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SCAPE land and design in the Upper Midwest

winter 15/16

The Directory Issue Annual Theme Launch Cityscape 2050

PLUS Seoul’s green revolution Crossing trail boundaries Transforming wetland mitigation Reviving the public realm Permeable paver applications Publication of the Minnesota Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects


from the

CHAPTER PRESIDENT Gina Bonsignoire, ASLA | ASLA-MN President

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ityscape 2050, Envisioning the Future. That’s the theme for our chapter endeavors this year. Looking to the future, I can’t help but look to the past. Most likely because I recently took a trip down memory lane. In 1970, my family moved from Chicago to Washington, D.C. I was 10 years old. We moved from 105th Street to a cul-de-sac at the end of Santayana Gina’s 5th grade school Drive, a winding picture - after her move to Washington D.C. narrow street in a wooded subdivision called Mantua. The cul-de-sac was a joy. That big piece of asphalt was great for games of Monk-and-I (a form of scary tidewater dodgeball) and hopscotch. But we couldn’t get anywhere very easily without a car. A walk to the store was an all-day affair, through backyards, crossing highways and parking lots.

Gina’s childhood mid-century home at the end of the Santayana Drive cul-de-sac.

Fast forward to 2015. The changes in the area are eerie. Am I in the same place? When we moved here, Route 50 was lined with a mish-mash of strip mall development, car dealerships and the occasional steak house. Now old hotels called “The Anchorage” and “Li-Hi Motel” vie with Hampton Inns and Courtyard by Marriots. I’m not

saying that all those dives are worthy of preserving (a bad Christmas stay at the Breezeway Motel will not be forgotten in my family), but now that all the remnant pastures, nurseries and undeveloped woodlots have been cleared for new development, what are the features that will still say Northern Virginia and not everywhere else? Some change is exciting. The Metro went on-line in 1976, and it’s taken this long for transit-oriented development to reach the Orange Line’s final stop near my childhood home. Apartments are going up. There are trails and sidewalks to get there. Restaurants and shopping are within walkable distance of the station. Compared to the dearth of good dining when I grew up, now wonderful ethnic restaurants abound, fueled by the influx of immigrants from Vietnam, Central America and Ethiopia. From watching this evolution, I have some sense of the future impact of light rail in our community. Some dreams I have for our Cityscape 2050 are reinforced from watching my childhood neighborhood evolve. The lessons learned are not new ideas. I hope kids in the future have places to roam as we did - but better yet - be taught about their own creeks and watersheds. We learned about recycling and Earth Day, but we never learned about the creek near our neighborhood elementary school, or about our native oak forests. So preserve the natural corridors and waterways – and teach kids about these anchors that are physical connections and also visual cues to the terrain that can still be legible as taller buildings hide the hills. Preserve districts, not just individual businesses, to represent an era with reuses for those auto-oriented strip malls that have their own charms – but add back in the things that were forgotten the first time around, like sidewalks and street trees.

Will that be enough? As change inevitably happens, how will I know that I am in St. Paul, Minnesota, and not Northern Virginia? While artists and public art can provide some answers, the work provides individuality to a place or neighborhood rather than a region. As landscape architects, we have many skills to offer. At our recent board retreat, someone came up with this line: “Landscape architects are trained, equipped and inspired to build resilient, beautiful and valued places.” I concur. We are key to preserving what makes this metropolitan area unique - the legacy of connected parks and waterways. To that knowledge we can apply our understanding of local flora as we become more aware of how vital plants are to sustaining natural systems and human health. So embrace technology, embrace new concepts and remember our unique niche as we help to shape our future communities.

Gina Bonsignoire ASLA President ASLA-MN

Winter 2015-16 | Issue #22

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ASLA-MN is the Minnesota Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) which represents nearly 300 professionals in the landscape architecture profession through advocacy, education, communication, and fellowship. ASLA, the national organization, has more than 18,000 members and 48 chapters, representing all 50 states, U.S. territories, and 42 countries around the world.

_SCAPE Editorial

Executive Committee & At-Large Members

Editor Ann Rexine arexine@gmail.com

Gina Bonsignore, ASLA President

Ann Rexine, ASLA Director of Communications

Carmen Simonet, ASLA President-Elect

Liz Hixon, Assoc. ASLA Director of Public Relations

Matthew Rentsch, ASLA Past President

Catherine Riley, Assoc. ASLA Director of Programs

Ellen Stewart, ASLA Chapter Trustee

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Copy Editor Jason McGrew-King Publisher JS Print Group Duluth, Minnesota

ASLA-MN Staff ON THE COVER

Kathy Aro Executive Director

Nicole Peterson, Assoc. ASLA Secretary Chris Behringer, ASLA Treasurer

Jody Refsand, Assoc. ASLA Co-Director of Awards & Banquet Todd Wichman, FASLA Fellow Representative

Graham Sones, ASLA Director of Education & Professional Development

Michael McGarvey, ASLA Government Affairs Committee

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Vacant Student Chapter President

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Winter 2015-16 | Issue #22

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from the

_SCAPE EDITOR Ann Rexine, ASLA

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n 2011, I had the opportunity to have lunch with Chris Behringer and Bryan Carlson to discuss an opening with ASLA-MN for the Director of Communications and _SCAPE Editor position. Little did I know that while I finished my chicken sandwich, I would sign on to publish several years’ worth of _SCAPE Magazine. The hard work of launching the magazine and garnering its place within ASLA-MN had been done by my predecessor Adam Arvidson. How hard could it be? I have had the opportunity to meet many talented contributing authors, in addition to working with some terrific Executive Committee members. My friend and cohort, Jason McGrew-King, has worked pro-bono as our copy editor these last 4 years – behind the scenes - ensuring a consistent voice between articles. His assistance has been invaluable. Thank you to the ASLA-MN membership for humoring my design layout skills (or lack thereof!) and timeliness of the publication dates. Volunteers are just that – volunteers. We are people who give our time, and your kind support and thoughtful criticism has always been encouraging. Throughout my time at _SCAPE, I have also been kept busy with two children; Asher (4) and Clara (1), and a full time job at Three Rivers Park District as their Principal Planner. I’ve always tried to

manage publishing this magazine against family/work time. My husband Todd has been so patient when I’m up late working on the magazine layout long after the kids have gone to bed. _SCAPE’s littlest fans and their parents. This swan song leads me to a unique opportunity for a lucky ASLA-MN member. My last _SCAPE issue will be Summer 2016 and I’m looking for that next shining star to step up and fill the editor shoes. I’ll be honest – it’s an intense commitment. The ‘editor’ title means you wear all hats; from soliciting articles, to layout, to organizing publishing details with the printing company. To ensure a smooth transition without interruption in the publication timeline, I’m looking to have someone shadow the next issue.

If you are interested, please contact me at arexine@gmail.com or Gina Bonsignore at gina.bonsignore@comcast.net – come be a part of the ASLA-MN team and let my family have their mom back!

Winter 2015-16 | Issue #22

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from the

UNIVERSITY OF MN Department of Landscape Architecture Joseph Favour, PLA| Interim Department Head

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n 1966, the University of Minnesota started its Landscape Architecture program. The 50th anniversary celebration for this event will take place this coming fall, on the weekend of Sept. 16-17. This has provided me with an impetus to look back and reflect on all that has happened and changed in the intervening years. Toward that effort, I pulled the October 1966 issue of Landscape Architecture magazine off the library shelf. The cover art is a multicolor image of a bicyclist and the accompanying focus is a series of articles on design and planning for bicycles in the growing age of the automobile. Among these articles is a brief review of the history of the bicycle and its impact on landscape in North America by J. B. Jackson. A passage from this work seems prescient: “The bicycle is now an extension, an improvement on the pair of legs. The pedestrian experience for most of us has become all but impossible and entirely without pleasure. The bicyclist is the modern version of the pedestrian – going a little faster, working a little harder, covering more ground, but still loyal to pedestrian values….dare we hope that this revived love for the bicycle will mean that some of the motorized vehicles will be replaced? I fear not. The bicycle at best replaces the pedestrian, but the motorized vehicle can only be replaced by a newer motorized vehicle.” -from “90-Year Wonder – It Rarely Broke the Human Barrier,” by J. B. Jackson Contrast that excerpt with a passage from a recent article in the Star Tribune by Tom Fisher, director of the U of MN’s Metropolitan Design Center, that discussed the future of autonomous vehicles’ impact on urban design;

“When car-sharing fleets have driverless cars, we will be able to buy a mobility service for about a quarter of the cost of owning and driving our own cars. And with that will go the need for parking. We will call up a car that will take us where we want to go, dropping us at our destination and then moving on to its next call, like some automated chauffeur service….this will reduce the number of vehicles by at least a factor of four…and, except perhaps in the middle of the night, eliminate parked cars.” - from “Streetscapes: Driverless cars will have big impact on city streets” by Tom Fisher, June 2015, Star Tribune Many questions arise as I reflect on the continuum these articles bracket. How will landscape architects utilize our knowledge gained in years of planning, design and implementation to shape the change that is coming in the design of our cities? Will we see a heightened importance on pedestrian and bicycle connectivity as a key aspect of transportation networks? Will this autonomous era usher in a new era of exurban development? What will happen to land freed up by narrower lanes, obsolete parking lots and reduced impervious surfaces? How do we position our profession to take advantage of potentially sweeping changes to our transportation infrastructure? As we prepare for our 50th anniversary celebration, I encourage you to both reflect and look forward on this topic and other important challenges facing our profession. Imagine where we will be 50 years hence. Please bring those thoughts this upcoming Sept. 16 and 17 and help us celebrate the first 50 years of Landscape Architecture at the U of MN.

Landscape Architecture magazine, October 1966

Winter 2015-16 | Issue #22

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green revolution The Cheonggyecheon’s urban spaces in Seoul, South Korea, transition into a riparian zone.

Photo Credit: Leslie Johnson

The Cheonggyecheon Stream Restoration Project by Leslie A. Johnson

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he Cheonggyecheon Stream runs through the heart of downtown Seoul, South Korea, and stands in stark contrast to the lofty skyscrapers and bustling streetscapes surrounding it. The reintroduction of this 3.6-mile waterway is heralded as one of the most successful and recognizable examples of modern urban renewal. Strolling along this striking green space today, it’s difficult to imagine that less than 15 years ago, the stream did not exist. Seoul’s recent commitment to increasing urban green space has resulted in a number of fascinating reclaimed landscapes around the city, but this movement is by no means limited to the capital alone. Cities around the world are recognizing the necessity of natural spaces within urban environments and the positive, widespread benefits that can accompany their implementation. The Cheonggyecheon Stream Restoration Project offers a powerful example of an intriguing and ambitious landscape design transforming the nature of an entire city. Prior to the Joseon Dynasty around 600 years ago, the Cheonggyecheon ran naturally through Seoul, known then as the city of Hanyang. Under King Taejong, Seoul became Korea’s capital, and shortly after, Taejong decided to dredge the stream to prevent flooding. This decision drastically transformed the stream’s natural, winding form, and the Cheonggyecheon became a managed, urban channel. Over the centuries, slums developed along its banks, and the stream became a major conduit of sewage out of the city. From the late 1950s to the 1970s, it was gradually buried beneath concrete and highways with the Cheonggye Expressway running most of its length. For decades following, the Cheonggyecheon lay beneath the ground, dried-up and largely forgotten. The Cheonggyecheon was not the only green space in Seoul that was sacrificed to accommodate urban development during the mid1900s. In the wake of the decades-long Japanese occupation and the ravages of the Korean War, 1960s-era South Korea refocused its energy on the future and successfully ushered in a period of

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economic growth. Yet to facilitate this rapid development, many of Seoul’s already limited parks and natural spaces were built upon to meet the demands of its booming industrialization. By the 1980s, however, this trending loss of allocated parks and natural landscapes began to change. The 1988 Seoul Summer Olympics kick-started beautification efforts in the metropolitan area, and the drive to create more accessible green space in Seoul gained momentum from the 1990s through 2000s. Breakthrough designs in land reclamation soon followed. By the time the city had completed the Cheonggyecheon Restoration in 2005, a variety of other green spaces had already opened. In 2002, World Cup Park transformed the surface of a 15-year-old landfill containing 92 million tons of garbage, a project that took a total of seven years to complete, including six years to stabilize the waste and one year to build the park itself. That same year, the city unveiled Seonyudo Park located in the Han River, the site of a former filtration plant converted into a water purification park. In 2005, Seoul Forest opened - providing an eco-forest, wetlands, and a center for nature field study. The Cheonggyecheon Stream Restoration started in the early 2000s when Seoul’s then-mayor, Lee Myung-bak, and urban planners began advocating to daylight the Cheonggyecheon, long buried beneath the Cheonggye Expressway. The expressway was in a state of decline; the area around it was known for its noise and pollution. Thus, the city faced the decision of whether to invest in repairs or tear it down. Lee offered yet another possibility: remove the expressway and resurrect the stream beneath it. The proposition was a risky one. In 2003, around 180,000 vehicles used the Cheonggye Expressway daily, and ramifications in terms of traffic and displaced shops could be substantial. If implemented successfully, however, the project would be a keystone of Seoul’s dedication to urban renewal and the reintroduction of natural scenery into one of the city’s most heavily developed areas. The project pressed forward. No design of this magnitude had been previously attempted in the city. SeoAhn Total Landscape,


GLOBAL

Cheongsuk Engineering, and Saman Engineering created the design, yet its success relied heavily upon the support of Seoul’s citizens to see the venture to fruition. Its construction was not easy and took two years and three months to build. Civil engineers orchestrated the first phase of the project’s construction, and landscape architects managed the final two phases, overseeing teams of civil engineers, bridge designers, and lighting designers. Not only was the project expensive, costing around $367 million USD, but also hundreds of thousands of tons of water needed to be pumped into the city to revive the stream. There were rampant concerns in regards to safety and gentrification, and more than 4,200 meetings were held to address concerns raised by alarmed business owners. All in all, it was a massive undertaking to construct, but after its completion in 2005, the Cheonggyecheon Stream Restoration has largely been lauded as a resounding success. It is important to mention that an endeavor of this magnitude and complexity is rarely without flaws. Since water is only naturally present in the Cheonggyecheon during the summer’s rainy season, consistent pumping of water from the Han River and other sources is required to keep the stream filled year-round. Key accessibility measures, such as elevators, were not installed on-site until public demands necessitated them. Such an oversight highlights the importance of designing for all user groups from the outset of a project.

staggering. Detailed in a case study published by the Landscape Architecture Foundation (LAF), “Landscape Performance Series,” biodiversity in the area has improved dramatically. From 2003 to 2008 alone, there was a 639 percent increase in flora and fauna, cited in the study as follows: “overall biodiversity of plant species increasing from 62 to 308, fish species from 4 to 25, bird species from 6 to 36, aquatic invertebrate species from 5 to 53, insect species from 15 to 192, mammals from 2 to 4, and amphibians from 4 to 8.” The stream offers protection in the instance of a 200-year flood and reconnects the Cheonggyecheon to the Han River and Jungraechon Stream. Pollution levels have also dropped; this is an accomplishment of particular merit due to the fact that area residents in this part of Seoul prior to the redesign were twice as likely to contract

respiratory disease compared to the rest of the city. Temperatures caused by the urban heat island effect have dropped, and notable social and economic benefits are readily apparent. The scenery along the stream transitions into three main segments: highly urban, urban-natural, and natural riparian, facilitating mixed-use functionality. The Cheonggyecheon attracts around 64,000 visitors daily, and the influx of tourists to the area has contributed to Seoul’s economy. Frequent events are hosted along the stream, a popular example being the annual lantern festival celebrating Korean culture and heritage. The Cheonggyecheon Stream Restoration Project and Seoul’s other reclaimed landscapes play a valuable role in promoting environmental and social health in the South Korean capital. The construction of the Cheonggyecheon demonstrates to Seoul’s citizens and the rest of the world the benefits that come from dedication to creating urban green space. Those within the field of landscape architecture stand at the forefront of this reformed relationship between urban environments and natural spaces. With monumental precedents, such as the Cheonggyecheon already successfully implemented, it will be exciting to see what future endeavors bring to cities around the world. _____________________________

Stone walkway crossing the stream. Photo Credit: Mary Milroy

Leslie A. Johnson is a first-year MLA student at the University of Minnesota. From 2013 to 2014, she worked as an English language instructor in Anyang, South Korea. Sources: “Back to a Future Seoul: CheongGyeCheon Restoration Project.” Seoul Metropolitan Government, 2005. Robinson, Alexander and Hopton, H. Myvonwynn. “Cheonggyecheon Stream Restoration Project.” Landscape Performance Series. Landscape Architecture Foundation (http://landscapeperformance.org/casestudy-briefs/cheonggyecheon-stream-restoration). Lah, T.J. “The huge success of the Cheonggyecheon restoration project: What’s left?” Citizen participation: Innovative and alternative modes for engaging citizens: Cases from the United States and South Korea. Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 2011 (97-117).

