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January 3-9, 2014

ASIANS 2013

Stories of hope, triumph and inspiration


Contents January 3-9, 2014

Asians of the Year Those who inspired us with their stories of hope and triumph

❖ Vietnam

❖ Pakistan

❖ Singapore

Ordinary lionheart

Friend of the poor

New age iron man


Contents January 3-9, 2014

❖ Malaysia

❖ Thailand

❖ Bangladesh

❖ China

Diving cherub

SEA Games athletes

Genius behind Carib bean waves

Messenger of peace


Contents January 3-9, 2014

❖ India

❖ The Philippines

❖ Taiwan

Datebook

Breaking down borders

Beauty queens, volunteers, soldiers

Bundle of joy

Happenings around Asia

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ASIANS 2013

January 3-9, 2014

ASIANS 2013 Asia News Network BANGKOK

There are no politicians and world-renowned celebrities on our list this year. But their simple, yet inspiring stories have made a difference in their respective communities and gave hope that this world is not all about glitter, glamour and power. And while some have enjoyed the limelight as a result of their hard work, their triumphs prove that compassion, perseverance and faith go a long way.


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January 3-9, 2014

Vietnam

Ordinary lionheart

PHOTO BY VIET NAM NEWS


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January 3-9, 2014

THU HUONG LE Viet Nam News Hanoi

F

ew things could have prepared Hoang Thi Nguyet for being caught at the centre of one of the biggest scandals to rock Vietnam’s health sector this year. In August, the 47-year-old blew the whistle on a major medical cover-up at the Hoai Duc General Hospital where she worked as a medical staff. She exposed hospital technicians who had been replicating up to 1,149 blood tests over a period of 10-months, and copies of the results were distributed to some 2,000 patients. The scandal had sparked nationwide outcry, including patients who were furious over being given inaccurate medical information and being

charged for the blood tests which were never conducted. While she was lauded for exposing the truth, it was not an easy thing to do, Nguyet admits. She said that she and her colleagues faced “intense pressure” to remain silent. “I was scared, but determined to expose the wrong-doers. I knew this was the right thing to do, and was not afraid of losing my job,” she said when interviewed at the 19-8 Hospital in Cau Giay district where she is currently undergoing training for medical testing. According to Nguyet, the shady dealings began over a year ago in July 2012 when the medical test unit at the Hoai Duc Hospital was divided into two sections. Nguyet and some of her senior colleagues suddenly were prohibited from conducting tests on patients.

This created suspicion as the 10-member unit usually performed up to 2,000 blood tests per day. “Suddenly we were not allowed to do our jobs. All our usual duties were being done by temporary staff or recent graduates, and somehow, they were able to return the test results to the patients an hour later. We knew something fishy was going on because this was impossible,” she said. Determined to find out the truth, Nguyet and her colleague began to record the technicians at work. To their horror, they discovered that the technicians would discard the blood samples they took and then give the patient a copy of someone else’s test result. Nguyet admitted that at first she did not want to turn in her


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colleagues to the authorities. “We knew that the directorgeneral of the hospital was involved in this, and it would be difficult to make him take responsibility. We tried confronting the technicians and telling them to do the right thing, but they kept on providing the patients with false results. I knew I had to do something.” Lobbying those who were against this practice, Nguyet and her colleagues wrote an 18-page letter to the Vietnam health authorities and the police, accusing the hospital’s directorgeneral Nguyen Tri Liem and others involved, of malpractice. “We didn’t hear anything in response for a long time. But eventually, the media highlighted the case,” she said. Khuat Thi Dinh who also worked in that hospital and

signed the letter exposing the misdeeds said it took a lot of courage for an “ordinary person” like Nguyet to do what she did, describing her as “extremely determined”. “When the whole ordeal became too stressful, many of us asked ourselves whether it was worth it,” said Dinh, adding that one senior colleague even withdrew her signature due to pressure from her family who feared she would be in danger if she exposed the hospital. The then hospital directorgeneral himself had threatened the group that there would be repercussions if they chose to expose him. After the case came to light, 10 people were found guilty including the director-general. Nguyet and two others who had helped her expose the malpractice

