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SCAPE land and design in the Upper Midwest

summer 14

The Awards Issue PLUS Engage locally to create change Harnessing the Collective Changes for Target Field Frogtown Farm & Park Land Use & Pollinators Memorial Gardens for the Next Generation Publication of the Minnesota Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects


FORWARD

President’s Message Engage in the Future - Step Up, Reach Out and Create Change The practice of landscape architecture is an engaging art - for our senses, our creativity, our intellect, and passion. Equally engaging is the call to share the best of our profession with others. In this edition of _SCAPE we read about the many ways our authors think about engaging in the future and review this past year’s award winners. When I entered our profession, I quickly realized the important role our professional society plays in strengthening our profession and maintaining public awareness. I also realized that as a volunteer-run organization, the only way I could contribute to its efforts was to actively participate as a volunteer. I have reached out and continually look for new ways to engage in our future and ask you, our members, to think about ways you may want to engage. This past year, ASLA-MN engaged in activities and events including the AIA-MN Expo, Northern Green Expo, Hedberg’s Education Day and Expo, and Stem (Science, Technology, Engineering & Math) Fairs at the Irondale & Mounds View High Schools. We worked with AchieveMpls, an independent, nonprofit partner that works with the Minneapolis School District. Some of our design firms will be working with high school students as summer interns to increase their knowledge of landscape architecture and provide them with on-the-job experience through Step-Up Achieve. We hope to place even more students in 2015. ASLA-MN put together a landscape/site plan for the Richard Schulze Family American Cancer Society Hope Lodge enabling them to apply for a grant for those improvements. On March 27th we were at our own state capital, as ASLA-MN volunteers participated in our first of many Lobby Days to come at the capitol. Discussions with our state representatives and senators included Complete Streets, park Initiatives and introducing them to landscape architects.

We celebrated our profession of landscape architecture with our Annual Celebration and Gala held at The Varsity Theatre. Our awards recognize the work of professionals and students and individuals and organizations that make significant contributions to the profession and their communities through their leadership and service. Networking and having fun continues to be important. The opportunities are many, working on our new media committee that will steer several upcoming DIGITAL VIDEO PROJECTS for ASLAMN. Join the Design Committee for the lounge area design for ASLA-MN at the AIA-MN Convention this November. For fun, bowling and golf have always been great events to see old friends, meet new friends and laugh and enjoy time spent together. Women in Landscape Architecture MN, continues to meet regularly to network, learn and mentor women and students in landscape architecture. We couldn’t accomplish all the activities we undertake without great sponsors, great volunteers and our chapter leadership! I’d like to take a moment to thank all of you who share your resources and time with us to make us more successful. With all we have been doing, there is still more that we can do together. I encourage all of you whether you’re a member or not, to pitch in and help as you are able. When we participate, educate, and advocate collectively, we engage a stronger future. Thank you.

Chris Behringer, ASLA, President ASLA-MN Summer 2014 | Issue #19

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ASLA-MN is the Minnesota Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) which represents nearly 300 professionals in the landscape architecture profession through advocacy, education, communication, and fellowship. ASLA, the national organization, has more than 18,000 members and 48 chapters, representing all 50 states, U.S. territories, and 42 countries around the world.

_SCAPE Editorial

Executive Committee

Editor Ann Rexine arexine@gmail.com

Chris Behringer, ASLA President

Copy Editor Jason McGrew-King Publisher JS Print Group Duluth, Minnesota

Matthew Rentsch, ASLA President-Elect Bryan Carlson, FASLA Past President Ellen Stewart, ASLA Chapter Trustee Kathryn Ryan, ASLA Treasurer Michael Jischke, ASLA Secretary

ON THE COVER

Gabrielle Grinde, ASLA Co-Director of Awards & Banquet Ally Czechowicz, Assoc. ASLA Co-Director of Awards & Banquet Ann Rexine, ASLA Director of Communications

Planting along Sam Morgan Trail, St. Paul, MN Credit: Great River Greening

_SCAPE is published twice each year by the American Society of Landscape Architects - Minnesota Chapter (ASLA-MN). _SCAPE is FREE (in limited quantity). To subscribe, go to www.asla-mn.org and click _SCAPE.

Send general ASLA-MN inquiries, including sponsorships, to: ASLA-MN International Market Square 275 Market Street, Suite 54 Minneapolis, MN 55405 PH: 612.339.0797 F: 612.338.7981 communications@asla-mn.org

Graham Sones, ASLA Director of Education & Professional Development Tiffani Navratil, Assoc. ASLA Director of Programs Colleen O’Dell, Assoc. ASLA Director of Public Relations Marjorie Pitz, FASLA Fellows Representative Heidi Bringman, ASLA Duluth Committee Chair Michael McGarvey, ASLA Government Affairs Committee Chair Coal Dorius Student Chapter Liaison John Rasmussen Student Chapter President

Send general _SCAPE inquiries, letters to the editor, and article queries to: Ann Rexine, Editor 9722 106th Place North Maple Grove, MN 55369 arexine@gmail.com

Summer 2014 | Issue #19

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NEWS

ASLA Fellow Recipients

Representing the Minnesota Chapter for 2014

The designation of Fellow (FASLA) is conferred on individuals in recognition of exceptional accomplishments over a sustained period of time. Individuals considered for this distinction must be a current ASLA Full Member or International Member in good standing, have achieved at least ten continuous years of full membership at the time of nomination, have demonstrated exceptional contributions over an extended period of time, have made a significant positive impact on the public and the profession and have received recognition for those contributions from multiple sources. ASLA-MN would like to formally recognize the ASLA College of Fellows newest members representing Minnesota – Peter MacDonagh, FASLA and Craig Churchward, FASLA.

Peter MacDonagh, FASLA

Craig Churchward, FASLA

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Peter MacDonaugh, FASLA For more than 27 years, L. Peter MacDonagh has been at the forefront of the sustainable landscape architecture movement. He is an internationally recognized authority on low-impact stormwater management, green infrastructure, lake and river restoration, natural area management, green roofs, and soil bio-engineering. The firm he founded in 1990, Kestrel Design Group, has completed more than 150 master plans and built works in 43 states and 9 foreign countries. The hallmark of Peter’s career is his coupling of scientific knowledge and the landscape architecture design process. His empirical understanding of ecology, soils, hydrology, and plants allows him to bring environmental credibility to designs for clients as diverse as public entities, schools, corporations, mining companies, and energy companies. In 13 years as adjunct faculty at the University of Minnesota, Peter introduces students to the design of sustainable sites and water management systems. In these classes, he draws from his 27 years of work experience to provide the next generation of landscape architects with critical knowledge on the function of landscapes, both natural and constructed. Craig Churchward, FASLA For nearly thirty years, Craig Churchward has been changing the way America plans and designs its highways and streets. At the Minnesota Department of Transportation (MnDOT) and in private practice, Craig has been instrumental in the movement to create new policies and programs in dozens of states and on hundreds of projects across the country. Though these ideals are well recognized today, this was not the case when Craig began his career. For decades he negotiated the entrenched hierarchy and staid systems of state transportation departments, always with an eye to using transportation to promote health, conserve and restore natural and cultural communities, and spur economic vitality. He has become a trusted expert nationwide, and is invited regularly to present seminars on his work at conferences and within other departments of transportation. As a consultant, teacher, and frequent lecturer at conventions of planning and design professionals, Craig has continuously promoted expansion of landscape architects’ roles within transportation agencies. In addition, he reintroduced the practice of putting economists, biologists, artists, and other non-traditional professionals on the planning and design teams he orchestrated, generating more sensitive solutions to the problems transportation projects often create in communities.

Engage in the Future - Step Up, Reach Out and Create Change


NEWS

University of Minnesota

Department of Landscape Architecture Update Kristine Miller, UMN | LA Department Head & Professor

Research Assistants in Practice In this update I want to introduce _SCAPE readers to our Research Assistants in Practice Program. The Research Assistants in Practice program (RAs in Practice) connects talented graduate students with local, state, and federal agencies, non-profit organizations, and design firms. Students apply skills in research, writing, and design and draw upon UMN libraries, databases, and faculty advisors to help their sponsoring organizations protect and enhance the public realm and natural and cultural resources. Our RAs in Practice have served nonprofit partners including local government units and agencies like the Minnesota Watershed Management Organization and Dakota County Technical College, national non-profits like Trust for Public Land, and local non-profits like the Minneapolis Parks Foundation, UMore Park, and Metro Blooms. Our RAs have examined emerging best practices around sustainability, interdisciplinary professional and agency collaboration, market trends, and societal needs. Our partners value students’ contributions toward advancing their mission and keeping them on the cutting-edge of contemporary research in the field. Our students value the educational opportunity of tackling real-world challenges. Students also receive an hourly stipend, a 1/3 tuition reduction, and health care at a reduced cost. Tom Campbell, one of our very first RAs in Practice, worked with Trust for Public Land two years ago. I just saw Tom this April in New York City at his new job with the Design Commission, and he credits his success in getting such a fantastic opportunity with his experience as a Research Assistant in Practice. Mike Richardson, one of our most recent RAs in Practice, worked with the Minneapolis Parks Foundation and is now working as a planner for the City of St. Paul. This year we will have the largest

group of RAs in Practice yet thanks to our partners at the Minneapolis Parks Foundation, City of Minneapolis, St. Paul Riverfront Corporation, Trust for Public Land, Minnesota Watershed Management Organization, Juxtaposition Arts and Destination Medical Center. We are very grateful for their support. The Minneapolis Parks Foundation has increased its number of RAs from 1 to 3 and those students are now working on important local issues like planning for public spaces in downtown Minneapolis, better connecting North Minneapolis to the Mississippi River and the future of the Upper Harbor Terminal site. For more information on setting up an RA in Practice to work with your organization, firm, or agency, please contact me at mille407@umn.edu.