In spite of these criticisms, the results of the Cheonggyecheon Stream Restoration are nothing short of

Rowe, Peter G. “A City and Its Stream.” Emergent Architectural Territories in East Asian Cities. Birkhauser, 2011 (148-160.)

Making wishes along the Cheonggyecheon. Photo Credit: Mary Milroy Winter 2015-16 | Issue #22

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trail planning

Creative use of paving gives a playful nod to the Rock Island Swing Bridge Park’s history as a railway corridor. High quality amenities and design features at the trailhead are hallmarks of landscape architect involvement in the trail design. Photo Credit: Hoisington Koegler Group, Eric Blodgett

Crossing Boundaries, Jurisdictions and Disciplines by Eric Blodgett

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he number of trail planning projects throughout the state of Minnesota has increased exponentially in the past decade. Several factors have fed this increase, some of them institutional in nature and some of them experiential. Additional funding at state and federal levels has driven the process, and more trails have led to more trail users, which has, in turn, led to increased demand for even more trails. Although trail planning and design involves the types of issues that landscape architects typically address in their work, trails also present unique problems. Trail projects typically cross boundaries, jurisdictions and disciplines, and thus require significant communication and coordination efforts. Trail alignments must also balance the user experience with ecological, budgetary, and connectivity needs. Placemaking and connectivity strategies are key to ensuring that trails serve multiple public purposes including recreation, commuting, cultural and outdoor heritage interpretation, and water and habitat quality. Clear communication strategies that include a variety of voices in the planning and design process are fundamental to needs identification and potential conflict mitigation. Finally, landscape architects must foster and create a far-reaching vision that will provide effective guidance for the extended length of time it takes to build a trail or trail system. Vision and Patience For Todd Hoffman, Parks and Recreation Director for the City of Chanhassen, trail planning requires landscape architects to be visionary, to see opportunities that may arise in the future and to see how disparate or disconnected parts can be transformed into connected trail systems 30 or 40 years into the future. Because of that extended time period from conception to realization,

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landscape architects must exercise patience in assembling parts that will eventually fit together and in making adjustments as conditions change and new opportunities present themselves. When Hoffman arrived in Chanhassen in the late 1980s, the city had a trail plan in place. Although Chanhassen had failed to make much progress implementing it, the city had been able to secure key easements during the subdivision process. Hoffman urged his department to begin building trail segments, and pushed for building as many segments as the city could manage, especially trail segments that connected neighborhoods to parks. Hoffman’s vision was that once people saw the benefits of their small neighborhood trails, their attitudes towards other trails might begin to shift. The community vision that was laid out in Chanhassen’s parks and trail plan and those trail easements provided the support his department needed to take each small step to get the trail system built. Don Varney, a landscape architect with the city of Saint Paul who has designed and managed several trail projects during his two decade-plus career, agrees that the overarching vision contained in trail and trail system master plans becomes the foundation for defending actions taken to get the trails built. He also says that by establishing the system’s goals or guiding principles, the vision is essential to the design process. The landscape architect’s task during the detail design phase is to merge the constraints presented by a site or a trail alignment with the system’s or trail’s overarching outcome goals. That matching of plan goals to designs extends across levels and can become a complex equation that tests the landscape architect’s ability to synthesize visions, goals, and principles from multiple plans. For instance, the regional trail master plan for the


RECREATION PLANNING

City of Saint Paul’s Harriet Island to South Saint Paul Trail strives to maintain consistency with the goals of the Great River Passage, Saint Paul’s master plan for the Mississippi River corridor, but also has to fit with the city’s existing trail system, adhere to the standards for the multi-state Mississippi River Trail, and also meet the National Park Service’s standards for the Mississippi National River and Recreation Area. When the landscape architect conducts detail design for trail segments, all of these different guiding documents impact the final design. Coordination and Communication Although having a vision to provide guidance and support for trail alignments and detail designs is an essential ingredient to success, the landscape architect must also clearly communicate that vision and how it informs the details to project stakeholders. For John Mertens, Senior Planner with Dakota County, “visual communications and illustrations have probably been the most important piece” in the successful creation and expansion of the county’s greenway system. Lil Leatham, a Dakota County Planner also heavily involved in creating the greenway system, agrees that effective visual communication has been a key to educating residents, stakeholders, and decision makers about the system’s vision and goals. Video, 3D renderings, illustrations, and plan graphics at both the planning and detail design levels have helped communities understand the greenway concept, their multiple public benefits, and how greenways might look and feel once they’ve been constructed. These visual communication methods have become so important and proven so effective that Mertens says they have become a standard part of the process rather than add-ons. Communication doesn’t end at the master planning phase, however. Sarah Evenson, a landscape architect at Hoisington Koegler Group (HKGi) who is currently involved in planning for the Crow River and West Mississippi River Regional Trails, notes that trail projects require landscape architects to maintain “a willingness to educate and negotiate with key parties” throughout the project. Varney from the city of Saint Paul agrees, saying that the “educational component is an ongoing thing.” As an example that illustrates the lengths that education and negotiation can sometimes require, he recalls one segment of trail along the Mississippi River near Saint Paul’s Mississippi River Boulevard in which the detail design called for a naturalized area along the river bluffs. “This naturalized area was consistent with the master plan’s goals, and the design had gone through the community design process,” he says, meaning it had passed muster with community members. The planting plan called for a buffer of trees along the river bluffs, but when the area was staked for siting of the trees, residents of an adjacent apartment building protested that their view of the river would be blocked. Varney recognized that the steep grade of the bluffs made it unlikely that anybody’s view of the river would be blocked by the stand of trees, but nevertheless, he was committed to keeping the dialogue with the residents alive. He offered to meet with each resident of the building, and indeed did meet with many of them to listen to and attempt to address their concerns. Most of the residents responded positively to his willingness to consider their concerns, with only one or two holdouts. Varney

says that is how he approaches the community design process. “You try to address their needs one by one. Ask them, “What’s your biggest worry?’” Out of those conversations emerge the most important topics to address from the master planning, through the detail design phases. Landscape architects, he says, have the unique ability “to be creative in how you address the concerns” of stakeholders, and that ability is one of the qualities that oftentimes distinguishes the landscape architect from other consultant peers. Even when communities have embraced trail projects, stakeholder communication remains a necessary component. Although Chanhassen’s residents boast of their trail system, Hoffman nevertheless notes that “I met with 112 property owners” to ensure that their voices were heard and considered during the planning and design of a recent trail project. “People realize that trails are a good public investment. They create stronger communities. They’re good for property values and public health,” Hoffman says, “but until they become real, they are just lines on a map.” When those lines on a map become stakes in the ground is when people get a true sense of how a trail alignment might impact them. When Dave Anderson, the current Chair of the Elk River Parks and Recreation Commission and a longtime parks volunteer, began setting out stakes for the first segment of the Woodland Trail back in the late 1980s, he was surprised one morning to find that the stakes had been rerouted away from one landowner’s property. Recognizing that building the trail would be nearly impossible without the cooperation of this landowner, Anderson opened up the lines of communication and was able to negotiate an arrangement that allowed the trail to follow its original alignment. That is the type of creative problem solving that Varney has in mind, and it’s the type of creative problem solving that Gabrielle Grinde participated in when she helped design a crucial onemile segment of Dakota County’s River to River Greenway. That greenway project involved two significant property owners, Dodge Nature Center and Sibley High School, both of whom were resistant to plans for the greenway running along their property. Nature center representatives expressed resistance to having a trailhead at the entrance, fearing that cyclists and hikers would overwhelm the nature center’s parking lot. Sibley High School was similarly reluctant to allow encroachments on its property for a public trail. Negotiations between Dakota County and the two property owners resulted in solutions that Grinde, a landscape architect with HKGi, was then charged with executing. She first met with faculty members at the school to find out how they might best be able to use the space. The initial master plan for the trail identified the northwest corner of the high school property as a placemaking node. The meetings with teachers enhanced those plans, and Grinde emerged from those meetings with concepts for a natural amphitheater and prairie restoration that the school can use as an informal classroom and meeting space. To address the nature center’s concerns, Grinde scaled back design for the trailhead, reducing the quantity of site furnishings and amenities. She also designed wayfinding signage incorporating elements from the nature center’s graphic scheme rather than from the county’s design elements. That design modification helped Winter 2015-16 | Issue #22

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the nature center extend its presence along the trail, and - when combined with the additional traffic from trail users - has helped raise greater awareness for the nature center. According to Grinde and Mertens, once the trail was completed the nature center began to realize benefits and its stance toward the trail was transformed from resistance to support. The transformation of people’s attitudes toward trails once they are actually built and users have the chance to experience them is a common refrain among all of the people interviewed for this article. Anderson’s experience in Elk River has been that “once the trail is in, then people want more.” Hoffman says he frequently receives positive feedback from Chanhassen residents and that community members have turned into the trail system’s biggest promoters. Mertens says that the County’s trails have probably become the public’s most popular recreational amenity. Although resistance to trail projects still exists, the prevailing attitude toward trails has shifted to one of support from the public, decision makers, developers, and even transportation departments. Placemaking The value that landscape architects bring to the trail design process is perhaps nowhere more evident than in their ability to analyze the surrounding context and design the type of placemaking enhancements that, in the words of Varney, “make trails more than just a way to connect two points.” Mertens says that in Dakota County a landscape overlay is required as part of the greenway plan set, assuring that landscape architects have a significant role in shaping the county’s greenways in a way that prioritizes placemaking. All of the planners and landscape architects interviewed for this article referred in one way or another to creating trails that offer great user experiences. HKGi’s design team referred to placemaking via site furnishings, wayfinding, interpretive elements, and trail alignments as essential considerations for trail design. Hoffman also stressed the importance of great user experiences. “People gravitate towards natural resources,” he says, so the trail system in Chanhassen is closely linked to significant landscapes. Mertens and Leatham agree, noting that Dakota County’s strategy is to create destination greenways. While the county’s trail system emphasizes connecting two points, its greenway system is intended to serve multiple public purposes that include providing habitat, recreational opportunities, water quality improvements and transportation. These multiple purposes have significant implications for design and result in the type of user experience that landscape architects seek to create. For Dakota County’s system, these guiding principles mean at least 80 percent of a greenway’s alignment is away from roads, the corridor is at least 30 feet wide, crossings are grade separated, high-quality materials and furnishings and interpretation are part of the greenway program, planting plans are enhanced, and viewsheds and natural resources are emphasized. As an example of how the County emphasizes user experience, Mertens notes that more than 1,500 trees were planted along the one-mile River to River Greenway segment to create a natural buffer for those segments that ran along roadways. He cites the Rock Island Swing Bridge trailhead as another example of the added value landscape architects bring to trail projects by emphasizing that site’s high-quality materials, its unique design elements that capture the site’s railway heritage, and its beautiful views of the river bottoms. Finally, Mertens notes that some of

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the county’s greenway alignment studies have taken up to two years to complete to ensure that the greenway serves its multiple purposes while also avoiding high-quality environmental areas, minimizing tree removal, and keeping grades low enough to keep the greenways accessible. “This process does sometimes lead to alignments that are not the most direct,” Mertens says, but he reiterates the fact that this higher level of design is necessary to achieve the public vision for Dakota County’s greenway system. Connectivity and (Back to) Vision A well-connected trail system that provides access to destinations is essential. It is one of the first things HKGi’s landscape architects mention when asked about trail planning. Dakota County sees its greenway system as a series of corridors that connect the county’s regional parks. Strategic connections between destinations are key to creating a flexible, multipurpose trail system. Landscape architects play a fundamental role in fostering that connectivity because the discipline considers context to a greater extent or in different ways than do other disciplines such as architecture or engineering. As Hoffman’s example from Chanhassen illustrates, connectivity can be traced all the way back to the vision. By building all those small trails connecting homes to parks, Hoffman envisioned future connections between small trails and larger trails until, eventually, an interconnected system took shape.

High quality materials and plentiful plantings contribute to placemaking efforts along Dakota County’s River to River Greenway. Photo Credit: Hoisington Koegler Group, Jessica Vetrano

Which brings us back to the importance of developing a vision. By guiding a thorough master planning process that invites public input, includes diverse community voices, and explores a range of conceptual and alignment alternatives, landscape architects set the stage for all of the coordination, communication, and design phases that follow. As Don Varney notes, trail projects are a good fit for landscape architects because they require “a working knowledge of some elements of engineering, environment, and erosion, in addition to knowledge of a project’s temporal aspects, social aspects, budget, and experience with collaborative design approaches.” Indeed, the complexity of trail planning and design projects means that landscape architects must address problems that range from broad scale conceptual planning all the way down to detailed design, testing the trail planner’s ability to think, in Evenson’s words, “across all scales.” ________________________________________________________ Eric Blodgett is Marketing Director at HKGi and enjoys exploring trails by bike and on foot. He tested several of the trails mentioned in this article.


RESTORATION

from problem to opportunity Restored wetland becomes the focal point of the new Chinese Garden at the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum by John Hink

J

apanese gardens are elaborate and formal, inviting visitors to contemplate the landscape

architect’s vision of idealized, perfected beauty in

an orderly, calm setting designed for reflection. The Japanese garden “Seisui Tei” (Garden of Pure Water) at the University of Minnesota Landscape Arboretum is one of the most renowned in North America. Much less common in the United States, Chinese gardens function more like parks to be discovered than gardens to be admired. Combining natural and built landscape features, and always including a path, a Chinese garden invites visitors to walk through, discover naturalistic beauty, and immerse themselves in its tranquility. The Arboretum has long envisioned adding a Chinese garden and set a bold vision to create one as a key element in its

The first phase of the Hsiao-Ho Chinese Garden, only the seventh to be developed in the United States, was completed in November 2015. Making progress on realizing the Arboretum’s vision for the garden required resolution of wetland mitigation requirements and challenges. Problem or Opportunity? The preferred site for the Hsiao-Ho Chinese Garden was along the Three Mile Drive, in part because it would provide convenient ADA access not only to the new garden, but also to existing collections of larch, willow, elm and hydrangea plants. Solution Blue Inc. and Damon Farber Associates undertook a pre-design study to determine the appropriate location and access for the garden on the Three Mile Drive. To arrive at a specific recommended location, and to develop a design concept for the garden on the site, we incorporated input from the Arboretum, several departments at the University of Minnesota, Carver County, the U.S. Army Corps of

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Engineers, and the Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources (BWSR). Developing the garden on the selected site disturbed 61,500 square feet of a Class 3 wetland. Based on the standard 2.5:1 replacement rule, the Arboretum would have been required to mitigate the disturbance by adding 153,750 square feet of a comparable wetland. The project could have complied by either establishing new Class 3 wetlands (and sites on the Arboretum property were identified for this purpose) or by purchasing credits through a wetland bank to offset the disturbance. Either option would have cost approximately $140,000 (funding that was not in the budget). As the project team, we challenged ourselves from the start. Could we consider wetland mitigation in a creative way? Could it be more than a regulatory requirement to meet, but a landscape design opportunity we could tap to the project’s advantage? Class 3 wetlands are low quality with low diversity. What if instead of adding more similar low-quality wetlands at some other location at the standard 2.5:1 ratio, our project team could improve the existing wetland on the project site and integrate it as a landscape feature in the new garden? The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers approved our plan to establish 46,600 square feet of Class 1 wetlands within the garden. Since Class 1 wetlands are high integrity and high diversity, the regulators agreed to a 0.75:1 mitigation rate.

wetland, 3,500 square feet of deep-water plantings, and 8,000 square feet of wet meadow. The pond offers wildlife habitat for waterfowl, frogs, and other birds and animals. To enhance the wetland site area, the first step was scraping portions of the existing degraded shallow marsh, which consisted of non-native cattail species. Marshes dominated by non-native cattails are low quality because they form dense single-species stands with few or no openings, resulting in low biological diversity. Best management practices for the scraping maintained the optimal amount of organic substrate. The pond was dredged and created by installing a weir at the southwest outlet of the wetland. The edges of the pond were graded to allow for future installation of a path that will create a loop around the pond as well as several bridges, buildings and a classic Chinese Moon Gate that are planned for subsequent phases of the garden’s development. The reinforced concrete weir is 40 feet in length and 8 feet in height and built on a foundation supported by helical piers. The pond ranges from 0 to 5 feet in depth. A sliding gate on the weir controls the water level. It allows the Arboretum to better control invasive species by drawing down the pond level when necessary. With the unique design of its gate control, the gate opens downward, so the water level is lowered from the surface. Arboretum maintenance staff can skim the top of the pond in very precise increments without draining it too much. We reinforced the enhanced shoreline with three geotextile components to protect the plantings and amplify the sculptural slopes. A cellular confinement product, constructed from polyethylene with 8x10-inch expandable cells, was placed 4.5 feet above and below the typical water level. Placed parallel to the shoreline, it helps prevent degradation of the slopes during water height fluctuations. The cellular confinement was filled with a root zone mix consisting of 80 percent sand and 20 percent organic matter. As the plants mature, the cellular confinement webs together with the roots to form a rugged barrier against wave erosion. Farther down the slope, a woven bristle coir mat reinforces the plants. This mat protects the roots and crowns of the shallow water plantings. It also provides firmer footing for the maintenance staff as they step along the softer soils.