were rewarded with cash plus a certificate of merit from the Hanoi health department. Patients who had received falsified results were also offered free check-ups, while the case prompted high-level talks on the need to protect whistle-blowers in such cases. Nguyet said she did not even think about receiving a reward, but felt that she needed to do the right thing for the medical sector. The case has been recognised by the National Assembly as well as the prime minister of Vietnam. She is now nicknamed “Nguyet Hoai Duc” (after the hospital). “People in the same industry told me that after the case came out, their respective hospitals tightened their regulations on medical testing. “Hearing this, I feel that my hard work has paid off.” ¬


January 3-9, 2014

Pakistan

ASIANS 2013

Friend of the poor


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January 3-9, 2014

QURAT UL AIN SIDDIQUI Dawn Islamabad

P

akistani kidney transplant surgeon Dr Adeebul Hasan Razvi is an iconic figure who is known as the director of the Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation (SIUT) and the Transplant Society of Pakistan. However, his greatest achievement is turning what was an eightbed government-run threadbare medical centre in 1971, into a state-of-the-art facility known as the Karachi Civil Hospital which

provides free treatment to poor patients. After studying medicine in Karachi, Rizvi trained and worked in the United Kingdom for eight years before returning home where he spearheaded SIUT, which is today a leading public health organisation in Pakistan. Under SIUT, the hospital provides a wide range of medical services to patients including in the areas of urology, nephrology, liver-related diseases and organ transplant. In

DR ADEEBUL HASAN RAZVI


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January 3-9, 2014

PHOTOS PROVIDED BY THE SINDH INSTITUTE OF UROLOGY AND TRANSPLANTATION

HIS GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT IS TURNING AN 8-BED MEDICAL CENTRE INTO THE STATE-OFTHE-ART KARACHI CIVIL HOSPITAL WHICH PROVIDES FREE TREATMENT TO THE POOR

2003, SIUT successfully carried out the first liver transplant in Pakistan. The free services enable many underprivileged patients, mainly from the rural areas or among the urban poor, who are unable to afford expensive medical procedures to be treated within

Pakistan. They are also provided medication and counselling, which would have otherwise cost many Pakistanis more than they could afford. Having provided cancer treatment for the past 23 years, SIUT recently opened an oncology centre in 2006 to further develop cancer treatment and

handle post-transplant malignancies. For his contributions to the people, Rizvi has earned the support of many members of the public who regularly donate to SIUT, which also has a unit in Sukkur, a city in northern Sindh. Rizvi was also a driving force behind the framing of a law to regulate human organ transplantation which was passed in 2009. Among other things, the law prohibits the sale and unauthorised transplantation of human organs, and has significantly curbed black market sale of human kidneys in Pakistan. ÂŹ


January 3-9, 2014

New age iron man POON CHIAN HUI The Straits Times Singapore

W

hen his superiors visited him at his hospital bed, Singaporean navy man Jason Chee tried to raise a hand to his forehead to salute them. It was no small feat for the 30-year-old former weapons systems supervisor who had lost both legs and his left arm in a horrific ship accident in December 2012. The mishap also claimed three fingers on his right hand.

JASON CHEE SHOWS HOW HE IS ABLE TO MOVE IN AND OUT OF HIS FLAT INDEPENDENTLY, USING HIS MOTORISED WHEELCHAIR.

PHOTOS BY THE STRAITS TIMES

Singapore

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DESPITE LOSING BOTH HIS LEGS AND AN ARM IN A SHIP ACCIDENT LAST YEAR, JASON CHEE STAYS OPTIMISTIC AND STRIVES FOR A BETTER LIFE WITH HIS ‘NEVER SAY DIE’ ATTITUDE.