Tom Campbell University of Minnesota Department of Landscape Architecture’s first Research Assistant in Practice alumni.

And for more information about news and events at the Department of Landscape Architecture we invite you to get in touch via Facebook and LinkedIn.

Professor Miller recently received a Bush Foundation Fellowship and the University of Minnesota Award for Outstanding Community Engagement for her ongoing work in North Minneapolis on environmental design and equity.

_SCAPE NOTE In each issue of _SCAPE, the University of Minnesota Department of Landscape Architecture provides an academic update to connect with local professionals and alumni and to keep readers informed about programs and events.

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Photo Credit: Great River Greening

Harnessing the Collective Utilizing a community volunteer base to achieve

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land restoration success on public lands

By Todd Rexine

olunteering promotes well-being and improves quality of life - and in return, it can produce a feeling of selfworth and community service with no financial gain for the individual. Engaging volunteers for environmental public land restoration can achieve large-scale success in a relatively short amount of time. Successful land restoration projects can be achieved by understanding how to effectively utilize a volunteer base to realize maximum project potential. Volunteer Motivations and Reactions Since the conservation movement of the late 1960s, people have become more aware of opportunities to improve their environment. The popular phrase, “think globally, act locally,” urges people to consider the health of the entire plant and to take action in their own communities. People are driven to volunteer for public land restoration projects by societal and personal motivations. A symbiotic relationship is struck when project managers of land restoration projects utilize volunteers, as they can become principal advocates and stewards to inform others of the project goals and objectives. When asked why they enjoy volunteering for restoration projects in the Twin Cities metro, people have answered: •

“I like the events, working outside with others, making our green spaces more beautiful and available to native wildlife.”

“Great experience for my daughters. I want to teach them to give back.”

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“It feels good to me when planting. [I] enjoy bringing the family and coming back to area’s planted and seeing their growth.”

“I feel proud to help others who believe in the river and its healthy surroundings. I meet a lot of other like-minded people.”

As evidenced in the responses from local volunteers, the community’s collective awareness is raised when people volunteer for public land restoration projects. Volunteers are more informed about environmental initiatives happening nearby - which in turn subconsciously connects them to the land. This connection between people and land is a primary goal of many volunteer-based land restoration projects. Engaging and Educating the Volunteer When conceptualizing and developing a public land restoration work plan that utilizes volunteers, a project manager must be

Engage in the Future - Step Up, Reach Out and Create Change


COMMUNITY cognizant of how to engage the community and to what extent. As the work plan is developed and objectives and timelines are discussed, a project manager can outline opportunities to engage the public. It can be tempting to allow a contractor to implement the project by letting out an RFP; however, it does not allow the local community to take ownership of the plan- which is critical to public land restoration projects. By identifying volunteer opportunity tasks early, it allows project managers time to focus on volunteers recruitment. Volunteer bases require some form of outreach to gauge interest and to aide in recruiting individuals. Common volunteer bases in the Twin Cities include: • • • • • •

A critical strategy to retain volunteers is to arm them with information and recognize that the work they are doing is making a difference. From personal experience, passionate volunteers have dragged buckthorn in two feet of snow for a brush pile burn and have planted rain garden plugs in the pouring rain. In all instances the returning volunteer feels a sense of accomplishment and revels in the circumstances he or she overcame to achieve project success. >>

Local organizations (i.e. Boy/Girl Scouts, 4H, Boys and Girls Clubs of America, Lion’s Club, Kiwanis etc.) Faith-based communities Chambers of Commerce Schools Youth organizations Corporations

When assigning volunteer opportunities in a work plan, it is important to note that volunteers can help with a variety of tasks including brush cutting and stacking, pulling invasive species, planting, seeding, seed collection, erosion control and serving as informational stewards. The range of volunteer activities is only limited by the vision of the project manager. Often, these land restoration volunteer opportunities can occur at one-day events that have proven to be successful in the Twin Cities region. These volunteer events, typically programmed by the project manager, are intended to accomplish large-scale restoration tasks that harness the collective volunteer power - all in a days work.

Reaching out to school groups and teen networks can offer a hands-on introduction to environmental careers. Photo Credit: Great River Greening

Educating volunteers while they are on-site provides an inherent project appreciation - knowing that the work they are doing is important and makes a difference. Project managers can educate volunteers on topics and issues ranging from the site’s contextual relationship to its surroundings, cultural history, importance of habitat preservation, storm water, invasive species threat and identification, and basic native plant identification. This educational approach ultimately provides the volunteer base with cursory project knowledge, enough to become environmental stewards of the project. Often, a select number of project volunteers will continue to engage with the project manager after a land restoration event, including revisiting the site to identify developing issues that require attention. This can be extremely helpful to the project manager’s work plan which has a limited staffing budget for site visits. Retaining the Volunteer Once volunteers are engaged and educated, a common land restoration goal is how to retain them. Each individual has his or her own personal motivations for volunteering, so achieving 100 percent retention is unfeasible. Some volunteer to fulfill community service hours, others as a team building activity, some to learn about the site and what is going on in their community, and still others are there because they want to help with the work that day – regardless of the project’s focus.

An understanding of land restoration can start early, as parents often volunteer as families to expose their children to local projects that “make a difference.” Photo Credit: Great River Greening

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Land restoration sites morph and change over time. This natural evolution allows volunteers the opportunity to attend future events and personally witness how a project that they participated in progresses towards a restored landscape. Potential also exists to build a small contingent of community members who want to stay engaged on the site. With fiscal constraints being felt at all levels of government, those individuals’ contact information (should they wish) can then be shared with the site’s land manager to continue future management. Added Value Benefit Whether volunteers are utilized for a public land restoration project or not, a project’s success must be measurable. From a dollars and cents approach, it may be difficult to gauge success, especially when those offering their time are new to the realm of environmental volunteering. Land restoration project success though utilizing volunteers can be measured by the: • • • •

Number of community members engaged, Completion of the event’s planned activity(s), Enjoyment of the collective volunteer group, and Acknowledgment that the work that was achieved made a difference.

By embracing the land restoration site and becoming stewards of the site’s maintenance, community volunteers can make a difference fiscally. They begin to inform the project manager or partner agency of things that are happening on site and ask if there is anything they can do to help with the ongoing maintenance. Some may even decide to mobilize their own groups, friends or fellow employees. An invested project manager will undoubtedly receive personal satisfaction, knowing that no matter how much sleep is lost the night before a volunteer event or fretting about if everyone will have an enjoyable experience – being able to witness a volunteer’s transformation is unmeasurable. Often at the event, a volunteer with no prior restoration experience will begin to discuss topics related to the project that were otherwise unknown just hours before. Volunteer opportunities have the ability to transcend socioeconomic groups, including racial and ethnic boundaries. People, often for

Ecologists introduce teen volunteers to field monitoring devices, including wildlife cameras and iPads, to demonstrate how technology can aide in site information gathering. Photo Credit: Great River Greening

the first time, begin to interact with someone and work side-byside for a few hours towards a common land restoration goal. That experience is profound and allows community members an opportunity of a lifetime – proving an added project value, albeit one that is often unquantifiable. Ultimately the use of volunteers on a restoration site is a decision that a project manager must weigh based on available budget, project goals and project partners parameters. Land restoration work will be completed one way or another – but the resounding difference between utilizing volunteers or contracting the work out is the positive impact on the local community. Allowing volunteers the opportunity to share in the ownership of the work and take pride in what was accomplished is imperative for project success. Community members who actively engage with the volunteer process can come back with their children and grandchildren and say, “I made a difference.” • Todd Rexine is the Director of Operations at Great River Greening, a local Twin Cities nonprofit with a mission to secure the legacy of Minnesota lands and waters through community restoration, stewardship and partnerships. He earned his Master’s of Landscape Architecture from the University of Minnesota.

Cedar Lake Farm Regional Park in Scott County was the host site to 100 volunteers who planted 9,000 native plugs for a shoreline restoration. Photo Credit: Mark Karney

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Engage in the Future - Step Up, Reach Out and Create Change


MATERIALS

Target Field Welcomes Changes for

2014

By Jason Kron

Photo Credit: Flickr

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rom a major transit station to security upgrades, Minneapolis’ Target Field welcomed the completion of several projects for the 2014 Major League season and in preparation for hosting the 2014 All Star game. Perhaps most significant is the completion of Target Field Station, a major light-rail transit hub located adjacent to the ballpark and at the edge of the city’s downtown central business district. In 2012, Hennepin County selected the design-build project led by Knutson Construction of Minneapolis and Perkins Eastman of New York to develop the $85 million Target Field Station. The station is the nexus of the Twin Cities’ transit system and is part of the Metropolitan Council’s 2030 transit plan. Granite was selected as a design element throughout Target Field Station, which is taking transit beyond just providing a means of getting from one location to another. Known as open transit design, the concept incorporates the design of a transportation hub into an iconic place that enhances urban life. >>

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An Inspired Concept With a great lawn, an amphitheater and adjacent mixed-use development, Target Field Station is poised to become the center for pre-game concerts, neighborhood gatherings, festivals, movie nights, individual gatherings and much more. “We worked directly with the area residents and business owners to develop urban design guidelines for this project,” said Dan Kenney, executive director of the Minnesota Ballpark Authority, the public entity that owns Target Field. “It’s very gratifying to see that collective vision become reality. Target Field Station is a great addition to the neighborhood.” The amphitheater and its seating area form what is called The Cascade. Project architects took inspiration from the St. Anthony Falls in Minneapolis, which tumble over granite and natural stone, and selected granite as a building material throughout the design. Black granite forms seat walls at Station Square and the great lawn, planter wall caps and the wall facing Station Square at The Cascade. In total, 2,400 square feet of granite was used to complete the project. Granite provided the durable, maintenancefree material required by this project.

