Page 1

ASHTON WILLIAMS 1


SELECTED WORKS Threadneedle Neighborhood Fragmentation & Connectivity The Rainforest Ecotone Idle Grounds

4 14 22 30

CONSTRUCTION Academic 42 Professional Practice 46 GRAPHIC DESIGN Print Materials 50 Branding 54 Digital Art 57


EDUCATION

ASHTON WILLIAMS

Bachelor of Landscape Architecture, Texas A&M University Expected Spring 2017 Minor in Art, New Media GPA: 3.75/4.0; magna cum laude Akademie für internationale Bildung (AIB), Study Abroad Fall 2016 Bonn, Germany

SKILLS

Proficient in AutoCAD, Google SketchUp,Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator, and Microsoft Office as well as experienced in ArcMap GIS, LandFX, VRAY, Lumion, and After Effects

AWARDS

CONTACT

210.845.6500 ashwilli93@tamu.edu 23411 Beaver Creek, San Antonio, TX, 78258 www.linkedin.com/in/ashtonmwilliams

City of Bonn Individual Design Award, “Bonn West Industrial Park,” December 2016 City of Bonn Best Group Contribution, “Fragmentation & Connectivity,” December 2016 Texas ASLA Honor Award, Analysis & Planning, “Idle Grounds,” April 2016 Department Head Award, April 2016 Michael Murphy Endowed Scholarship, 2016 Samuel Garrett Jr. Endowed Memorial Scholarship, 2016, 2015 History Maker Homes Scholarship, 2016, 2015 RCCCP Scholarship, Best Design Group for Manchester Neighborhood, December 2015 Tau Sigma Delta, Honor Society for Architecture and Allied Arts, April 2014

WORK EXPERIENCE

Rialto Studio Landscape Architecture, Summer Intern, San Antonio, Texas May–August 2016 Drafted various types of construction documentation such as details, sections, elevations, preliminary grading, site plans, planting plans, cost estimates, as well as set up and revised document sets. Engaged in client, design team, and contractor meetings, lunch and learns, educational site visits, as well as collaborated within a team-oriented office environment. Contributed site analysis graphics, schematic design, concept modeling, site plan and perspective rendering, project branding, and presentation packaging. Participated in on-site visits to conduct site analysis, create punch lists, and observe construction. Horizon Design and Development, Summer Intern, San Antonio, Texas May–July 2015, May–August 2014, 2013 (3 Years) Computed various AutoCAD tasks including tree preservation plans and planting plans. Transported plans and permits to/from clients and Development Services. Aided in job site and tree surveying. Practiced basic design work for landscape plans.


LEADERSHIP

ASLA Texas A&M Student Chapter, Communications Chair, 2015–2016 A&M Christian Fellowship, Small Group Leader, 2015–2016 Tau Sigma Delta, Landscape Architecture Representative, 2014–2015 Spencer Leadership Conference in Dallas, TX, Delegate, 2013–2015

SERVICE

The Big Event, Community Service Event, 2013–2017 SOS Ministries Carnival, Community Service Event, 2012–2015 Aggie Vision, Community Service Event, Single Moms Created for Change, 2014 Rainbow Days, Community Service Event, Leadership Service Event, 2014

MEMBERSHIPS

ASLA Texas A&M Student Chapter, 2012–2017 A&M Christian Fellowship, 2012–2017 Texas A&M Theme Park Organization, 2014 MSC Lead, Sophomore Leadership Organization 2013–2014 Texas A&M University Orchestra, Viola, 2012–2013 Texas A&M Orchestra Club, 2012–2013 Howdy AGS, Tradition Promotion Group, 2012–2013

WORKSHOPS

Texas ASLA Conference, Spring 2014-2017 Aggie Workshop, Charrette and Workshop, February 2013–2017

REFERENCES

Bobby Eichholz, RLA, Texas ASLA President and Partner, Rialto Studio Landscape Architecture p. 210.828.1155 e. bobby@rialtostudio.com Dr. Jun-Hyun Kim, Assistant Professor p. 979.845.2532 e. jhkim@arch.tamu.edu