Family members watching him struggle to show this act of loyalty wept silently by his side. Yet, the selfproclaimed “never say

die man" did not wallow in his misfortune. Speaking to The Straits Times from his hospital bed in February this year, Chee said that despite losing his limbs, he still has hope. Chee, who holds the rank of Military Expert (ME) 2, was doing a routine check on board a Republic of Singapore Navy warship when he got caught between a motorised winch and a rope. Investigations revealed that a faulty piece of shipboard equipment known as a contactor was the likely cause of the accident. It took one hour for the rescue team to extricate him. The story of his plight moved the nation. More

than 800 people flocked to blood banks to donate blood, following an appeal from the navy. Cash donations poured via the Thomson-Shunfu Residents’ Committee which was helping to raise funds for the family, amounting to over S$370,000 (US$291,798). The Singapore Institute of Management University, where Chee was pursuing a degree in mathematics, collected another S$25,000 (US$ 19,716). Chee almost did not make it. His lungs started failing eight days after the accident, despite being hooked up to a ventilator, his family revealed. Eventually, his condition improved and he started talking again in February. His first words

were that he hoped to be able to walk again. “The accident has already happened, so I just have to move on with life,” he said. “My goal this year? I want to stand up and walk.” Five months later, his wish came true. A one-minute video which went viral on Facebook in July shows Chee taking his first steps on prosthetic legs, aided by a walking frame and medical staff. Among those who left encouraging comments in response to the video was Singaporean paraplegic athlete who wrote, “You will be going places and (will) inspire many”. Going through physiotherapy to regain use of his limbs was no


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easy ordeal. Many of his sessions take place in a swimming pool, and Chee describes the first session as “tiring” because he faced difficulty staying afloat. However, he pushed himself to complete the session and go faster with every stretch. “It’s tough, but I won’t give up. I want to be able to walk on my own again, and be able to take care of my family and my future,” he said. Chee is the only child and lives with his 72-year-old widowed father who is retired. Asked how he manages to stay so optimistic, he said, “I have a ‘fighting spirit’, and I am determined to fight through this.” This indefatigable

attitude has kept him from having a "victim" mentality and made him an inspiration to many. In a show of independence, he made a trip to a downtown shopping mall from his home entirely on his own. Chee, who was still hospitalised at the time but was allowed to go home on weekends, took the city train on a motorised wheelchair, which he controls with his right hand. Members of the public such as Azmi Rahman who were inspired by Chee’s story wrote on The Straits Times’ Facebook page, “Total respect for him. He’s a fighter, he’s a solder.” Chee was discharged from the hospital in

June and currently undergoes physiotherapy twice a day. Today, he is able to dress himself and go to the toilet without assistance. With his prosthetic fingers, he can now write and even cook at home. Losing his limbs did not stop Chee from actively participating in sports either, particularly table tennis. In September, Chee bagged two gold medals and one bronze at the 8th National Disability League’s table tennis tournament, just three months after being discharged from the hospital. In 15 minutes, he beat his opponents with just two fingers on his right hand, winning three out of four sets.

In the same month, he also competed in the league’s 10-metre air rifle competition and came up in 5th place. Recently, Chee was spotted sparring with Singapore’s world No. 4 paddler Feng Tianwei at the Singapore Table Tennis Association Headquarters in Toa Payoh. Still a bachelor, Chee said that he was inspired by several disabled athletes in Singapore, namely Paralympian swimmers Yip Pin Xiu and Theresa Goh. “’They’re disabled but can still excel in sports. Why not me?’, I thought.” His “big dream”, he said, is to represent Singapore at the upcoming 2016 Paralympics. ¬


January 3-9, 2014

ASIANS 2013

Malaysia

Diving cherub

GLENN GUAN/THE STAR

PANDELELA RINONG COMPETING IN THE WOMEN'S 10M PLATFORM DIVING FINAL EVENT IN THE 15TH FINA WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS AT PISCINA MUNICIPAL DE MONTJUIC ON JULY 25, 2013, IN BARCELONA, SPAIN.


