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Industrial Biotechnology Innovation Centre

Strategic Plan to Deliver the Vision


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Vision

Our vision is to create a truly distinctive, world leading innovation centre for industrial biotechnology. We will accelerate and de-risk the development of commercially viable, sustainable solutions for high-value manufacturing in chemistry-based and life science sectors. In doing so we will establish an innovation and growth engine yielding substantial economic impact and delivering increasing and sustainable wealth creation, prosperity and employment in Scotland.

By 2030 our target is to generate

ÂŁ1 to ÂŁ1.5bn of GVA contribution annually

to the Scottish economy; this represents a growth of revenue from 2012’s estimated value of


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Industrial Biotechnology Innovation Centre 2020 Strategy Roadmap

Introduction

T

here is a huge opportunity for developing IB in Scotland. This paper details five strategic areas and sets out a roadmap that will direct the activity of IBioIC over the next four years towards delivering this opportunity. This Strategic Plan follows on from the Strategic Background to the IB National Plan paper published on 13th February 2015. That paper contains a market audit of the current capabilities of IB in Scotland looking at a number of factors with the potential to influence the development and uptake of IB across the country. The table below highlights the main findings of the market audit. The Chemical Sciences sector is a very important Scottish industry and has the most significant potential for IB development. The number of companies present, many of which are multi-nationals, and the availability of funding make this sector attractive for IB development. Regulatory barriers to development are low, enabling rapid exploitation and commercialisation of ideas. The current level of academic/industry interaction is relatively low, which, with careful attention, focus and coordination from IBioIC, presents an opportunity for the centre in this sector. Within Scottish Life Sciences there are many innovative SMEs but few large companies and significant regulatory barriers to market entry compared with other sectors. However, there are strong academic links with life science companies, both within the UK and abroad, and a growing number of companies developing supporting technologies relevant to this sector. In addition, public research and venture capital funding are plentiful to support accelerated growth in this sector.

Factors

Continuing through the sectors examined, there are some strengths and opportunities in the Food and Drink, Oil and Gas, Textiles and Engineering fields. Current uptake of IB and academic collaboration are low in all these sectors with a high level of effort required to identify opportunities and drive these to commercialisation. The Strategic Background paper mentioned earlier contains an assessment of viable feedstocks and their availability within Scotland. It concludes that wood, municipal waste, commercial & industrial co-products and macro algae presented the most compelling commercial opportunities for further investigation. These will have the greatest economic impact within the Chemical and Life Science sectors via the synthesis of high value chemicals, nutraceuticals, personal care and pharmaceutical ingredients from biological resources or utilising a biological process. There is merit in the development of novel routes to biofuels, but only if these are the highest value products possible from the feedstocks used.

Academic/ Industry Engagement

Current Sector size

Project Funding Grants Availability

Regulatory Environment (Speed to Mkt)

Investment support required

Forecast IB Sales 2025 (minimum)

Chemical Sciences

Average

£9bn

High

<3 yr

Self funding/ Multi-nationals, Some SME

£500m

Life Sciences

Good

£3.2bn

High

>10 yr

Few Multinationals Mainly SME

£200m

Renewable Energy

Good

£5bn

Medium

<5 yr

Few Multinationals Mainly SME

£300m

Oil and Gas

Poor

£24bn

Medium

<3 yr

Self funding/ Multi-nationals, Some SME

£60m

Food and Drink

Average

£5.5bn

Low

<5 yr

Few Multinationals Mainly SME

£60m

Engineering and enablers

Poor

£2.7bn

Low

<3 yr

Few Multinationals Mainly SME

£10m

Textiles

Poor

£0.8bn

Low

<3 yr

Mainly SME

£20m

Sectors

Increasing Strategic Importance

Renewable energy in Scotland makes up a large proportion of the total energy demand, with 44% of electricity capacity currently coming from renewable sources (largely wind turbine and hydro). Within this sector IB has played a small but growing role hence the number of companies involved is low however with increasing importance placed on renewable feedstocks for chemicals and energy from government, the funding landscape is improving.


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IBioIC Strategic Focus

IBioIC Strategic Focus The broad actions recommended in the Strategy Background paper to the National Plan are as follows:

The Centre will focus on five key strategic areas to provide the unique service provision and support required to shape and deliver the National Plan:

PROACTIVELY

pursue opportunities in the Chemical and Life Science sectors, these will be the focus of IB growth where there are game changing applications

Support the strategic and tactical needs of companies that can gain commercial advantage through IB

OPPORTUNISTICALLY

pursue opportunities in Renewable Energy, Food & Drink and Oil & Gas sectors where IB offers an enabling technology to solve some of the issues faced by these sectors

Develop commercial and academic capabilities in:

REACTIVELY

a. b. c.

