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......................WORKS. ASHLEYMORGANHASTINGS........ SCIARCFA15SP16..............


...........................WORKS ASHLEYMORGANHASTINGS............ SCIARC20152016..................


CONTENTS

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............1GB...DESIGN.STUDIO

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.................VISUAL.STUDIES

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................APPLIED.STUDIES

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...............CULTURAL.STUDIES

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............1GA...DESIGN.STUDIO

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.................VISUAL.STUDIES

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................APPLIED.STUDIES

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...............CULTURAL.STUDIES


STUDIO INSTRUCTORS: Emmett Zeifman Margaret Griff in Alexis Rochas

ASSISTANT TEACHER: Cody Miner

TEACHING ASSISTANT: Patrick Geske

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1GB.DESIGN.STUDIO SPRING.2016

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MAISON PLANEIX -- LE CORBUSIER Located in the 13th arrondissement in Paris, Maison Planeix is one of Le Corbusier’s earliest residential works, built in 1928. This precedent serves as a prime example of early 20th century duplex construction, as well as live/work complementary space. Depicting the simple complexity of the duplex, this rowhouse featured curved walls and modernist stucco construction

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The key features of the duplex included a two-storey garden at the back of the house, a double height studio space on the fourth floor, and a modern piano nobile concept, where the main house was located on the première étage. Le Corbusier’s approach to this house reflected the idea of ‘une maison/un palais’ -- ‘a house/a palace’. While Maison Planeix is Le Corbusier’s only fully-attached residential project in his works, it remains individually unique as one that ennobled the home, creating the idea of a luxurious villa through his use of proportion, form, and circulation.

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In his sections of Maison Planeix, Le Corbusier depicts the division of spaces aptly -- smaller proportioned spaces on the ground and mezzanine floors; more widely opened spaces on the first and second floors -- where the master bedroom and studio spaces were located, respectively.

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There’s also a fine symmetry, showing us that while the proportions of the spaces are relevant, the lines and grids created within the cross-section show nearly perfect symmetry and harmony within the space. This becomes apparent in both the front and back elevations, as shown on the next page. The gridded ribbon windows, guardrail along the parapet, and ‘box’ pushed out of the front of the house.

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Across both of these pages lay printed works created by Eduardo Chillida, a Basque sculptor and painter who uses broad strokes of brush and block, as well as using the idea of extrusion in his raw materialed sculptures. Black and white. Steel and concrete. Big intentions. Asymmetrical symmetries. Repetition. Inspiration. Beautifully simple moves.


Situated atop a simple plinth, elevated from the streets of Venice, California, I approached the design of this duplex with broad strokes, big moves, and a love of simple beauty. Chillida’s paintings propose relationships -- energies between forms, the idea of the diptych. The main painting that inspired me put two block-like figures together on a page, facing each other as solids with void in between. The void, painted black, serves as the only disruption within the tight envelope of the painting. My project became one that looked at this relationship, the energy between the blocks. An energy that moves and interacts, one that stretches. This stretching is physical, it creates experiences, and exaggerates the ideas of form. Both houses incorporate details that have been enlarged or enhanced, then tested in multiple ways. While seemingly compact, my duplex incorporates physical, metaphorical, and ideal methods of stretching.

Previous page: long section of both houses Next pages: ground floor plan, first floor plan, second floor plan, cross-sections of both houses

PHYSICALLY -- internally, there is a form that flows through the building, created from an extrusion (a nod to Chillida’s sculptural forms). The form creates both solids and voids in the houses: massing of walls on the interior (solid); directing circulation passively (void). This ‘interior solid’ subtracted from the form creates an ‘exterior void’. All of this (inter)action with the original extruded form happens multiple times throughout both houses.

METAPHORICALLY -- blocks reaching toward the center, towards each other, never touching. The massing of the block-like forms at the center create a courtyard, a shared area; again, here stretching but never touching. The massing is experienced multiple times, through inhabitation of the volumes as well as interaction with them outside.

IDEALLY -- the repeated relief forms created from a twodimensional projection of the extruded mass. The idea of stretching continues in the realized consistency of windows, pathways on the plinth, in the stairways and handrails... Stretching. Interaction. Experience of these elements multiple times.

