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ASHYLN OAKES 2018 Undergraduate Design Portfolio


Ashlyn Oakes Undergraduate Portfolio Yale University Class of 2018 Bachelor of Arts, Architecture PO Box 209096 New Haven, CT 06520 ashlyn.oakes@yale.edu a.oakes96@gmail.com 470-208-9410


Academic projects The University Commons The Weaver + Scholar The Arts + Industries Building The Urban Farm The Domestic Niche The Firehouse The Multi-faith Center The Pyramids of Giza

6 20 30 44 52 58 68 76

Independent works

Yale Scientific Magazine Personal Work

84 90


ACADEMIC PROJECTS


THE UNIVERSITY COMMONS Originally conceived as a depiction of five obstructions, this site development was influenced by the interaction between two opposing forces: the negative and the positive. Where root-like structures at first seem the obvious choice in deeming what is obstruction, five corresponding voids instead become the more dominating obstacle. The playful tension between the solid and the void then became a fully developed site, on which the commons of a university campus is housed amongst winding paths and sunken courtyards. Site location: Stanford University, CA Critic: Sunil Bald


Left to right Top views of concept models in clay Varying perspectival views through the obstructions Final concept


Academic Projects

The Commons

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Elevation and plan views of five obstructions model (left) and diagram depicting voids as obstructions rather than roots (right)


Academic Projects

The Commons

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Site development through a series of diagrams and one aerial model photo


Academic Projects

The Commons

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Site elevation and programmatic diagram depicting organizational layout inspired by unobstructed paths


Academic Projects The Commons

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Topographic deconstruction of site pathways


Perspectival views of final concept


Academic Projects

The Commons

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THE WEAVER + SCHOLAR The goal of this project was to design a studio structure to house visiting residents, one a scholar and the other a weaver. Situated in the woods of the Albers Foundation, this project took inspiration from weaver Annie Albers and artist Josef Albers in form and facade, resulting in an eccentric space enclosed by woven walls. Site location: Albers Foundation, CT Critic: Turner Brooks


Josef Albers Stenograph which inspired the structural logic of the project


Academic Projects Weaver + Scholar

23 Initial concept showing relation to the Albers lithograph through overlay


Revised concept


Academic Projects

Weaver + Scholar

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Left to right Site plan within the Albers foundation Plan view of interior


Academic Projects Weaver + Scholar

27 Weave analysis in various lighting and perspectives


Rendering of the studio at night


Academic Projects Weaver + Scholar

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Variation of light based on weave density in public and private spaces within the studio


THE ARTS + INDUSTRIES BUILDING In partnership with the Smithsonian Institute, five student teams of Making Spaces, a course jointly listed in Engineering and Architecture, explored the next chapter of the Arts and Industries Building (AIB). My designated team focused on the physical space of the building, developing a modular system that could be housed within each of the four wings without causing any damage to the existing historic architecture. Professor: Joseph Zinter In collaboration with Rachel Goslins of the Smithsonian Institution Teammates: Jordan Boudreau, Zishi Li, and Julia Medina


From left to right Plan views of the AIB, the four wings in which the modular system was housed, and the pre-existing grid that dictated the organization of the modules


Academic Projects The Arts + Industries Building

33 Axonometric view depicting the three-dimensional grid array within the building


Left to right Section model showing the modular system and views in the north wing entrance of the AIB


Academic Projects

The Arts + Industries Building

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Section model front and back views


Academic Projects

The Arts + Industries Building

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From left to right Perspective views depicting the rotunda looking into the north wing, the Brooklyn Fashion Design Accelerator exhibit in the east wing, and the canopy exhibit in the west wing


Academic Projects

The Arts + Industries Building

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AIB Style Guide developed for the project, including a color palette, logo, and proposed guidelines designating the use of these branding methods Left to right Style guide booklet and inside content


Color Palette

Located on the National Mall, the AIB was America’s first national museum. Since opening in 1881, it has showcased some of America’s greatest innovations and its legacy is one of innovation and forward thinking. The building is in the process of being reimagined as a place which celebrates the future over the past, and experiences over artifacts. We have derived a set of visual standards that we feel express the AIB’s role in proposing the future and giving exposure to groundbreaking innovations in diverse fields. We kept these concepts as well as the AIB’s longstanding ideals of optimism and change in mind while designing this style guide.

Our color palette is defined by bold and bright accent colors that are offset by pairs of more neutral, grounding hues. The six key colors can be combined and arranged to fit a variety of applications. The first key color is a deep gray for use in paragraphs of text on a white background or as a backdrop to white or light text. The next three colors, pink, blue, and yellow, can be used as accent colors in headings and subheadings. They are meant to add a hint of playfulness throughout the theme as a contrast to the deep gray and the final two key colors. The tan and light gray are meant to act as neutral backgrounds to dark text. Here are the colors in a variety of opacities.