Shoreline habitat enhancement section.

Finally, small interlocking, three-dimensional polyethylene mesh elements to reinforce the turf on the island were intermixed within the top six inches of the 80/20 soil mix on the top surface of the island - a featured landscape element in the pond. The design of the island creates a dramatic sculptural bulbous effect representative of a steep mountain. The mesh supports the steep 2:1 slopes and helps resist water erosion.

Installation of cellular confinement and natural fiber mat. Photo Credit: Erik Lemke

Improving Rather than Mitigating When completed, the Hsiao-Ho Chinese Garden will encompass a total of 105,000 square feet (2.4 acres). Our plan creates 46,600 square feet of Class 1 wetland within the garden comprised of a 28,600 square foot pond and 18,000 square feet of enhanced shoreline, established with native wetland vegetation. The shoreline includes three habitats: 6,500 square feet of emergent

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There are three primary plant communities: shallow marsh, wet meadow and deep-water. The shallow marsh, which has standing water, features emergent plants, such as arrowhead, water plantain, softstem bulrush, hardstem bulrush, lake sedge, and tussock sedge. These aggressive native plants can hold their own against cattails.  The wet meadow, which has saturated soils but seldom has standing water,  includes a variety of species such as prairie cord grass, fox sedge, tussock sedge, blue flag iris, swamp milkweed, cup plant, and blue vervain. Plant installation in this area consisted of both seeding and planting live plants as plugs. Under the supervision of Tom Brinda, University of Minnesota Landscape Arboretum Horticulture Manager, the project team worked with Wetland Habititat Restoration to propagate


Wetland planting. Photo Credit: John Hink

strong-rooted plugs. It was important for the plugs to have well developed roots in order to support quick establishment and resistance to invasive species. Finally, the deep-water plantings were established with large groupings of white water lily, yellow water lily, and wsago pondweed placed at strategic locations. In Chinese culture, water lilies represent perfection and symbolize ultimate purity of the heart and mind, because they rise untainted and beautiful from the mud. The two varieties of water lilies where chosen because they are proven to thrive in shallow ponds and are particularly cold climate tolerant. Essential Results Our design makes the restored, improved wetland and enhanced shoreline edge the central focus of the Hsiao-Ho Chinese Garden. The pond, carved out from the existing degraded wetland, provides vistas of open water and island while improving the ecological function of the site. Our team took advantage of the variety of textures and colors of the numerous wetland species that were introduced. The shoreline was planned and planted as a semi-formal landscape. The plantings were laid out by height, differences in foliage, shape and color, and variations in bloom times. The result is a restored and landscaped wetland with the naturalistic beauty characteristic of a Chinese garden. Removal of the cattails and replacement with native plants results in greater plant diversity, as well as improved wildlife habitat.  Establishment of wildflowers, including blue flag iris and swamp milkweed, creates new habitat for pollinators. Plants such as arrowhead provide food sources for waterfowl, and seed producing grasses, for example, prairie cord grass, serve as a food source for birds.   The solution our project team developed and implemented for the Arboretum cost $40,000. While saving $100,000 compared to the cost of conventional mitigation practices, we achieved compliance with wetland mitigation regulatory rules, restored healthy

ecological function to the site, and created a naturalistic landscape feature that not only integrates with and complements the garden, but also provides a focal point fitting for a Chinese garden. Lessons Learned Landscape architects usually view wetland mitigation requirements resulting from their site development plans and landscape designs to be problems for engineers to solve outside the spaces they are creating. Wetland mitigation does not have to be just a problem to solve or an obstacle to overcome, but an opportunity to incorporate improved wetlands that function both ecologically and aesthetically as integrated elements within a landscape design. With environmentally sensitive landscape strategies, landscape architects can attain regulatory compliance, ecological function and aesthetic appeal. In the design and development of the Hsiao-Ho Chinese Garden, our team identified an opportunity to create a high integrity, high diversity wetland with an ecologically balanced pond and enhanced shoreline with three diverse habitats within the garden site. We not only enhanced an existing degraded wetland, we demonstrated that it is feasible and affordable to sensitively transform one into a Class 1 wetland that is ecologically successful, attractive, inviting and useful for our communities. ________________________________________________________ John Hink, President and Co-founder of Solution Blue, is an innovative and passionate environmental engineer with 22 years of experience in sustainable site design, brownfield re-development, water resources, and construction administration.

Acknowledgements: The author thanks Lance Schuer, Landscape Architect at Damon Farber Associates, Randal Tweden, Civil Engineer at Solution Blue, Inc. and Tom Brinda, Horticulture Manager at U of M Landscape Arboretum for their project support and David Aquilina, Strategic Storyteller, for his assistance in preparing the article.

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temporary spaces Reviving the Downtown Public Realm by Peter Truax

D

aniel Burnham, the great American planner of the late 19th century, famously said, “Make no little plans; they have no magic to stir men’s blood.”

affordably, creating a robust landscape that brings the focus back on people.

In one vein or another, we have done so, especially in the construction of American downtown central business districts, defined typically by their collection of office towers and ringed by highways to get daytime workers in and out. This is the magic curse, perhaps - under which our cities have laid for more than half a century now. Our office tower landscapes are visually evocative, forming picturesque skylines, rich with architectural grandeur. Up close, however, they form spaces that alienate people at ground level - dead spaces that vacuum people quickly away, and those who choose to linger find themselves awkwardly out of place. Our downtowns, where the greatest numbers of people come together in the greatest concentrations, should be a vibrant and well-integrated public realm. Instead, our downtowns have become deadlands.

On Burnham’s point, I would disagree; sometimes it is exactly the little plans that we need most to keep our civic blood stirring. Temporary installations in small spaces are an excellent way of providing design iterations to that public realm. Like the Fourth Plinth in Trafalgar Square, London, the on-going site of temporary sculptural displays, our downtown public realm could become a revolving showcase of temporary installations - some becoming permanent, others being momentary encapsulations of ideas. Brussels, Belgium is currently in the process of doubling the pedestrian-only zone of their downtown, including taking the former Boulevard d’Anspach, a four-lane vehicle thoroughfare leading past several major civic buildings, and turning it into a pedestrian mall. Filling out the programming of this space, the city has installed a variety of temporary elements - those that are best liked by the public will be rebuilt more permanently.

As landscape architects, this moribund public realm presents us with an opportunity to repurpose these spaces and bring life back to them. Good public realm design is crucial to ensuring civic vitality - if our downtowns are to succeed as neighborhoods, with people and families of all ages and backgrounds living there, we must give them livable public spaces. Creating that public realm is a years-long process of planning and execution. I believe there is an opportunity to begin improving the public realm now, quickly and

Temporary installations are also an easy way of bringing in private-sector support for public realm integration alongside private space. Building managers need only give up a portion of their property and for a set amount of time. Limiting an installation’s existence to a fragment of time, especially if it avoids the destructive winter months here, allows less durable and more easy-to-install materials to be used, reducing cost. Furthermore, temporary installations that a particular site owner no longer wants

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INSTALLATION

can be dismantled and repurposed elsewhere, especially if they are designed beforehand to be reused. Finally, the advantage of allowing faster iterations of design that are both economically and temporally flexible makes temporary installations ideal teaching instruments, for both experienced professionals and those just arriving in the field. Designing the Hard Way One afternoon this past March, the University’s Landscape Architecture Department forwarded an email to the students about a Request for Creativity for the 2015 Parklot, a competition to improve the downtown Minneapolis public realm facilitated by the Hennepin Theater Trust and financed by Bank of America. None of my colleagues in our first year had heard of this competition (which was itself only in its second year), but after quick consultation, a group of nine of us first-years in the Students for Design Activism group decided to write up a proposal. The site, off Eighth Street South in downtown Minneapolis, is roughly a triangle 48 feet by 24 feet to the west of the side entrance to the IDS Center, and was (and is once more) a concrete plaza that serves as the designated smoking space for the building. The design had to fit within the space, couldn’t anchor into the concrete, had to weigh less than 250 pounds per square foot, and couldn’t incorporate anything requiring electricity, as there would be no available hookup. Our proposal was accepted, and we were to be one of four teams to present a final design, in two weeks’ time.

Site rendering for final presentation. Photo Credit: Yuqi Yan

We met for three preliminary charrettes as we began to hash out a vision for our design, and then the actual form of it. Settling upon the theme “Activate Imagination,” and with the goals of expanding social space, engaging the public, and inspiring new outlooks, we collaboratively put together a design for the space. In late March, we presented our design to the competition jury, and two weeks later we were pleased to be selected to bring the design to fruition, with a $10,000 budget. I remember reading the email with a mix of joy and dread. Ecstatic to have been selected despite being untested students, we now actually had to build our design, and make sure it stayed up for three months. Though we all come from different graduate school experiences, I can almost universally say that students who are halfway through their second semester are inexperienced, at best. Inexperienced in project management, in site analysis, in plant selection, in detailing, in construction best practices, even in coordinating as a group. There is no education like adversity, though. We quickly rose to the challenge. “Challenge” is the operative word. For those of you reading who are experienced professionals, recall what your first projects were like. “Accounting for slope” may be the most terrifying three words I’ve now encountered. The site at the IDS Center has a noticeable slope, something in the range of 8 percent. Translating that into elements whose long axes change depending on their orientation, and consequently how they slope in the space, was a challenge. Doing so while getting them to fit together seamlessly in a zigzagging line across almost 100 linear feet, and flush to the IDS Center exterior, was a nightmare.

Detailing during construction. Photo Credit: Peter Truax

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And then there was the deck in our design - constructed in three sections for mobility, which sloped in both directions underneath but remained level on top. We added the deck to the design as a way to provide rigidity to the trellis system, based on feedback from Tom Whitlock of Damon Farber, to whom we had presented our design after being chosen to construct the Parklot. It was an invaluable addition, both structurally and stylistically; however, it now meant we had to create an installation that engaged with the ground plane and space above people’s heads, as well as in the middle where people would sit and stand to eat and mingle.

Unfortunately, our deadline was upon us, and the installation was still incomplete. The day we’d given the IDS Center management for opening would be missed, even though the formal opening was still two days off. This was a moment for another important and unexpected lesson - admitting to your client that you are behind, and apologizing for it. Even the best planned schedules can come undone in their execution, and even working as long as 16 hours some days, sometimes all that remains is to say we’re sorry, we did our best to complete it by the date we gave you, and we will continue to work as hard as possible until it is complete.

Tying these two systems together were planting boxes, the plants for which needed to be able to withstand the windswept, waterless site whose temperatures fluctuated enormously based on the position of the sun. Furthermore, they had to grow quickly to fill out the space and provide seasonal interest in the height of summer. Supplementing the appeal of the design created by plants, we included crocheted yarn wraps on the columns of the trellis, and bright green flags strung between the cross-braces. The final site element was programmatic, the Little Free Library, which also contained the only moving piece in the entire design - the door that opened and closed to the bookshelf. Vexingly, this door accounted for the vast majority of site maintenance throughout the summer.

And we did complete it. In the early hours of the morning on June 1, we put in the final screws, and the installation was opened to the public. It remained in place until the first week of September, when it was dismantled and repurposed at a local coffee shop in the North Loop. What was originally a smokers’ corner, fully exposed and empty below the sheer glass curtain of the tallest building in the state, was for a time a well-received and well-used space. It was both intimate and inviting, and for us, its designers and builders, it was an inspiration. For my colleagues and I, it was the first opportunity we had ever had to put our educations into practice. We learned how to design a space that fit in a real context, to budget and plan a project, to detail it to the point that those who didn’t design it could still build it, and to assemble it manageably and successfully. The result was a space for people in what was otherwise part of the all too common downtown deadlands. It activated imagination.

Pulling Together to Pull It Off The first step was ordering materials. It may seem like a relatively simple first step, but think about how that is broken out into many pieces - who to order from, how much and what type of material to order, and what is a reasonable price. Siwek Lumber of Minneapolis generously supplied us with all of our wood at a discount for being a student group. We are indebted to both Joe Favour and Kevin Groenke at the University for their knowledge and feedback as well as Rebecca Krinke and a host of volunteers who were instrumental in helping us construct the parklot. Part of the difficulty of working in a team and with a deadline is work must be efficiently split. This meant the construction occurred almost simultaneously as it was being detailed. While one person extrapolated dimensions from the master plan, others were translating that into cut lumber, while yet others then assembled. Constructing a wooden installation with no formal knowledge of carpentry lends itself to overbuilt furniture, time inefficiently spent, and a lot of panicked moments when wondering whether we could even get the project out the front door and onto a truck to get it to the site. And splinters. We quickly learned from our mistakes, even though the rapid pace of construction meant assessment and revision were done on the fly. Making design moves knowing there wouldn’t be time or money to redo them made us carefully consider our choices - and get inventive when inevitably we made the wrong ones and had to live with a new reality. Finally, with the structure of the site assembled in the courtyard of Rapson Hall, we were far enough along to move it onsite. More to the point, the deadline was rapidly advancing on us, and we had to begin fitting our assembly into its space. Moving out of a fully equipped woodshop to a basement storage room in the IDS Center presented certain challenges. All tools had to be brought to the site - a double challenge without an electrical hookup. Everything had to be battery or hand powered. The final days of assembly saw the pieces come together slowly but surely, even as sanity frayed, tempers rose, and yes, batteries drained.

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The Parklot installation was well-received, by all accounts that came back to us. People on their lunch breaks had a place to sit and eat food from local food trucks. On the weekends, visitors to Nicollet Mall and other downtown attractions had a place to stop and rest. At night, it was a well-lit and visible area where people could feel at ease. And now it is enjoying a second life. For our part, building it was a challenge, sure, but it was amazing! Each stage of the process brought new excitement and enjoyment. We had no idea going in how much aesthetic enjoyment you can get from seeing all the screws line up, or to see a color of stain take to wood the way you wanted it to, or to see your plants flower when all you were hoping for was that they would stay alive. The experience was a joy, and each of us has found more commitment and fulfillment in landscape architecture because of it. Unfortunately, as it stands now, the University’s curriculum doesn’t afford the opportunity for real project experience, and internships and assistantships are either extraordinary in their success, or don’t push students into this terrifying but invaluable trial by fire. Our downtown public realm is a waiting canvas, one where the potential benefit for temporary installations like this is greatest. Taking away from this project, there need to be more opportunities like this - for the public to enjoy, for our profession to hone its craft, and, most importantly, for students to learn the hard way of design. And if we screw it up, it need not stay up long, and we’ve learned a lesson all the same. For those of you reading who are in positions to influence policy and practice, I urge you to consider engaging with those of us who are just beginning our explorations of crafting landscape. We are eager to take on the challenge. ________________________________________________________ Peter Truax, Madeline Goldkamp, Paul Liesmaki, Maria Martin, Luke Nichols, Alexandra Olson, Andrew Papke-Larson, Kevin Tousignant, and Yuqi Yan are now 2nd year MLAs at the University of Minnesota.