The granite supplier worked closely with David and his graphic designer Alan Svoboda through the process of coordinating the digital artwork. Getting the digital files together was a real challenge and required close communication between the granite supplier and David, who had never used a computer for his artwork. In the end, the result is an extraordinary visual experience. “Having public art is wonderful. If you can make a place a special place with some iconography, it becomes something unforgettable,” said David. “I feel these works are making a contribution to the betterment of the community. It’s social art and goes beyond the aesthetic. It belongs to everybody.” Rapid Results With the addition of the billion-dollar mass transit investment known as the Green Line, arrivals and departures are set to double in the city. Target Field Station had to be complete before the Green Line could begin operating.

“Granite is a 50- to 100-year product, and this is a 50-year structure at least,” said George Fantauzza, project architect for owner Hennepin County. “It fit the nature of the long-term expectations for the project.” Iconic Art Part of the public nature of the project involved procuring a public artist for the amphitheater. The art was funded by the Minnesota Ballpark Authority. “The artist wanted to complete his sandblast murals on a very dark black stone with little variegation,” said Fantauzza. St. Paul artist Craig David designed three murals for the backdrop to the amphitheater’s seating area. David’s artwork encompasses three themes that correspond to three themes of the station’s design – transit, sustainability and gathering. According to David, the design motifs within the murals are based upon the two-dimensional design technique of petroglyphs, or pictographs. His goal with the pieces, collectively called “City Glyphs,” is to create abstracted, flattened forms that depict figures and imagery in a symbolic, primordial style with a contemporary twist. “I decided to be exuberant with content,” said David. “This is a three-tone, three-value image – the black of the stone, white and then an in-between value. Since there’s not a lot of contrast, we are highlighting, but very lightly so it looks natural. I didn’t want a ‘painted’ look, so I thought if it’s going to be subtle, it needs more movement. That’s why it’s dynamic.” David initially created paintings on wood panels using acrylic paint. His paintings were then digitized and sent to the granite supplier. Deciding what process to use to transfer the artwork onto the stone provided a challenge. Both stenciling and mil masking were considered, but mil masking was selected due to its ability to create the tiny dot (halftone) pattern in the imagery David created.

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Engage in the Future - Step Up, Reach Out and Create Change


“Because our granite supplier is local, they’re able to get the product when we need it,” said Fantauzza. “That was important because it’s such a fast-track project. Plus, we had more control. Keeping the stone within a 500-mile radius has helped us meet LEED criteria for the project.” Target Field Station’s grand opening celebration was held May 17, one month in advance of the Green Line’s June 14 start of operations. The schedule has been met, despite one of the coldest winters on record in Minnesota. In total, 50 days dropped below 0 degrees Fahrenheit. And with the cold of winter behind them, the citizens of Minneapolis are finding the public space at Target Field a welcome sight this summer. “Target Field Station is unique in what it does for the surrounding neighborhoods,” said Fantauzza. “It’s not just a destination. It will become an event area. This project isn’t just about transit. It’s about community. The granite is going to be the backdrop for every person that walks through this public space. Over the course of its lifetime, millions of people will see and experience it.”

Target Field Adds Security As the Station project has progressed, Target Field has made changes of its own. For the owners of a major league sporting venue, security is always a top concern and Target Field is no exception – particularly in a year when the ballpark hosted the 2014 Major League Baseball All-Star game. Helping to secure the site perimeter at the beginning of the 2014 season are 70 carefully planned granite benches serving as vehicular barricades. The granite benches and other landscape upgrades are designed by landscape architects Oslund and Associates of Minneapolis. “This urban ballpark presented some unique design challenges,” said Tadd Kreun, landscape architect and partner at Oslund and Associates. “Of particular concern were areas where we have city streets adjacent to the ballpark, which in some cases is only 15 feet from the public right of way.” In addition to the streets, four pedestrian bridges surround the ballpark. Underneath the pedestrian bridges lie vehicular entries for the ballpark’s staff. To further complicate matters, a railway >>

St. Paul artist Craig David designed three murals for the backdrop to the amphitheater’s seating area entitled “City Glyphs.” Photo Credit:Michael’s Photography Summer 2014 | Issue #19

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Granite’s durability and ease of maintenance make it an ideal material for the security benches at the ballpark’s perimeter. Photo Credit: Michael’s Photography

corridor with an adjacent bike trail lies next to the underground pedestrian spaces. The challenge for the team was to provide a secure means of sealing off the ballpark’s perimeter at these numerous access points, both underneath and next to the stadium. Granite Provides Secure Solution The design team wanted a solution to provide security that wouldn’t look foreboding and that would blend in and accentuate the outdoor space. The owner wanted to use stone native to Minnesota, and black granite was selected for the 2-foot by 2-foot by 6-foot benches that would serve as vehicular barricades. Granite lends an inviting appearance to the space, and its use in a functional everyday element such as a bench is pleasing to the eye while providing the security that’s needed. “The ballpark is clad with native limestone, a buff warm-colored stone,” said Kreun. “We didn’t want to use the same limestone for the benches, which would detract from the beauty of the building, so we selected granite for its color because it would contrast with the tan building. We also wanted granite for its durability and low maintenance. It’s much more dense and forgivable, especially in our climate.” As the bench design got underway, one important consideration was deterring skateboarders who might see the objects as a target upon which to slide. As such, the bottoms and tops of the benches were cut flush, while all the exposed faces were split to achieve an irregular edge. A textured finish was added to help interrupt the sliding action skateboarders would seek. “The granite supplier set up a full-scale mockup of a half dozen blocks of the different finishes we could get,” said Kreun. “This was very beneficial to us in our selection process.” The owners of the Minnesota Twins were also involved in viewing the mockup finishes, which were critical to the selection process.

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A total of 1,304 cubic feet of granite was required to construct the 70 granite benches. Multiple engineering firms were engaged to perform structural analysis on the bridges to ensure they could support the load of the cubes, which weigh 2,000 to 3,000 pounds each. In some locations the benches were formed in a square formation to create a sitting area where fans can face each other. Planters dropped in the middle of the square break up the space and provide green area. “This project has secured the site perimeter to protect the ballpark and fans in a subtle and welcoming way,” said Kreun. “But as benches, the vehicular barricades provide a very functional use, especially as additional seating needed for Metro Mobility and a Metro Transit bus stop.” The perimeter security enhancements were completed before the start of the 2014 season, well in time to secure the area for the 2014 season and the MLB All-Star game. • Jason Kron is a Sales Director for the Building Materials Division at Coldspring. He oversees the Regional Sales Managers, who assist the architectural and design communities with natural stone needs. Project Resources Target Field Station: Mesabi Black® granite in Diamond® 10 and Diamond® 8 finishes from Coldspring, MN Target Field benches: Mesabi Black® granite Diamond® 100 finish from Coldspring, MN

Engage in the Future - Step Up, Reach Out and Create Change


In December 2013, the Amherst H. Wilder Foundation transferred a vacant 13-acre parcel, locally known as Frogtown Farm, to the City of Saint Paul. It was the culmination of a process that had begun five years earlier with the organizing of the site’s neighbors, who had first envisioned a community farm that served the Frogtown neighborhood. The deal was brokered by the Trust for Public Land and was a striking example of a community taking control of its destiny with persistence and a strong vision. In the summer of that year, the non-profit organization Frogtown Farm selected Rebar, a consultant team based in San Francisco, but with staff working locally in Saint Paul, to develop a master plan for the farm. Rebar coordinated with the City of Saint Paul for the adjacent park design, and led the community engagement process that would run throughout the project. The plan, which in this document is called the framework, is a roadmap for building and growing the Farm over time. Like any plan of action, it should be regularly evaluated to see if the course is still relevant (hence the word “framework” and not “master plan”, which implies a finished blueprint). Frogtown Farm Framework Plan can be read, and hard copies purchased at www.frogtownfarm.wordpress.com Follow Frogtown Farm events, ambassadors, and updates at: www. frogtownfarm.org, and on Facebook: facebook.com/FrogtownFarm

Above Photo Credit: Rebar

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Frogtown Park & Farm community led design

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By Jake Voit

ow does a diverse seven-person design team effectively build upon five years of inspiring resident-led community engagement that resulted in the purchase of 13 valuable acres for a farm and park? By being inspired by Frogtown residents, and standing in the shoes of residents’ experience to facilitate an empathic design process. Being very curious, and listening without ego to as many local residents as possible. Finding out the nuances of power dynamics, the niches in the food system, the opportunities in the local economy, and peoples’ dreams and concerns. And, by using Asset Based Community Development approaches to build capacity for continued engagement after the design is finished. Many times the design team talked about helping the farm become a part of the community fabric, instead of just being for the community. The Frogtown Farm non-profit that hired Rebar has the following multi-dimensional mission: Frogtown Farm will be a hub for a healthy food system that fills gaps in food production, storage, manufacturing, and distribution. With spokes that reach beyond its acreage and the Frogtown neighborhood, Frogtown Farm will be recognized as a destination for those seeking learning, innovation, reflection, celebration, and authentic community. Rooted in values of social equity, justice, and inter-connectedness, this urban farm on the hill will serve as a model for multi-cultural community and a catalyst for economic development, wealth creation, community pride, and sustainability. (frogtownfarm.org) Residents of Frogtown Neighborhood were motivated to create this organizational mission for the vacant property due to worry about losing the hugely popular sledding hill to possible condo development. Instead of worrying, residents met and started to make a plan to save it. In order to save the sledding hill, they decided to create an entire farm! The grassroots effort evolved into a partnership with the Trust for Public Land (TPL) to raise money and acquire the land. Working with the City of St. Paul to take on ownership of the property ensured the land would be held in the public commons rather than private ownership.