THREADNEEDLE NEIGHBORHOOD THE ENERGY CORRIDOR DISTRICT

Emerging as an internationally acclaimed location to live, work, and invest, the Energy Corridor District (ECD), located along I-10 (west of downtown Houston), seeks to redevelop the Threadneedle Neighborhood along St. Mary’s Ln. and Threadneedle St. Wishing to improve livability and attractiveness for property owners, businesses, employees, and residents alike, the ECD seeks to better accommodate multi-modal transportation and sustainable practices.

PROJECT LOCATION Houston, Texas CLIENT The Energy Corridor District PROJECT TYPE Public Design and Planning Mixed Use, Plaza Design, Business Park COLLABORATION Team Ashton Williams, Christina Anderson, Stephen Parsons, and Andrew Toungate

6

Inadequate pedestrian circulation, dangerous intersections, dominating impervious surfaces, and lack of engaging pedestrian friendly destinations detract from the neighborhood’s ability to serve the needs of its users, operate efficiently, practice sustainability, and improve value and appeal. Through the development of complete streets, enhancement of community corridors, promotion of environmental design, and creation of vibrant destinations within the Threadneedle Neighborhood, the longterm vision of the site is manifested through a system-oriented approach that promotes healthy living and sustainable design.


O F F I C E PA R K

WILLIAMS (DESIGN) & PARSONS (RENDERING )

7


P R E M I E R E M P L OY E R S

8

AU T O M O T I V E C O M M U T E

(Parsons & W illiams)


EXISTING CONDITIONS

C L I M AT I C C O N S I D E R AT I O N S

(W illiams & Anderson)

parking 1,101,989 sf

office 1,649,135 sf

greenspace 47%

streets 6% buildings 16%

commercial 108,464 sf

residential 96,263 sf

parking 32%

(W illiams)

9


U S E R A N A LY S I S

(W illiams)

10


DESIGN PROGRAM

automotive access

public park access

pedestrian access

pocket park access streetscape treatment

bicycle access public transit access

living walls

public park access

living roofs

mixed-use centers

native landscapes

residential centers

bio-retention facilities

community centers

(Parsons)

11


7

2

1

3

4

6 5

12


11

8

10 9

MASTER PLAN 1) NATURALIZED PARK AND RETENTION POND 2) MIXED USE RETAIL & OFFICE

3) TRANSPORTATION HUB AND PARKING GARAGE 4) TOWNHOMES

5) COMMUNITY PARK

6) MIXED RESIDENTIAL & RETAIL 7) OFFICE

8) COMPLETE STREET 9) RETAIL 0’ 25’ 50’

100’

(W illiams; Rendering & Toungate; Linework)

10) COMMUNITY PARK 11) HOTEL

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M I X E D R E S I D E N T I A L & R E TA I L Along with the addition of Townhomes, the proposed housing complex increases the density of available living space as well as encourages more people to live within walkable distance. The retail on the street level along the outer edges feed into the lively community spaces and parks. (Anderson)

R E TA I L & C O M M U N I T Y PA R K A retail center on the east side of the site provides more opportunities for shopping and eating in order to aid The Energy Corridor’s vision of becoming a renown place to sustainably live, work, and invest. A community park space adjacent from it creates an “Urban Ecological Island� which supports a variety of LID functions, as well as a unique space for interaction and environmental education. (Parsons)

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PROPOSED PLANNING

COMPLETE STREETS

bike lanes added

pedestrian paths added

COMMUNITY CORRIDORS

park spaces added

(W illiams & Anderson)

