET 1300 477 353 www.navmanwireless.com.au

OZ LED 07 3205 4355 ozled.com.au

MERCER VALVE CO. 03 9460 5203 mercervalve.net

NELMAC PTY LTD 02 6027 1520 www.nelmac.net.au

MGPA 0427 442 382 www.mgpa.com

NLT AUSTRALIA PTY LTD 07 5495 2944 www.nltinc.com

PACIFIC COAST ENGINEERING PTY LTD 07 4774 8477 www.pcegroup.ypsitesmart.com.au

MIDECO DUST CONTROL 1300 854 085 www.mideco.com.au

NO BOLT OPERATIONS PTY LTD 1800 331 478 www.nobolt.com.au

MILES ENGINEERING 07 4627 1631 www.milesengineering.com.au

NORMAN G. CLARK (A/ASIA) PTY LTD 03 9450 8200 www.ngclark.com.au

MINE SIGNS 07 3208 3440 www.minesigns.com.au MINEARC SYSTEMS 08 9333 4966 www.minearc.com.au MINECORP 07 3275 2300 minecorp.com.au MINECRAFT CONSULTING 07 3482 3664 www.minecraft.com.au MINERALS INDUSTRY SAFETY AND HEALTH CENTRE – UNIVERSITY OF QUEENSLAND 07 3346 4066 www.mishc.uq.edu.au MINING INDUSTRY RESOURCES PTY LTD 07 4952 4662 www.adaptfms.com MINOVA AUSTRALIA PTY LTD 02 4428 5248 www.minova.com.au MINVENT SOLUTIONS 08 9377 1129 www.minvent.com.au MODULAR MINING SYSTEMS PTY LTD 02 4352 5711 www.mmsi.com MOTOROLA SOLUTIONS 03 9842 6471 www.motorolasolutions.com.au MOULTRIE DATABASE AND MODELLING 07 3326 1200 www.moultrie.com.au

NORSTATE GAS 07 4031 1738 www.spwgroup.com.au NOSKE GROUP 03 9591 9303 www.noskegroup.com.au NSCA – NATIONAL SAFETY COUNCIL OF AUSTRALIA LTD 03 8562 1555 www.nsca.org.au

PAFTEC AUSTRALIA 02 8436 4000 www.paftec.com.au PALARIS MINING PTY LTD 02 4927 5511 www.palaris.com.au PARAMEDICAL SERVICES 02 9608 0222 www.paramedical.com.au PELICAN PRODUCTS AUSTRALIA PTY LTD 02 4367 7022 www.pelican.com PENTAGON MANAGEMENT 02 9891 4844 www.pentagon.com.au PERFORMANCE ON HAND 1300 731 336 www.performanceonhand.com

PROTECTOR ALSAFE PTY LTD 132 832 www.protectoralsafe.com.au PROXYVOLT PTY LTD 07 3722 6499 www.proxyvolt.com.au QML PATHOLOGY 07 3121 4444 www.qml.com.au QMW INDUSTRIES PTY LTD 08 6253 1700 www.qmw.com.au RADIATION SAFETY SERVICES 08 9475 0099 www.radiationsafety.com.au RCR INTERNATIONAL PTY LTD 03 9558 2020 www.rcr.com.au RECEO SAFETY AND RESPONSE CONSULTANTS 08 9432 2520 www.receo.com.au RECOILA 02 9621 8988 www.recoila.com.au

NUFAB INDUSTRIES PTY LTD 08 9927 1297 www.nufab.com.au

PERI AUSTRALIA PTY LTD 02 8805 2300 www.periaus.com.au

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH MACKAY 07 4957 4724 www.occupationalhealthmackay.com.au

PERMANENT ANCHOR POINTS AUSTRALIA 08 9414 1634 www.papa.net.au

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH PROFESSIONALS PTY LTD 1300 724 502 www.ohp.com.au