Engage in the Future - Step Up, Reach Out and Create Change


ENGAGEMENT Partnerships The partnership between Frogtown Farm and the City of St. Paul would help ensure the farm will remain a community asset for food health, food justice, education, and economic development. Frogtown Farm will manage the three- to five-acre farm portion of the property to ensure the philosophy, programming, and vision of the organization will be realized. By working together, the City and Frogtown Farm will help each other in maintaining the acreage while creating greater value to the community. In the world of urban farming and engagement, determining the start- up capital and on-going cash flow is potentially overwhelming, and partnering to create a more rich value proposition was important for fundraising. Frogtown Farm will add impact in the community that could be leveraged for capital campaigns to acquire the land. Funders were likely much more interested in helping a farm with a robust mission in a disadvantaged community, than just creating a typical park. Having them together also adds an innovation outcome, which is attractive to funders. Of course, the Trust for Public Land leading the fundraising and land brokerage was immeasurably helpful and important. Designing a Whole System After the land acquisition, Frogtown Farm needed help from the Rebar Design Team to articulate a landscape design as well as plans for on-going engagement, social enterprises, business models, and organizational structure. Rebar needed to design the whole system that would achieve Frogtown Farm’s multi-dimensional mission. Facilitating systems thinking with big and diverse groups of residents was tricky yet necessary. To make a plan that achieves the multi-faceted mission required the stakeholders to understand the dynamics and trade-offs between the different elements of the Farm and organization. When people could think through how one element of the farm affected another element, then they could make confident decisions on the priorities for development. Blending Community Know-How with Consultant Expertise During the process, a collection of community dreams, farm elements, goals, ideas, and philosophies began to develop. A few examples include: chickens, a café, for-profit farm production, community gardens, fruit trees, community center, educational programming, and a commercial kitchen. Next to the community collection was a second Design Team collection of precedents, research, and experience the stakeholders also had to consider for decision-making. Some examples of expertise include: scenarios for different types of buildings, precedents of other successful farms, business models and how to staff them, cost of soil remediation and irrigation, planting all vegetables and annuals vs. perennial food systems, and determining which yields to produce from Frogtown Farm. It was an art form to effectively present community dreams alongside the outside expertise of the design team. The team’s facilitation strategy had to result in the community’s confidence in

the design process. The team had to listen well, and then prove that community members were heard. This would help ensure the community ideas and the expertise were both mutually considered and used for the design. Together, the design team leveraged its collective ideas and expertise in a way that placed the farm into the flow of the existing community dynamics. It was threading into the social fabric in ways that would make the vision more possible to achieve. Together, everyone involved wove together a human ecological fabric that would regenerate the food, landscape, economic, neighbor, soil, and plant systems. Research and Precedents Background documentation reviews, conversations with stakeholders, and networking efforts were needed in order for Rebar’s team to create its initial assessments of what the existing opportunities and challenges were between Frogtown Farm and the community. A power map with communication flows was created to encourage courageous conversations to clarify how ongoing decision-making would happen. The research and mapping allowed the design team to identify many assets in the community and where open niches existed for complimentary farm development. Due to the multi-faceted vision of Frogtown Farm, precedent research was important to show models of other organizations achieving similar goals. Examples of different yields, organizational structures, business models, community impacts, economic development, and educational models along a spectrum of success were presented. Empathic Design Process After research and mapping, design team members needed to get their physical selves into the community with big ears and open hearts . They needed to listen to as many community members as possible to ensure the Framework Plan for the organization would weave the Farm into the fabric of the community. This process goal would build upon the first five years of engagement and created momentum for more in the future. To understand the complex system into which they were designing the farm, team members needed to go wide and deep in their engagement with the following efforts and strategies over the quick five-month design process. Elements of the Engagement Plan Stakeholder Interviews. Frogtown Farm and local design team members listed dozens of people important to learn from in the local food and neighborhood systems. They wanted to know about potential partners, what the community needed and wanted, what other farms were doing, what the multi-cultural social dynamics were, what hornet’s nests they might step into, and anything else the community thought should be known. For about two weeks, in-person interviews were conducted with people on the list. Antonio, the Community Organizer, led the effort and Molly, the Project Manager, worked with him throughout. >> Summer 2014 | Issue #19

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Kathleen Anglo, City of St. Paul Landscape Architect leading the design of the Park portion of the project, said, “the idea for the park came out of the neighborhood, so the groundwork was set for the community to be engaged, the community actually described to the city how to get their idea done. The engagement process helps because it’s important to be upfront and transparent, it prevents surprises about what is developed.”

Community Design Meetings. After weeks of conversations in the community, it was time to present and get ideas on a food system map, organizational structures, programming, and business models. The first community design meeting allowed residents to see these initial ideas visually, and to physically edit the presentation boards. This was an important activity for cultivating ownership of the Farm design and Framework Plan

Community Ambassadors. The help of residents was needed to reach a large enough demographic. Community ambassadors were identified who would become part of the design team. Their scope of work included distributing and helping fill out surveys, managing the design process website (Frogtownfarm. wordpress.com), conducting outreach and invitations, and gathering community opinions about the farm. Ambassadors received coaching on how to effectively canvass, invite participation, and listen to residents who were unable to attend community design meetings.

Design team members facilitated groups at each presentation board as they added their ideas and concerns. For example, Courtney Tchida, the team’s local food systems expert and urban farming consultant, created a Frogtown food system map. The map presented an aerial view of the neighborhood with food system elements shown on the map (restaurants, markets, farms, etc.). The groups discussed how Frogtown Farm could exist in relationship with those elements. Then they placed post-it notes on the map listing things missing, more ideas, questions, and possible partnerships. Not only did this help the design team confirm what was accurate, it provided tangible evidence that the design team was listening. It was also a co-creative process of community ideas and consultant expertise. Another important conversation was about trade-offs; how it’s impossible to have it all, but that great things could still happen. John Bela and Blaine Merker invented and facilitated a farm design game that asked the community to design its own farm. Teams of people laid out game pieces including a barn, field, orchard, compost piles, and more. Each element had benefits and costs to be tallied at the end. When finished, the tally illustrated the reality of costs, benefits, and other trade offs to consider. It was an experiential learning exercise that taught tough decisions, systems thinking, scenario planning, and prioritization — all-important capacities for the evolution of the farm’s future.

Community members add ideas to the design boards that aided in the final decision-making. Photo Credit: Rebar

Community Design Meeting 2 was co-facilitated by the City of St. Paul and the Trust for Public Land. It happened right before the final Framework Plan was written. This meeting also used presentation boards showing design options for the buildings, farm layout, production strategies, soil remediation, and park elements. Participants could again physically add ideas, edits, and questions to the boards. Design Advisory Committee Meetings. This committee was made up of about 12 interested community members who did additional research and held discussions with the design team and Board of Directors. Specific tradeoffs that needed deeper discussion were handled in these smaller meetings, which were effective for finding solutions to complex design issues. Trust for Public Land and City of St. Paul Café Meetings. World Café style meetings were held by the Trust for Public Land and City of St. Paul to gather ideas through community discussion. Design Team members participated with residents. People gathered in small groups and discussed their dreams, ideas, concerns, and possible involvement for the farm. The simple act of sitting in a circle and sharing with each other created deeper discussion by the community about their ideas. Great progress was made in identifying patterns of possibilities and dynamics to consider.

The public process allowed time to discuss and try ideas on the design. Photo Credit: Jake Voit

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Engage in the Future - Step Up, Reach Out and Create Change


Discussion at Frogtown Neighborhood Association & Existing Community Meetings. Local people on the design team, Trust for Public Land staff, City Staff, and Board Members attended many community meetings that were already scheduled to gather additional ideas and invite participation in the design meetings. Decision Matrix. An important document was created that laid out why decisions were made to include or exclude elements in the Park and Farm. Kathleen Anglo, St. Paul Landscape Architect, found the document very helpful when talking with residents about why the design and plan was decided on because it, “outlined what was heard, what was decided, and why.” Resulting Frogtown Farm Framework Plan Antonio said, “We achieved a great, cohesive, functional, and pleasing design that many community members appreciated. Previous existing tensions around the site and project were not exacerbated by the process, but alleviated with conscious concern on the part of the design team and the thoughtful and respectful engagement on the part of the community. I would definitely measure the outcomes (thus far) as successful!”