PROPOSED LAND USE

streetscape anchors

E N V I R O N M E N TA L D E S I G N

oďŹƒce

2,203,806 sf

residential 361,376 sf

commercial 215,676 sf

saved annually (LID)

harvested annually

V I B R A N T D E S T I N AT I O N S

parking

1,579,201 sf (W illiams)

new mixed use centers

community centers

D E S I G N I M PAC T A green network system was proposed and multiple open space corridors were created through the addition of public park space and street treatment while improving effectiveness of stromwater management facilities through the application of bioswales, living walls, green roofs to provide optimum sustainability. From the proposed sustainable practices to mixed use developments, community centers, and a variety of residential options, the Threadneedle Neighborhood becomes an appealing place to live, work, and invest. 15


F R AG M E N TAT I O N & C O N N E C T I V I T Y * B O N N W E S T I N D U S T R I A L PA R K

Following the railroad along Bonn, Germany’s urban fringe, there exists ecologically, spatially, and socially fragmented spaces that hinder the historic city’s image as visitors arrive by train. Furthermore, socially fragmented people groups remain isolated without access to public space.

PROJECT LOCATION Bonn, Germany CLIENT City of Bonn PROJECT TYPE Public Design Brownfield Restoration, Mixed Use, Urban Park COLLABORATION Individual (Design) and Team (Analysis, “3.94KM” Strategy) Ashton Williams (Landscape Architecture, Texas A&M) Thomas Langford (Urban Planning, Texas A&M) Kim Spaulding (Landscape Architecture, Texas A&M) Hannah Thomas (Landscape Architecture, Penn State)

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Awarded the *CITY OF BONN BEST INDIVIDUAL DESIGN CITY OF BONN BEST GROUP CONTRIBUTION

Abutting residential and commercial landuses, a slew of abandoned, underutilized, and ill-purposed industrial spaces adjacent from the Bonn West tram stop create an indecisive identity as the relationship between buildings, the landscape, and people have weak relations. Areas within the site are socially fragmented; lacking areas for social engagement, pedestrian oriented pathways, active destinations, and edges compatible with immediate surroundings. Through the creation of a new series of multi-functional park and public spaces, fragmented populations within the community can be brought together. Once an eyesore and poor impression upon arrival of the city, the proposed Bonn West Industrial Park consists of zones of activity with distinct identities that connect thematically with one another.


U N D E R PA S S PA R K

WILLIAMS (DESIGN & RENDERING )

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3 . 9 4 K M S I T E B O U N DA R Y

18


EXISTING CONDITIONS

3 . 9 4 K M D E S I G N S T R AT E G Y

(W illiams)

S O C I A L F R AG M E N TAT I O N

(W illiams, Spaulding, & Thomas)

19


I N V E N T O R Y A N A LY S I S

S O C I A L F R AG M E N TAT I O N & U S E R P R I O R I T I E S

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NATURE

SPORTS

ACCESS

ACCESS

GARDEN

GARDEN

BIKE PATHS

GARDEN

NATURE

SOUP KITCHEN

PLAYGROUND

NATURE


Z O N E S O F AC T I V I T Y This fragmentation has been created by the incompatibility of adjacent conditions of land use perseverated by the division of the railroad. In order to unite people groups separated by this juxtaposition, transforming the derelict industrial areas can be achieved by the designation of smaller socially-invigorating spaces with uninterrupted transitions from to one another and their surroundings. Integrative open space, plazas, community areas, and recreation spaces meet the physical needs of these populations as well as create cultural enrichment and spatial identity. Comfortable site circulation connect programmed spaces. A pedestrian bridge leading to the Bonn West stop provides access to populations on either side of the railroad and a bike path through the site connects to the city’s proposed “Bicycle Highway.” Finally, ecological connections have been made through the extension of habitat into areas previously devoid of vegetation. Many onsite structures were adapted for new uses. 9