PRODUCT

Private residence Falcon Heights, Minnesota Photo Credit: Willow Creek Paving Stones

permeable applications Varying Scales of Permeable Paver Installation by Brenda Bredahl

W

hen a homeowner wants to add a patio or a business needs additional parking, they often are surprised to discover that options are limited by impervious surface restrictions. As a stormwater management best practice, impervious footprint limits are integral to low-impact development (LID) and green building projects. Options such as permeable paving stones and other pervious surfaces offer a solution that landscape professionals are often on the front lines to deliver. Permeable pavers allow rainwater to infiltrate back into the ground where it lands, lessening the need for other forms of stormwater management and decreasing the environmental impact. It is a win-win situation when multi-purpose outdoor spaces can also serve as stormwater management tools, with the added benefits of recharging groundwater and protecting and conserving nearby waterways. Engineers, landscape architects, designers and contractors are at the forefront of educating residential and commercial clients about permeable paving options, says Burt Plett, product manager for Willow Creek Paving Stones in Oakdale, Minneosta.

“Landscape professionals are eager to learn about permeable pavers so they can offer the best options to their clients in situations like impervious surface limits,” says Plett. “Many take advantage of the training and resources provided by permeable paving stone manufacturers and the Interlocking Concrete Pavement Institute.” The benefits of permeable paving stones are economic, ecological and performance-based, making them superior to poured-in-place concrete and asphalt. Because permeable paving stones work as a system that is specific to site and soil conditions, the first thing is to properly assess the site. For example, performance begins with the contractor correctly building the open-graded sub-base and base. Reducing runoff & protecting waterways Permeable pavers can reduce or eliminate the need for retention ponds that control runoff into nearby lakes and waterways. As part of Three Rivers Park District’s (Park District) stormwater management plan, Park District staff selected permeable parking pads to be installed between driving lanes at Fish Lake Regional Park to protect the lake from unfiltered runoff. Because the subgrade was clay and posed a challenge, engineers at SEH

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devised an innovative filtration and sloping system to work in concert with the 19,000 square feet of permeable pavers. “Although the base material was mostly clay, infiltration to some degree will occur at each level of the parking pad, which provides even more filtration before the stormwater reaches the basin, and ultimately the lake,” says Josh Bowe, project manager for the Park District. “We’ve found that permeable paving stones are ideal for retrofits, like this pavement maintenance project,” says Bowe. “We were able to utilize the area under the parking pads for stormwater storage and treatment while minimizing the disturbance of existing space by not adding basins and piping. Not only do permeable paving stones look great, but they also give you the multiple uses of parking and stormwater management.” The University of Minnesota-Twin Cities also has incorporated permeable pavers for the dual purpose of parking and stormwater management. Some 60,000 square feet of parking space on campus is comprised of permeable pavers, eliminating 95 percent of runoff. “The whole parking lot is essentially an infiltration system,” says Stan Lim, an engineer with HR Green who worked on the U of M project. “All of the runoff flows through the pavers and underlying aggregate and is temporarily stored in the ground under the lot instead of running into the city’s storm sewer system.” At Maplewood Mall in suburban St. Paul, developers also combined a variety of stormwater management solutions, including permeable pavement, to protect nearby Kohlman Lake. That system incorporates permeable pavers, rain gardens, infiltration basins, tree trenches and water features that collect and direct roof runoff to the permeable paver areas. The system reduced phosphorus load from the site by at least 60 percent and sediment by 90 percent to the lake.

in Faribault, Minnesota, had reached its municipality’s impervious surface limit, but the company’s growth meant new employees and the need for more parking. Engineers from HR Green solved the problem with 18,000 square feet of permeable pavers that were machine installed by contractor JD Rynders. The parking lot looks so good that they hold a classic car show on it every year. Offering flexibility & safety Like traditional paving stones, permeable pavers are easy to remove for repairs and utility maintenance as well as to retrofit additional hardscape or landscaping features. Permeables also are well suited for situations where water pools or ice builds up, offering a measure of pedestrian safety. Developers of Oaks Station Place, an urban transit-oriented residential/commercial development along the Blue Line transit route in Minneapolis, wanted to implement as many LID and sustainable construction practices as possible, in part to protect nearby Minnehaha Creek. The project used permeable pavers for residential patio areas and public walkways. “The development was modeled after a historic landmark transit community on the Long Island Railroad in Queens, New York,” said Jim Schloemer, an engineer with Kaas Wilson Architects. “The classic hardscapes help evoke the grace of an earlier era in history.” In addition to providing stormwater management and enhancing the historic look, permeable pavers also were selected for their ability to prevent puddles and ice patches for the public and residents, as well as ease of installation for a future public art project, said Chad Johnson of Structures Hardscapes. Meeting irrigation needs Urban areas can benefit greatly from the installation of permeable pavers. Permeable pavement reduces thermal pollution and the ‘heat-island effect’ that can affect urban waterways, which are often under stress. That was one goal of a project spanning 12 blocks on Marquette Avenue and Second Avenue South, in Minneapolis. Some 50,000 square feet of permeable pavers and underground stormwater retention cells filled with bio-infiltration soil mix prevent runoff into the city’s storm sewer system, which eventually discharges directly into the Mississippi River. An added advantage is that the system provides a natural irrigation for the 190 trees planted in the pavers along the streets.

Kohlman Lake benefits from Maplewood Mall’s permeable pavers. Photo Credit: Willow Creek Paving Stones

Gaining usable space A homeowner in Falcon Heights, Minnesota had a long driveway and a concrete basketball court on the property. They wanted to add outdoor living space and needed more parking for their teen drivers. While applying for necessary permits, they discovered that they were already close to the 30 percent impervious limit for their property. So Villa Landscapes in Saint Paul helped the homeowners select permeable paving stones for 900 square feet of outdoor living and parking. Commercial clients also have discovered the permeable paver solution from engineering and landscape professionals when faced with impervious surface limits. Several years ago, MRG Tool & Die

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Educating property owners about permeables Engineers, landscape architects, designers, contractors and installers are instrumental in helping their clients select permeable pavers for situations such as impervious surface limitations, areas where water pools and freezes or stormwater management is needed. They are also in the best position to communicate the vast benefits of selecting permeable paving stones and pavement options. “Like the property owner in Falcon Heights, some might learn about permeables during the permitting process when they discover that their city has an impervious surface limit,” Plett says. “Others come to a contractor having done the research because they want to be as green as possible in their landscaping.” ________________________________________________________ Brenda Bredahl is a writer/editor for Willow Creek Paving Stones in Oakdale, Minnesota


FIRM DIRECTORY

Bryan Carlson Planning & Landscape Architecture

Firm Principals or Contact(s) Bryan Carlson, PLA, FASLA

3128 Dupont Avenue South Minneapolis, MN 55408 T: 612.623.2447 bcarlson@bryancarlson.com

Firm Personnel by Discipline Number of Employees: 1 Landscape Architects: 1

Coen + Partners, Inc.

Firm Principals or Contact(s) Shane Coen, FASLA, PLA Robin Ganser, ASLA Bryan Kramer

400 First Avenue North Suite 210 Minneapolis, MN 55401 T: 612.341.8070 F: 612.339.5907 www.coenpartners.com info@coenpartners.com

Confluence 530 North Third Street, Suite 120 Minneapolis, MN 55401 T: 612.333.3702 F: 515.288.8359 www.thinkconfluence.com tminarik@thinkconfluence.com Other Office Locations Cedar Rapids, IA; Des Moines, IA; Kansas City, MO; Sioux Falls, SD

Categories of Project Work 30% Site Planning/Development Studies 30% Recreation/Resort Planning 20% Parks, Open Space, Recreation 10% Master Planning 5% Urban Design and Streetscapes 5% Residential Gardens

Firm Personnel by Discipline Number of Employees: 16 Landscape Architects: 14 Administrative: 2 Categories of Project Work 20% Residential 20% Parks and Open Spaces 20% Urban Design and Streetscapes 20% Master Planning 20% Site Planning

Firm Principals or Contact(s) Terry Minarik, ASLA, PLA Chris Della Vedova, ASLA, LEED AP Terry Berkbuegler, ASLA, LEED AP Jon Jacobson, ASLA Patrick Alvord, ASLA, AIA, LEED AP Chris Cline, ASLA Firm Personnel by Discipline Number of Employees: 41 Landscape Architects: 34 Planners: 1 Administrative: 4 Other: 2

Example Projects • Peninsula Papagayo Resort & Golf Community, Guanacaste, Costa Rica • Peace Plaza, Annenberg Plaza, Feith Family Park, Rochester, MN • Wells Fargo Home Mortgage Campus, Minneapolis, MN • Minnesota Landscape Arboretum Visitors Center, Chaska, MN • Campbell Garden, Hanson Hall, U of MN, Minneapolis, MN • WW II Veterans Memorial, State Capitol, St. Paul, MN

Example Projects • Washington Square Park, Kansas City, MO • King Abdullah Financial District Environs, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia • Higher Ground and Dorothy Day Connection Center, St. Paul, MN • Malibu Estate, Malibu, CA • Bel Air Estates, Bel Air, CA • Nicollet Mall Redesign (with Field Operations), Minneapolis, MN

Categories of Project Work 25% Urban Design and Streetscapes 20% Site Planning and Development 18% Master / Comprehensive Planning 17% Parks and Open Space 10% Campus Planning and Design 5% Transit Facilities Planning 5% Athletic Facilities Planning and Design Example Projects • MPRB South Service Area Master Plan, Minneapolis, MN • Krause Gateway Center, Des Moines, IA • Dakota County Mississippi River Trail Interpretive + Experience Design, Dakota County, MN • Wichita Art Museum Riverview Art Garden, Wichita, KS • Parks, Recreation and Trails Strategic Plan, Edina, MN • Ritz Block Tower One, Minneapolis, MN

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DAMON FARBER 401 Second Avenue North Suite 410 Minneapolis, MN 55401 T: 612.332.7522 F: 612.332.0936 www.damonfarber.com twhitlock@damonfarber.com

Hart Howerton 13911 Ridgedale Drive Suite 220 Minnetonka, MN 55305 T: 952.476.1574 F: 952.476.1573 www.harthowerton.com raberg@harthowerton.com Other Office Locations San Francisco, CA; New York, NY; Cambridge, MA

Firm Principals or Contact(s) Tom Whitlock, ASLA, PLA Jesse Symynkywicz, ASLA, PLA Joan MacLeod, ASLA, LEED AP, PLA Chuck Evens, PLA Jean Garbarini, ASLA, PLA Matt Wilkens, ASLA, PLA Julie Aldrich, PLA Matt Rentsch, ASLA, PLA

Categories of Project Work 20% Campus Planning/Higher Education 20% Corporate 20% Multi-Family Housing 20% Parks and Open Space 5% Historic Research and Planning 5% Health and Wellness 5% Cultural Institutions 5% Urban Design and Planning

Firm Personnel by Discipline Number of Employees: 15 Landscape Architects: 8 Technical: 6 Administrative: 1

Example Projects • University of Minnesota Athletes Village, Minneapolis, MN • Central Park, Maple Grove, MN • Blake School Masterplan, Hopkins, MN • Tashjian Bee Pollinator Center, St. Paul, MN • Peavey Plaza HSR, Minneapolis, MN • University of St. Thomas Master Plan, St. Paul, MN

Firm Principals or Contact(s) Roland Aberg, Principal, ASLA Anne Howerton, Principal, ASLA John Burkholder, Principal, ASLA John Larson, ASLA, PLA Jennifer Lau, AICP

Categories of Project Work 45% Architecture 35% Landscape Architecture/Master Planning 15% Architectural Planning 5% Interior Design

Firm Personnel by Discipline Number of Employees: 110 Landscape Architects: 12 Planners: 21 Administrative: 21 Architects: 46 Interior Designers: 5 Graphic Designers: 5

Other Office Locations Los Angeles, CA; Milwaukee, WI; Rochester, MN; Sacramento, CA; San Francisco, CA; San Jose, CA; Washington, DC

HGA Architects and Engineers 420 North 5th Street Suite 100 Minneapolis, MN 55401 T: 612.758.4000 F: 612.758.4199 www.hga.com info@hga.com

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Firm Principals or Contact(s) Theodore Lee, ASLA, PLA, LEED AP BD+C Emanouil Spassov, ASLA, PLA, LEED AP BD+C Trygve Hansen, ASLA, PLA, LEED AP BD+C Nissa Tupper, ASLA Stephen Himmerich, ASLA Jody Rader, ASLA Firm Personnel by Discipline Number of Employees: 601 Landscape Architects: 3 Planners: 10 Technical: 130 Engineers: 85 (3 Civil; 30 Structural; 30 Mechanical; 20 Electrical; 2 Industrial) Administrative: 120 Other: 3 Architecture: 250

Cityscape 2050

Example Projects • University of Minnesota Scholars Walk, Minneapolis, MN • Minnehaha Creek Corridor Restoration, Hopkins/St. Louis Park, MN • Santa Lucia Preserve, Monterey, CA • Palmetto Bluff, Bluffton, SC • Calpers Headquarters, Sacramento, CA • 560 Mission Plaza, San Francisco, CA

Categories of Project Work 25% Site Planning/Development Studies 20% Urban Design and Streetscapes 20% Master/Comprehensive Planning 20% Plazas, Courtyards, Rooftop Gardens and Rain Gardens 10% Parks and Open Space 5% Interior Landscape/Plantings Example Projects • Minnesota State Capitol Grounds Renovation, St. Paul, MN • Military Family Tribute, State Capitol Mall, St. Paul, MN • Surly Destination Brewery, Minneapolis, MN • Noguchi Sculpture Courtyard, Macalester College, St. Paul, MN • Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN • Temple Israel Expansion, Minneapolis, MN


FIRM DIRECTORY

HNTB Corporation 5500 Wayzata Boulevard Suite 450 Minneapolis, MN 55146 T: 763.852.2100 F: 763.852.2199 www.hntb.com

Other Office Locations 60 offices nation-wide Firm Principals or Contact(s) Mark Salzman, ASLA, PLA, CLARB Diane Hellekson, ASLA, PLA, CLARB Firm Personnel by Discipline Number of Employees: 37.5 Landscape Architects: 2 Planners: 3.5 Technical: 12 Structural Engineers: 7 (5 PE, 2 EIT) Civil Engineers: 11 (8 PE, 3 EIT) Administrative: 2

Firm Principals or Contact(s) Mark Koegler, ASLA, PLA Paul Paige, PLA Brad Scheib, AICP Bryan Harjes, PLA Jeff McMenimen, PLA

Hoisington Koegler Group, Inc. 123 North Third Street, Suite 100 Minneapolis, MN 55401 T: 612.338.0800 F: 612.338.6838 www.hkgi.com info@hkgi.com

LHB, Inc. 21 West Superior Street, Suite 500 Duluth, MN 55802 T: 218.727.8446 F: 218.727.8456 www.lhbcorp.com info@lhbcorp.com Other Office Locations 701 Washington Avenue North, Suite 200 Minneapolis, MN 55401

Firm Personnel by Discipline Number of Employees: 15 Landscape Architects: 8 Planners: 3 Administrative: 1 Landscape Designers: 3

Categories of Project Work 55% Transportation 15% Urban Design 15% Parks, Parkway, & Trails 15% Construction Administration Example Projects • Minneapolis Downtown Pedestrian Improvements, Minneapolis, MN • Samatar Crossing (Fifth Street), Minneapolis, MN • Franklin Avenue Bridge Renovation, Minneapolis, MN • I-405 Orange County, Los Angeles, CA • Gerald Desmond Bridge, Long Beach, CA • Opportunity Corridor, Cleveland, OH

Categories of Project Work 25% Park, Trail, Greenway, and Open Space Master Planning and Design 20% Transit and Corridor Planning and Design 15% Comprehensive Planning and Zoning Ordinance 15% Downtown, Neighborhood and Redevelopment Master Planning and Design 10% Park and Recreation System Master Planning 10% Streetscape and Site Design 5% Development Services Example Projects • Penn Avenue Corridor Vision and Implementation Framework, Minneapolis, MN • Le Sueur Comprehensive Plan Update, Le Sueur, MN • St. Louis River Corridor Neighborhood Parks Master Plans, Duluth, MN • Harriet Island to South St. Paul Regional Trail Design and Construction, St. Paul, MN • Downtown Chaska Streetscape Design and Construction, Chaska, MN • Gateway Land Use Study, Woodbury and Lake Elmo, MN