The 125-page framework includes guides and tools for the ongoing evolution of the Frogtown Farm engagement process. It is a, “framework, not a master plan. A master plan is a finished blueprint with no room for adaptation. A framework allows for making decisions along the way. Where it is not necessary to detail design decisions, the team has not done so. We believe that it is best to let the participants guide most of these details, as long as there is sufficient focus on who the Farm serves and how it is organized. The Farm has been organized by community members from the start. Their ideals have been a major force in shaping the framework. The most important step is to prioritize and frame the site’s possibilities.” The Framework was submitted for approval and adoption by the Frogtown Farm Board of Directors in March 2014. (Framework Plan 2014) • Jake Voit | Contributing Author to “Designing Urban Agriculture,” Sustainability Intra-preneur, Project Manager at Arteka Companies. Consultant at Community Earth. Board Chair at World Café Community Foundation. Co-Chair at Permaculture Research InstituteCold Climate. (www.linkedin.com/in/jakevoit)

World Cafe style conversations regarding the final design assisted in prioritizing the phased development. Photo Credit: Rebar Summer 2014 | Issue #19

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Urban Land Use Impact on Pollinators By Ally Czechowicz One year ago I was thinking about bees. I was thinking about bees as welcomed residents of Nicollet Mall in downtown Minneapolis. I imagined diamondshaped hives niched between the double glass panes of a Nicollet Avenue skyway as canvasses in a living art exhibit. I saw sunlight streaming in and picking up amber hues before shooting hexagonal patterns across the corridor’s outdated carpet. Bees would buzz and bumble about their merry business of feasting on nectar from lots allowed to fallow and creative new planting spaces along the Mall. I imagined “Urban Honey” gracing the menus of Nicollet restaurants. Then I graduated. After graduation I joined the Planning and Landscape Architecture group at Stantec Consulting. In order to commit to integrating into my new team and learning how the profession operates, I dropped my disposition as a graduate student calling the shots of my academic project and adopted the humility of a rookie with much to learn. My thoughts of bees faded as I came to embrace the business of shop drawing reviews, clients’ agendas, and billable work. Without a client and project number, I couldn’t entertain the spectacle of integrating bees into an urban ecology anywhere. Today, I am back to thinking about bees. I have come back to thinking about bees thanks to the Women in Landscape Architecture (WILA) group (ASLA-MN), where I have been a member for several years. Last fall at our planning retreat, only months after starting with Stantec, our group’s founder, Joan Macleod (Damon Farber Associates) described her intensifying concern for bees as they struggle to keep colonies together and in good health. In particular, she described how landscape architects may be contributing to bees’ plight by failing to specify pesticidefree plants in their projects, expounding on the standard practice in

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the nursery trade to apply a neonicotinoid style pesticide to plants in order protect their stocks against insect damage. Let us back up: Neonicotinoids If you’re not already familiar with neonicotinoids, as I was less than a year ago, I’ve summarized some background on this class of pesticide. In short, neonicotinoids are worrisome for bee health because of their systemic approach to insect-deterrence, their widespread use, and the gravity of bee decline. SYSTEMIC APPROACH Neonicotinoids, often known as neonics, are synthetic forms of nicotine and were first registered for use in the mid 1990s. They function extremely well as pesticides because they act systemically; they are absorbed by plants through the vascular system and then lurk in various tissues until ingested by sap-sucking and leafchewing insects. Once ingested by these insects, neonics act on the nervous system, causing insects’ nerves to fire continually until they fail, leading to paralysis and death.

Engage in the Future - Step Up, Reach Out and Create Change


CURRENT ISSUES Neonics persistence in plants and the environment reads trouble for pollinators like bees who are not only disinterested in damaging plants but offer highly valuable pollination services. It has been documented that neonics can persist in soil for months or years after a single application – allowing untreated plants to absorb residues applied the previous year. The long-lasting presence of neonics in plants, although useful from a pest management standpoint, makes it possible for these chemicals to harm pollinators even when the initial application is made outside the bloom period. Although many recent studies suggest that residues from neonicotinoids can accumulate in the pollen and nectar of treated plants and thus present a potential exposure to pollinators, no one investigating the issue is suggesting that neonicotinoids are the sole cause of current bee declines. Beekeepers and entomologists both suggest that the cause of bee decline includes the widespread use of pesticides like neonicotinoids (but also others), as well as the spread of viral pathogens and parasitic mites in beehives. WIDESPREAD USE Neonics are widely used on farms, but are also found around our homes, schools, and other urban and managed landscapes. Millions of acres of American farmland have been treated with neonics. Perhaps most relevant to landscape architects as stewards of the built environment is how prolific neonics are in garden products. Garden products containing neonicotinoids can legally be applied in far greater concentrations in gardens (up to 100 times as great) than they can be on farms, which increases the risk to pollinators like bees. Since some of the most familiar pesticides available in garden centers contain neonics, is it any wonder that uncounted backyards and other managed landscapes have been treated with neonicotinoids at these alarming concentrations? GRAVITY OF THE BEE DECLINE. Pollinators support the reproduction of nearly 85 percent of the world’s flowering plants and 35 percent of global crop production. In the United States and other temperate climates, bees are considered the most important group of pollinators. The majority of the 4,000 species of bees that live in North America are native to the continent and provide unmanaged (free) pollination services worth $3 billion annually. Interestingly, it is the nonnative European honey bee (Apis mellifera) that is most widely managed for crop pollination. Honey bee pollination services have been valued at more than $15 billion annually in this country. Commercial production of many specialty crops like almonds, other tree nuts, berries, fruits and vegetables depend on pollination by honey bees. Given the role of bees in agriculture, it is frightening to contemplate trends like Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), the largescale loss of European honey bees first observed during the winter of 2006-2007 when the majority of worker bees left hives and did not return. Annual losses since then have averaged 33 percent one-third of which beekeepers attribute to CCD. Beyond supporting our food system, pollinators are keystone species in most terrestrial ecosystems and their conservation is critical to maintaining biodiversity. Beyond pollination, pollinating insects serve other important roles in these ecosystems like being staple food sources for birds and other vertebrates.

These three realities: the systemic and persistent nature of neonicotinoids, the pesticide’s widespread use – especially in landscapes designed by landscape architects, and the recent decline of bee populations are contributing to a consternating situation that demands our attention. WILA-Bees WILA has aimed to become a group of women landscape architectural professionals as outwardly focused as we are inwardly focused. So when Joan expressed her concern about bees, we rallied to engage the issue and inaugurated the WILA-Bee Committee. Since then, I have been thinking again about bees. And this time, I have not entertained solo installations in downtowns (at least not much:) but have been part of a group effort in abating bee decline. This shift from thinking solo about bees as a capstone student to engaging with colleagues to do something feels like the difference between pushing yourself for a better workout at the gym and cajoling your team for an upset in the World Cup. There is no comparison. The WILA-Bee Committee is composed of about 10 students and professionals. We are engaging the issue of bee decline in THREE primary ways: 1) we are educating ourselves about the issue; 2) we are seeking partnerships; and 3) we are treating this as a design opportunity. LEARNING There are many studies that have been published that detail the effects of neonicotinoids and other pesticides and factors contributing to bee decline. We believe it is critical to be informed about this research in order to make educated and strategic decisions as a committee. We accomplish this by connecting in real time using social media and have created an online wiki-type repository for articles, websites, and other relevant information. We are also seeking information at fun events like Policy and a Pint (hosted by the Current and the Citizens League), workshops hosted by the Arboretum, and documentaries. Being informed is critical to any definition of success for us. SEEKING PARTNERSHIPS If climate change (and my capstone project) has taught us anything – it is the inefficacy of solo efforts. Moreover, many organizations, communities, and individuals are concurrently working to mitigate bee decline. Thus it is strategic for us to reach out to these other acting groups to learn about their efforts, resources, and other partnerships with an eye for leverage points and synergies. So far we have reached out to non-profits, local businesses, university researchers, politicians, and significant landholders like the University of Minnesota and the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board. We wonder about our role as landscape architects in this larger web of effort – but are confident that this organizational mapping will result in great insights for further action. DESIGN OPPORTUNITY We desire to treat any action we elect to pursue as a design opportunity where we devote our outstanding critical and creative thinking skills to the action at hand. We on the >>

Summer 2014 | Issue #19

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WILA-Bee Committee are cognizant of what I’ll call the shoemaker effect, which terms why the shoemakers’ children wear the worst shoes of all. We designers are adept at out-of-the-box thinking and strategy in managing expectations, funding projects, and overall making projects happen for our clients, yet too often we deserve blame for not applying this skillset onto ourselves and non-day job issues we are passionate about. Isn’t it about time we wielded our ferocious skills in other areas? The WILA-Bee Committee is committed to doing something about bee decline with all the sharpness we bring to our day jobs as designers. Where to start. That said, our first order of business is hosting garden parties. Let me tell you why. Engagement for us, a group of ladies working outside of 9 to 5, looks like dissecting this lofty goal of doing something about bee decline into energizing tidbits that fit into our lives - before work, over lunch, after putting kids to bed, and over the weekend. We are also committed to starting in our arena; namely on drawings and in specifications. We will start here for three reasons: 1) this is an area where we have control in the construction of our projects; 2) we can start tomorrow and earn early wins to sustain our energy on this long-term effort; and 3) if we do pollinator landscapes right, we not only quit our hand in the pesticidepedaling business, but we could actually do something positive to aid bee health like providing refuge. The WILA-Bee Committee is finding, however, that many of the do something chunks that we’ve outlined are still too big or involved, or we’re still too busy, or we’re not the right person for the task (i.e. are not energized by entomological research). In response, we’ve decided that hiring an enthusiastic graduate research assistant is right for us at this time. We want to support someone to take sustained time and effort to summarize the plethora of research. This research assistant will then meet with a small group of professionals and begin translating the relevant pieces of research into best practices. This new set of best practices in the useful form of specifications and planting guidelines can then be promulgated to help our community of professionals implement landscapes with integrity. So here we are organizing garden parties. We envision these garden parties to be fun, informal get-together’s where we invite our networks, build awareness for bees, and pitch for a few bucks in the name of participating in the solution. In truth, after 5 p.m., we are also energized by spending a summer evening gathered around a bonfire, catching up with a pint and friends and engaging an issue such as bee decline. Perhaps after we throw a few of these parties and raise $5,000 to hire a research assistant, translate that research, and distribute it, some of us within the landscape architecture community will see the full value of that work and throw in a few extra bucks in support. Frankly, I am hoping that some of us are forward-thinking enough to see the value of this work and throw in that few bucks now.