January 3-9, 2014

LIM TEIK HUAT The Star

T

he London Olympic Games last year will always be remembered not only for Malaysian shuttler Lee Chong Wei almost snaring the elusive gold medal but also the emergence of a new sporting star in Pandelela Rinong Pamg. The cherubic looking lass came from nowhere to dive into history as Malaysia's first female Olympic winner. Many thought that Malaysia's medal hopes were already over after Lee settled for silver for the second successive time at the Olympics. A second medal was not expected considering the Games were winding down and the fact that nerves got the better of the Malaysian divers in the synchro events where there were hopes of breakthrough performances. But Pandelela went against the odds and delivered. The bronze medal she won was also Malaysia's first-ever Olympic medal in a sport other than badminton.

ASIANS 2013

Pandelela, then 19, garnered a total of 359.20 points to finish third behind China's Chen Ruolin who won gold with 422.30 points and Australia's Brittany Broben who took silver at 366.50 points. Pandelela had a poor start in the final, earning only 58.50 points for her first dive and placing 10th in the ranking. By her third dive, she was still in 10th place—until her last two dives were well received by the judges, netting 81.60 and 76.80 points. Pandelela hoped her achievement in London will inspire others to take diving as a competitive sport. "I'm so happy to win this medal. It's something that I had only dreamed of and now can look at it as a turning point. I feel that a huge burden has been lifted off my shoulders and we can now look forward to better times," she said at that time. Pandelela, who has since become a revered figure in her ethnic Bidayuh community back home in Sarawak, East Malaysia, added her win was least expected although it was her pet event.


GLENN GUAN/THE STAR

PANDELELA COMPETING IN THE WOMEN'S 10M PLATFORM DIVING FINAL EVENT IN THE 15TH FINA WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS AT PISCINA MUNICIPAL DE MONTJUIC ON JULY 25, 2013, IN BARCELONA, SPAIN.


GLENN GUAN/THE STAR

MALAYSIAN DIVERS LEONG MUN YEE (LEFT) AND PANDELELA RINONG SHOW OFF THEIR BRONZE MEDALS FOR THE WOMEN'S 10M PLATFORM SYNCHRONISED DIVING EVENT AT THE 15TH FINA WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS AT PISCINA MUNICIPAL DE MONTJUIC ON JULY 22, 2013, IN BARCELONA, SPAIN.


January 3-9, 2014

GLENN GUAN/THE STAR

This may be Pandelela's most high-profile feat but it's not her first achievement by far. She also captured bronze in the women's 10m synchronised platform final with Mun Yee Leong at the 2009 World Championships in Rome. It was then the country's first ever medal in aquatics at a world meet and the duo repeated the feat in this year's edition of the world meet in Barcelona in July. Pandelela took silver at the 2010 Summer Youth Olympics in Singapore in the girls' 10m platform and 3m springboard finals. She also wrote a piece of sporting history at the 2010 Commmonwealth Games in New Delhi as the first ever diving gold medalist for Malaysia after emerging top in the women's 10m platform final. Pandelela's splendid achievements have earned her two successive National Sportswoman Awards from her country but she is not planning to sit on her laurels. The self-confessed big fan of Korean pop and drama is aware she needs to work harder after this. ÂŹ

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PANDELELA COMPETING IN THE WOMEN'S 10M PLATFORM DIVING FINAL EVENT IN THE 15TH FINA WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS AT PISCINA MUNICIPAL DE MONTJUIC ON JULY 25, 2013, IN BARCELONA, SPAIN.


ZULAZHAR SHEBLEE/ THE STAR

PANDELELA RINONG AFTER RECEIVING THE 2012 ATHLETE OF THE YEAR AWARD IN HER HOME STATE OF SARAWAK, EAST MALAYSIA.


