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ASIAN CITY GUIDE Asia News Network

A guide to leading cities in Asia

THIS WEEK IN

Hong Kong What's on

BEIJING BANGKOK MANILA HONG KOKG SEOUL TOKYO SAPPORO TAIPEI SHANGHAI

HIGHLIGHTS

Shopping

Eateries


HONGKONG

ASIAN CITY GUIDE

What’s on

¬ A Symphony of Lights Where: Tsim Sha Tsui water waterfront, Wainchai promenade What: This nightly light and sound show combines interactive lights of 45 buildings on both sides of the Victoria Harbour accompanied by music. Held every night at 8pm.

¬ Hong Kong Fringe Club Where: 2 Lower Albert Road, Central What: Try catching a current show, including art exhibitions, live performances or comedy nights by local emerging artists at the centrally located Fringe Club, where the commercial city’s culturally minded converge.


HONGKONG

ASIAN CITY GUIDE

What’s on

¬ Dialogue in the Dark

¬ Feng Shui class Where: The Household Centre, Mei Foo What: In this specially constructed pitchblack exhibition, visually impaired guides lead the sighted to discover various parts of Hong Kong via hearing, touch, smell and taste. Tours offered in English, Cantonese and Mandarin.

Where: Flat B and C, 14/F Golden Hill Commercial Building, 39-41 Argyle Street, Mongkok What: Attend a free Feng Shui class by master Alex Yu, who teaches how a basic knowledge of feng shui (the ancient practice of positioning objects and buildings in harmony with nature) can benefit you at work and at home.


HONGKONG

ASIAN CITY GUIDE

What’s on

¬ Cantonese opera class

¬ Tea class Where: Lock Cha Tea Shop, G/F KS Lo Gallery, Hong Kong Park, Admiralty What: Join this tasty and relaxing journey into the traditional culture of Chinese teadrinking. You’ll be introduced to the varieties of tea, drinking etiquette and a collection of rare teapots. Held 4pm to 5pm every Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Registration required.

Where: Lobby of the Hong Kong Heritage Museum, 1 Man Lam Road, Shatin What: This free appreciation class opens your eyes to this unique and colloquial art form that blends Chinese legend, music and drama. Not only will you be able to view the colourful costumes worn by performers, you will also attend a live opera by a local troupe.


HONGKONG

ASIAN CITY GUIDE

What’s on

¬ Kung Fu corner Where: Sculpture Walk, Kowloon Park, 22 Austin Road, Kowloon Park What: This free event held 2:30 pm4:30pm every Sunday offers a variety of traditional kung fu demonstrations and cultural performances, from drumming to dragon dances. Audiences are invited to try out their skills.

¬ Duk Ling ride ¬ Hong Kong Story Where: G/F Hong Kong Museum of History, 100 Chatham Road South, Tsim Sha Tsui What: How did Hong Kong become the international city it is today? Visit this multimedia exhibition that takes you back in time. Expect to discover the city through artifacts and mockup scenes of an ancient village temple or a typical Hong Kong home in the 1930s.

Where: Kowloon public pier, Tsim Sha Tsui (disembarks at Hong Kong Island) What: Sail on a Duk Ling, an authentic Chinese junk originally manned by Chinese fisherman, for a 360-degree view of the city’s magnificent skyline and harbour. It costs HK$100 per person.


HONGKONG

ASIAN CITY GUIDE

What’s on

¬ Kung Fu corner Where: Sculpture Walk, Kowloon Park, 22 Austin Road, Kowloon Park What: This free event held 2:30 pm4:30pm every Sunday offers a variety of traditional kung fu demonstrations and cultural performances, from drumming to dragon dances. Audiences are invited to try out their skills.

¬ Duk Ling ride ¬ Hong Kong Story Where: G/F Hong Kong Museum of History, 100 Chatham Road South, Tsim Sha Tsui What: How did Hong Kong become the international city it is today? Visit this multimedia exhibition that takes you back in time. Expect to discover the city through artifacts and mockup scenes of an ancient village temple or a typical Hong Kong home in the 1930s.

Where: Kowloon public pier, Tsim Sha Tsui (disembarks at Hong Kong Island) What: Sail on a Duk Ling, an authentic Chinese junk originally manned by Chinese fisherman, for a 360-degree view of the city’s magnificent skyline and harbour. It costs HK$100 per person.


HONGKONG

ASIAN CITY GUIDE

Shopping

¬ Sin Tat Plaza (先達廣場) A well known bustling cellphone and electronics plaza in the heart of Kowloon. Not only will you be able to find the latest and used phones, but also cool gadgets from cameras, PDAs to accessories. You might see plenty of big phone companies on the ground floor, but the real bargains are on the first and second floors.