SITE PLAN A

8

6 7

B

10

5

11

4

12

14

13

16 15

3 17

1 18 2

1) REPURPOSED MUSIC VENUE

10) COMMUNITY GARDEN

3) SPORTS SPACE

12) REPURPOSED CAFE

2) MIXED USE

4) OPEN SPACE

5) INTERACTIVE INSTALLATION 6) BIKE PATH ENTRY

7) ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION

8) ELEVATED PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE

11) REPURPOSED GREENHOUSE BUILDING 13) EXISTING PARKING & TEMP SKATE PARK

14) UNDERPASS PLAZA AND COFFEE STAND

15) COMPACTED RUBBER INTERACTIVE PLAYSCAPE 16) BIKE PATH EXIT

17) MIXED USE RESIDENTIAL

9) BONN WEST TRAM STOP (EXISTING) 18) MIXED USE

0

175

350

21


I N T E R AC T I V E P L AYG R O U N D Section A

COMPACTED GRANULAR RUBBER PLAY BERM

PEDESTRIAN PATH

PEDESTRIAN PATH

BIKE PATH

ECOLOGICAL ZONE Section B

BERM

22

PEDESTRIAN PATH

BERM & INTERACTIVE SCULPTURE

BIKE PATH

BERM

RAILWAY


COMMUNITY GARDEN WILLIAMS (DESIGN & RENDERING )

S P O R T S P L A Z A A N D O P E N S PAC E WILLIAMS (DESIGN & RENDERING )

23


T H E R A I N F O R E ST E C OT O N E I N T E G R AT I N G T H E S O LT I S C E N T E R

Located in the Children’s Eternal Rainforest near San Juan de Penas Blancas (San, Ramon, Costa Rica), the Soltis Center serves as a beneficial research institute for Texas A&M University. Students, faculty, staff, and local community members frequent the center to conduct research, learn about the rainforest, and enrich the community. Inefficient use of space, lack of wayfinding and rest areas, inconsistent pedestrian access, and poor transition between the built and natural areas limit the Soltis Center from effectively maximizing desired activities and immersing its visitors into a seamless eco-tourism experience. PROJECT LOCATION Alajuela, Costa Rica CLIENT Texas A&M University; The Soltis Center PROJECT TYPE Ecotourism; Site Design COLLABORATION Team Ashton Williams, Yamile Garcia, and Logan Kidwill

24

Implementing educational wayfinding, connecting pedestrian trails, providing recreational spaces, and smoothing the transition between the built area and the rainforest entrance will allow the Soltis Center to meet user needs as well as emphasize the importance of the rainforest. The proposed design allows the visitors to feel as close as possible to the rainforest and the animals that inhabit it without disturbing the ecosystem.


O B S E R VAT I O N D E C K

WILLIAMS (RENDERING ) & KIDWILL (DIGITAL FRAMEWORK)

25


S O LT I S T R A I L M A P

(W illiams)

26


open space / dirt lot

jungle entrance

north jungle scenery

entrance to soltis center

east panoramic view of jungle

VIEWSHED While the Soltis Center is surrounded by lush scenery, this is not currently taken advantage of on site. The entrance to the rainforest consists of an open dirt lot and a concrete sidewalk that distracts the visitor from becoming fully immersed in nature, lacking the grand entry it deserves and functional space. The east view of the jungle is the most picturesque, but there is nowhere to sit and enjoy it. The steep grassy slope devoid of native vegetation is the ďŹ rst sight coming up the path from the site entry. (W illiams)

A N I M A L H A B I TAT & S I G H T I N G S Within the perimeter of the Soltis Center, there are common sightings of animals within their habitats. Toucans and songbirds can easily be seen from the main building’s balcony. However, there is no place to observe sloths and coatimundis. Vipers and monkeys are dangerous and visitors should enter deeply into the edges of the site. Frogs are prevalent near the bungalows, and there is need for an area to research them without entering deep into the jungle. (W illiams)

27


DESIGN PROGRAM

(W illiams)

SITE PLAN 1) JUNGLE ENTRY

8

2) OPEN GREENSPACE 3) BUS DROP-OFF

7 6

5

4) OUTDOOR CLASSROOM

5) FIRE PIT SEATING SPACE

6) INTERACTIVE SEATING SPACE

10

7) JUNGLE OBSERVATION DECK

4

8) FROG POND

2 1

(W illiams: 28

12 3

Rendering, Garcia and Kidwill: Linework)

