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The Body:// Code Unknown

pen at work, too. He made grave errors of judgement, and ran up huge debts. Over a couple of years, these incidents became more and more frequent, until he was more often in this state than out of it. Eventually, he was diagnosed with Huntington’s. Neither of them had been aware that he was at risk. He’d known of a couple of eccentric relatives; his own parents had died quite young, presumably before the disease had been able to take hold of whichever of them had carried it. In what sense was this the man Ca‑ therine had married? She believes he isn’t. Perhaps our identity is genetic. This leaves us with a different problem. We tend to understand syndromes like HD as diseases – entities alien to our bodies that invade and corrupt them. If, however, the tendency to develop a disease lies in one’s genes, how is it any different from, let us say, the tendency to develop blue eyes? Other than the obvious fact that blue eyes do not hurt us and shorten our lives. Accepting this, perhaps we must view the changes inflicted by Huntington’s as integral to the sufferer’s identity. This is not easy to accept, although it may well be the case. There is a religious answer to this dilemma, I know. There is also a set of much more complex neurological and philosophical approaches, which I couldn’t articula‑ te here even if I were capable of it. These approaches, though, as with all others, remain inconclusive. Using the necessarily less precise tool of theatre, all we could do was give some personal sense of them, and the overriding question that faces all of these people: how do you live with this inheritance? It’s not a question that I could begin to answer. We set‑ tled for telling a story about honesty; about facing up to one’s future, and being truthful with others about it; and a‑ bout the ways in which what we inherit from our parents can determine our lives, however much we struggle against this.

40

http://sites.google.com/site/transformcontents/

Wise Fools – Learning from the Clowns Coulrophobia

ʻThere is no rational explanation for why I became a clownW but I noticed very soon during the training that it made me feel great, because it was an exploration of myself.ʼ

p.18

This is what Julia tells me when I ask her why she decided to become a clown. Julia is my best friend. I’ve known her since forever. It was only this year, though, that our relationship moved to a completely new level. Julia became a clown and I made a film about that. www.vimeo.com/5062055

Clown car

When Julia was 15, she read a newspaper article about a clown school in Hamburg. From that moment on, she dreamed of going there to train as a professional clown. It took a few years and a degree in Political Sci‑ ences in between, but in March 2008 she enrolled in the school to pursue her dream. For the next 12 months, she travelledW to Hamburg once every month for three days. She immersed herself in a completely new world. Today, she is a changed person.

41


The Body:// Code Unknown

pen at work, too. He made grave errors of judgement, and ran up huge debts. Over a couple of years, these incidents became more and more frequent, until he was more often in this state than out of it. Eventually, he was diagnosed with Huntington’s. Neither of them had been aware that he was at risk. He’d known of a couple of eccentric relatives; his own parents had died quite young, presumably before the disease had been able to take hold of whichever of them had carried it. In what sense was this the man Ca‑ therine had married? She believes he isn’t. Perhaps our identity is genetic. This leaves us with a different problem. We tend to understand syndromes like HD as diseases – entities alien to our bodies that invade and corrupt them. If, however, the tendency to develop a disease lies in one’s genes, how is it any different from, let us say, the tendency to develop blue eyes? Other than the obvious fact that blue eyes do not hurt us and shorten our lives. Accepting this, perhaps we must view the changes inflicted by Huntington’s as integral to the sufferer’s identity. This is not easy to accept, although it may well be the case. There is a religious answer to this dilemma, I know. There is also a set of much more complex neurological and philosophical approaches, which I couldn’t articula‑ te here even if I were capable of it. These approaches, though, as with all others, remain inconclusive. Using the necessarily less precise tool of theatre, all we could do was give some personal sense of them, and the overriding question that faces all of these people: how do you live with this inheritance? It’s not a question that I could begin to answer. We set‑ tled for telling a story about honesty; about facing up to one’s future, and being truthful with others about it; and a‑ bout the ways in which what we inherit from our parents can determine our lives, however much we struggle against this.