¬ Argyle Centre (旺角中心)] For a colourful range of cheap fashion and accessories, climb the overcrowded stairs of the multiple-level shopping mall featuring a maze of microscopic shops selling the hottest trends from South Korea, Japan and Taiwan at excellent prices (better than Causeway Bay and even the street markets nearby). Don’t forget to bargain.

Address: Argyle Center, 688 Nathan Rd., Mong Kok 旺角彌敦道688號

Address: 83 Argyle Street, Mongkok

旺角亞皆老街83號


HONGKONG

ASIAN CITY GUIDE

Shopping

¬ The Landmark

(置地廣場)

Situated in the heart of the city’s central business district, this exclusive luxury mall is known for its 200 international designer brands including Louis Vuitton, Tiffany and Vivienne Tam, as well as fine dining options and prestigious Michelin-starred restaurants. The airy Café Landmark is a favourite hangout for local celebrities. Don’t be surprised to see paparazzi milling around. Address: 15 Queen’s Rd, Central, Central

中環皇后大道中15號

¬ Cat Street (古董街) Nicknamed Thieves’ Market, Cat Street is famous for its fantastic collection of antique merchants and art galleries selling a motley collection of Chinese knick-knacks: from Ming dynasty furniture to propaganda poster from Chairman

Mao’s era. Bargains can also be found in jade, porcelain, silk and wooden handicrafts.

Address: 上環荷里活道及摩

羅上街


HONGKONG

ASIAN CITY GUIDE

Shopping

¬ K11 K11 doubles as an art gallery and shopping mall. It not only features a broad selection of fashion, electronics and beauty products but also art exhibitions and cool masterpieces by local artists all year round. Visitors with overseas passports can claim a coupon booklet with discount offers from the concierge.

Address: 18 Hanoi Road, Tsim Sha Tsui 尖沙咀河內道18號

¬ Island Beverly

(金百利商場)

The multi-floored mall might not catch your eye amid the city’s skyscrapers, but it’s a hidden gem for fashion gurus. Expect to find hundreds of boutiques no bigger than a hundred square feet selling South Korean and Japanese chic fashion, hair accessories and shoes popular with the young crowd. The shops open around 1pm and close at 10pm.

Address: 81 Great George Street, Causeway Bay

銅鑼灣記利佐治街81號


HONGKONG

ASIAN CITY GUIDE

Shopping

¬ Stanley Market (赤柱市集) Shopping at this seaside village on Hong Kong Island’s south side is a temporary escape from the city’s hustle and bustle. Check out the international cuisines, watering holes and the popular market for local handicrafts, souvenirs and fashion. Ocean breeze and sea views for free.

Address: Stanley New Street and Stanley Market Road, Stanley赤柱新街及赤柱市場道

¬ Harbour City (海港城) How can you visit the shoppers’ paradise without dropping by the largest shopping mall around town? The megamall has three malls in one: Ocean Terminal, Ocean Centre and Gateway Arcade — allowing shoppers a choice of more than 50 restaurants, two cinemas and 450 outlets selling sportswear, kids’ items, cosmetics and gadgets.

Address: 3-27 Canton Road, Tsim Sha Tsui 尖沙咀廣東道3號


HONGKONG

ASIAN CITY GUIDE

Shopping

¬ Hysan Place (希慎廣場) This brand-new shopping mall is a new landmark in the heart of Causeway Bay. Boasting stylish contemporary interiors, the chic mall features 120 international brand boutiques spread over 17 floors. Check out the Eslite bookstore from Taiwan. US fashion brand Hollister California and a second Apple Store are rumoured to open soon.

Address: 500 Hennessy Road, Causeway Bay 銅鑼灣

軒尼詩道500號

¬ Citygate Outlets (東薈城名店倉) Probably the only outlet mall in Hong Kong, this spacious mall houses over 80 international brands that offer yearly discounts of at least 30 to 70 per cent on fashion, kids’ wear, beauty and sportswear. The airport is just 10 minutes away by local transport. An ideal spot for some last-minute shopping.

Address: 20 Tat Tung Road, Tung Chung 東涌達東路20號


HONGKONG

ASIAN CITY GUIDE

Eateries

¬ Typhoon shelter seafood Here’s how it works: a sampan picks you up at the pier ferry and takes you to a floating restaurant that offers its signature dishes: typhoon shelter crabs with chilli and garlic, and stir-fried clams in aromatic black bean sauce.

Recommended Restaurant : Sun Kee Typhoon Shelter Seafood

¬ Barbecued pork It’s a sight, these juicy roasted meats or siu mei–including pork, chicken and goose–roasted over an open fire on forks and hung in high-end restaurants and fast-food chains around town. Ubiquitous yet delicious.