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TWO.HOUSES BOTH.ALIKE.IN.FORMALITY IN.FAIR.VENEZIA WHERE.WE.LAY.OUR.SCENE Pictured above: final models, created at 3/32” scale and situated on a four-foot-tall (scaled) plinth 30


Both of the houses and the plinth were 3D printed out of ABS plastic. Windows are shown as simple openings without the need for ‘glass’ inserts. The houses were painted to match the renderings -- the color palette was derived from raw metals, namely steel in this instance.

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VISUAL STUDIES INSTRUCTORS: Anna Neimark Matthew Au

TEACHING ASSISTANT: Kevin Finch

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1GB.VISUAL.STUDIES SPRING.2016

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The beauty of typography and letterform is one that perpetuates throughout time and exists without residence. Humans have longed to communicate through written word or form for thousands of years.

One form alone is beautiful. Two forms together are fascinating. Creating axonometric representations, we began to see how projections and extrusions of the geometry of each letter intersect and interact with each other.

With the advent of the printing press in the 17th century, we enabled our idle hands with the ability to create and recreate series of letters that began to relate to each other, not only in terms of their alphabetical sequence, but also now in terms of their geometries.

With each new iteration, the drawings evolve from two-dimensional, strictly gridded and regimented representations into axonometric fields of projection. The intersection of forms created between the letters ‘h’ and ‘y’ were manipulated in ways outside of orthogonal projection -- through multi-axial rotations and folding of original gridded locations, the letters yielded a hybrid form.

In these exercises, we examined the Paris Scientific Type or Royal Alphabet letterforms. Beginning with individual letters, these forms were explored as two-dimensional architectural drawings, focusing on the creation of specific, genuine forms. The arcs of a serif. The parallel lines of a staff. The grid upon which this linework lives and evolves. These are all elements of beauty -- elements that speak to each other and become more than representations of letters. They become forms.

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Building these line drawings, we also identified how an italic letter is created, and what it means to be italic. What it means to lean at an angle. What it does to the arcs that were circles that become ellipses.

This hybrid can stand on its own -- it became more than the sum or best of its parents. It became almost monumental in its ease of existence. It is soft, yet strong. Subtle, yet bold.


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In these renderings, I focused on the hybrids graphical ability to stand on its own. The ability to have and maintain its own posture. Neither parent letter was italicized, yet the hybrid leans in such a way that suggests it is naturally italic. The parallel shafts from both letters indicate columnal qualities, giving the form an aforementioned monumental quality.

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The curves from the ‘h’ are so soft, so beautiful. They create an opposite language, an anti-mirror to the converse and more angular side. Viewing the hybrid in these contra posta moments, one contemplates the ideas of balance, symmetry, and the qualities of the rendering (creating shadows, articulating form and movement) -- these letterforms create a new sort of communication. Instead of the written word, we now have the written form.

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Point, line, surface, volume, shade... Color. Here, we go from most basic to (potentially) most complex representational trait of a drawing. We disregard surface and replace the surfaces with lines and arcs -- replacing volume and shade with multple colors to create similar, but different, drawing approaches.

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Through only the use of line, repetition, and color, a seemingly simpler drawing based on element, is instead more complex based on content. Some of these drawings have upwards of 1.5 million lines layered together -- and yet, the hybrid letterform is still a gestalt version of its actual form.


Above: additional line drawings of hybrid letterform created with zig-zagging parallel lines Opposite: ďŹ nal line drawing of hybrid letterform utilizing ďŹ ve layers of CMYK colors to create a type of skin tone coloration

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ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS INSTRUCTORS: Illaria Manzoleni Russell Fortmeyer

TEACHING ASSISTANT: Jessica Rodrigues Passos

GROUP PROJECT MEMBERS: Luiza De Souza Tamara Harutyunyan Ashley Hastings Elishah Ratansi Abagael Warnars

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1GB.APPLIED.STUDIES SPRING.2016

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1/8" STEEL SHEET -8" SQUARE CUT PIECES FOR SHADES 3/8" STEEL PLATE -12" SQUARE CUT PIECES FOR BASE

5'-6 5/16"

3/8" SQUARE STEEL RODS FOR MODULE LEGS

5’-0"

In our design, we proposed to address ‘reflectivity’ through the perspective of materiality. Additionally, we wanted to incorporate different materials, colors, and a hybrid of specific materials and colors together. Our approach was to create a floor luminaire, approximately six feet tall, in the form of a square tower. The metal tower body has openings approximately eight inches tall that span the width of each face of the fixture.