#2F3030

#D12460

#0086FF

#F4DA44

#EDD5B7

#DDD3D5

Academic Projects

AIB principles

100%

80%

60%

40%

20%

10%

Typeface Usage

Suggested color combinations

The pairing of Dosis and Perpetua extrapolates our original ideals. We chose two fonts that together are energetic and approachable. Dosis is a clean and legible font face for both print and web media. The font is available in multiple weights, making it useful for headings and prominent text. Perpetua complements Dosis and is used for body text, adding a level of professionalism that is not overly serious or technical.

In continuity with the AIB principles, we suggest pairing the bright and optimistic accent colors with the neutral hues of the color scheme. We want to maintain a balance of the neutral tones pulled from the existing building and the addition of bright and contemporary accents.

Color combinations to avoid

Body text: Perpetua AaBbCc123

Light

Semi Bold

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AaBbCc123

AaBbCc123

AaBbCc123

AaBbCc123

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nullam rhoncus gravida massa non molestie.

AaBbCc123

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Regular

Pairing two accent colors or two neutral colors together should be avoided, as they detract from the over-all balance of history and modernism intended by the AIB. Color usage should be playful, but not overly vibrant.

AaBbCc123 Medium

Bold

Extra Bold

Regular

Italic

Bold

Appropriate uses

AIB Logo The logo was constructed geometrically from circles laid over a grid, inspired by the arches and underlying architecture of the AIB. With this simple, geometric form, we created a logo that is both playful and

Header text: Dosis AaBbCc123 AaBbCc123

The Arts + Industries Building

Color usage

Thickness variation

Any of the key colors may be used as a solid logo against a white or suggested color background as outlined in the color combinations. Any color may be used for dot of the “i” when the remainder of the logo is charcoal gray.

Geometric derivation

Inappropriate uses The aspect ratio of the logo is crucial to it’s appeal and should not be tilted, twisted, or stretched. We caution against using more than two colors within the logo, except in the case mentioned above. Individual aspects of the logo should not be modified, and should be treated as a whole “image”. Outlined are some examples of logos that are considered to detract from the vision of the AIB.

41


Business card templates

ARTS AND INDUSTRIES BUILDING • SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION

Applied usage To: Barack Obama 1600 Pennsylvania Ave NW Washington, DC 20500

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Business card templates

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Rachel Goslins, Executive Director

(100) 123 - 4567

(100) 123 - 4567

900 Jefferson Drive, SW Washington, DC 20560

executivedirector@aib.gov

http://aib.si.edu/

Left to right Templates for a letterhead and business cards and business card packaging

FIRSTNAME LASTNAME Position Arts and Industries Building Smithsonian Institute email@si.edu (000) 123 4567 900 Jefferson Drive SW, Washington, DC 20560 https://aib.si.edu/


Academic Projects

The Arts + Industries Building

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THE URBAN FARM Three related non-profit organization, City Seed, New Haven Farm, and Land Trust, were meant to be housed within one structure. The building is designed to serve as a productive workspace as well as a demonstration to the wider community of these organizations’ works. Sited on a plot in danger of flooding and with contaminated soil, the building was raised off the ground in order to house the public market underneath, which is used only quarterly. Site location: Poplar Street, New Haven, CT Critic: Turner Brooks


Concept sketches and final model


Academic Projects

The Urban Farm

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Academic Projects The Urban Farm

49 Clockwise from left Orthographic views of the urban farm, first floor plan, rooftop plan, and south section


Massing model as situated in the given site and developed topography


Academic Projects

The Urban Farm

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THE DOMESTIC NICHE Developed as a preface to designing a fire house, this project is an alteration of the trundle bed wherein bunks attached to sliding extensions are stacked in threes to allow for multiple configurations of a single room. This invention of the trundle bed system reestablishes private space without removing a needed sense of community. These private rooms will allow for better sleeping conditions as well as improving efficiency of space and storage. Site location: 842 Chapel Street, New Haven, CT Critics: Joyce Hsiang and Alfie Koetter


Left to right Digital collages depicting the nature of mental hospital sleeping quarters circa 1950 and similarities of housing conditions in varying careers, used as background research in this project


Academic Projects

The Domestic Niche

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Top to bottom Perspective view of one orientation of the domestic niche Orthographic views of two contractible trundle bed orientations and the domestic niche trundle bed alteration in plan and section

The Domestic Niche

The Domestic Niche

The Domestic Niche

An inhabited space

Trundle bed orientations

0’

2’

Trundle bed layering system

0’

1’

Layered trundle system section view

0’

3’


Academic Projects The Domestic Niche

57 Plan views of two room orientations and possible aggregations of the domestic niche for up to seven bedrooms

0’

4’

Basic layouts and various room configurations

0’

16’