the crux of environmental crises today, isn’t it? Personally, I would respond with gusto to an RFP to research, summarize, and translate relevant research into useful frameworks for supporting pollinators. But the market does not yet support professionals like myself to do such work, despite the looming crisis. Meanwhile, our group is building bridges and hoping to extend doing something beyond landscape architecture. Impressed by our young leaders who took a year-and-a-half to put on the “Watershed Event” this spring, perhaps a next step will look like a symposium. We are open to ideas on how to do more. If you would like to give input, perhaps look for a garden party near you or schedule a lunchtime meeting with one of us to contribute your ideas, network, sharpness, and pocketbook to engage a real issue. Some last thoughts I’d like to leave you with some last thoughts. I’m finding that engagement is necessarily doing. It is not just thinking about something like my capstone project. It is riling up your colleagues, looking for opportunities to act, and then designing those actions for maximum impact. Engagement is also doing something when you don’t have the time. But there is hope. We WILA-Bee members will attest that when something is energizing like meeting up to discuss this issue and crafting actionable goals like hosting small garden parties, that we make time for it. Likewise, here I am, leaning into the discomfort that is this article being overdue to pitch an idea to my community for us to be leaders of the built environment. •

Ally Czechowicz studied ecology as an undergraduate at Luther College where her advisor suggested she take his entomology course. She’s entertained a small obsession with insects ever since, having researched invasive root weevils in Midwest woodlands, taken an urban beekeeping course, and stalked walking sticks on several continents. Ally completed her MLA in 2013 (University of Minnesota) and now works as a Graduate Landscape Architect with the Urban Design/Planning Team at Stantec. Sources http://www.xerces.org/wings-magazine/neonicotinoids-in-your-garden/ http://www.epa.gov/oppsrrd1/registration_review/highlights.htm#nn http://www.forbes.com/sites/jonentine/2014/02/05/bee-deaths-reversal-asevidence-points-away-from-neonics-as-driver-pressure-builds-to-rethink-ban/ http://ento.psu.edu/publications/are-neonicotinoids-killing-bees http://www.ars.usda.gov/News/docs.htm?docid=15572#public

I admit that this model of garden parties begs the question of the economics of raising the bar for professional practice preemptively, before new policy or a steeper crisis demands it. When I do work that I can’t directly barter value for (a.k.a. non-billable work) like WILA-Bee tasks, I contemplate why such important work couldn’t have emerged from the market. But that’s

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NSP Veteran’s Park Photo Credit: DSGW Architects

Memorial Gardens for the

By Brenda Bredahl

Next Generation

Communities create legacy spaces for veterans, active duty service members and citizens

V

eterans' memorials have long served as outdoor tributes to men and women who have been lost, injured or captured during war and conflict. Names are etched in stone for perpetuity, a lasting reminder of their brave service. In recent years, communities have taken this honored tradition further by creating outdoor spaces that also honor active and retired military and, in some cases, emergency services personnel.

Landscaped and hardscaped memorial gardens - typically situated on municipal properties, donated land, public parks or in city cemeteries - bring communities together. The collaborative process of constructing a memorial space can be rewarding, bringing together veterans' groups, citizens, school and youth groups, civic leaders, local businesses and others far and wide. Materials and services may be discounted or donated by local businesses, and volunteers often provide sweat equity. A Tale of Two Cities Two neighboring St. Paul suburbs are among the municipalities that have embraced building veterans' memorials. The City of Oakdale Veterans' Memorial was completed in 2012. Next door in North St. Paul, an entire city park will be developed as a veterans' park and memorial, commencing this year. "The Oakdale Veterans' Memorial was a rewarding collaboration for everyone involved and a beautiful and fitting tribute to veterans and their families," says Bill Rasmussen, a member of VFW Post 1350 who helped established the Oakdale Veterans’ Memorial, a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization. “It's a place of honor, reflection and pride. Oakdale citizens now have a place for Memorial Day and Veterans’ Day observances and other events.” Rasmussen said the process from start to finish took about three years. "At the start, we worked with a certified public accountant to handle the legal process and our fundraising, and we worked with the city council to gain public input and approval," he said.

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"We were offered a spot on city hall property, and local resident Joe Samuel, who was with MSA Professional Services at the time, provided the initial design at a substantial discount." Through the 501(c)3 organization, members of American Legion Post 39 and VFW Post 1350, citizens and city officials and employees completed the planning, raised funds and oversaw construction. The group made about $8,000 from the raffle of a motorcycle provided to the group at wholesale from St. Paul Harley-Davidson. About $19,000 was collected from the pre-sale of engraved pavers, and the remainder of the $44,000 project was funded by a low-interest loan from the city. The loan payment and maintenance is provided by the ongoing sale of engraved pavers, an annual fish fry fundraiser and a presence at community events like a weekly farmers' market and summer festivals. "We were lucky in that everything fell together for us," Rasmussen said. "While our initial estimate was about $90,000, we talked with the contractor and engineers at the retaining wall supplier, who helped come up with an alternative wall design that brought the cost down to $44,000." The 800 square-foot hardscape project wasn't without its challenges. "A fiber optic line to city hall needed to be replaced, so we had to wait on the utility company for that," said Rasmussen. "We also were able to save an eight-inch diameter oak tree and move it to the city band shell. This was the first time the city transplanted such a large tree. Employees from the City of

Engage in the Future - Step Up, Reach Out and Create Change


REMEMBRANCE

Woodbury came to watch because they wanted to move some large trees, too." Completed and dedicated in October 2012, the Oakdale Veterans' Memorial includes a retaining wall with pilasters framing black granite commemorative plaques with an image of a bald eagle, a poem, dedication text and insignia from the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, Coast Guard and Merchant Marines. Engraved paving stones with the names of active, retired or deceased veterans are set in various areas through the hardscaped spaces, and the landscaped spaces are enhanced by natural stone benches, water features and basalt pillars. Next-Door Neighbors Residents in neighboring North St. Paul also had been thinking about a veterans' park and memorial for years. In 2011, members of the same VFW and Legion, city officials and the North High School Junior ROTC program joined together to transform the former Cannon Park at the north corner of Margaret Street and Highway 36 into the North St. Paul Veterans Park and Memorial Wall. "The idea was started in the 1980s, but (was) put on a back burner," says Joe Zakrzewski, a member of American Legion Post 39 who serves as committee secretary for the North St. Paul Veterans’ Park Foundation, organized through Post 39. Last year members of the foundation attended four city council meetings to get the process started, which resulted in a statement of public support via a resolution.

The project picked up steam, Zakrzewski says, when articles in the local newspaper highlighted the committee's progress and when the foundation regularly set up a table at the city's Friday night car shows last summer. As in Oakdale, the purchase of engraved pavers was open to veterans from any locale, and plans were made for a memorial wall to include the names of veterans from all conflicts and eras with the zip code 55109 listed as Killed in Action, Missing in Action and Prisoners of War. The foundation is currently completing the permitting process, and a Lake Elmo architecture firm, DSGW, is providing the design pro bono. "The NSP Veterans Park Committee was integral in designing and conceptualizing the project throughout the process. It was a highlight to collaborate with the committee," said Steve Knutson, a designer with DSGW, who is involved with the project. "DSGW has provided design and visualization assistance for both planning and fund-raising, also technical specifications and construction documents for construction." Knutson’s design is intended to reflect patriotism, says Dan Fisher, co-chair of the NSP Veteran’s Park Foundation. “Veterans Park is visually unique in that it coordinates the patriotic colors and symbols of the American flag to tell the story in pavers of American Veterans of all eras in the North Saint Paul community, the state of Minnesota, and the United States,” he says. Fortunately, fundraising has exceeded expectations. "In 16 months, we had raised $94,000, and people from New York to Texas purchased pavers, including one to remember a veteran from the Civil War," said Zakrzewski. "In March, committee members co-chairs Fisher and Tom Trost along with the mayor and a city council member presented the project to the Minnesota Legislature, focusing on the regional and statewide importance of the veterans’ park and memorial." That resulted in state bonding and Legacy funding totaling almost $110,000. With ongoing fundraising and sale of engraved pavers, Zakrzewski expects that all phases of construction will be adequately funded. The foundation is also offering pavers to groups like the Order of the Purple Heart and businesses who wish to purchase larger pavers as an honorarium to vets. "We hope to have a formal groundbreaking this fall and have our first Memorial Day service in 2015," Zakrzewski says. Rasmussen says a community memorial project is simply dedicated people working together. “We are very grateful to all of the volunteers and businesses who helped with the project or donated materials and time and made this project a reality," he says. •

Bill Rasmussen (left), Randy Bastyr (right), retired City of Oakdale parks superintendent, and Jerry Koecher (center), Linwood Contracting, worked together with their community to make the Oakdale Veterans’ Memorial a reality. The memorial created with retaining walls holding three commemorative plaques and engraved concrete paving stones with the names of veterans. Photo Credit: Brenda Bredahl

Brenda Bredahl is a writer/editor at VERSA-LOK Retaining Wall Systems in Oakdale, MN. Her articles and photos have appeared in the Chicago Tribune, Wisconsin People & Ideas magazine, Minnesota Monthly and elsewhere.