9

11

9) OPEN OBSERVATION DECK 10) BUNGALOW PLANTING 11) ADVENTURE PATH

12) LID DEMONSTRATION AREA


PROPOSED BUNGALOW PLANTING WILLIAMS (RENDERING)

I N T E R AC T I V E S E AT I N G S PAC E WILLIAMS (RENDERING)

29


JUNGLE ENTRANCE WILLIAMS (RENDERING)

N AT U R E PAT H & F R O G P O N D KIDWILL (RENDERING)

30


T R A I L H E A D WAY F I N D I N G

RAINFOREST ENTRY STRUCTURE The design for the rainforest entry consists of a structure made out of native bamboo and rock. Beginning at ten feet, it narrows to seven feet to make the visitor feel as though they are becoming smaller. It becomes a passage to the jungle in order to heighten experience. The space between the rods of bamboo allow for sunlight to shine through and create shadows in a similar fashion to the trees.

(W illiams & Garcia)

WAY F I N D I N G S E T

Three tiers of wayfinding help orient visitors within the jungle trails and include notes on safety, facts about animals, and general information about the jungle. Within the design of the trail signs (above) the name of the trail, directions to the next areas of interest, and the difficulty of the hike are stated. A visual representation of the steepness of the trail adds visual and informational interest. The Soltis Center’s three rules are represented as icons on the bottom of each sign as a reminder, but are explained on the primary sign at the jungle entrance.

(W illiams)

31


IDLE GROUNDS*

M A X I M I Z I N G R E S I L I E N C Y I N U N D E R U T I L I Z E D S PA C E

PROJECT LOCATION Manchester, Texas CLIENT City of Manchester PROJECT TYPE Analysis and Planning; Community Design and Service COLLABORATION Team Ashton Williams, Christina Anderson, Hunter Jayroe, Stephen Parsons, and Bryce Wood

32

Awarded the *TEXAS ASLA HONOR AWARD (2016) RCCCP SCHOLARSHIP; BEST DESIGN GROUP

Due to Houston’s lack of zoning regulations, the surrounding industry has had devastating impacts on the community, making it vulnerable to flooding, high levels of pollution, diseases, and poor infrastructure. Underutilized land within the Harrisburg, Manchester, and Magnolia Park neighborhoods threaten the behavioral, economic, and environmental factors essential to fostering a resilient community. Through identification, redevelopment, reprogramming, and the use of LID techniques, these once idle grounds can be transformed into green space, public space, and a variety of other necessary, functional, and responsible land uses to create a vibrant and resilient community.


S T O R M WAT E R T R E AT M E N T PA R K WILLIAMS (DESIGN & RENDERING )

33


S I T E L O C AT I O N

(W illiams)

EXISTING CONDITIONS

(W illiams)

The impervious surfaces outnumber the areas that are pervious and while some of those surfaces are roads, there is little pedestrian access or canopy cover. 34

The site’s location and topography make it vulnerable to flooding. The water flows to the lower east end, draining polluted stormwater into the Bayou.

Land use analysis reveals conflicting land use types and buildings are sporadic. Undeveloped/ underutilized spaces are scattered throughout.


(Anderson, Jayroe, & Wood)

(Parsons)

35


PA R C E L PAT T E R N S

Once the types of underutilized land are identified, analyzing how these spaces within their respective parcels are spatially related is crutial to the design process. From there, these patterns provide the design team the flexibility to redevelop these spaces to efficiently maximize design goals. ABOVE:

The color key responds to five identified spatial patterns, while the senarios to the right of the arrow offer possible solutions to redevelop these spaces.