THE FIREHOUSE Taking inspiration from the raumplan, the vision for the firehouse first began with heavy dependence on the organization of the section. Space was differentiated by thresholds and various means of circulation in order to create a continuous but layered space. The section was then “wrapped� to create the second goal for this project: a new exterior. Multiple iterations analyzed different organizational methods through which new a internal exterior could be defined. By creating an enclosure within the firehouse and isolating it from its urban context, a new frame of reference formed a unique living experience that could then represent the unconventional lifestyle of the firefighter. Site location: New Haven, CT Critics: Joyce Hsiang and Alfie Koetter


Digital collage depicting the growth of a megacity through independently compartmentalized but simultaneously interconnected urban components


New Haven site analysis Academic Projects

Street analysis Left to right Figure-ground diagram of streets One-way/two-way street distribution Street congestion gradient

Mass analysis Left to right Figure-ground diagram of buildings Building program distribution Building elevation gradient The Firehouse

Lot analysis Left to right Figure-ground diagram of lots Green space/parking space distribution Private/public lot distribution

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Inverted sectional concept model in various views


Academic Projects

The Firehouse

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Progression through massing and draft models to final concept


Academic Projects

The Firehouse

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On page Elevation and section of firehouse within New Haven Site

Facing page Site plan of firehouse resulting form due to surrounding buildings


Academic Projects

The Firehouse

67


THE MULTI-FAITH CENTER Conceived as a space for assembly, this project relied on the aggregation of cubes as a spatial representation of the strength in coalescence. Formal examinations resulted in a predominantly subterranean structure, wherein negative forms created courtyards and positive forms converged to create an extensive and spatially-complex underground gathering place open to the ground plane by light wells. Site location: Cross Campus, Yale University Critics: Bimal Mendis and Rosalyne Shieh


Two-dimensional analysis of cubic aggregations, resulting intersections, and various overlays


Academic Projects The Multi-faith Center

Clockwise from bottom left Positive massing analysis of cubic aggregations Negative massing analysis of cubic aggregations Final concept diagram depicting positive cubic aggregations as inhabitable subterranean building space and negative cubic aggregations as surface-level courtyards

71


Final model exterior and interior views


Academic Projects

The Multi-faith Center

73


Left to right Site plan of center on Yale University Cross Campus and detail model of multi-faith center entrance


Academic Projects The Multi-faith Center

75 3 | MULTIFAITH CENTER | detail model, entrance


LYSIS

YRAMIDS


THE PYRAMIDS OF GIZA The purpose of this precedent analysis was to juxtapose the Egyptian Pyramids between a terrestrial and a cosmological frame of reference. Rather than focusing on the mass of the pyramids themselves, attention was paid to the voids within the structures, the organization of which are said to correspond with culturally significant astronomical figures. This method of analysis resulted in a puzzle-like physical embodiment of the enigmatic nature of the Egyptian pyramids, engaging the user through hands-on assembly. Critics: Bimal Mendis and Rosalyne Shieh


Left to right Kit of parts model assembled and unassembled components

KIT OF PARTS

EGYPTIAN PYRAM

1B | KIT OF PARTS | Egyptian Pyramids


Academic Projects

The Pyramids of Giza

79


1B | KIT OF PARTS | Egyptian Pyramids

Interactive model that, when assembled and rotated correctly, fits together in alignment with constellations 1B |four KIT OFcorresponding PARTS | Egyptian Pyramids


Academic Projects The Pyramids of Giza

81 1B | KITmodel OF PARTS | Egyptian Pyramids relationship to the pyramid shafts Assembled presenting the constellations’


INDEPENDENT WORKS


YALE SCIENTIFIC MAGAZINE The Yale Scientific Magazine is an undergraduate publication distributed quarterly. Having served a year-long term as Art Editor, I was responsible with designing the cover of each issue as well as various visual pieces to be paired with articles within the publication. Managing team: Allison Cheung, Zach Gardner, Lionel Jin


Next two spreads Magazine covers and various articles featuring artwork


Independent Work

Yale Scientific Magazine

87


Independent Work

Yale Scientific Magazine

89


PERSONAL WORK Works of varying media, including colored pencil, charcoal, acrylic paint, and digital art, completed outside of academic or extracurricular responsibilities.


Independent Work

Personal Work

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Independent Work

Personal Work

95


5 | TRADITIONAL MEDIA | Rudolph Schindler’s Lovell Beach House plans, elevation, and section Clockwise from left Orthographic views of Rudolph Schindler’s Lovell Beach House, from left to right first story plan, second story plan, elevation, and section


Independent Work Personal Work

97 Exploded axonometric view of| Rudolph each uniqueSchindler’s concrete frame section 5 | TRADITIONAL MEDIA Lovell Beach House axonometric anaylsis of spatial separation


Plan view of Louis Kahn’s Yale University Art Gallery Staircase


Independent Work

Personal Work

99 Digital work


Ashlyn Oakes 2018 portfolio  

An undergraduate design portfolio following graduating from Yale University with a B.A. in Architecture

Ashlyn Oakes 2018 portfolio  

An undergraduate design portfolio following graduating from Yale University with a B.A. in Architecture

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