PERNA ENGINEERING 08 9418 6352 www.pernaengineering.com

REFLEXITE AUSTRALIA PTY LTD 07 3376 6511 www.reflexite.com.au

PERTH PETROLEUM SERVICES 08 9258 5877 www.perthpetroleum.com.au

REMOTE CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES 08 9353 6577 www.rct.net.au

ODOUR CONTROL SYSTEMS AUSTRALIA PTY LTD 02 4961 6185 www.odours.com.au OEM GROUP PTY LTD 08 9379 3300 www.oemgroup.com.au OHMCATS PTY LTD SAFETY MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST 0411 444 093 www.ohmcats.com.au OLYMPIC CIVIL ENGINEERING PTY LTD 08 9385 1155

PERTRONIC 03 9562 7577 www.pertronic.com.au PHYSIOLINK PTY LTD 08 8364 0889 www.physiolink.com.au PIPE CODING TECHNOLOGY PTY LTD 08 9571 8593 www.pipecoding.com POWER STEP (AUSTRALIA) PTY LTD 07 3277 3977 www.powerstep.com.au

MOULTRIE HIRE 07 4953 9209 www.moultrie.com.au

ON SITE SAFETY 08 9208 7288 www.onsitesafety.com.au

MOULTRIE SAFETY 07 3326 1200 www.moultrie.com.au

OPTALERT 03 9425 5000 www.optalert.com

PRACTICAL SOLUTIONS GROUP (PSG) 08 9205 4800 www.practicalsolutionsgroup.com

MPOWER 02 8788 4600 www.mpower.com.au

OPTEC 03 5133 7174 www.optec.com.au

PRATT SAFETY SYSTEMS 1300 133 226 www.prattsafety.com.au

aSm MARCH 2013

PRO-VISUAL PUBLISHING 02 8272 2611 www.provisual.com.au

© Aspermont Limited – courtesy Inside Safety Magazine

REEL TECH PTY LTD 03 9583 2368 www.reeltech.com.au REFLECT FABRICS 07 5522 1614 www.reflectfabrics.com

REMOTE CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES 08 9021 1600 www.rct.net.au REPOWER MINING INTERNATIONAL 02 4954 0163 www.rmipsl.com.au RISK FREE WORKPLACE 02 9945 0691 www.riskfree.com.au RITE PRICE DISTRIBUTORS 07 5574 5618 www.ritepricedistributors.com.au RIVERINA WORKWEAR 02 6955 5999 www.rwwgroup.com.au ROOFSAFE INDUSTRIAL SAFETY-RIS / SYNCRON 02 8781 2100 www.rissafety.com

31


Inside Safety Suppliers Directory ROPE ACCESS ENGINEERING 02 6253 0653 www.ropeaccessengineering.com