Firm Principals or Contact(s) Michael Fischer, AIA, LEED AP Lydia Major, ASLA, PLA, LEED AP Heidi Bringman, ASLA, PLA, LEED AP BD+C Erica Christenson, ASLA, PLA, LEED AP BD+C Tiffani Navratil, Associate ASLA Sarah Weeks, Associate ASLA Sandy Meulners, Associate ASLA

Categories of Project Work 20% Parks and Open Spaces 20% Streetscapes/Highways/Transit 15% Urban Design 15% Wetlands/Stormwater 10% Campus 10% Greenways/Trails 10% Resource Management/Regional Planning

Firm Personnel by Discipline Number of Employees: 195 Landscape Architects: 4 Planners: 1 Technical: 9 Engineers: 39 Administrative: 1 Other: 141 (3 Graduate Landscape Architects, 28 Graduate Engineers, 25 Licensed Architects, 15 Graduate Architects, 3 Certified Interior Designers, 66 A/E Design Technicians, 1 Historic Preservationist)

Example Projects • Minneapolis Parks and Recreation Downtown Service Area Master Plan, Minneapolis, MN • Minneapolis Parks and Recreation Board RecQuest Recreation Center Master Plan, Minneapolis, MN • Downtown Public Realm Framework Plan, Minneapolis, MN • Edina Grandview Area Transportation Study, Edina, MN • Wisconsin Indianhead Technical College Campus-wide Site Improvements, Superior, WI • Kenwood Village Mixed Use Housing Development, Duluth, MN Winter 2015-16 | Issue #22

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Firm Principals or Contact(s) Bruce Chamberlain, ASLA, PLA Firm Personnel by Discipline Number of Employees: 1 Landscape Architects: 1

Loam 4037 Zenith Avenue South Minneapolis, MN 55410 T: 612.743.6424 bruce@loam-inc.com

Categories of Project Work 70% Park Planning and Design 30% Urban Design

Firm Principals or Contact(s) Barry Warner, FASLA, AICP, PLA Mike McGarvey, ASLA, LEED AP, PLA Ken Grieshaber, ASLA, PLA Joni Giese, ASLA, AICP, PLA Michael Jischke, ASLA, PLA

SRF Consulting Group, Inc. 1 Carlson Parkway North Suite 150 Minneapolis, MN 55447 T: 763.475.0010 F: 763.475.2429 www.srfconsulting.com mmcgarvey@srfconsulting.com

Firm Personnel by Discipline Number of Employees: 318 Landscape Architects: 13 Planners: 30 Technical: 50 Engineers: 165 (Civil, Structural, Water Resources, Electrical, Traffic) Administrative: 15 Other: 45 (Right-of-way, Survey, Wetlands)

Other Office Locations Fargo, Madison, Bismarck, Milwaukee, Minot, Omaha

ATS&R Planners/Architects/ Engineers

Firm Principals or Contact(s) Ron Spoden, ASLA, PLA

8501 Golden Valley Road Suite 300 Minneapolis, MN 55427 T: 763.545.3731 F: 763.525.3289 jelamfoote@atsr.com

Firm Personnel by Discipline Number of Employees: 62 Landscape Architects: 3 Technical: 28 Mechanical Engineers: 3 Electrical Engineers: 1 Administrative: 8 Architects: 11 Specifications/Quality Control: 2 Interior Designers: 3 Contract Administration: 3

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Example Projects • Minneapolis Parks Fellow, Minneapolis, MN • Barn Bluff Master Plan, Red Wing, MN • Lake Walk Strategic Plan, Duluth, MN • Pathways to Places Public Realm Framework, Minneapolis, MN

Cityscape 2050

Categories of Project Work 20% Parks and Open Space 15% Master/Comprehensive Planning 15% Site Planning/Development Studies 15% Transit Facilities Planning 15% Urban Design and Streetscapes 10% Redevelopment Planning 10% Corridor/Transportation Planning Example Projects • Saint Anthony Falls Regional Park Master Plan, Minneapolis, MN • Bottineau Blue Line Station Area Planning, Minneapolis, MN • Lake Vermilion State Park, Minnesota DNR • Hyland Ski & Snowboard Area Site Design, Bloomington, MN • Central Corridor Green Infrastructure Plan, Saint Paul, MN • Civic Center/2nd Street Riverfront Urban Design, Fargo, ND and Moorhead, MN

Categories of Project Work 80% Educational Projects 5% Civic Projects 5% Faith-based Projects 5% Feasibility & Facility Studies 5% Commercial/Retail Projects Example Projects • Southwest Minnesota Regional Amateur Sports Complex, Marshall, MN • Southwest High School Addition & Renovations, Minneapolis, MN • Living Word Christian Center Remodeling, Brooklyn Park, MN • Chippewa Falls Area Unified School District Master Planning, Chippewa Falls, MN • Burnsville High School Additions & Renovations, Burnsville, MN • Ultimate Wellness Clinic, Brooklyn Park, MN


FIRM DIRECTORY

Bob Close Studio, LLC 705 Raymond Avenue Suite 200 Saint Paul, MN 55114 T: 651.600.9538 www.bobclosestudio.com bobclose48@gmail.com

Kimley-Horn 2550 University Avenue West Suite 238N Saint Paul, MN 55114 T: 651.645.4197 www.kimley-horn.com tom.harrington@kimley-horn.com Other Office Locations Rochester, MN; Madison, WI; Chicago, IL; Herndon, VA

Perkins + Will, Inc. IDS Center Eighty South Eighth Street Suite 300 Minneapolis, MN 55402 T: 612.851.5000 F: 612.851.5001 ana.nelson@perkinswill.com Other Office Location(s) Atlanta, Austin, Boston, Charlotte, Chicago, Dallas, Dubai, Dundas, Houston, London, Los Angeles, Miami, Minneapolis, New York, Ottawa, Research Triangle Park, San Francisco, Seattle, Shanghai, Sao Pauo, Toronto, Vancouver, Washington, DC

Firm Principals or Contact(s) Bob Close, FASLA, PLA Firm Personnel by Discipline Number of Employees: 1 Landscape Architects: 1 Categories of Project Work 70% Public Realm 20% Master Planning 10% Housing Mixed-use

Example Projects • CHS Field, Lowertown, Saint Paul, MN • Lakefront Promenade, White Bear Lake, MN • The Link/Pentagon Park Redevelopment, Edina, MN • Hiawatha and 38th St. TOD/Streetscape Study, Minneapolis, MN • Residential Retreat - Master Plan, Inverness, CA • Penn-American Mixed-Use Redevelopment, Bloomington, MN

Firm Principals or Contact(s) Tom Harrington, ASLA, PLA Todd Halunen, ASLA, PLA, CLARB Andrea Arnoldi, ASLA, PLA Jennifer Krantz, PLA Geoff Martin, ASLA, PLA Chuck Stewart, ASLA, PLA

Categories of Project Work 30% Land Development 30% Roads and Highways 15% Aviation 10% Transit 10% Planning 5% Parks and Recreation

Firm Personnel by Discipline Number of Employees: 2536 Landscape Architects: 81 Planners: 57 Technical: 620 (Civil, Structural, Transportation, Traffic) Engineers: 1385 Administrative: 393

Example Projects • Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport - MAC, Minneapolis, MN • Bemidji City Park, Bemidji, MN • Main Street Revitalization, Anoka, MN • South Loop District Master Plan and Streetscape, Bloomington, MN • Metro Transit, Green Line Extension, Hennepin and Ramsey County, MN • Metro Transit, Blue Line Extension, Hennepin County, MN

Firm Principals or Contact(s) Leo Alvarez, FASLA, AIA, LEED AP Ana Nelson, ASLA, PLA John Slack, ASLA, PLA Krisan Osterby-Benson, PLA Firm Personnel by Discipline Number of Employees: 1773 Landscape Architects: 29 Planners: 40 Technical: 201 Administrative: 340 Architects: 799 Interior Designers: 326 Planning + Strategies: 14 Branded Environments: 24

Categories of Project Work 25% Urban Planning 20% Site and Development Studies 20% Trails, Parks and Open Space 15% Campus and Research Park Planning 15% Streetscapes, Transit and Corridor Planning 5% Market Research Example Projects • Kenilworth Trail Landscape Improvements, Minneapolis, MN • Lake Calhoun-Harriet Master Plan and Improvements, Minneapolis, MN • University of Minnesota - Bell Museum + Planetarium, St. Paul, MN • Land O’Lakes Corporate Headquarters Expansion, Arden hills, MN • City of Rochester 2nd Street Streetscape Project, Rochester, MN • St. Olaf Campus Master Plan, Northfield, MN

Winter 2015-16 | Issue #22

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SEH, Inc. 10901 Red Circle Drive, Suite 300 Minnetonka, MN 55343 T: 952.912.2600 www.sehinc.com info@sehinc.com

Firm Principals or Contact(s) Bob Kost, ASLA, PLA, AICP, LEED-AP Mike Horn, ASLA, PLA Andy Masterpole, ASLA, PLA, LEED-AP Mark Engle, ASLA, PLA Karl Weissenborn, ASLA, PLA Karyn Luger, ASLA, PLA, PE Andrew Montgomery, Associate ASLA

Other Office Locations Rochester, MN; Vadnais Heights, MN; Duluth, MN; Munster, IN; Madison, WI; Denver, CO

Firm Personnel by Discipline Number of Employees: 699 Landscape Architects: 16 Planners: 18 Technical: 100 Engineers: 300 Administrative: 80 Other: 185 (Architects, Scientists, Surveyors, Graphic Designers)

SGA Group, Inc.

Firm Personnel by Discipline Number of Employees: 3 Landscape Architects: 2 Administrative: 1

5324 Clementa Avenue SW Waverly, MN 55390 T: 763.675.3129 www.sgagroupinc.com graham@sgagroupinc.com Firm Principals or Contact(s) Robert J. Gunderson, PLA, CLARB, ASLA Graham Sones, PLA, ASLA

Categories of Project Work 80% Park Planning, Master Planning, Site Planning/Development 10% Education/Institutional Planning and Landscape Architecture 5% Urban Design, Residential 5% Historic Landscape Architecture, Research/Preservation

Categories of Project Work 30% Park and Trail Planning and Design 15% Transportation Landscape Architecture 15% Urban Design and Master Planning 15% Land Development, Site Planning 15% Community Planning 10% Landscape Planning and Design Example Projects • Gateway Riverfront Park, Chippewa, WI • Spring Lake Trail, Dakota County, MN • Comprehensive Plan, Austin, MN • Gamehaven Park Masterplan, Rochester, MN • Parks and Riverfront Master Plan, Cloquet, MN • Community Center Entrance Landscape Revitalization, Maplewood, MN

Example Projects • Bertram Chain of Lakes Regional Park, Monticello, MN • City Athletic Complex Concept, Monticello, MN • Franklin Township Park Suitability Study, Delano, MN • New Public Works Facility, Crystal, MN • YMCA Camp Manitou Re-Development, Monticello, MN


Stantec 2335 West Highway 36 St. Paul, MN 55113 T: 651.636.4600 F: 651.636.1311 www.stantec.com info@stantec.com Other Office Locations Rochester, MN; St. Cloud, MN; Fargo, ND; and more than 15,000 employees located in 250 locations throughout North America

Westwood Professional Services 7699 Anagram Drive Eden Prairie, MN 55344 T: 952.937.5150 F: 952.937.5822 www.westwoodps.com wps@westwoodps.com Other Office Locations St. Cloud, MN; Scottsdale, AZ; Overland Park, KS; Dickinson, ND; Dallas, TX; Houston, TX; San Antonio, TX Madison, WI

Firm Principals or Contact(s) Stuart Krahn, PLA, LEED AP Todd Wichman, FASLA, PLA Mark Putman, ASLA, PLA, LEED AP Phil Carlson, AICP Steve Alm, PE Dan Edgerton, PE Categories of Project Work 25% Parks, Open Space & Cemeteries 20% Site Planning / Development Studies 20% Urban Design & Streetscapes 10% Educational / Institutional 10% Master Planning 10% Water Resources 5% Environmental Services

Firm Principals or Contact(s) Paul Schroeder, ASLA, PLA Cory Meyer, ASLA, PLA Kevin Teppen, ASLA, PLA Chad Feigum, ASLA, PLA Jeff Westendorf, ASLA, PLA Dan Sjordal, ASLA, PLA Firm Personnel by Discipline Number of Employees: 350 Landscape Architects: 6 Planners: 6 Technical: 60 Engineers: 60 (civil, electrical) Administrative: 25 Other: 193 (environmental scientists, surveyors, inspectors)

FIRM DIRECTORY

Example Projects • The Blaine Wetland Sanctuary, Blaine, MN • Bossen Field Park, Minneapolis, MN • Metro Transit I-35E and County Road E Park and Ride, Vadnais Heights, MN • Xylon Avenue North Streetscaping, New Hope, MN • Woodland Cove (Mattamy Homes), Minnetrista, MN • Southeast Minnesota Veterans Cemetery, Preston, MN

Categories of Project Work 50% Final Design and Construction Plans 30% Concept/Site/Master Planning 15% Graphics 5% Studies/Reports Example Projects • City Place, Woodbury, MN • Hy-Vee, Oakdale and New Hope, MN • Eden Gardens, Eden Prairie, MN • Avonlea, Lakeville, MN • The Shops at Arbor Lakes, Maple Grove, MN • 71 France Mixed Use Redevelopment, Edina, MN


MEMBER DIRECTORY

A Roland Aberg, ASLA, PLA Principal Hart Howerton 13911 Ridgedale Drive, Suite 220 Minnetonka, MN 55305 (952) 476-1574 raberg@harthowerton.com Timothy Agness, FASLA, PLA Landscape Architect 12136 Everton Avenue North White Bear Lake, MN 55110-5951 (651) 429-8997 latim@comcast.net Brad Aldrich, ASLA, PLA, LEED AP BD+C Confluence 530 North Third Street Suite 120 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (612) 333-3702 baldrich@thinkconfluence.com Ross Altheimer, ASLA, PLA, FAAR Principal + Cofounder TEN x TEN 211 North 1st Street #350 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (612) 201-9995 ross@tenxtenstudio.com Eric Alward, Associate ASLA Landscape Designer biota | Landscape Design + Build 211 St. Anthony Parkway Studio 102 Minneapolis, MN 55418 (612) 781-4000 design@biotalandscapes.com Jason Amberg, ASLA, PLA Group Manager - Landscape Architecture WSB & Associates, Inc. 701 Xenia Avenue South, Suite 300 Minneapolis, MN 55416 (763) 231-4841 jamberg@wsbeng.com

McRae Anderson, ASLA, CLP President McCaren Designs, Inc. 760 Vandalia Street, Suite 100 Saint Paul, MN 55114-1303 (651) 646-4764 mcraea@mccaren.com Kathleen Anglo, ASLA, PLA Senior Landscape Architect City of Saint Paul - Parks and Recreation Department 25 West 4th Street 400 City Hall Annex Saint Paul, MN 55102 (651) 266-6368 Kathleen.Anglo@ci.stpaul.mn.us Andrea Arnoldi, ASLA, PLA Landscape Architect Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc. 2550 University Avenue West Suite 238N Saint Paul, MN 55114 (651) 643-0452 andrea.arnoldi@kimley-horn.com Meg Arnosti, ASLA, PLA Landscape Architect Southview Design 2383 Pilot Knob Road Saint Paul, MN 55120 (651) 775-4318 marnosti@southviewdesign.com Adam Arvidson, FASLA, PLA Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board 2117 West River Road North Minneapolis, MN 55411 (612) 230-6470 aarvidson@minneapolisparks.org Jason Aune, ASLA, PLA Vice President, Landscape Architect Aune Fernandez Landscape Architects 705 Raymond Avenue, Suite 200 Saint Paul, MN 55114 (651) 248-6155 jaune@aflandarc.com