January 3-9, 2014

ASIANS 2013

Thailand

SEA Games athletes

Bangkok

T

aking a break from the country's divisive politics, Thais cheered on their athletes at the 27th SEA Games held in Myanmar. And they were not disappointed. Thailand was crowned overall champion bringing home a total of 107 gold, 94 silver and 81 bronze medals. The volleyball teams made a clean sweep in the men's and women's indoor events by winning the gold. In the women's event, Thailand, two-time Asian champions and world No. 12, thrashed arch-rivals Vietnam; in the men's showdown, the Thai volleyball team, ranked No. 34, pulled off a scintillating victory over Indonesia. The men's football team capped the victory by successfully winning the gold against Indonesia. Back home, while red- and yellow-shirt protesters battled, Thai athletes showed that all that mattered in sports are gold, silver and bronze. ÂŹ


THAILAND'S FOOTBALLERS CELEBRATE THEIR WIN.


THAILAND'S VOLLEYBALL TEAMS, BOTH GOLD WINNERS.


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Bangladesh

Genius behind Caribbean waves THE DAILY STAR

NAFEES BIN ZAFAR


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January 3-9, 2014

THE DAILY STAR Dhaka

A

n Oscar winning computer genius, the Bangladesh-born Nafees Bin Zafar considers himself to be “somewhere in the middle”. He is a man of science but also an artist who incorporates his calculative forte to feed the aesthetic-hungry Hollywood (technically speaking, international) audience with amazing graphics. From software engineer to principle engineer, his ability to stay in the middle of artisanship and science awarded him with an Oscar in 2008 for Pirate of the Caribbean: At World’s End. Not many of Bangladeshi origin achieved such glory. He has worked for digital domain and at present is working for Los Angeles-based ani-

mation firm DreamWorks as principal engineer. DreamWorks animation is one of the best motion picture and animated filmmakers across the world. He was born in Dhaka in 1977. His father served in the Bangladesh Army. The family lived all over the country but when he was 11, the family moved to the United States. He finished the rest of his schooling there. Then he got interested in computer graphics. He ended up working in the industry in 2000. A computer genius with a great artistic skill, one would think he would have a state-of-the-art personal website. But it looks like something done by an amateur. His personal website is not as impressive as his entry at IMDB.com. ¬

Nafees’ filmography Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted (principal engineer) Puss in Boots (senior software engineer) Kung Fu Panda 2 (senior software engineer) Megamind (senior production engineer) Shrek Forever After (senior production engineer) Percy Jackson & the Lightning Thief (software engineer) The Seeker: The Dark Is Rising (visual effects: Digital Domain) Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End (technical developer) Flags of Our Fathers (technical developer) Stealth (software engineer) The Croods (research and development principal engineer)


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China

Messenger of peace CHINA DAILY Beijing

H

e has become an international star through his emotional interpretations of classical music. Now Chinese concert pianist Lang Lang is taking to the world stage to help the United Nations promote global education.

UN Secretary-General Ban Kimoon designated the acclaimed 31-year-old native of Shenyang, Liaoning province, as a Messenger of Peace with a special focus on education last October. Lang Lang—the first person from China to receive the honour—supports the secretary-gen-

eral's Global Education First Initiative. The campaign uses the "transformative power of education to build a better future for all" through raising education's political profile and quality, and generating funding through "sustained advocacy efforts", according to the UN website.


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When he was asked whether he saw the appointment as an opportunity not only to do humanitarian work but to raise China's global profile, Lang Lang said: "China has become a very important global player. The next generation of Chinese will be much more open towards different parts of the world. The UN gives me the perfect platform to start looking at that." The pianist, who has been playing since age 3, termed it "a great honour" to be the first Messenger of Peace from China. "It's given me tremendous pleasure to stand up here today," he said. "I hope I can take the challenge and find a more meaningful place to work with people and to work with myself as well." Lang Lang is no stranger to the UN or humanitarian causes. He spent the past decade as the goodwill ambassador for

the United Nations International Children's Fund, or Unicef. He frequently uses his music to raise funds for Unicef, including playing a sold-out Carnegie Hall recital in support of the organisation's effort to help victims of the 2010 Haiti earthquake. In 2008, his Lang Lang International Music Foundation took shape, to "inspire and motivate the next generation of classical music lovers and performers and to encourage music performance at all levels as a means of social development for youth, building