SAFETY EYEWEAR EXPRESS 0431 597 951 www.safetyeyewearexpress.com.au

ROYAL FLYING DOCTOR SERVICE OF AUSTRALIA (RFDS) 08 9417 6400 www.rfdswa.com.au

SAFETY GLASSES AUSTRALIA 08 9208 7288 www.safetyglassesaustralia.com.au

RSEA PTY LTD 132 100 www.rsea.com.au

SAFETY INSTITUTE OF AUSTRALIA 1800 808 380 www.sia.org.au

RSEA PTY LTD 08 9022 7185 www.rsea.com.au

SAFETY MATE 1300 267 336 www.safetymate.com.au

RST – DUST EARTH WATER SOLUTIONS 07 5522 0244 www.rstsolutions.com.au

SAFETY SERVICES 03 5821 2817 www.netspace.net.au

RSV AUSTRALIA PTY LTD 08 9202 1068 www.rsvaustralia.com RUSH ENGINEERING MAINTENANCE 08 8340 0776 www.rushengineering.com.au RUSMAR 0416 233 233 www.rusmarinc.com RUSSELL CONSULTING INTERNATIONAL 03 9696 3166 www.russellconsulting.com.au SAFE 1 02 4954 0622 www.safe1.com.au SAFE WORK COLLEGE 07 3846 2411 www.safework.qld.edu.au SAFE-T-VIEW CONVEX MIRRORS 02 9905 5199 www.safe-t-view.com.au SAFEMAN AUSTRALIA 03 6435 0112 www.safeman.com.au SAFEMAN AUSTRALIA 08 9451 3000 www.safeman.com.au SAFEMAN SAFETY EQUIPMENT & WORKWEAR 03 9009 8222 www.safeman.com.au

SAFETY SIGNS SERVICE 1300 723 549 www.safetysignsservice.com.au SAFETY STATIONS AUSTRALIA 03 9796 3358 www.safetystations.com.au SAFETY STEP 02 6688 0209 www.safetystep.com SAFETY SUPPLIES (SA) PTY LTD 08 8387 8660 www.safetysuppliessa.com.au SAFETY SYSTEMS PTY LTD 03 5442 5449 www.safetysystems.net.au

STAR SAFETY 08 8349 9411 www.starsafety.com.au

SHIFTWORK SOLUTIONS 07 3216 0161 www.shiftworksolutions.com

STATEWIDE SAFETY SUPPLIES WA 08 9965 5440 www.safetysupplieswa.com.au

SIGN WORKS WA 08 9964 2749 www.signworkswa.com.au

STRATA PRODUCTS AUSTRALIA 02 4950 4000 www.strataproducts.com

SITE WARE DIRECT 1800 897 989 www.sitewaredirect.com.au

STRATA SAFETY PRODUCTS 0439 855 805 www.strataproducts.com

SITEMED 08 8447 2017 www.sitemed.com.au SKILLED GROUP LTD 08 9229 8233 www.skilled.com.au SKILLPRO SERVICES PTY LTD 07 3276 0099 www.skillpro.com.au SKILLSDMC 02 9324 8600 www.skillsdmc.com.au

SUNWATER 07 3120 0000 www.sunwater.com.au

SKYHOOKS DIFFICULT ACCESS 02 9686 8236 www.skyhooks.com.au

SUPER SAFETY 02 4322 8847 www.supersafety.com.au

SAFETYLEC 07 4035 3533 www.safetylec.com.au

SM SAFETY 02 9652 0799 www.smsafety.com.au

SAFETYLINK PTY LTD 1300 789 545 www.heightsafety.com

SMC PNEUMATICS (AUST) PTY LTD 07 3623 5300 www.smcaus.com.au

SAFETYQUIP CENTRAL COAST 08 9250 7611 www.safetyquip.com.au SAGE TECHNOLOGY 03 5132 2600 www.sagetechnology.com.au SAI GLOBAL 1300 513 107 www.saiglobal.com/compliance

SAFERIGHT PTY LTD 1800 352 335 www.saferight.com.au

SATCOMMS AUSTRALIA 1300 732 517 www.satcomms.com.au

SAFEROADS PTY LTD 1800 060 672 www.saferoads.com.au

SCARBOROUGH UPHOLSTERY & SAFETY EQUIPMENT 02 4294 3311 www.scarboroughupholstery.com.au SCHNEIDER ELECTRIC 1300 369 233 www.schneider-electric.com.au

STRUCTURFLEX LTD +64 9 8372 350 www.structurflex.co.nz SUNSHINE COAST WORKWEAR & SAFETY 07 5452 6566 www.sunshinecoastwork wearandsafety.com.au