B Thomas Badon, Jr., ASLA Vice President of Sales MSP Outdoor Services 10908 South Shore Drive Plymouth, MN 55441 (612) 310-3246 tom@mspoutdoor.com Deborah Bartels, ASLA, PLA Landscape Architect Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board 2117 West River Road North Minneapolis, MN 55411 (612) 230-6438 dbartels@minneapolisparks.org Julie Beatty, Afiliate ASLA (651) 503-4394 Chris Behringer, ASLA Sr. Urban Designer Behringer Design LLC 3811 Bassett Creek Drive Minneapolis, MN 55422 (763) 233-2650 cabehringer@gmail.com Ronald Beining, ASLA, PLA Landscape Architect Ron Beining Associates LLC 1787 Lake Street Lauderdale, MN 55113 (612) 418-0772 ron@rbalandscape.com Kevin Biehn, ASLA, PLA, CPESC, LEED AP BD+C Landscape Architect Emmons & Olivier Resources, Inc. (EOR) 651 Hale Avenue North, Suite 300 Oakdale, MN 55128 (651) 770-8448 kbiehn@eorinc.com

Winter 2015-16 | Issue #22

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Karen Blaska, ASLA, PLA Park Planner/Landscape Architect Anoka County 550 Bunker Lake Boulevard Northwest Andover, MN 55304 (763) 767-2865 karen.blaska@co.anoka.mn.us

Chad Buran, ASLA, PLA Project Manager Margolis Company 295 West Larpenteur Roseville, MN 55113 (651) 488-7258 cburan@margolisco.com

Wallace Case, ASLA, PLA Landscape Architect Wallace Case - Landscape Architect 4812 West Lane Minnetonka, MN 55345 (952) 474-3542 w_case@earthlink.net

Brett Blumer, ASLA, PLA Landscape Architect Ramsey County Parks and Recreation Department 2015 Van Dyke Street Maplewood, MN 55109-3796 (651) 748-2500 ext. 334 brett.blumer@co.ramsey.mn.us

Barbara Burgum, ASLA, PLA Retired 19380 Walden Trail Deephaven, MN 55391 (952) 404-1734 thebarbo@aol.com

Bruce Chamberlain, ASLA, PLA Principal LOAM, Inc. 4037 Zenith Avenue South Minneapolis, MN 55410 (612) 743-6424 bruce@loam-inc.com

Gina Bonsignore, ASLA, PLA Regional Planner (MnDNR) 391 Mount Curve Boulevard Saint Paul, MN 55105 gina.bonsignore@comcast.net

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Jessie Bourquin, ASLA Scott Bradley, FASLA, PLA Director, Context Sensitive Solutions Assistant Director MnDOT Office of Environmental Stewardship 395 John ireland Boulevard Mail Stop 686 St. Paul, MN 55155 (651) 366-3302 scott.bradley@state.mn.us Jonathan Braski, ASLA P.O. Box 246 Biwabik, MN 55708 Heidi Bringman, ASLA, PLA, LEED AP BD+C Landscape Architect | Wetland Specialist LHB, Inc. 21 West Superior Street Suite 500 Duluth, MN 55802 (218) 279-2429 heidi.bringman@lhbcorp.com

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Andrew Caddock, ASLA, PLA, LEED-AP Senior Planner University of Minnesota Capital Planning and Project Management 319 15th Avenue Southeast Donhowe Bldg. #400 Minneapolis, MN 55455 (612) 624-9555 caddock@umn.edu Camille Calderaro, ASLA, MLA, CPSI Playground Design Consultant Fireflies Play Environments, INC. Lowertown Northwestern Building 275 East Fourth Street Suite 620 Saint Paul, MN 55101 (612) 990-2969 camille@lunningwende.com Bryan Carlson, FASLA, PLA Principal Bryan Carlson Planning & Landscape Architecture 3128 Dupont Avenue South Minneapolis, MN 55408 (612) 623-2447 bcarlson@bryancarlson.com

Cityscape 2050

Erica Christenson, ASLA, PLA LHB, Inc. 701 Washington Avenue N. Suite 200 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (612) 766-2831 erica.christenson@lhbcorp.com Curt Claeys, ASLA, PLA Landscape Architect Anderson Engineering of Minnesota 13605 1st Avenue North Suite 100 Plymouth, MN 55441 curtclaeys@hotmail.com Roger Clemence, FASLA University of Minnesota College of Design Landscape Architecture (612) 625-6860 cleme001@umn.edu Robert Close, FASLA, PLA Owner Bob Close Studio, LLC 705 Raymond Avenue Suite 200 Saint Paul, MN 55114 (615) 600-9538 bobclose48@gmail.com


MEMBER DIRECTORY

Shane Coen, FASLA, PLA President + CEO Coen + Partners, Inc. 400 First Avenue North Suite 210 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (612) 341-8070 shane@coenpartners.com

Mark DeBower, ASLA, PLA, PMP

Donald Colberg, ASLA, PLA Colberg Tews Landscape Architecture 3101 East Franklin Avenue Minneapolis, MN 55406 (612) 850-2223 don@colbergtews.com

Brendan Dougherty, ASLA Landscape Ecologist Barr Engineering Company 4300 MarketPointe Drive Suite 200 Minneapolis, MN 55435 (952) 832-2600 bdougherty@barr.com

Charles Colvin, ASLA Flagship Recreation, LLC 4940 West 35th Street Saint Louis Park, MN 55416 (763) 550-7860 charlie@flagshipplay.com Mitchell Cookas, ASLA, LEED Green Assoc. Vice President & Director of Sustainability Solution Blue, Inc. 318 Cedar Street Saint Paul, MN 55101 (651) 294-0038 mcookas@solutionblue.com Stewart Crosby, ASLA, PLA Associate SRF Consulting Group, Inc 1 Carlson Parkway North, Suite 150 Minneapolis, MN 55447 (763) 452-4780 scrosby@srfconsulting.com

D Matthew Davis, ASLA Shaw Design Associates, Inc 3119 East 26th Street Suite B Minneapolis, MN 55406 (612) 293-9680 mdavis@shawdesign.com

Brooke Donahue, ASLA Keenan & Sveiven, Inc. 15119 Minnetonka Boulevard Minneapolis, MN 55345 (952) 475-1229 brooke@kslandarch.com

Barbara Dunsmore, Affiliate ASLA 10602 Fenner Avenue Southeast Delano, MN 55328 countrysidegardens@frontiernet.net Steven Durrant, FASLA, PLA Vice President Alta Planning + Design 1402 Third Avenue, Suite 206 Seattle, WA 98101 (206) 735-7466 stevedurrant@altaplanning.com

E Bernard Edmonds, ASLA Retired Steven Eggert, Associate ASLA Project Planner Westwood Professional Services, Inc. 7699 Anagram Drive Eden Prairie, MN 55344 (952) 937-5150 steven.eggert@westwoodps.com Nathan Ekhoff, ASLA, PLA Loucks Associates 7200 Hemlock Lane, Suite 300 Minneapolis, MN 55369 (763) 496-6722 nekhoff@loucksassociates.com

Amy Elias, ASLA, PLA SRF Consulting Group, Inc 1 Carlson Parkway North, Suite 150 Minneapolis, MN 55447 (763) 475-0010 aelias@srfconsulting.com Mark Engel, ASLA, PLA Landscape Architect SEH, Inc. 717 3rd Avenue Southeast Rochester, MN 55904 (507) 288-6464 mengel@sehinc.com Gene Ernst, ASLA, PLA Owner, Principal Ernst Associates 1949 Woodstone Lane Victoria, MN 55386 (952) 283-1415 ernstla@mediacombb.net Stephanie Erwin, Associate ASLA Okra Landschapsarchitecten B.V. Oudegracht 23 3511 AB Utrecht, Netherlands +31 30 273 4249 stephaniemerwin@gmail.com Sarah Evenson, Associate ASLA, PLA Landscape Architect Hoisington Koegler Group, Inc. 123 North Third Street Suite 100 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (612) 338-0800 sarah@hkgi.com

F Jon Fahning, ASLA Vice President - Real Estate Development Shingobee Builders, Inc. 669 North Medina Street P.O. Box 8 Loretto, MN 55357-0008 (763) 331-4964 JFahning@shingobee.com

Winter 2015-16 | Issue #22

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Stephanie Falkers, Associate ASLA SRF Consulting Group, Inc 1 Carlson Parkway North Suite 150 Minneapolis, MN 55447 (701) 241-1310 sfalkers@srfconsulting.com Damon Farber, FASLA DAMON FARBER 401 Second Avenue North Suite 410 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (612) 332-7522 dfarber@damonfarber.com

Frank Fitzgerald, ASLA, PLA Associate Cuningham Group Architecture, Inc. St. Anthony Main 201 Main Street Southeast Suite 325 Minneapolis, MN 55414 (612) 379-3400 ext. 6256 ffitzgerald@cuningham.com Regina Flanagan, ASLA, PLA Independent Consultant Art • Landscape • Design 1506 Osceola Ave. Saint Paul, MN 55105-2321 (651) 587-0447 regina@artlandscapedesign.us

Pat Faust, Honorary ASLA Landscape Structures, Inc. 601 7th Street South Delano, MN 55328-8605 (763) 972-5200 patfaust@playlsi.com

G Michael Gair, ASLA Emertis (612) 251-0469 Nathan Gandrud, Associate ASLA

Chad Feigum, ASLA, PLA Project Manager / Landscape Architect Westwood Professional Services, Inc. 7699 Anagram Drive Eden Prairie, MN 55344 (952) 937-5150 chad.feigum@westwoodps.com Scott Ferguson, ASLA DAMON FARBER 401 Second Avenue North, Suite 410 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (612) 332-7522 sferguson@damonfarber.com

Donald Ganje, FASLA, PLA Landscape Architect 350 North Main Street #206 Stillwater, MN 55082 cdganje@yahoo.com Robin Ganser, ASLA Principal Coen + Partners, Inc. 400 First Avenue North Suite 210 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (612) 341-8070 robin@coenpartners.com

Jeffrey Feulner, ASLA, PLA WSB & Associates, Inc. 701 Xenia Avenue South, Suite 300 Minneapolis, MN 55416 (763) 287-8527 jfeulner@wsbeng.com _SCAPE

Anne Gardner, ASLA, PLA Landscape Architect City of Saint Paul - Parks and Recreation Department 25 West 4th Street 500 City Hall Annex Saint Paul, MN 55102 (612) 802-9928 anne.gardner@ci.stpaul.mn.us

Darcy Fowler, ASLA, LEED GA

Joseph Favour, ASLA, PLA Associate Professor in Practice University of Minnesota 89 Church Street S.E. Room 145L, Rapson Hall Minneapolis, MN 55455 (612) 626-7716 favou001@umn.edu

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Jean Garbarini, ASLA, PLA Senior Associate DAMON FARBER 401 Second Avenue North Suite 410 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (612) 503-8284 jgarbarini@damonfarber.com

Cityscape 2050

Samuel Geer, Associate ASLA, MLA/ MURP, LEED AP Landscape Designer / Planner Urban Ecosystems LLC 3042 42nd Avenue South Minneapolis, MN 55406 (612) 520-1176 sam@urbanecosystemsinc.com Marcia Gibson, Affiliate ASLA Chief Sales Officer Hedberg Supply 1205 Nathan Lane North Plymouth, MN 55441 (612) 366-0697 mgibson@hedbergsupply.com Joni Giese, ASLA, PLA, AICP SRF Consulting Group, Inc 1 Carlson Parkway North Suite 150 Minneapolis, MN 55447 (763) 475-0010 jgiese@srfconsulting.com Kerry Glader, Affiliate ASLA Sales Manager Plaisted Companies, Inc. P.O. Box 332 11555 205th Avenue Northwest Elk River, MN 55330 (763) 633-6571 kglader@plaistedcompanies.com


MEMBER DIRECTORY

Stephen Wesley Goltry, ASLA, PLA, CLARB, AICP Landscape Architect & Planner 3026 West Lake Street Suite 201 Minneapolis, MN 55416-4515 (612) 920-3825 stephen@goltrydesign.com Richard Gray, ASLA, PLA, LEED AP Senior Landscape Architect TKDA 444 Cedar Street Suite 1500 Saint Paul, MN 55101 (651) 292-4420 richard.gray@tkda.com Kenneth Grieshaber, ASLA, PLA Principal SRF Consulting Group, Inc 1 Carlson Parkway North Suite 150 Minneapolis, MN 55447 (763) 475-0010 kgrieshaber@srfconsulting.com Gabrielle Grinde, ASLA, PLA Landscape Architect Hoisington Koegler Group, Inc. 123 North Third Street Suite 100 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (612) 252-7141 gabrielle@hkgi.com John Gronhovd, Affiliate ASLA 233 Park Ave. Minneapolis, MN 55415 jgronhovd@alliant-inc.com Robert Gunderson, ASLA, PLA, CLARB Landscape Architect SGA Group, Inc. 5324 Clementa Avenue Southwest Waverly, MN 55390 (612) 353-6460 rgunderson@sgagroupinc.com

H Jim Hagstrom, FASLA, PLA Landscape Architect/Principal Savanna Designs, Inc. 3637 Trading Post Trail South Afton, MN 55001 (651) 436-6049 j.hagstrom@savannadesigns.com Todd Halunen, ASLA, PLA, CLARB Landscape Architect Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc. 2550 University Avenue West, Suite 238N Saint Paul, MN 55114 (651) 643-0448 todd.halunen@kimley-horn.com Tara Hanlon-Nevins, ASLA Assistant Designer Minnehaha Falls Landscaping 4461 Minnehaha Avenue Minneapolis, MN 55406 (612) 724-5454 ext. 13 tshanlon@ucdavis.edu Charles Hanna, Affiliate ASLA Outdoor Lab Landscape Design Inc 147 10th Street East Saint Paul, MN 55101 (651) 202-3662 info@outdoorlab.net Trygve Hansen, ASLA, PLA, LEED AP BD+C Senior Associate HGA Architects and Engineers 420 North 5th Street Suite 100 Minneapolis, MN 55401-2338 (612) 758-4523 thansen@hga.com Thomas Harrington, ASLA, PLA Landscape Architect Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc. 2550 University Avenue West Suite 238N Saint Paul, MN 55114 (651) 643-0448 tom.harrington@kimley-horn.com

Benjamin Hartberg, ASLA, PLA, CLARB, LEED AP BD+C Landscape Architect Calyx Design Group, LLC 370 Selby Avenue Dacota Building Suite 303 Saint Paul, MN 55102 (651) 334-5498 ben@calyxdesigngroup.com Stefan Helgeson, Affiliate ASLA, PLA Crane Engineering Building Science 2355 Polaris Lane North Suite 120 Plymouth, MN 55447 (763) 557-9090 stefanh@craneengineering.com Diane Hellekson, ASLA, PLA, CLARB Landscape Architect HNTB-Minneapolis 5500 Wayzata Boulevard, Suite 450 Minneapolis, MN 55416 (763) 852-2123 dhellekson@hntb.com Andrew Herzog, Associate ASLA Clinton Hewitt, FASLA Professor Emeritus University of Minnesota College of Design Landscape Architecture 89 Church Street Southeast Ralph Rapson Hall - Room 101 Minneapolis, MN 55455 (612) 625-7355 hewitt@umn.edu Stephen Himmerich, Associate ASLA Landscape Designer HGA Architects and Engineers 420 North 5th Street Suite 100 Minneapolis, MN 55401-2338 (612) 758-4284 shimmerich@hga.com

Winter 2015-16 | Issue #22

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Drew Holmgren, Associate ASLA drew.holmgren@my.ndsu.edu Scott Holmgren, ASLA, AIA Consult / President Innovative Land Design Associates, Inc 5150 Delta River Drive Lansing, MI 48906 (517) 648-5723 scottholmgren@comcast.net Michael Horn, Affiliate ASLA, PLA Landscape Architect SEH, Inc. 10901 Red Circle Drive Suite 300 Minnetonka, MN 55343 (952) 912-2600 mhorn@sehinc.com Ashley Hudson, Associate ASLA Landscape Designer Bolton & Menk, Inc. 12224 Nicollet Avenue Burnsville, MN 55337-1649 (952) 890-0509 ashleyhu@bolton-menk.com Ryan Hyllested, Associate ASLA Associate ASLA, LEED Green Associate Westwood Professional Services, Inc. 7699 Anagram Drive Eden Prairie, MN 55344 (952) 697-5721 ryan.hyllested@westwoodps.com

J Donald Jensen, ASLA DJ2DMJ Planning (612) 801-5834 Sean Jergens, ASLA, PLA Associate Landscape Architect SRF Consulting Group, Inc 1 Carlson Parkway North Suite 150 Minneapolis, MN 55447 (763) 475-0010 sjergens@srfconsulting.com