36


D E S I G N S T R AT E G Y

In order to meet community needs, the site was broken up into three main development zones by reinvigorating underdeveloped and underutilized spaces with LID techniques, creating multiple functional spaces that integrate community members and promote healthy living, and connecting spaces with green infrastructure.

DESIGN PROGRAM

37


OPPORTUNITES & CONSTRAINTS

A D A P TAT I O N A N A LY S I S

The proposed street hierarchy designates Harrison BLVD. as a primary “Eco-Boulevard.” Secondary “Green Streets” and tertiary “Skinny Streets” promote a spatial hierarchy, and pedestrian roads promote safety while ensuring walkability.

38

The proposed land use designates an active core containing a central greenspace and mixed commercial. Other land uses now respond to the needs of the community and group similar uses together while still maintaining diversity.

Despite taking advantage of underutilized space to bring much change to the site, the proposed design affected only 19.7% of the existing buildings including inactive removed at 11.4%, relocated 3%, active removed 1%, and renovated .02%


MASTER PLAN

(Design by Team, Rendering: Parsons)

L I D S T R AT E G Y

(Jayroe)

39


E C O LO G I C A L L E A R N I N G C E N T E R The new learning center is located near an elementary school and serves as an important educational tool. The building is composed of shipping crates, which are inexpensice and readily available within the community, and collects/treats water from the green roofs.

H A R R I S B U R G S Q UA R E The square consists of mixed use retail, event space, and a central park area. The proposed design of the park includes a large retention pond with a small wetland area, as well as activity space with a fenced in playground.

FA R M E R S M A R K E T The market meets the demand within the community, as well as ďŹ ts the character of the site. The building contains material from recycled shipping containers and includes several green walls.

40


D E S I G N I M PAC T

While once a behavioral, economic, and environmental hinderance, underutilized/ underdeveloped spaces have been reprogrammed to foster a more resilient and vibrant community that meets the needs of its residents for decades to come.

41


C O N ST R U C T O N D O C U M E N TAT I O N ACADEMIC AND PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE


94

102 00

101 50

95

101 00

100 50

100 00

7 25

93

95.50 5%

2%

96.00

BS 96.35

94.40 TC 94.90 BC

WM

7 50

94.00

.4%

96.20

MIXED-USE CENTER

94.54 TC 94.04 BC

94.54 TC 94.04 BC

94.58 TC 94.38 BC

GRADING PLAN

96

(first floor plans) 99.85 UL

TS 99.85

92

(FOR GREEN WALLS, SEE ROOF PLAN)

97.40

97.40

00

99.85 UL

99.65

KYLE STREET

8

97.40 TW 95.40 BW

RAIN GARDEN

99.85 UL

97

97.40 TW 95.40 BW 97.00

97.00 TW 95.00 BW

93

97.00 TW 95.00 BW 91

2%

97.50 LL

97.00

99.35

99

95.21 TC 94.71 BC

98.86 99.36 TC 98.86 BC

92.50

94.87 TC 94.37 BC

89.50

2%

98.36

95.86 TC 94.36 BC

8

90

90

95.26 TC 94.76 BC 94

2%

98

89

96.00

95.46 TC 94.96 BC 98.98 TC 98.48 BC

50 98.10

98

98.60 HP

97

96

ASHTONWILLIAMS ASHTON WILLIAMS

94

95 94.40 BP

5%

98

93.80

G=.015

SWALE G=.035

97

95

96

98.98 TC 98.48 BC

94 95.28 TC 94.78BC

95.05 TC 94.55 BC

ASHTON WILLIAM

93

2% 99

MIXED USE CENT

99.36 TC 98.86 BC

95.68 TC 95.18 BC

G=.035

9 00

99

92

95.05 TC 94.55 BC

95.00 BP

98

97

96

95

94

93

92 10

BM SPIKE IN POLE, 99.05

0

44

GRADING PLA

91

G=.02

IRON ROD

99

95.45 TC 94.95 BC

20

MIXED USE

92

5 / 5 / 16 SCALE 1"=20'