SKYLOTEC AUSTRALIA PTY LTD 02 4721 3337 www.en.skylotec-industry.com

SAFETYQUIP 02 4966 1102 www.safetyquip.com.au

ST JOHN AMBULANCE AUSTRALIA (NT) INC 08 8922 6200 www.stjohnnt.org.au

SGS AUSTRALIA PTY LTD 1300 765 725 www.sgs.com

SAFETYCO PTY LTD 08 8235 2003 www.txc.net.au

SAFEPAD 08 9474 6886 www.safepad.com.au

SAFETY & RESCUE AUSTRALIA PTY LTD 08 9414 9877 www.safetyandrescue.com.au

SETS ENTERPRISES / SAFETY & EMERGENCY TRAINING SERVICES 08 9240 5191 www.setservices.com.au

SOKEROL 1300 889 262 www.sokerol.com SONIC HEALTHCARE LIMITED 1300 775 357 www.sonichealthcare.com.au SPANSET AUSTRALIA 02 4735 3955 www.spanset.com.au SPARROWS GROUP 08 9359 2355 www.sparrowsgroup.com SPECIAL MINING SERVICES PTY LTD 02 9652 0799 www.smsafetyonline.com.au

SUPER SIGNS AUSTRALIA P/L 1800 707 446 www.supersigns.com.au SUPPLY CONNECTIONS PTY LTD 07 3385 7250 www.supplyconnections.com.au SURVIVAL CRAFT INSPECTORATE (AUSTRALIA) PTY LTD 08 9330 8399 www.survivalcraft.com.au SUSTAINABILITY FUTURE GROWTH 08 9246 6666 www.sustainability.net.au SWIVELPOLE AUSTRALIA 08 9582 0870 www.swivelpole.com/au SYSTAG 07 3245 2098 www.systag.com.au TECHNOFIBRE AUSTRALIA 08 9494 2622 / 07 3255 6752 www.technofibreaustralia.com