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Michael Jischke, ASLA, PLA SRF Consulting Group, Inc. 1 Carlson Parkway North Suite 150 Minneapolis, MN 55447 (763) 475-0010 mjischke@srfconsulting.com Clayton Johnson, ASLA Designer Yardscapes, Inc. 8609 Harriet Avenue South Bloomington, MN 55420 (952) 887-2794 clayton@yardscapesinc.com Philip Johnson, ASLA Ayres Associates 3433 Oakwood Hills Parkway Eau Claire, WI 54701-7698 (715) 834-3161 johnsonp@ayresassociates.com Rebekah Johnson, ASLA, PLA 346 Bellis Street Duluth, MN 55803 rebekah.a.johnson@gmail.com Britton Jones, ASLA, PLA Project Manager Coen + Partners, Inc. 400 First Avenue North Suite 210 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (612) 341-8070 britton@coenpartners.com Spencer Jones, ASLA, PLA Principal Spencer Jones, Landscape Architect 809 Ivanhoe Drive Northfield, MN 55057 (507) 645-4188 sjonesla@charter.net Lucius Jonett, Associate ASLA, PLA Associate, Landscape Architect Wenck Associates, Inc. 1800 Pioneer Creek Center P.O. Box 249 Maple Plain, MN 55359 (763) 479-4254 ljonette@wenck.com

Cityscape 2050

K Tiffany Kafka, Affiliate ASLA Marketing Representative Kafka Granite LLC 550 East Highway 153 Mosinee, WI 55445 (800) 852-7415 tiffany@kafkagranite.com Laura Kamin-Lyndgaard, ASLA, PLA Project Designer Coen + Partners, Inc. 400 First Avenue North Suite 210 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (612) 341-8070 laura@coenpartners.com Michael Keenan, Associate ASLA Urban Ecosystems LLC 3042 42nd Avenue South Minneapolis, MN 55408 (651) 340-8568 michael@urbanecosystemsinc.com Gregory Kellenberger, ASLA, PLA President Landmark Design, Inc. 4045 Watertown Road Maple Plain, MN 55359-9616 (952) 476-6765 gregk@landmarkdesignmn.com Eva Kelly, ASLA, PLA Landscape Architect Alliant Engineering, Inc. 233 Park Avenue South, Suite 300 Minneapolis, MN 55415-1108 (612) 767-9330 ekelly@alliant-inc.com Keith Kinnen, ASLA, PLA Landscape Architect, Environmental Specialist Karvakko Engineering 2300 Bemidji Avenue North, Suite 101 Bemidji, MN 56601 (218) 444-8004 keith.kinnen@karvakko.com


MEMBER DIRECTORY

Tracey Kinney, ASLA, AICP Assistant Director of Urban Design Saint Paul Riverfront Corporation 25 West Sixth Street Saint Paul, MN 55102 (612) 293-6886 tkinney@riverfrontcorporation.com Mark Koegler, ASLA, PLA CEO Hoisington Koegler Group, Inc. 123 North Third Street, Suite 100 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (612) 325-27120 mkoegler@hkgi.com John Koepke, ASLA, PLA Full Professor University of Minnesota Department of Landscape Architecture 1765 Fairview Avenue North Falcon Heights, MN 55113 (651) 249-6030 koepk002@umn.edu Mike Konieczny, ASLA, PLA Business Development Manager Landscape Forms, Inc. 431 Lawndale Avenue Kalamazoo, MI 49048 (269) 337-1311 mikek@landscapeforms.com David Kopfmann, Affiliate ASLA Yardscapes, Inc. 8609 Harriet Avenue South Bloomington, MN 55420 (952) 887-2794 yardscapes@yardscapesinc.com Skye Kopfmann-McLoughlin, Affiliate ASLA Business and Marketing Director Twisted Elements, Inc. 275 Market Street Suite C-4 Minneapolis, MN 55405 (612) 305-0456 skye@twisted-elements.com

Robert Kost, ASLA, PLA, AICP, LEED-AP Design Director SEH, Inc. 10901 Red Cricle Drive Suite 300 Minnetonka, MN 55343 (612) 247-4704 bkost@sehinc.com

Teri Kwant, Affiliate ASLA RSP Architects 1220 Marshall Street Northeast Minneapolis, MN 55413 (612) 677-7182

L

Bailey Krause, Associate ASLA WSB & Associates, Inc. 701 Xenia Avenue South Suite 300 Minneapolis, MN 55416 (763) 439-3528 bkrause@wsbeng.com

Katherine Lamers, ASLA, PLA, LEED AP Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board 2117 West River Road North Minneapolis, MN 55411 (612) 230-6400 klamers@minneapolisparks.org

Tadd Kreun, FASLA, PLA oslund.and.assoc. 115 Washington Avenue North Suite 200 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (612) 359-9144 tkreun@oaala.com

Lillian Leatham, ASLA, PLA Planner Dakota County 14955 Galaxie Avenue Apple Valley, MN 55124 (952) 891-7159 lil.leatham@co.dakota.mn.us

Kevin Kroen, Associate ASLA Landscape Designer Tushie Montgomery Architects 7645 Lyndale Avenue South Suite 100 Richfield, MN 55423 (612) 861-9636 kevink@tmiarchitects.com

Theodore Lee, ASLA, PLA, LEED AP BD+C Associate Vice President HGA Architects and Engineers 420 North 5th Street Suite 100 Minneapolis, MN 55401-2338 (612) 758-4306 tlee@hga.com

Mark Kronbeck, ASLA, PLA Landscape Architect Alliant Engineering, Inc. 233 Park Avenue South Suite 300 Minneapolis, MN 55415-1108 (612) 758-3080 mkronbeck@alliant-inc.com Alexandria Krzmarzick, Associate ASLA Designer/Planner SRF Consulting Group, Inc 1 Carlson Parkway North, Suite 150 Minneapolis, MN 55447 akrzmarzick@srfconsulting.com

Katherine Leise, Associate ASLA Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc. 2550 University Avenue West Suite 238N Saint Paul, MN 55114 (651) 643-0476 katie.leise@kimley-horn.com Bruce Lemke, ASLA Design/Sales Plantscape, Inc. / Commercial Silk International 9901 West 74th Street Eden Prairie, MN 55344 (952) 224-9929 bruce@plantscapeinc.com

Winter 2015-16 | Issue #22

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William Livingston, ASLA Clearwater Recreation LLC 329 East Lake Street Waconia, MN 55387 (952) 442-1820 clearwaterrec@msn.com

Roger Martin, FASLA, PLA Consultant Roger Martin, Landscape Architect 2912-45th Avenue South Minneapolis, MN 55406 (612) 729-8245 marti009@umn.edu

Karyn Luger, ASLA, PLA, PE Landscape Architect SEH, Inc. 10901 Red Cricle Drive Suite 300 Minnetonka, MN 55343 (952) 912-2600 kluger@sehinc.com

Jody Martinez, FASLA, PLA Design and Construction Manager City of Saint Paul - Parks and Recreation Department, Design and Construction Division 25 West 4th Street 400 City Hall Annex Saint Paul, MN 55102 (651) 266-6424 jody.martinez@ci.stpaul.mn.us

M L. Peter MacDonagh, FASLA, PLA, LEED AP, ISA Director of Design & Science The Kestrel Design Group, Inc. 7109 Ohms Lane Minneapolis, MN 55439-2142 (952) 928-9600 ext. 10 pmacdonagh@tkdg.net Lydia Major, ASLA, PLA, LEED AP LHB, Inc. 701 Washington Avenue N., Suite 200 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (612) 752-6956 lydia.major@lhbcorp.com Timothy Malooly, Affiliate ASLA President Water in Motion, Inc. 175 James Avenue North Minneapolis, MN 55405 (763) 559-1010 ext. 111 timm@watermotion.com Geoffrey Martin, ASLA, PLA Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc. 2550 University Avenue West Suite 238N Saint Paul, MN 55114 (651) 643-0448 geoff.martin@kimley-horn.com

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Andrew Masterpole, ASLA, PLA, LEED-AP Senior Landscape Architect/Urban Designer SEH, Inc. 717 3rd Avenue Southeast Rochester, MN 55904 (507) 288-6464 amasterpole@sehinc.com Stephen Mastey, ASLA, PLA, LEED AP, CLARB Landscape Architect Landscape Architecture, Inc 2350 Bayless Place Saint Paul, MN 55114 (651) 646-1020 stephen@landarcinc.com

Michael McGarvey, ASLA, PLA, LEED AP Principal SRF Consulting Group, Inc 1 Carlson Parkway North Suite 150 Minneapolis, MN 55447 (763) 249-6753 mmcgarvey@srfconsulting.com Renee McGarvey, ASLA US Army Corps of Engineers 180 Fifth Street East Suite 700 Saint Paul, MN 55101 (651) 290-5640 renee.c.mcgarvey@usace.army.mil Samantha McKinney, Associate ASLA Landscape Architectural Designer WSB & Associates, Inc. 701 Xenia Avenue South Suite 300 Minneapolis, MN 55416 (763) 287-8315 smckinney@wsbeng.com Peter McLoughlin, Affiliate ASLA Buyer & Sales Director Twisted Elements, Inc. 275 Market Street Suite C-4 Minneapolis, MN 55405 (612) 305-0456 peter@twisted-elements.com

Robert Mattson, FASLA 36120 Tamarack Road Crosslake, MN 56442 bmattson@crosslake.net

Howard Merriam, ASLA Studio5051 5051 Bryant Avenue South Minneapolis, MN 55419 (612) 961-2646 howard@studio5051.com

Andrew McDermott, ASLA Landscape Architect/Supervisory General Engineer U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 5600 American Boulevard W, 9th floor Bloomington, MN 55437 (612) 713-5263 andrew_mcdermott@fws.gov

Alice Messer, ASLA, PLA City of Saint Paul - Parks and Recreation Department 25 West 4th Street 400 City Hall Annex Saint Paul, MN 55102 (651) 266-6412 alice.messer@ci.stpaul.mn.us

Cityscape 2050


MEMBER DIRECTORY

Sandra Meulners, Associate ASLA LHB, Inc. 701 Washington Avenue North Suite 200 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (612) 338-2029 sandra.meulners@lhbcorp.com Cory Meyer, ASLA, PLA Sr Project Manager / Landscape Architect Westwood Professional Services, Inc. 7699 Anagram Drive Eden Prairie, MN 55344 (952) 937-5150 cory.meyer@westwoodps.com Aaron Mikonowicz, ASLA, PLA US Army Corps of Engineers 180 Fifth Street East Suite 700 Saint Paul, MN 55101 (651) 290-5606 aaron.a.mikonowicz@usace.army.mil Maleah Miller, ASLA, PLA Project Manager Alliant Engineering, Inc. 233 Park Avenue South Suite 300 Minneapolis, MN 55415-1108 (612) 767-9337 mmiller@alliant-inc.com Kristine Miller, Ph.D., ASLA Professor and Department Head University of Minnesota Department of Landscape Architecture Rapson Hall 89 Church Street Southeast Minneapolis, MN 55455 (612) 626-7948 mille407@umn.edu Terry Minarik, ASLA, PLA Principal Confluence 530 North Third Street Suite 120 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (952) 451-0144 tminarik@thinkconfluence.com

Stephen Mitrione, M.D., ASLA 1806 Hubbard Avenue Saint Paul, MN 55104 smitrione@iphouse.com Steve Modrow, ASLA Principal biota | Landscape Design + Build 211 St. Anthony Parkway Studio 102 Minneapolis, MN 55418 (612) 781-4000 stevemodrow@biotalandscapes.com Mark Moeller, ASLA City Planner City of Winona City Hall P.O. Box 378 Winona, MN 55987-0378 (507) 457-8250 mmoeller@ci.winona.mn.us Andrew Montgomery, Associate ASLA SEH, Inc. 10901 Red Cricle Drive Suite 300 Minnetonka, MN 55343 (651) 490-2000 amontgomery@sehinc.com David Motzenbecker, ASLA, PLA Landscape Architect Cuningham Group Architecture, Inc. St. Anthony Main 201 Main Street Southeast Suite 325 Minneapolis, MN 55414 (612) 379-3400 ext. 6271 dmotzenbecker@cuningham.com Satoko Muratake, Affiliate ASLA Landscape Designer 2 Cuningham Group Architecture, Inc. St. Anthony Main 201 Main Street Southeast Suite 325 Minneapolis, MN 55414 (612) 379-3400 ext. 6262 smuratake@cuningham.com

Bryan Murphy, ASLA, PLA City of Saint Paul - Parks and Recreation Department 25 West 4th Street 400 City Hall Annex Saint Paul, MN 55102 (651) 266-6411 bryan.murphy@ci.stpaul.mn.us Richard Murphy, Jr., FASLA, PLA President Murphy Companies 701 24th Avenue Southeast Minneapolis, MN 55414 (612) 623-1287 richard@murphywarehouse.com Dr. Laura Musacchio, ASLA Associate Professor University of Minnesota Department of Landscape Architecture 89 Church Street Southeast Ralph Rapson Hall - Room 101 Minneapolis, MN 55455 (612) 626-0810 musac003@umn.edu Josephine Musumeci, Affiliate ASLA Midtown Greenway Coaliton Board (612) 872-1053

N Tiffani Navratil Hannan, Associate ASLA Landscape Designer LHB, Inc. 701 Washington Avenue North Suite 200 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (612) 766-2806 tiffani.navratil@lhbcorp.com Jonathan Nelsen, Associate ASLA Landscape Designer Bolton & Menk, Inc. 12224 Nicollet Avenue Burnsville, MN 55337-1649 (952) 890-0509 ext. 2975 jonathanne@bolton-menk.com

Winter 2015-16 | Issue #22

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Ana Nelson, ASLA, PLA Perkins+Will IDS Center Eighty South Eighth Street, Suite 300 Minneapolis, MN 55402 (612) 851-5053 Ana.Nelson@perkinswill.com Joan Nelson - MacLeod, ASLA, PLA, LEED AP Landscape Architect DAMON FARBER 401 Second Avenue North Suite 410 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (612) 332-7522 jmacleod@damonfarber.com Cassie Neu, ASLA, PLA Landscape Architect 4326 Grand Avenue South Minneapolis, MN 55409 (612) 669-8584 cassie_pf@yahoo.com Emily Neuenschwander, Associate ASLA Confluence 530 North Third Street, Suite 120 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (612) 333-3702 eneuenschwander@thinkconfluence.com Diane Norman, ASLA Director of Business Development RSP Architects 1220 Marshall Street Northeast Minneapolis, MN 55413 (612) 677-7376 diane.norman@rsparch.com

O Colleen O’Dell, Associate ASLA Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board 2117 West River Road North Minneapolis, MN 55411 (612) 230-6469 designodell@gmail.com

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Joel Odens, ASLA, PLA, LEED AP Bolton & Menk, Inc. 12224 Nicollet Avenue Burnsville, MN 55337-1649 (952) 890-0509 joelod@bolton-menk.com Peter Olin, FASLA, PLA Professor Emeritus Minnesota Landscape Arboretum 3675 Arboretum Drive Chaska, MN 55318 (612) 301-1275 olinx002@umn.edu Retired Brian Olsen, Associate ASLA olsen587@umn.edu Thomas Oslund, FASLA, PLA, FAAR oslund.and.assoc. 115 Washington Avenue North Suite 200 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (612) 359-9144 toslund@oaala.com David Owen, ASLA, PLA 3486 Ivy Place Wayzata, MN 55391-9745 david.owen@mediacombb.net

P Crystal Passi, ASLA Landscape Planner Anoka County Parks and Recreation 550 Bunker Lake Boulevard Northwest Andover, MN 55304 (763) 757-3920 crystal.passi@co.anoka.mn.us Gregory Pates, ASLA, PLA Transport Planner/LA Minnesota Department of Transportation MnDOT Aeronautics 222 E Plato Blvd Saint Paul, MN 55107 (651) 234-7192 gregory.pates@state.mn.us