信記避風塘海鮮美食

Recommended Restaurant: Yung Kee Restaurant 鏞記酒家 Address: 32-40 Wellington Street, Central 中環威靈頓街 32 號 Telephone: 2522 1624

Address: Typhoon Shelter, Gloucester Road, Causeway Bay 銅鑼灣告士打道避風塘 Telephone: 8112 0075


HONGKONG

ASIAN CITY GUIDE

Eateries

¬ Silk stocking milk tea

¬ Claypot rice If you’re visiting Hong Kong in winter, there’s nothing better than the popular chewy claypot rice with a choice of toppings from tender chicken to pork ribs with soy sauce. Cooked in a traditional charcoal claypot, the dish boasts a layer of crispy rice you can peel off from the bottom of the pot.

Don’t get it wrong. The popular drink, black tea sweetened with evaporated milk, isn’t made from a silk stocking. The tea and milk are strained through a very fine cloth (that resembles a stocking) many times to produce its velvet texture. Hong Kongers consume up to 900 million cups of milk tea a year!

Recommended Restaurant: Lan Fong Yuen 蘭芳園 Address: 2 Gage Street, Central 中環結志街2號 Telephone: 2544 3895 / 2854 0731

Recommended Restaurant: Hing Kee Restaurant 興記菜館 Address: G/F, 15-19 Temple Street, Yau Ma Tei

油麻地廟街15-19號地下 Telephone: 2384 3647


HONGKONG

ASIAN CITY GUIDE

Eateries

¬ Egg tart

¬ Stinky tofu If you have the guts, try this—one of the weirdest streetfood you will find here. Hong Kongers love it although it smells as bad as durian. The overpowering ammonia is the result of fermentation of the tofu, which is deep fried. Mostly available from street vendors.

Recommended Place: Delicious Food 美味食店 Address: Shop 10, G/F, 30-32 Nullah Road, Prince Edward 太子水渠道 30-32

號A美星樓地下10號舖 Telephone: 2142 7468

Egg tarts from Tai Cheong Bakery in Central used to be Hong Kong ex-governor Chris Patten’s favourite. Served lukewarm, this popular snack is a buttery and crunchy pastry crust filled with egg custard. Cheap and makes a tasty afternoon snack.

Recommended Bakery: Tai Cheong Bakery 泰昌餅家 Address: Various locations, including G/F, 35 Lyndhurst Terrace, Central 中環

擺花街35號地下 Telephone: 2544 3475


HONGKONG

ASIAN CITY GUIDE

Eateries

¬ Walled-village cuisine

¬ Wonton noodles

For an exotic yet authentic taste of Hong Kong, don’t miss this. The cuisine, originating from the city’s early inhabitants from walled-villages, is savoured till today. Its signature dish, the “big bowl feast”, has food piled up in 12 layers, containing abalone, shrimp, chicken, tofu and radish, and can feed a group of 10. Other popular dishes include the Malay sponge cake and white rice with lard and soy sauce.

This simple dish is nothing more than dumplings made with shrimps held together by thin flour wrappers and elastic egg noodles served in a fragrant broth—sometimes made from shark bones. But be prepared to wait for a table at crowded places for a bite of the city’s favourite.

Recommended Restaurant: Tai Wing Wah Restaurant 大榮華酒樓 Address: 2/F, Koon Wong Mansion, 2-6 On Ning Road, Yuen Long 元朗安寧路2-6號2樓 Telephone: 2476-9888

Recommended Restaurant: Wing Wah Noodle Shop

永華麵家 Address: 89 Hennessy Road, Wan Chai 灣仔軒尼詩道89號 Telephone: 2527 7476


HONGKONG

ASIAN CITY GUIDE

Eateries

¬ Dim sum The term “dim sum” can be hard to define. Literally meaning “touch your heart”, it’s a basket of delicate dumplings and snacks served in bamboo containers with as many as 150 items on a menu. Here are some of the classics: shrimp dumpling, shao mai (ground pork and mushroom wrapped in thin dough), barbecued pork bun and deep-fried spring rolls.

Recommended Restaurant: U-Banquet 譽宴 Address: 1F, Pioneer Centre, 750 Nathan Road, Prince Edward

太子彌敦道 750 號始創中心1樓 Telephone: 2811 1983

¬ Swiss wings These yummy sweet soy sauce-flavoured chicken wings have nothing to do with Switzerland. The urban legend goes that when a waiter served the dish “sweet wings” to a foreigner, it was misinterpreted as “Swiss wings”. Perfect to serve with steaming hot white rice.

Recommended Restaurant: Tai Ping Koon Restaurant 太平館 Address: 6 Pak Sha Road, Causeway Bay

銅鑼灣白沙道6號 Telephone: 2576-9161


Asian City Guide: Hong Kong