30

SHE


LANGFORD DRIVE

102 00

DOUBLE CHECK VALVE (1") & GATE VALVE (1 1/4")

101 50

101 00

7 25

1-21 " TYPE K COPPER CONNECTS TO 1" WATER METER STATIC PRESSURE 76 PSI

100 50

100 00

IMPERVIOUS ASPHALT

2

50

1/2" 1/2"

MIXED-USE CENTER

1/2"

(FOR GREEN WALLS, SEE ROOF PLAN)

1/2" 1/2" 1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

1/2" 1/2"

1/2"

ROOF GARDEN DRAIN SECTION

1/2"

1/2" 1/2"

1/2"

6

1/2" 1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

1/2" 1/2"

1/2" 1/2"

4

1/2" 1/2" 1/2"

1/2"

1/2" 1/2"1/2"

1/2" 1/2" 1/2" 1/2"

1/2"

9 00

1/2"

1/2"

1/2" 1/2"

1/2" 1/2"

POB 0+00 IRON ROD

1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

1/2" 1/2" 1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

8

16

1/2" 1/2"

1/2"

1/2" 1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

1/2" 1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

ASHTON WILLIAMS ASHTON WILLIAMS

1/2" 1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

1/2" 1/2"

1/2" 1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

AS

1/2"

MIX

IR

12

1/2" 1/2"

1/2"

2

1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

1

1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

1/2" 1/2"

1/2"

7

1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

1/2" 1/2" 1/2"

11

1/2"

1/2"

4

1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

12

1/2" 1/2"

50

10

1/2"

1/2" 1/2" 1/2" 1/2"

1/2" 1/2" 1/2" 1/2"

1/2" 1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

3

8

1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

2

Elevator

1/2"

13 1/2"

1/2"

(see roof plan)

1/2" 1/2"

1/2"

1/2" 1/2" 1/2" 1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

00

1/2"

2

1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

14

6" SCHEDULE 80 PVC SLEEVE

1/2"

4

1

KYLE STREET

5

1/2"

1/2"

1/2" 1/2" 1/2"

1/2"

8

1/2" 1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

3/4" MAIN

1/2" 1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

1/2" 1/2"

1/2"

(first floor plans)

1/2" 1/2"

1/2"

WM

7

1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

1/2" 1/2"

1/2" 1/2" 1/2" 1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

1/2" 1/2" 1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

1/2" 1/2"

15

1/2" 1/2" 1/2"

2

1/2" 1/2"

1/2"

1/2" 1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

1/2"

MIXED

10

9

5/5/1

20

SCALE

0

30

45


QL (4)

QL (2)

PLANTING PLAN

WM

QP (3)

APC (2) AH (4) (FOR GREEN WALLS, SEE ROOF PLAN)

QL (4)

SC

IV (5)

PA (3) IV (3) MA (3)

EH EH ET

RO (1) LMY (3) SS RO (3) LMY (6) RO (1) LMY (3)

MA (3) PA (3)

LMY (1) RO (3)

AH (6)

UC

AH (6)

ASHTONWILLIAMS ASHTON WILLIAMS

AH (3) LMY (3) AH (3) QL (1) QP (5)

MA (5) MD (2) TS (3)

IV (3)

ASHTON WILLIAM

RO (1)

MIXED USE CENTE

PLANTING PLA

MIXED USE

METAL EDGER (TYP.) 0

46

10

5 / 5 / 16

20

SCALE 1"=20'

30

SHEE


EXTENSIVE OR BIODIVERSE GREEN ROOF

MODULAR GREENROOF, REF. SHEET 14 FOR PLANTING PATTERN 14 HVAC FACILITIES

AT (3) PA (3)

15

14

QL (1) RO (3)

DRAIN AT GRADE LMY (3) AH (3)

MA (3) LMY (3)

QL (1)

INTENSIVE ROOF RO (3) AH (6) QL (1)

PA (3) MR (3)

PA (3)

RO (2) AT (3)