Cityscape 2050

Bianca Paz, Associate ASLA City of Saint Paul - Parks and Recreation Department 25 West 4th Street Saint Paul, MN 55102 (651) 266-6418 bianca.paz@ci.stpaul.mn.us William Pesek, ASLA, PLA City of Saint Paul - Parks and Recreation Department 25 West 4th Street 400 City Hall Annex Saint Paul, MN 55102 (651) 266-6419 pesekpla@aol.com Bryce Peterson, ASLA CEO Plantscape, Inc. / Commercial Silk International 9901 West 74th Street Eden Prairie, MN 55344 (952) 934-7666 bryce@plantscapeinc.com Nicole Peterson, Associate ASLA The Kestrel Design Group, Inc. 7109 Ohms Lane Minneapolis, MN 55439 (952) 928-9600 ext. 22 nicole@tkdg.net Danyelle Pierquet, ASLA, PLA Project Lead Landform 105 South Fifth Avenue, Suite 513 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (612) 638-0226 dpierquet@landform.net Marjorie Pitz, FASLA, PLA Principal Martin & Pitz Associates, Inc. 182 Mounds Boulevard Saint Paul, MN 55106 (651) 778-9558 pitz@bitstream.net


MEMBER DIRECTORY

Frederick Poehler, ASLA, PLA Project Designer Habitat Studio 4319 Bryant Avenue South, Suite C204 Minneapolis, MN 55409 (612) 590-1163 habitatstudio.fjp@gmail.com

Ann Rexine, ASLA Principal Planner Three Rivers Park District 3000 Xenium Lane North Plymouth, MN 55441-1299 (763) 694-1103 arexine@threeriversparkdistrict.org

Amanda Prosser, ASLA, PLA Senior Landscape Architect ISG 7900 International Drive, Suite 550 Minneapolis, MN 55425 (952) 426-0699 amanda.prosser@is-grp.com

Catherine Riley, Associate ASLA catherinesriley@gmail.com (651) 395-1153

Marc Putman, ASLA, PLA, LEED AP Senior Landscape Architect Stantec 2335 West Highway 36 Saint Paul, MN 55113 (651) 636-4600 marc.putman@stantec.com

R Jody Rader, Associate ASLA HGA Architects and Engineers 420 North 5th Street, Suite 100 Minneapolis, MN 55401-2338 (612) 758-4411 jrader@hga.com Jodi Refsland, Associate ASLA Landscape Ecologist Wetland Habitat Restorations, LLC (612) 281-1355 jodirefsland@gmail.com Matthew Rentsch, ASLA, PLA DAMON FARBER 401 Second Avenue North Suite 410 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (612) 332-7522 mrentsch@damonfarber.com

Lorelei Ritter, ASLA Topo, LLC 325 Cedar Street Suite 1000 Saint Paul, MN 55101 (612) 929-2049 lorelei@topollc.com Thomas Ritzer, ASLA, PLA University Landscape Architect University of Minnesota - Twin Cities 2904 Fairmount Street SE Room 150C Minneapolis, MN 55414 (612) 624-8225 ritze001@umn.edu James Robin, ASLA, PLA Cuningham Group Architecture, Inc. St. Anthony Main 201 Main Street Southeast Suite 325 Minneapolis, MN 55414 (612) 379-3400 jrobin@cuningham.com Maura Rockcastle, ASLA, PLA Principal + Co-Founder TEN x TEN 211 North 1st Street #350 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (612) 440-8369 maura@tenxtenstudio.com

Marisabel Rodriguez, ASLA Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico P.O. Box 192017 Hato Rey, PR 00919-2017 (787) 622-8000 ext. 663 mrodriguez@pupr.edu Charlene Roise, Affiliate ASLA President Hess, Roise and Company The Foster House 100 North First Street Minneapolis, MN 55401 (612) 338-1987 roise@hessroise.com Sandra Rolph, ASLA, PLA, LEED AP Cuningham Group Architecture, Inc. St. Anthony Main 201 Main Street Southeast Suite 325 Minneapolis, MN 55414 (612) 379-3400 ext. 6270 srolph@cuningham.com Stephan Roos, ASLA, PLA Senior Research Fellow Center for Rural Design, University of Minnesota 1420 Eckles Avenue Coffey Hall Room - 277 Saint Paul, MN 55108 (612) 624-9273 roosx008@umn.edu Ryan Ruttger, Associate ASLA Designer Rvk Architects Limited 745 East Mulberry Avenue, #601 San Antonio, TX 78212 Kathryn Ryan, ASLA, PLA CEO Platform 3D 4647 Sheridan Avenue South Minneapolis, MN 55410 (612) 382-4565 kathryn@platform-3d.com

Winter 2015-16 | Issue #22

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S Mark Salzman, ASLA, PLA, CLARB Principal Landscape Architect HNTB-Minneapolis 5500 Wayzata Boulevard, Suite 450 Minneapolis, MN 55416 (763) 852-2125 msalzman@hntb.com Danielle Sanborn, ASLA, PLA Landscape Architect Anoka County Parks and Recreation 550 Bunker Lake Boulevard Northwest Andover, MN 55304 (763) 767-2864 danielle.sanborn@co.anoka.mn.us William Sanders, FASLA, PLA Senior Landscape Architect Loucks Associates 365 Kellogg Boulevard East Saint Paul, MN 55101-1411 (763) 496-6784 bsanders@loucksinc.com James Saybolt, Affiliate ASLA Principal biota | Landscape Design + Build 211 St. Anthony Parkway Studio 102 Minneapolis, MN 55418 (612) 781-4000 jimsaybolt@biotalandscapes.com Bryan Schantz, Affiliate ASLA County Materials Corporation 205 North Street P.O. Box 100 Marathon, WI 54448 (715) 749-4121 bryan.schantz@countymaterials.com Nichole Schlepp, ASLA, PLA Landscape Architect, Associate SRF Consulting Group, Inc. 1 Carlson Parkway North Suite 150 Minneapolis, MN 55447 (763) 472-4702 nschlepp@srfconsulting.com

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Paul Schroeder, ASLA, PLA, LEED AP Senior Project Manager Westwood Professional Services, Inc. 7699 Anagram Drive Eden Prairie, MN 55344 (952) 906-7456 paul.schroeder@westwoodps.com Cory Schulz, ASLA, PLA, CLARB Senior Supervising Landscape Architect Parsons Brinckerhoff 520 Nicollet Mall Suite 800 Minneapolis, MN 55402 (612) 677-1251 schulz@pbworld.com Lacy Shelby, ASLA Principal Urban Designer City of Minneapolis 105 Fifth Avenue South Suite 200 Minneapolis, MN 55401 lacy.shelby@minneapolismn.gov Emily Shively, ASLA, AICP Planner City of Oakdale 1584 Hadley Avenue North Oakdale, MN 55128 (651) 730-2720 emily@ci.oakdale.mn.us William Short, ASLA, PLA White Bear Township 1281 Hammond Road White Bear Township, MN 55110 (651) 747-2758 bill.short@ci.white-bear-township.mn.us Stephen Shurson, ASLA, PLA Landscape Architect Three Rivers Park District 3000 Xenium Lane North Plymouth, MN 55441-1299 (763) 559-6766 sshurson@threeriversparkdistrict.org

Cityscape 2050

Eric Simmons, ASLA Hunter Industries 1940 Diamond Street San Marcos, CA 92078 (630) 200-7581 eric.simmons@hunterindustries.com Carmen Simonet, ASLA, PLA Landscape Architect Carmen Simonet Design LLC 354 Stonebridge Boulevard Saint Paul, MN 55105 (651) 695-0273 carmen@simonetdesign.com Daniel Sjordal, ASLA, PLA Westwood Professional Services, Inc. 7699 Anagram Drive Eden Prairie, MN 55344 (952) 697-5764 dan.sjordal@westwoodps.com John Slack, ASLA, PLA Perkins+Will IDS Center Eighty South Eighth Street, Suite 300 Minneapolis, MN 55402 (612) 851-5000 john.slack@perkinswill.com Robert Slipka, ASLA, PLA Senior Landscape Architect WSB & Associates, Inc. 701 Xenia Avenue South, Suite 300 Minneapolis, MN 55416 (763) 231-4844 rslipka@wsbeng.com Nancy Snouffer, ASLA, PLA Landscape Architect PO Box 23 Luck, WI 54853 Tim Solomonson, ASLA Graduate Landscape Architect Hoisington Koegler Group, Inc. 123 North Third Street, Suite 100 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (612) 252-7137 tim@hkgi.com


MEMBER DIRECTORY

A. Graham Sones, ASLA, PLA Senior Vice President SGA Group, Inc. 5324 Clementa Avenue Southwest Waverly, MN 55390 (612) 353-6460 graham@sgagroupinc.com Emanouil Spassov, ASLA, PLA, LEED AP BD+C Landscape Architect HGA Architects and Engineers 420 5th Street North, Suite 100 Minneapolis, MN 55401-2338 (612) 758-4448 espassov@hga.com Ronald Spoden, ASLA, PLA Senior Landscape Architect ATS&R 8501 Golden Valley Road, Suite 300 Minneapolis, MN 55427 (763) 525-3218 rspoden@atsr.com Anna Springer, Associate ASLA Hoisington Koegler Group, Inc. 123 North Third Street Suite 100 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (612) 338-0800 anna@hkgi.com Barbara Stark, ASLA, PLA Barbara Stark, Landscape Architect 2311 East 3rd Street Duluth, MN 55812 (218) 728-6019 bxstark@yahoo.com Charles Stewart, ASLA, PLA Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc. 2550 University Avenue West Suite 238N Saint Paul, MN 55114 (651) 408-3438 chuck.stewart@kimley-horn.com

Ellen Stewart, ASLA, PLA Landscape Architect City of Saint Paul - Parks and Recreation Department 25 West 4th Street 400 City Hall Annex Saint Paul, MN 55102 (651) 266-6380 ellen.stewart@ci.stpaul.mn.us Matthew Stewart, ASLA, PLA Project Landscape Architect Coen + Partners, Inc. 400 FIrst Avenue North Suite 210 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (612) 341-8070 matthew@coenpartners.com Jennifer Stromberg, Associate ASLA Doris Sullivan, FASLA Retired Michael Swanson, ASLA Marketing Manager Hearth & Home Technologies (952) 985-6641 swansonm@hearthnhome.com Robert Sykes, ASLA, PLA Associate Professor Emeritus University of Minnesota - Twin Cities Department of Landscape Architecture (952) 925-0167 sykes002@umn.edu Jesse Symynkywicz, ASLA, PLA Landscape Architect DAMON FARBER 401 Second Avenue North Suite 410 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (612) 332-7522 jsymynkywicz@damonfarber.com

T Cory Tauer, ASLA, PLA Landscape Architect ISG 115 East Hickory Street, Suite 300 Mankato, MN 56002 (507) 387-6651 cory.tauer@is-grp.com Jennifer Thompson, ASLA, PLA, AICP Senior Landscape Architect/Land Planner Pioneer Engineering 2422 Enterprise Drive Mendota Heights, MN 55120 (651) 251-0627 Matthew Tucker, ASLA University of Minnesota Department of Landscape Architecture 89 Church Street Southeast Ralph Rapson Hall - Room 144F Minneapolis, MN 55455 mjtucker@umn.edu Nissa Tupper, Associate ASLA Landscape Designer HGA Architects and Engineers 420 North 5th Street Suite 100 Minneapolis, MN 55401-2338 (612) 758-4295 ntupper@hga.com Monica Turner, ASLA Hearth & Home Technologies turnerm@hearthnhome.com Gary Tushie, ASLA, PLA Tushie Montgomery Architects 7645 Lyndale Avenue South Suite 100 Richfield, MN 55423 (612) 861-9636 garyt@tmiarchitects.com

Winter 2015-16 | Issue #22

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Karl Weissenborn, ASLA, PLA, CLARB SEH, Inc. 10901 Red Circle Drive, Suite 300 Minnetonka, MN 55343 (651) 318-0348 kweissenborn@sehinc.com

V Travis Van Liere, ASLA, PLA Principal Travis Van Liere Studio 211 1st Street North #350 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (612) 760-0494 travis@tvlstudio.com

Alan Whidby, ASLA, PLA Owner Alan Whidby Landscapes PO Box 1835 Minnetonka, MN 55345 (952) 938-6116 awhidby@visi.com

Richard Varda, ASLA Principal Target Corporation 50 South 10th Street TP3-1120 Minneapolis, MN 55403 (612) 761-7214 rich.varda@target.com

W Barry Warner, FASLA, PLA, AICP Senior Vice President SRF Consulting Group, Inc 1 Carlson Parkway North Suite 150 Minneapolis, MN 55447 (763) 475-0010 bwarner@srfconsulting.com Andrea Weber, ASLA, PLA Senior Project Manager Capital Project Management Dakota County Dakota County Administration Center 1590 Highway 55 Hastings, MN 55033 (651) 438-4357 andrea.weber@co.dakota.mn.us Sarah Weeks, ASLA Landscape Designer LHB, Inc. 701 Washington Avenue North Suite 200 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (612) 766-2807 sarah.weeks@lhbcorp.com

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John Workman, ASLA (612) 741-7353 work0022@umn.edu Mitchell Workmon, Associate ASLA Landscape Architect Analyst Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc. 2550 University Avenue West Suite 238N Saint Paul, MN 55114 (612) 294-9723 mitch.workmon@kimley-horn.com Kent Worley, ASLA

Thomas Whitlock, ASLA, PLA Vice President DAMON FARBER 401 Second Avenue North, Suite 410 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (612) 332-7522 twhitlock@damonfarber.com

Anthony Wotzka, Associate ASLA Minnesota Department of Transportation 395 John Ireland Boulevard MS 686 Saint Paul, MN 55155 (651) 366-3606 anthony.wotzka@state.mn.us

Todd Wichman, FASLA, PLA Associate Stantec 2335 West Highway 36 Saint Paul, MN 55113 (651) 604-4903 (612) 400-3237 work mobile todd.wichman@stantec.com

Steven Wyczawski, ASLA, PLA Sr. Landscape Architect AECOM 800 LaSalle Avenue, Suite 500 Minneapolis, MN 55402 (612) 376-2080 steve_wyczawski@aecom.com

Matthew Wilkens, ASLA, PLA DAMON FARBER 401 Second Avenue North, Suite 410 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (612) 332-7522 mwilkens@damonfarber.com Kelsey Windrum, Associate ASLA Civil Site Group, Inc. 4931 West 35th Street Suite 200 Saint Louis Park, MN 55416 Timothy Wold, ASLA, PLA Sr. Associate SRF Consulting Group, Inc 1 Carlson Parkway North Suite 150 Minneapolis, MN 55447 (763) 475-0010 twold@srfconsulting.com

Cityscape 2050

Z Cynthia Zerger, ASLA, AICP Associate Urban Designer Toole Design Group 212 3rd Avenue North Suite 476 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (612) 584-4094 czerger@tooledesign.com


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Cityscape 2050


thank you advertisers Twisted Elements

612-305-0456 Minneapolis, MN www.Twisted-Elements.com

Madrax

Thinking about your next project? Contact these advertisers for more information on the products and services they offer.

800.448.7931 www.madrax.com

Victor Stanley, Inc. 1.800.368.2573 Maryland, USA www.victorstanley.com

Plaisted Companies, Inc. 763.441.1100 Elk River, MN www.plaistedcompanies.com

VERSA-LOK Retaining Wall Systems 651.770.3166 Oakdale, MN www.versa-lok.com/

Bachman’s Wholesale 651.463.3288 Farmington, MN www.bachmanswholesale.com

Gertens Wholesale Landscape Forms 1.800.430.6206 x 1333 MN, ND, SD, WI www.landscapeforms.com

Borgert Products, Inc. 1.800.622.4952 St. Joseph, MN www.borgertproducts.com

Inver Grove Heights, MN 651.450.1501 www.gertens/wholesale/

Mlazgar Associates Eden Prairie: 952.943.8080 Grand Forks: 701.746.5407 www.mlazgar.com

Landscape Structures

Hunter | FXLuminaire

1.888.438.6574 www.playlsi.com

760.744.5240 San Marcos, CA www.hunterindustries.com

JTH Lighting Alliance

Hedberg

www.jthlighting.com

Plymouth: 763.512.2849 Stillwater: 651.748.3158 Farmington: 651.423.5048 www.hedbergaggregates.com

Commercial Aquatic Engineering

Kafka Granite

877.632.0503 www.fountaindesigns.com

800.852.7415 www.kafkagranite.com

Want to advertise with ASLA-MN? • Contact Kathy Aro at 612.339.0797 or karo@asla-mn.org for more information. Winter 2015-16 | Issue #22

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International Market Square 275 Market Street, Suite 54 Minneapolis, MN 55405-1627 T: 612.339.0797 F: 612.338.7981 info@asla-mn.org www.asla-mn.org

_SCAPE 2015 2016 winter  
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