self-confidence and a drive for excellence", according to a UN release. "Children and music are my passion," Lang Lang told the ceremony in the Dag Hammarskjold Library Auditorium. "I hope to motivate children to have dreams." The pianist said he plans to visit the world's communities and organisations to emphasise "the importance of improving children's lives through education". Lang Lang joins actors George Clooney and Michael Douglas, Nobel Laureate Elie Wiesel, cellist Yo-Yo Ma and seven others asked over the years to advocate on behalf of the UN as a Messenger of Peace. Secretary-General Ban called Lang Lang "a true global citizen", saying the pianist "collects people not only through his music but through his passion to build a better world through education". ÂŹ


January 3-9, 2014

ASIANS 2013

India

Breaking down borders

NINA DAVULURI


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January 3-9, 2014

New Delhi

T

wenty-four-year-old Miss New York Nina Davuluri last September became the first of Indian-origin to win the prestigious Miss America pageant after wooing the judges with a Bollywood fusion dance. Davuluri, who aspires to become a physician like her father, won at least US$50,000-worth in scholarships. “It was the first time Bollywood was ever performed on the Miss America stage and it’s such an honour for myself, my family and the Indian community as well,” Davuluri explained. “I was so happy to see the organisation has embraced diversity,” she noted in her first press conference after winning the crown. Her pageant platform was “celebrating diversity through cultural

competency” and Davuluri said she had to dispel a lot of misconceptions about her culture through the years, such as whether her parents will arrange a marriage for her. She said she plans to represent her roots and push her platform of diversity in her new role. Davuluri said she's against plastic surgery, but said people should make their own choice but be confident in their appearances. She showcased a classical Bollywood fusion dance piece as her talent. She also had formal training in Indian dance for the past 15 years, including summers in India. Davuluri, who struggled with bulimia and weight problem, said she lost 60 pounds prior to becoming Miss New York. She was born in Syracuse, but moved to Oklahoma at age four then to Michigan at 10.

THE STATESMAN

THE STATESMAN

Six years ago, her family moved to Fayetteville, where her dad is an obstetrician/gynaecologist affiliated with St Joseph's Hospital. Davuluri's has a degree from the University of Michigan in brain behaviour and cognitive science. She plans to become a physician and says she would love to attend Upstate Medical University. She says she's a 'Type A personality', and makes it a priority to stay organised every minute. ¬


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January 3-9, 2014

The Philippines

Beauty queens, volunteers, soldiers Manila

T

he Philippines made it to international news this year for two reasons: beauty pageants and disasters. And among these emerged inspiring figures that gave cheer and hope amidst the rubble and devastation. Megan Young, 23, won Miss World while Bea Rose Santiago, 23, emerged as Miss International in pageants that were both held in Asian countries. Their victory brought smiles to Filipinos who have been besieged by two big natural disasters this year: a magnitude-7.2 earthquake that hit Bohol and Cebu in central Philippines in October, and a month later, Supertyphoon Yolanda (international name: Haiyan) in November that also hit the country’s central region.

The disasters brought out the "bayanihan" (community) spirit among Filipinos, helping one another rise up from the disasters. Volunteers crowded relief centres not only in the affected areas but in Metro Manila to help repack goods and extend help to evacuees. The scene was repeated in other parts of the country. Soldiers carried on their shoulders the grim task of rescue and relief operations on the ground while the local government was brought to its knees and the national government reeled from the shock of having to deal with a disaster in scales not seen before. The victories of Megan and Bea Rose, as well as the compassion and strength shown by volunteers and soldiers make them this year’s most inspiring Filipinos. 


AFP

MISS WORLD MEGAN YOUNG


AFP

MISS INTERNATIONAL BEA ROSE SANTIAGO


AFP

FILIPINO SOLDIERS CARRIED ON THEIR SHOULDERS THE GRIM TASK OF RESCUE AND RELIEF OPERATIONS .


AFP

VOLUNTEERS OF ALL AGES AND FROM ALL WALKS OF LIFE CROWDED OPERATION CENTRES IN THE COUNTRY TO HELP OUT IN THE RELIEF EFFORTS.