TREE GRATE

AH (1)

MR (4) RO (3)

PA (6) LMY (3) QL (1) IV (3) AT (1)

ASHTONWILLIAMS ASHTON WILLIAMS

UNDERGROUND RAIN WATER HARVESTING TANK

HVAC FACILITIES

13

ASHTON W

A

RO (3)

EXTENSIVE GREEN ROOF

MIXED USE

MODULAR GREENROOF, REF. SHEET 14 FOR PLANTING PATTERN

PLANTING

ROOF PLANS ENLARGED ROOF PLAN VIEW

MIXED USE

5

SCALE 1"=20'-0" 0

10

5 / 5 / 16

15

SCALE 1"=20'

47


(In Cooperation with Rialto Studio Landscape Architecture)

2/L3.2 1 L3.2 2/L3.2

10/L3.2

1

PLAN: WALK LAYOUT SCALE: 1/4"= 1'-0"

1 L3.2

1 L3.2

7

9/L3.2

PLAN: ACCESSIBLE RAMP TYPE F SCALE: 1/4"= 1'-0"

9/L3.2 SIM.

4

PLAN: ACCESSIBLE RAMP TYPE C SCALE: 1/4"= 1'-0"

2

PLAN: ACCESSIBLE RAMP TYPE A SCALE: 1/4"= 1'-0"

1 L3.2

1 L3.2

1 L3.2

7/L3.2 8/L3.2

9

48

PLAN: ACCESSIBLE RAMP TYPE H SCALE: 1/4"= 1'-0"

8/L3.2

5

PLAN: ACCESSIBLE RAMP TYPE D SCALE: 1/4"= 1'-0"

8

PLAN: ACCESSIBLE RAMP TYPE B SCALE: 1/4"= 1'-0"


4 L3.2

1 L3.2 10 L3.2

4 L3.2

SECTION: ACCESSIBLE RAMP

9

1 L3.2

SCALE: 1/2"= 1'-0"

5

SECTION: CONC. WALK AT CURB SCALE: 1"= 1'-0"

1

SECTION: 4 INCH CONC. PAVING SCALE: 1"= 1'-0"

4 L3.2

1 L3.2 11 L3.2

2

10

SECTION: ACCESSIBLE RAMP SCALE: 1/2"= 1'-0"

1 L3.2

6

SECTION: EXPANSION JOINT SCALE: 1"= 1'-0"

4 L3.2

SECTION: DETECTABLE PAVERS SCALE: 1/2"= 1'-0"

1 L3.2

4 L3.2

3

SECTION: CONCRETE @ STRUC. SLAB SCALE: 1-1/2"= 1'-0"

Iss

11

SECTION: DETECTABLE PAVERS SCALE: 1"= 1'-0"

7

Re

SECTION: DETECTABLE PAVERS SCALE: 1"= 1'-0"

1 L3.2 2 L3.2

Pr

Dr

4

DETAIL: EXPANSION JOINT SEALANT

Ch

Sc

N.T.S.

Sh

10 L3.2

8

SECTION: ACCESSIBLE RAMP SCALE: 1/2"= 1'-0"

Sh

49

Sh


(In Cooperation with Rialto Studio Landscape Architecture)

50


GRAPHIC DESIGN

P R I N T M AT E R I A L S , B R A N D I N G , A N D A R T


52


53


54


55


56


57


AGGIE WORKSHOP POSTER ASLA Communications Poster Design and Marketing Photoshop & InDesign (Williams)

58


CLIFFS OF MENACE Digital Painting I Matte Painting Photoshop (Williams)


ASHTON WILLIAMS 210.856.6500 ashwilli93@tamu.edu

Ashton Williams: Portfolio 2017  

This portfolio consists of selected work as a student of landscape architecture within the Texas A&M University College of Architecture.

Ashton Williams: Portfolio 2017  

This portfolio consists of selected work as a student of landscape architecture within the Texas A&M University College of Architecture.

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