4”

1'-0" 8"

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ISOMETRIC VIEW SCALE: 1/8" = 1'-0"

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PLAN VIEW SCALE: 1/8" = 1'-0"

Within these openings, the inside of the metal body is lined with an array of materials, ranging from black carpet (lowest reflectivity value) to mirror (highest reflectivity value).

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LEFT ELEVATION SCALE: 1/8" = 1'-0"

The location of each material was organized in a way that created a controlled approach to how the light is delivered, or received in the space.


1'-2" 8" 4"

Within the tower body of the luminaire, we installed a pulley system for the lamp and ballast. This pulley system provides a manual method of interaction, much like controlling how window shades are raised and lowered. As the lamp is lowered, it interacts with each section’s material and/or color, creates a diff erent type of refl ectivity.

The interactivity of the fixture is based on simple actions that anyone can take. Our intended use locations included: Keck Hall at SCI-Arc, inside the living room area of one of our apartments, and also within a local bar.

1'-0"

1/8” STEEL SHEET -WELDED TOGETHER TO CREATE MODULAR CLIP REMOVABLE PULLEY SYSTEM WITH TIEBACKS TO WRAP LAMP ELECTRICAL CORD

3D PRINTED PULLEY SYSTEM -ABS PLASTIC, TO BE PAINTED BLACK

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Our proposal was based on precedents that focused on a geometrical or geodesic body, providing transparency in terms of how materials are used.

1/4” ROUND STEEL ROD -BENT TO HOLD PULLEY

The varying levels of refl ectivity in our project will provide ample lighting in any space. 4

FRONT ELEVATION SCALE: 1/8" = 1'-0"

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DETAIL SCALE: 1/8" = 1'-0"

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PULLEY DETAIL SCALE: 1/8" = 1'-0"

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During our design process and precedent research, the idea of materiality was discussed extensively. It was our intent to use raw, unf inished materials for the body of the f ixture in order to convey not only an industrial style and aesthetic, but also to use these materials in a way to control the levels of ref lectivity that we hoped to produce from the interior of each unit.

The design is simple and, most importantly, maintains our desire for a fully modular f ixture -- one that can be easily customized with any number of ‘houses’.

Initially, we thought about using a casting or forming method to create the four-sided shades; however, the reality of using concrete in this capacity was not feasible. We instead looked to metalworking, specif ically using a heavy gauge steel. To maintain this approach to a raw sensibility, we decided to use 1/8” steel plates, cut to size per our drawings -- 8” x 8” -- and TIG weld the plates together with a 3/8” square steel rod at each corner.

In our light reflectivity research, we tested a variety of materials to help us obtain a wide range of lumen outputs, using a light meter. The results of this research helped us determine the hierarchy of materials needed to line the inside of our modular lamps. In the end we created a manual dimmer using the varying refl ectivity of the materials. A light tower, illuminating its environment and offering diff erent levels of lighting.

As a result, the fixture is broken down into three main components: the base (a f ixed house welded to a 1/4” steel plate), the house (primary body module), and the clip (a steel rod and plate combination that holds the pulley and lamp housing).

The modular capability coupled with a well-executed selection of materials has given us not only an effective dimmable light source, but also a beautiful and intriguing design.

Each ‘house’ unit is comprised of the four steel plates and rods, plus whatever interior material is used for each level of reflectivity.