Summer 2014 | Issue #19

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2014 Awards Celebration & Gala Varsity Theater, Minneapolis

The Varsity Theater in Minneapolis near the University of Minnesota, East Bank campus was host to the annual Awards Celebration and Gala on May 2nd. Built in 1915, the Varsity Theater was one of the last vaudeville houses in the City of Minneapolis. Remodeled in the 1930s in the Art Deco style, the theater served the Dinkytown neighborhood for the next fifty years. In 2005, the Varsity Theater relaunched as a vaudeville house for the 21st century and was the back drop for Minnesota’s landscape architecture community for the evening.

Bryan Carlson, Chris Behringer, Matt Rensch Chapter Past Pre sident, Preside nt & President Elect

ASLA-MN acknowledged outstanding projects that represent the talented work of local professionals and students. In addition to the design awards, the chapter also awarded awards of recognition to recognize outstanding regional professionals that contribute to the local profession. Congratulations to all the award winners - your talent is a true testament of your leadership in landscape architecture, your engagement in our communities and your commitment to our environment. The Executive Committee looks forward to another successful year for Minnesota’s creative landscape architecture community.

Service Awards H.W.S. Cleveland Award

Ally Czechowicz

Theodore Wirth Award for Excellence in Parks Award

Don Ganje, FASLA

Lob Pine Award

Ellen Stewart, ASLA

Women in Landscape Architecture (WILA-MN) Student Leadership Award

Solange Guillaume

Community Design Excellence Award

Paul Labovitz

Support for Emerging Professionals Award

Joan MacLeod, ASLA

University of Minnesota Student Awards Honor Award

Amber Hill and Erin Garnaas-Holmes

Merit Award

Michael Schiebe and Michael Richardson

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RECOGNITION

General Design Awards University of MN Biomedical Discover District & Cardiovascular & Cancer Research Facility

Award of Excellence

Damon Farber Associates

Honor Award

Hammel Green & Abrahamson, Inc. American Swedish Institute

Merit Award

Damon Farber Associates

University of MN Amplatz Children’s Hospital

Merit Award

LHB, Inc.

Hazelden Ignatia Courtyard

Merit Award

LHB, Inc.

MCTC Fine Arts Plaza

Residential Design Award Honor Award

Coen + Partners

Wood House

Analysis and Planning Awards Honor Award

SRF Consulting Group, Inc.

Strategic Stormwater Solutions for Transit Oriented Development

Merit Award

City of St. Paul Department of Parks and Recreation Design and Construction Division

Great River Passage Master Plan

Merit Award

Hammel Green & Abrahamson, Inc. Nicollet Corridor Analysis and Vision

Merit Award

University of Minnesota Center for Changing Landscapes

Winona + Riverfront Vision Plan

Coen + Partners

Movement on Main

Hang Su

Everywhere Nowhere, Urban Brownfield Transformation & Willamette Falls Rediscovery

Unbuilt Works Award Merit Award

Student Award Merit Award

People’s Choice Award City of St. Paul Department of Parks and Recreation Design and Construction Division Great River Passage Master Plan and Bruce Vento Nature Sanctuary

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Service Awards

Community Design Excellence Award Paul Labovitz

National Park Service, Mississippi National River & Recreation Area Superintendent The Community Design Excellence Award is given to an individual who has recognized the role urban design and environmental excellence play in maintaining and enhancing the quality of life in Minnesota’s towns and cities. Recipients have shown a strong commitment to the work of landscape architects, sustainable design, and place making. As superintendent of the National Park Service for the Mississippi National River & Recreation Area for the last 7 years, Paul Labovitz has been an outstanding spokesperson and supporter for urban development and park planning that provide connections to natural areas and open space. Active in the quest to get people outside and on the river, Paul’s enthusiasm has generated incalculable stewardship of our environment and support of landscape architecture. With a keen understanding of the interrelatedness of the urban and natural areas along the river, Paul has been a great supporter of landscape architecture during his tenure.

Theodore Wirth Award for Excellence in Parks Award Don Ganje, FASLA

St. Paul Parks & Recreation Department The Theodore Wirth Award for Excellence in Parks is presented to an individual, group, organization, business, governmental or non-governmental agency who has been influential in the planning, design, development, administration, maintenance or preservation of an historic site, landmark or cultural landscape in a park, park system or wildlife preserve. This year’s recipient, Don Ganje, is a Senior Landscape Architect with the St. Paul Parks & Recreation Department. Don’s position has evolved into a 38-year career with St. Paul and is directly responsible for the design and development of a significant portion of the city’s 4,600 acre park system, a major portion of which has now been designated as a National Park. Don’s skill at listening, respecting and responding to the views of individuals has become an important component in the success of his valued and utilized designs.

Lob Pine Award

Ellen Stewart, ASLA

St. Paul Parks & Recreation Department The Lob Pine Award is the highest honor given by ASLA-MN and has been awarded annually since 1989. Recipients have demonstrated exemplary leadership and mentorship for the landscape architecture community over an extended period of time. Ellen Stewart has been involved in ASLA in various roles at both the chapter and national levels for over a decade. Ellen’s strong relationships with ASLA staff and members of our chapter as well as other chapters has ensured that as decisions are made about policies and programs for landscape architects, our members have a voice. Ellen graduated with the mission to focus on outdoor spaces that foster environmental stewardship and strengthen the communities around them. Ellen is an articulate and tireless advocate for ASLA- MN and the landscape architecture profession and we are pleased to recognize her devotion.

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Support for Emerging Professionals Award Joan MacLeod, ASLA Damon Farber Associates

The Support of Emerging Professionals award is given to a person or group for outstanding achievement in service that encourages and implements sustained achievement and support for emerging professionals in Minnesota. Recipients show commitment to successful recruitment, integration, mentorship, promotion and retention of emerging professionals in the established professional community. Joan MacLeod has earned a reputation for being both a communicator who has helped to build bridges between communities and clients and a creative thinker who brings sustainable and achievable solutions to complex problems. Joan’s creative thinking has brought many rewards to the young women she has mentored in her career. In 2011, Joan launched Women in Landscape Architecture-MN, a professional networking and mentoring forum to support Minnesota women in landscape architecture including long-time practitioners, young professionals, undergraduate and graduate students, and women considering the profession.

Women in Landscape Architecture Student Leadership Award Solange Guillaume

The WILA Student Leadership Award goal is to recognize the accomplishments of emerging women leaders in our field. The award competition is open to second and third year women masters in landscape architecture students at the University of Minnesota. As cochair of Students for Design Activism, Solange Guillaume was instrumental in both the organization’s entry for Northern Spark - an interactive light sculpture based on flow patterns of the Mississippi River. Solange also co-led the Northrop Residency and was one of the masterminds behind the Watershed Event, a public event created with the Floodplain Collective that gathered 150 local landscape architects, planners, policy-makers and engaged citizens.

Horace William Shaler (H.W.S.) Cleveland Award Ally Czechowicz

The H.W.S. Cleveland Award is given annually to an individual trained in landscape architecture who is not yet licensed. Recipients have shown through their work and service to ASLA-MN that they have the potential to be a leader in the profession. Ally Czechowicz has served as the Co-Director of Awards & Banquet for ASLA-MN over the past year was vice president of the ASLA-MN student chapter in 2010 -11, a member of SDA (Students for Design Activism) and a volunteer for Habitat for Humanity. Ally is a co-founding member of an aquaponics start-up, a venture where they pair fish raising with produce cultivation indoors in a controlled environment all year round. Ally received the WILA-MN 2013 Student Leadership Award and gives every indication that she will continue to be a leader in the Landscape Architecture Profession long into the future.

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Student Awards In an effort to reward students demonstrating outstanding academic achievement, each year ASLA invites accredited Universities to nominate a number of their graduating students for the ASLA National Honor and Merit Awards. The University of Minnesota faculty selects four nominees from a list of eligible candidates who have demonstrated the highest level of academic scholarship and have exhibited self-motivation, responsibility, and a willingness to work with others. The nominees present their academic work to a jury of professionals, who then vote to award up to two Honor and two Merit awards.

Merit Award, Michael Schiebe Michael Schiebe’s passion for system-based site design has grown immensely over the past three years while studying at the University of Minnesota. With previous coursework in urban studies, he has always been fascinated with the way in which cities grow and adapt to shifting cultural and societal motions. A semester abroad studying the intersection of water and urban systems in Europe allowed him to experience and gain knowledge of a vast array of new technologies and design strategies. Michael’s capstone project investigates the balance between river and city in Mankato, with an emphasis on readapting existing infrastructure to create a more vibrant and beneficial public riverfront space that enhances river access and connections.

Merit Award, Michael Richardson Mike Richardson’s interest in working toward creating great places was formed by living in a wide variety of locations before beginning his studies at the University of Minnesota. From a small town on the Great Plains to an economically depressed area in Maine, to a Florida that saw boom and bust, his opinions about how places should function has continually evolved. He cares about connecting people to place and to each other in a real, emotional way. He believes that as human beings, we connect to places much like we connect to people. Places can intimidate us and they can comfort us. We can fall in love with places and the relationships that we have with them can mature or erode through time. As an individual who has had the great fortune of preparing for a career in this field, it is his goal to do as much as he can to strengthen those bonds of person and place.

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Honor Award, Amber Hill Amber Hill’s area of design focus centered around creating public space in low-income communities that makes a connection between the built environment and nature. Her capstone project focused on the Time Check neighborhood in Cedar Rapids, Iowa which was recently destroyed by the flood of 2008 and was demolished to create a new flood management system. FLOODABLE is a memorial that intersected the remembrance of this lost community with the revealing of a river’s daily to extreme fluctuations. Amber’s work has been influenced by her upbringing, her background in sociology and world travel, as well as her interest in photography. Throughout graduate school Amber worked as an intern at oslund.and.assoc. and co-taught an undergraduate design course as well as participating in community engagement through the Center for Urban and Regional Affairs and the Women in Landscape Architecture (WILA) group. Amber is currently working at SRF Consulting Group and her current project participation includes the Central Mississippi Riverfront and the Fargo Red River Diversion.