SPILL STATION AUSTRALIA PTY LTD 02 9725 5640 www.spillstation.com.au

TERRAPPE GROUP 1800 982 166 www.terrappe.com.au

SPILL STATION AUSTRALIA PTY LTD 08 9303 4033 www.spillstation.com.au

TEX ONSITE 1300 785 935 www.texonsite.com.au

SAFETY & RESCUE EQUIPMENT 08 9412 8700 www.srequipment.com.au

SCOPE TRAINING 08 9321 6307 www.scopetraining.com.au

SAFETY AIR PTY LTD 03 9589 5435 www.safetyair.com.au

SEEING MACHINES LIMITED 02 6103 4700 www.seeingmachines.com

SPRAY NOZZLE ENGINEERING PTY LTD 03 9583 2368 www.spraynozzle.com.au

SAFETY CULTURE 1300 306 604 www.safetyculture.com.au

SEMCO EQUIPMENT SALES 02 9833 6000 www.semcogroup.com.au

SPRAYING SYSTEMS CO PTY LTD 03 9318 0511 www.spray.com.au

THE LIFTING COMPANY PTY LTD 08 9472 6333 www.theliftingcompany.com.au

SAFETY EQUIPMENT AUSTRALIA 02 9910 7500 www.theseagroup.com

SETON AUSTRALIA 1800 651 173 www.seton.com.au

ST JOHN AMBULANCE 08 9334 6722 www.stjohnambulance.com.au

THE MOORE COMPANY INC 0011 1 304 344 8024 www.moorecompany.com

32

© Aspermont Limited – courtesy Inside Safety Magazine

THE KB GROUP AUSTRALIA PTY LTD 1300 851 143 www.kbhs.com.au

MARCH 2013 aSm


WASTE INITIATIVES 02 6571 4088 www.wasteinitiatives.com

THERMO FISHER SCIENTIFIC 1300 735 292 www.thermofisher.com.au

WASTECH ENGINEERING 03 8787 1600 www.wastetech.com.au

THINK SAFETY 02 6581 4000 www.thinksafety.com.au

WEG AUSTRALIA PTY LTD 03 9765 4600 www.weg.net/au

TOTALLY WORKWEAR 07 4047 4444 www.totallyworkwear.com.au

WEIGHMATE PTY LTD 02 9756 2622

TOWN & COUNTRY WORKWEAR 1800 134 463 www.tcworkwear.com.au

WELLING & CROSSLEY P/L 03 9316 9700 www.wellcross.com.au

TOWNVIEW AUSTRALIA PTY LTD 02 9560 3929 www.townview.com.au

WESLEY CORPORATE HEALTH 07 3234 2600 www.weshealth.com.au

TRAFFICCA 03 8750 0920 www.trafficca.com.au

WESTATE MINING & INDUSTRIAL 08 9274 4443 www.westatemining.com

TRAINING AID AUSTRALIA PTY LTD 1300 2EN ROL www.trainingaidaustralia.com.au

WILCOX SAFETY AND SIGNS PTY LTD 03 9720 1800 www.wilcoxsafety.com.au

TRANSPACIFIC INDUSTRIES PTY LTD 131 339 www.transpacific.com.au

WILD GEESE INTERNATIONAL 08 9322 1080 www.wildgeese.com.au

TREOTHAM AUTOMATION 02 9907 1788 www.treotham.com.au TROPICAL SAFETY AND IDENTIFICATION 07 4957 5550 www.tropicalsafety.com.au TUFF-AS WORKWEAR AND SAFETY 02 6492 6002 www.tuff-as.com.au TUTT BRYANT HIRE 08 9230 0500 www.tuttbryantcranehire.com.au UNION RUBBER & ENGINEERING PTY LTD 02 9636 3444 UNITY TRAINING SERVICES 08 9227 7809 www.unitytraining.com.au UTC FIRE & SECURITY AUSTRALIA PTY LTD 03 9239 1200 www.gesecurity.com.au VEQ PTY LTD 08 9221 6328 www.veq.com.au VERO INSURANCE LIMITED 08 9268 4225 www.veroengineering.com.au

WILHELMSEN SHIPS SERVICE PTY LTD 08 9336 0900 www.wilhelmsen.com WILTRADING PTY LTD 08 9435 9000 www.wiltrading.com.au WORK SAFE GEAR 08 9314 3377 www.worksafegear.com WORKCOVER 131 855 www.workcover.com WORKLINK OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & REHABILITATION SERVICE 08 9481 8055 www.worklink.com.au WORKPLACE SAFETY CENTRE 02 9833 7500 www.worksafecentre.com.au

SUPPLIERS GUIDE Annual product and service suppliers guide dedicated to the Australasian Health, Safety and Environment (HSE) sectors

Deliver your message direct to the Health, Safety and Environment sectors This comprehensive Suppliers Guide, published in May 2013, is built around listings of the companies supplying products and services to the health, safety and environment sectors.

WORKSAFE CONNECT 0407 652 128 www.worksafeconnect.com WORKSENSE SAFETY AND WORKWEAR PTY LTD 02 8882 5840 www.worksense.com.au

VIGIL ANTI SLIP 08 9437 4811 www.vigilantislip.com

WORKSITE FITNESS & REHABILITATION 08 9325 8333 www.worksite.com.au

VISION SAFE 08 9295 0624 www.visionsafe.com.au

WORMALD 133 166 www.wormald.com.au

VOCAM PTY LTD 03 9809 7700 www.vocam.com

WPM CONSULTING 08 8361 8177 www.wpmconsulting.com.au

WA SAFETY 08 9258 7088 www.wasafety.com.au

YAKKA 08 9373 0000 www.hardyakka.com.au

ASM MARCH 2013

ce an e! ch rtis st ve La ad to

THE SAFETY HUB 08 8346 6899 www.thesafetyhub.com.au

© Aspermont Limited – courtesy Inside Safety Magazine

Secure your copy by subscribing to Australia’s Mining Monthly, Contractor or WME magazine at www.industry-news.net/subscribe

Last chance to advertise! For bookings, please call +61 8 6263 9100 or email supplierguides@aspermont.com by 27 March.

33


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