40

http://sites.google.com/site/transformcontents/

Wise Fools – Learning from the Clowns Coulrophobia

ʻThere is no rational explanation for why I became a clownW but I noticed very soon during the training that it made me feel great, because it was an exploration of myself.ʼ

p.18

This is what Julia tells me when I ask her why she decided to become a clown. Julia is my best friend. I’ve known her since forever. It was only this year, though, that our relationship moved to a completely new level. Julia became a clown and I made a film about that. www.vimeo.com/5062055

Clown car

When Julia was 15, she read a newspaper article about a clown school in Hamburg. From that moment on, she dreamed of going there to train as a professional clown. It took a few years and a degree in Political Sci‑ ences in between, but in March 2008 she enrolled in the school to pursue her dream. For the next 12 months, she travelledW to Hamburg once every month for three days. She immersed herself in a completely new world. Today, she is a changed person.

41


19

18

p.41

p.44


The Body:// Code Unknown

pen at work, too. He made grave errors of judgement, and ran up huge debts. Over a couple of years, these incidents became more and more frequent, until he was more often in this state than out of it. Eventually, he was diagnosed with Huntington’s. Neither of them had been aware that he was at risk. He’d known of a couple of eccentric relatives; his own parents had died quite young, presumably before the disease had been able to take hold of whichever of them had carried it. In what sense was this the man Ca‑ therine had married? She believes he isn’t. Perhaps our identity is genetic. This leaves us with a different problem. We tend to understand syndromes like HD as diseases – entities alien to our bodies that invade and corrupt them. If, however, the tendency to develop a disease lies in one’s genes, how is it any different from, let us say, the tendency to develop blue eyes? Other than the obvious fact that blue eyes do not hurt us and shorten our lives. Accepting this, perhaps we must view the changes inflicted by Huntington’s as integral to the sufferer’s identity. This is not easy to accept, although it may well be the case. There is a religious answer to this dilemma, I know. There is also a set of much more complex neurological and philosophical approaches, which I couldn’t articula‑ te here even if I were capable of it. These approaches, though, as with all others, remain inconclusive. Using the necessarily less precise tool of theatre, all we could do was give some personal sense of them, and the overriding question that faces all of these people: how do you live with this inheritance? It’s not a question that I could begin to answer. We set‑ tled for telling a story about honesty; about facing up to one’s future, and being truthful with others about it; and a‑ bout the ways in which what we inherit from our parents can determine our lives, however much we struggle against this.

18

p.41

40

http://sites.google.com/site/transformcontents/

Wise Fools – Learning from the Clowns Coulrophobia 19

ʻThere is no rational explanation for why I became a clownW but I noticed very soon during the training that it made me feel great, because it was an exploration of myself.ʼ

p.18

This is what Julia tells me when I ask her why she decided to become a clown. Julia is my best friend. I’ve known her since forever. It was only this year, though, that our relationship moved to a completely new level. Julia became a clown and I made a film about that. www.vimeo.com/5062055

Clown car

p.44

When Julia was 15, she read a newspaper article about a clown school in Hamburg. From that moment on, she dreamed of going there to train as a professional clown. It took a few years and a degree in Political Sci‑ ences in between, but in March 2008 she enrolled in the school to pursue her dream. For the next 12 months, she travelledW to Hamburg once every month for three days. She immersed herself in a completely new world. Today, she is a changed person.

41


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Vimeo Amazon WordPress Transform is an open-ended, multimedial system, designed to help BBC you explore a wide range of transformative experiences. featuring a large and diverse group of young Flickr creative voices, it is a portrait of that most elusive of things Google Books – change itself. In today's fast moving society, self-definition is a tricky issue and it isMaps easy for us to feel intimidated by the Google need to constantly transform. By combining an eclectic array of online andLast.FM print elements, Transform encourages you to find your YouTube own route, to make connections and, even, in your own unique way, to make sense of it all.

To find out more visit http://tinyurl.com/yh8qoes

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