National Student

Honor Award, Erin Garnaas-Holmes Erin Garnaas-Holmes came to the profession of landscape architecture from the field of social justice work in Washington, DC, where he coordinated volunteer efforts to provide services to low-income residents and spearheaded the construction of a green roof vegetable garden that increased a food pantry’s access to healthy produce and green space. He is now earning concurrent degrees in landscape architecture and urban planning at the University of Minnesota, hoping to continue to expand equitable access to sustainable design. As a leader of Students for Design Activism, Erin has organized and directed community events, design charrettes, and public art projects that illuminate cultural connections to shared public resources and build community capacity to enhance the environment through cooperative visioning and design. His capstone project explores how ecological restoration efforts can become leverage for social justice within the Anacostia River watershed in Washington, DC.

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Award of Excellence

University of Minnesota

Biomedical Discovery District and Cardiovascular & Cancer Research Facility Damon Farber Associates Project Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota Category: General Design The Biomedical Discovery District (BDD) exemplifies the value that landscape architects can bring to transforming spaces to meet an institution’s vision. The University of Minnesota embarked on a journey to become a top research institution. Through the leadership of the Landscape Architect disconnected research facilities, parking lots, abandoned grain elevators and railroad yards were transformed into a vibrant, inviting, cohesive research complex. Interconnected memorable spaces were designed to invite informal collaboration between researchers to support cross pollination of ideas to solve complex health issues. The project met the Minnesota Sustainability Challenge and has attracted researchers from around the globe.

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Honor Award

American Swedish Institute Hammel Green and Abrahamson, Inc. Project Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota Category: General Design The Nelson Cultural Center at the American Swedish Institute (ASI) reflects and builds upon the history, culture and commitment to community at the core of the 83-year-old institution. The landscape architect completed a sensitive addition to an historic landmark and a new cultural campus that transforms an entire block into an inspiring urban cultural space. The design process was driven by a holistic approach to building sustainable communities, essential to the mission of ASI.

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Merit Award

University of Minnesota Amplatz Children’s Hospital Damon Farber Associates Project Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota Category: General Design The University of Minnesota Amplatz Children’s Hospital is among the best in the country according to US News and World Report. The project included a 40,000 square-foot transformation of an existing parking lot into an innovative series of intimate plazas, donor gardens, and play spaces for the children able to venture outdoors. The design affords the hospital a new presence on the historic Riverside Avenue in Minneapolis. The landscape is a presentation of transitions, incorporating places of comfort, reflection, and recovery with playful forms and elements for children, their families, and the community, regardless of age or medical condition.

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Merit Award

Hazelden Ignatia Courtyard LHB, Inc. Project Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota Category: General Design Hazelden’s facilities are an essential part of the healing process for clients of this renowned addiction treatment organization. At Ignatia Courtyard, the challenge was to transform one of the most important spaces at Hazelden, it’s entry. The redesigned courtyard sets the tone for the journey to recovery. A 150-foot long arcing slate wall draws visitors into the site. A water feature, surrounded by colorful perennials, provides a focal point and sense of respite. It is comforting and inspiring, offering warmth, familiarity, and hope for patients and families at the beginning steps of their process to transform their lives.

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Merit Award

MCTC Fine Arts Plaza LHB, Inc. Project Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota Category: General Design The Fine Arts Plaza at the Minneapolis Community and Technical College erases the old division between the campus and the north corner of Loring Park - pulling down walls, opening up views, and drawing green right up to the doors of the Fine Arts and Student Centers. Terraced gardens overflow with a soft palette of blue and lavender plants, complementing the linearity of the dark concrete seatwalls. Pervious pavers sweep across the space, contributing to the underground stormwater system. LED strip lights on the walls make this composition as dramatic during night performances as it is during the day.

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Honor Award

Wood House Coen + Partners Project Location: Wicker Park, Chicago, Illinois Category: Residential Design This landscape is a comprehensive site design for a newly constructed home in Wicker Park, Chicago. The residence is situated around an interior courtyard that was designed in concert with the architectural elements, creating a calming urban refuge. The landscape intent is to create a series of linked site installations that artfully address the client’s desire for privacy, extend the living space to the outdoors, and serve as a viewing garden from the visually permeable residence when the landscape is unoccupied. The landscape functionally extends the active and contemplative interior elements to the outdoors, creating a seamless connection from inside out and maximizing opportunities for rest, recreation, and introspection. The project illustrates the understated elegance that can be obtained when a strong design philosophy is paired with effective design collaboration.

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Honor Award

Strategic Stormwater Solutions for Transit Oriented Development Green Line LRT Corridor SRF Consulting Group, Inc. Project Location: Category:

Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota Analysis and Planning

The Strategic Stormwater Solutions for Transit-Oriented Development project developed an innovative stormwater management concept of shared, stacked-function green infrastructure (SSGI) – a system in which stormwater generated from multiple parcels is jointly treated in a manner that provides economic, environmental, and social benefits. By treating stormwater as an amenity through SSGI, this project demonstrated that creative, collaborative design is a path to achieve vibrant community spaces where water is revealed and celebrated. A replicable approach and usable products were developed that provide tools for elected officials, developers, and agencies to help meet TOD goals along the Twin Cities’ newest LRT line.

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Merit Award

Great River Passage Master Plan City of Saint Paul Department of Parks and Recreation Design and Construction Division Project Location: Category:

St. Paul, Minnesota Analysis and Planning

The Great River Passage Master Plan will transform Saint Paul in profound ways. The Plan provides strategies for development of the natural, economic, cultural, and recreational potential of the Mississippi River corridor which will bring new life and economic vitality to the City, while preserving and enhancing unique and critical natural systems. Based on three principles for riverfront development - to be more natural, more urban, and more connected - this legacy plan lays the framework to unify Saint Paul’s riverfront into one grand and comprehensive vision, to be implemented over the next several decades.

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Merit Award

Nicollet Corridor Analysis and Vision Hammel Green and Abrahamson, Inc. Project Location: Category:

Minneapolis, Minnesota Analysis and Planning

The Nicollet Mall Analysis + Vision (NCAV) was commissioned by the Minneapolis Downtown Council in partnership with the City of Minneapolis. The plan was led by the Landscape Architect (LA) to understand the need, problems and potential of a revitalized Mall. The product is a comprehensive 100-page document that captures the entire scope and vision of the corridor. The plan is supported by an economic analysis designed to build support among local businesses and government officials. Collectively, the plan envisions Nicollet Mall as an active urban environment while creating critical connections within the city’s green infrastructure network.

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Merit Award

RiverFIRST Framework Plan and Priority Projects Tom Leader Studio Project Location: Category:

Minneapolis, Minnesota Analysis and Planning

Out of 55 preliminary designs from 14 countries, the RiverFIRST team, led by the landscape architecture firm, won the Minneapolis Riverfront Design Competition. The design team transformed RiverFIRST into a workable Framework Plan for short- and long-term development. The proposal transforms the Mississippi from a back-door aquatic truck dock into an active front door amenity, establishing parks as the engine for economic development, knitting both sides of the riverfront together with their surrounding communities, and re-focusing the city toward one of the world’s great rivers, an environmental amenity that defines Minneapolis’ civic identity - past, present and future.

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Merit Award

Winona+Riverfront Vision Plan University of Minnesota Center for Changing Landscapes Project Location: Category:

Winona, Minnesota Analysis and Planning

This collaborative project empowers Winona to “take back” a historically important Mississippi River downtown riverfront open space that was left largely unusable by US Army Corps flood protection “improvements” in the 20th century. Working with a local political and business stakeholders and civic leaders, the project team generated innovative, 21st century strategic plan and policy recommendations. The result is a Vision Plan that identifies unrealized riverfront potential, strategies to correct the unintended consequences of over-engineered flood infrastructure, provides a venue for grassroots cultural events and leads a river-based renaissance of river-based, context-sensitive recreation and tourism for the community.

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Merit Award

Movement on Main Coen + Partners Project Location: Syracuse, New York Category: Unbuilt Works The Movement on Main streetscape design competition set for the ambitious goal of creating a “healthy main street.” The plan centers on sustaining and improving the neighborhood’s iconography and built fabric and the physical and mental health of its residents through meaningful and economical landscape interventions. The revitalized landscape presents new opportunities for active and passive connections to nature and serves as a catalyst for new investment to the neighborhood. The project has the potential to serve as a model for other communities seeking to implement similar projects conflating design, redevelopment, and public health.

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Merit Award

Everywhere, Nowhere Urban Brownfield Transformation & Willamette Falls Rediscovery Hang Su Project Location: Oregon City, Oregon Category: Student Work The overall theme of the task is to repurpose a 23-acre industrial site that is located along the Willamette Falls in the historic Oregon City, with the goal of transforming this former Paper Mill site into a tourism engine for the Oregon City. The approach of this design is to introduce an art zone into the site, which aims at redefine the valuable cultural heritage of Oregon Trail, and also to provide improved public access to the falls. For the first time in 150 years, people will have the opportunity to rediscover this cultural and scenic treasure.

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International Market Square 275 Market Street, Suite 54 Minneapolis, MN 55405-1627 T: 612.339.0797 F: 612.338.7981 info@asla-mn.org www.asla-mn.org

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