ARCHITECTURAL CULTURE INSTRUCTOR: Dora Epstein-Jones, PhD

TEACHING ASSISTANT: Glory Curtis Bejar

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1GB.CULTURAL.STUDIES SPRING.2016

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Excerpt taken from Maximum Chameleons Architectural Culture Instructor: Dora Epstein-Jones, PhD

Looking to nature for sustainable answers not only requires design acumen or a solid understanding of architecture or engineering, but also an ability to think on a much larger temporal scale. It requires critical thinking and application of tested design principles and long-term planning. No longer is it sufficient to think five, ten, or twenty years in advance in terms of urban planning and critical civilization forecasting; no, now we are to look hundreds, potentially thousands of years into the future in order to create better lives today. Simply meditating on (and not yet attempting to answer) the question of ‘what will the world be like in one thousand years?’ may take more energy and more creativity, that one may be unable to actually muster any sort of initial response. This is a big question, but it rather pales in comparison to a project that sustainable thinker, Danny Hillis, and Amazon.com founder, Jeff Bezos are collaborating on: the 10,000-year Clock. According to the Clock’s website, an introduction written by Bezos states casually, “[Danny Hillis]’s been thinking about and working on the Clock since 1989. He wanted to build a Clock that ticks once a year, where the century hand advances once every 100 years, and the cuckoo comes out on the millennium. The vision was, and still is, to build a Clock that will keep time for the next ten thousand years.” In partnership with The Long Now Foundation, the 10,000-year clock is precisely what it sounds like. The proposed mechanical engineering feat has been borne out of the idea (and really, the necessity) of developing and encouraging long-term thinking. In order to continue to grow and develop at the rates of the current human race, we must realign our processes and priorities. Here is a passage from an essay by Stewart Brand, founding board member of The Long Now Foundation, on the essential nature of long-term thinking: Civilization is revving itself into a pathologically short attention span. The trend might be coming from the acceleration

of technology, the short-horizon perspective of market-driven economics, the nextelection perspective of democracies, or the distractions of personal multi-tasking. All are on the increase. Some sort of balancing corrective to the short-sightedness is needed—some mechanism or myth which encourages the long view and the taking of long-term responsibility, where ‘long-term’ is measured at least in centuries. Long Now proposes both a mechanism and a myth. The 10,000-year Clock is not a chameleon, but it is a means by which to measure the continued existence of the chameleon (and its friends, the humans), and so it must be respected as a method of tracking the achievement of supreme adaptability. An undertaking like this Clock is unparalleled and difficult to grasp, even for one as myself who believes in evolution and its timescale. Similar to Michael Pawlyn and his firm, Exploration Architecture, The Long Now Foundation is taking the understanding of 3.8 billion years of historic evolution, and attributing that potential to the (supposed) living future of Planet Earth by looking ahead a wee ten thousand years. While only a tiny stitch in the fabric of time, the concept of this level of forecasting is foreign and, likely, uncomfortable for many. Utilizing this method of long-term thinking, not only am I confining (confirming?) my own existence (as an individual human), but also I am distancing myself with the understanding that my actions in this lifetime may not, in fact, have immediate impact on those of my successors; however, as a world society, we who live today in the year 2016 have already exhausted many of the natural resources previously abundant only thirty, fifty, or one hundred years ago. It is time for a major paradigm shift in terms of planning—culturally, architecturally, and now more than ever, temporally.

Left: Atomium, Brussels, Belgium + Google’s Deep Dream Generator Photo Credit: Ashley Hastings

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DESIGN STUDIO INSTRUCTORS: Jenny Wu Anna Neimark Constance Vale Matthew Au

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1GA.DESIGN.STUDIO FALL.2015

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SMOKE BY TONY SMITH Photo Credit: Ashley Hastings


Above and Opposite: color studies of Smoke elevations and isometrics

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Above and Opposite: paper model of expanded Smoke ďŹ eld, truncated by bounding box


Looking at the repeated forms from Smoke, two basic two-dimensional projections could be found in looking at the plan or elevation views of these shapes. The hexagon and the four square grid could be seen in all of these iterations -- through this study, we were challenged to understand how to look for different persepctives. When combined, multiple wireframes showed that their intersections, too, showed the same hexagon or grid projections. It is with this hybrid wireframe that we moved from line (or edge) to surface models, expanding our views and understanding.


Above and Opposite: color studies of individual surface models, as well as hybrid surface model (left)

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In the beginning, there was a wireframe line drawing, created by two-dimensional projections that came from a repeated array of cells in a sculpture called Smoke. The process is always so dull, but the geometry is intriguing. Two separate conditions were made from surfaces that came together at edges, meeting softly yet intently. As a result, an interior volume was formed from the wrapping of surfaces, not fully solid, yet interacting enough to infer massing. The other surface model yielded an obvious exterior condition -- an envelope that could cradle and house the interior volume.