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January 3-9, 2014

Taiwan

Black & white bundle of joy Taipei

AFP

A black and white fur ball has brought much joy to Taiwan prompting Taipei’s deputy mayor to quip that residents are happier. The birth of panda cub Yuan Zai on July 6 has been widely anticipated since 2008 when her parents Tuan Tuan and Yuan Yuan first arrived in Taiwan. The two pandas were given to Taipei Zoo as a symbol of warmer ties between Taiwan and China. Taipei Zoo has been documenting the growth of Yuan Zai, who is set to make her public debut on Jan 6, 2014. Move aside bickering politicians and pop idols, the real star is here. 


DATEBOOK

January 3-9, 2014

ÂŹ Macau

Taste the history of tea "Taste and Essence", an exhibition reflects upon how the time-honoured tea culture evolved in China and the West. It brings together 170 exhibits, including teas, antique tea wares and tea-themed paintings from the collections of the Palace Museum and Victoria and Albert Museum. Falling into six categories, the exhibits explain how emperors' personal tastes influenced the cultivation of different tea types and the techniques of making tea wares. For example, an intricate enamel teapot with patterns of landscapes, flowers and birds from the reign of Qing Dynasty (1644-1911) Emperor Qianlong demonstrates his fastidious attitude towards tea drinking. A section specifically traces back to the emerging social landscape of afternoon tea in Britain in the 19th century. When: Until March 9 Where: Macau Museum of Art

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January 3-9, 2014

¬ Shanghai

French connection

China Art Museum, Shanghai and Musee des Annees Trente de Boulogne-Billancourt, France are presenting the exhibition "Turning Point—French Art of the 1930s: Masterpieces from Musee des Annees Trente de Boulogne-Billancourt". The exhibition of four chapters gives viewers a taste of the richness and variety of French art at the time modern art was flourishing in the first half of the 20th century. The chapter about art deco and ChineseFrench artistic intersection reveals the relevance of modern French art to China and Shanghai. When: Until March 16 Where: China Art Museum

DATEBOOK


January 3-9, 2014

ÂŹ Pasay City, Philippines

Bridal Fair

With the reliable and credible suppliers in the wedding industry, soon-to-weds have more options to make their wedding perfect in every way. Learn more ideas and insights from the wedding experts when they take the stage to share valuable ideas and inspiration. Planning for a wedding can be more exciting when you get great deals from the bridal fair. When: January 17-19 Where: SMX Convention Centre

DATEBOOK

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DATEBOOK

January 3-9, 2014

ÂŹ Kuching, Malaysia Asean Tourism Forum 2014 The event is a cooperative regional effort to promote the Asean region as one tourist destination where Asian hospitality and cultural diversity are at its best. Each year, the hosting of ATF is rotated among the member countries. ATF 2014 marks the 33rd anniversary of this event since its inauguration in Malaysia in 1981. When: January 16-23

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January 3-9, 2014

DATEBOOK

ÂŹ Seoul Lighting Festival The event is the biggest festival of lights in South Korea. Major parks in Seoul will be illuminated by 30,000 lights. The gleaming lights add a festive glow to the garden during the winter season. In the event of inclement weather, lights may be turned off for safety. When: Until March 16 Where: Hakyung Garden, Hometown House Garden, Bonsai Garden, Moonlight Garden, Sky Path and Garden of Eden, Seoul

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DATEBOOK

January 3-9, 2014

ÂŹ Bangkok Chinese New Year Chinese New Year is widely celebrated in Chinatown on Yaowarat Road, one of the most famous roads in Bangkok often referred to as the Golden Road and the Land of the Siamese Dragon. Visitors experience the strong connection between Thai and Chinese communities through the magnificent cultural performances that show the deep roots of Chinese culture in Thailand. This special occasion is opened by HRH Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn every year. There are several shrines located in this area, and it is believed that making merit during Chinese New Year brings good luck. When: Until January 31

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