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These models ďŹ t perfectly together, yet did not align. They overlapped in areas and fell short in others. They shared walls that built up double thicknesses. When together, though perfectly snug, still created a misalignment, a misreading of a corner conditions and made unique the interplay of all of the surfaces together. Ultimately, this interplay -- the interlocking volumes -- immediately affected the program of this building project: the Miriam Matthews Branch of the Hyde Park Library in Inglewood, California.


W Florence Ave Van Ness Ave

Arlington Ave


First oor plan -- book stacks, storage, public restrooms (not shown: circulation desk, reference desk, additional administrative rooms)

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Second oor plan -- conference room, reading rooms, additional stacks, employee breakroom, public restrooms

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Final sectional model of completed library. The section shows an interior created by two folded, intersected envelopes. Bookstacks are primarily located on the second oor, with public administrative spaces on the ground.

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Models built from chip board, museum board, ABS plastic (3D printed stairs), basswood, and perforated paper.

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VISUAL STUDIES INSTRUCTORS: Matthew Au

ASSISTANT TEACHER: Andrew Adzemovic

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1GA.VISUAL.STUDIES FALL.2015

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Analyzing how cuts are made, bends are broken, and folds are attened, we are challenged to create accurate two-dimensional representations of realistic, three-dimensional behavior. Using these ‘broken arms’, I used simple planes to slice through the body. These planes serve as a cutting tool as well as a placeholder, depicting original geometry.

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These movements require attention, not only intention. They create disruptions in otherwise uninterrupted forms. The extruded tetrahedron is a stable, solid structure -- upon slicing, it loses its strength and wants to fall; however, giving care to how the new bends react together, beautiful intersections and joints are created. These connections give strength and rigidity in a new way, a way that gives the form a way to respond, to speak for itself.

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After breaking, cutting, slicing, and bending, architectural/ engineering best practices require that we analyze, understand, and then put back together. (Re)assembly demands direction and clarity -- clearly annotated references of movement. These drawings were generated out of real movements, precise and true, and can be the only exact lines to be created from a perfectly closed, solid tetrahedron. If any of the surfaces were even one degree off, the form would be incomplete. Each of these annotated rotations is a perfect 360 degree circle; however, each of the circles has been rotated on its own path, depicting the rotation of each surface. With this approach, it is possible to construct and deconstruct any solid and appropriately represent its geometry

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Rotation, rotation, rotation... Contoured line drawing. Adding deďŹ nition, value, depth of ďŹ eld, and dimensionality through the use of lines and repetition. Form created by extrusion. GIving mass to lines using other lines.


MATERIALS + TECTONICS INSTRUCTOR: Pavel Getov

GROUP PROJECT MEMBERS: Abagael Warnars Jackson Lukas Ashley Hastings

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1GA.APPLIED.STUDIES FALL.2015

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Reinforcement bar

1st layer of polyurethane Re-bar hangers

Shotcrete layers of interior dome

2nd layer of polyurethane Airform

Exterior Coating Ring beam footing Monolithic Concrete Footing


Oscar Niemeyer’s master plan for Brasilia as the new capital of Brazil defined a new generation for not only South America, but also the rest of the world. During the 1960s, the modernist movement spread widely and quickly, and the rise of architects like Niemeyer, Le Corbusier, Johnson, and Mies van der Rohe was almost instantaneous. In partnership with engineer, Lucio Costa, Brasilia is a young city with ancient roots. The entire city was planned and built in four years. Niemeyer’s work spans across the city in the form of twenty-eight buildings, sixteen of which were built from the late 1950s to late 1960s. He is primarily known for his love of curvature and non-orthogonal forms. For this group project, we focused on the Museu Nacional (National Museum), part of the Complexo Cultural da Republica (the Cultural Complex of the Republic). The museum is recognized immediately for its domed structure -- in contrast to other well-known domes, namely Buckminster Fuller’s geodesic designs, the Museum is much more hemispheric instead of being spherical and raised above the ground on a sort of plinth. We wanted to take the idea of the dome as a habitable space, an interior without corners, an exterior without recognizable features... and re-form it.

We created elevational studies of a sphere, and raised and lowered it from ground level. The resulting potential elevations -- shown at 10%, 30%, 60%, and 90% -- show us how the typical form of a dome can go from being completely occupiable, to completely unoccupiable. At human scale and greater, a domed structure that is 10% above the ground is impossible to stand comfortably inside. With each iteration, it becomes more possible to move from the exterior to the interior. These opportunities create new relationships with the space in and around the dome. Looking to the interior, the dome introduces a space without corners. This can be disorienting for occupants -- corners give definition, provide scale, allow for orienting oneself inside a space; on the other hand, a rooms or halls without corners also become volumes without end, volumes that give the illusion of infinity. Domes provide contrast. Our everyday worlds are filled with orthogonal, gridded geometries. Niemeyer’s architecture worked against the routine building, and gave the world complexity in its simplest form. 99


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INTRODUCTION TO CONTEMPORARY ARCHITECTURE INSTRUCTOR: Todd Gannon, PhD

TEACHING ASSISTANT: Meghan Hui

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Excerpt taken from Does Architecture Really Speak for Itself? Intro to Contemporary Architecture Instructor: Todd Gannon, PhD

Each piece of architecture is built within its own ‘-ism’—formalism, functionalism, modernism, realism, neo-classicism, etc. In the case of Reyner Banham’s essay The New Brutalism, the title period in contemporary architecture is discussed, wherein he describes this style as being a confounding of cubism and futurism, ultimately created as a reflection of modern socialism. Brutalism uses a language all its own—unadulterated concrete, big repeated forms that created particular zones within the plan. It is characterized precisely by its brutality, its je m’en foutisme, which literally translates to its ‘I don’t give a fuck-ness’. Brutalism is about pure honesty in terms of communicating form and function through the use of raw, uncompromising materials. During this time, architecture is underdone, interesting, and harsh. According to Banham, the language of the Brutalist style follows three rules: it is ‘uncompromisingly frank about its materials’, the ‘plan is very formal in the disposition of its main elements’, and it ‘makes a kind of symmetry’. It is as a result of the use of materials that Le Corbusier states ‘L’Architecture, c’est, avec des Matières Bruts, établir des rapports émouvants’—Architecture, with its use of raw materials, establishes an emotional relationship. Brutalist buildings, designed by architects like Alison and Peter Smithson, Le Corbusier, and Louis Kahn, evoke emotions and reactions within us… Or, do we only feel and respond as a result of interpretation, either our own or through the words of critics? Do materials have their own universal message? The language of architecture utilizes grammatical tools of composition in order to speak to the world—buildings tell us that they are experientially similar to another by the layout of their floor plans. They communicate with us using symbols and signs, guiding or comforting us as we wander through their corridors. They remind us of what they are based on, their styles and their relationships of materials to one another. In his essay La Dimension Amoreuse, George Baird refers to the linguist Roman Jakobson and how he uses metaphor and metonymy

to characterize certain works of art and architecture. Here, Jakobson defines metaphor as a relation of substitution, and metonymy as a relation of contiguity, or continuous connection. In describing Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth house, one can see that the entire structure—while relatively ‘house-like’—is one big metaphor for the normative term of ‘house’. The exterior walls are all glass, providing no privacy or insulation, but alluding to the idea of what we understand to be a common wall. The house is elevated at both the terrace and foundation levels, alluding to a structure more like a temple, not a residence. The use of metaphor in architecture reminds us of similarities between projects, no matter how divergent they may be. However, it is when we attribute such things as architectural words, metaphors, and semantics to these works, the building no longer speaks for itself; instead, we are applying our own interpretation and significance to the structure. In this way, we allow for argument and debate of the actual meaning of the building itself. It begins to lose its voice and identity as we fabricate our own definitions, regardless of what it actually is. By providing our own commentary, we silence the building… Or, are we giving it the voice it could never have?

Left: The Hunstanton School, Peter and Alison Smithson, 1954 Photo Credit: Nigel Henderson

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THANK YOU FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION.

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Works AMH SCI-Arc MArchI  

First year portfolio -- Fall 2015_Spring 2016

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