The SWOT analysis on the following page highlights areas and opportunities for development. The role of IBioIC is to accelerate the development of IB across these sectors by applying and connecting to industry the considerable academic resources that exist in Scotland in IB. IBioIC will identify opportunities, troubleshoot, horizon scan, thought lead, deliver solutions and raise aspirations of its industrial members to deliver the National Plan for IB in Scotland.

pursue opportunities in Engineering and Textile sectors where there are some niche IB applications

Synthetic Biology Bio-transformations and Fermentation Integrated Bioprocessing

Develop projects that build a compelling case for constructing biorefineries in Scotland

Develop IB pilot plant, scale up and technical demonstration facilities that support the three areas above

Train new and existing employees to have the requisite skills to develop and commercialise IB

This paper gives the detail on each of these five strategic areas and presents a roadmap in the form of a high level timeline of how and when these will be delivered. Overall it is expected that around 50% of the total spend of IBioIC will be committed in the area of supporting companies with the balance covering the other four areas in order to cement Scotland as a compelling location for investment, people and resource.


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Industrial Biotechnology Innovation Centre 2020 Strategy Roadmap

Strengths

Weaknesses

Feedstock • Increasing forestry production • Centralised Industrial and Population concentration • Whisky residues • Macro-algae

Feedstock • Limited crop growing area and agricultural waste • Dispersed population outside central belt making waste collection expensive • Single short annual growing season • Climate not favourable to all high energy crops

Industrial • Large and diverse chemicals sector • Innovative Life Science sector • Strong focus on Renewable Energy • Innovative and large oil and gas sector Academic • Unity amongst the 14 partner HEIs • Expertise: biotechnology science, yeast and bacterial strain development, gene discovery, plant genetics, bio-mass pre-treatment, “polyomics”, marine science Other • Scottish Government focussed on supporting sustainable industries, health sector and renewable energy all of which can be developed with IB • Focused resource from both Scottish and H&I Enterprises • “Team Scotland” approach • Highly skilled workforce in regulated process industries

Industrial • Poor adoption of IB across chemical and life science sectors • Food & Drink sector lack of engagement with IB • Small engineering sector and process development sector Academic • Focus on Life Sciences/Health rather than other sectors • Limited expertise: bio-transformation, bio-catalysis, process engineering Other • Funding opportunities for SMEs to scale up their businesses to commercial scale • Limited facilities for process scale-up or development

Opportunities

Threats

Feedstock • Developing biorefineries using available feedstock to make high value chemicals

Feedstock • Available feedstocks are used for other lower value, lower cost applications e.g. wood chip to low grade energy • Available feedstocks are not price competitive compared with other geographic areas

Industrial • Application of IB opportunities within the Chemicals Sector • Scotland can be an attractive investment location for International/Global Chemical companies with existing Scottish sites • New companies wanting to invest in IB capabilities in Scotland • Engaging with and developing IB projects in Oil and Gas sector • New spin-out companies and SMEs in IB Academic • Developing capabilities in Synthetic Biology, bio catalysis, bio-transformations, fermentation and process development • Ability to build on academic experience. IBioIC is building on the momentum as a country of outstanding research excellence • Nurture new collaborative projects to support industry

Industrial • Investment case for building biorefineries in Scotland faces strong competition from other geographic areas • Failure to work with with the less engaged Industry sectors Academic • Inability or unwillingness to attract world class IB talent to HEIs • Competition for a limited pool of Academic talent Other • Failure to win the grant income required to support new projects and facilities • Failure of Government (Scottish, UK and European) to properly support the development of IB • Biodiversity conversion • Lack of IP clarity over strain ownership

Other • Developing pilot-plant and demo scale testing facilities • Developing the skills of the workforce to meet the needs of IB • Developing a range of support packages to encourage the development of SMEs and Inward Investment Collaboration • Growth in technology companies

Industrial Biotechnology SWOT


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Supporting Companies

Supporting Companies CASE STUDY 1

Supporting Companies by Making Connections A key purpose of IBioIC is to create an active network of informed individuals, bringing companies and academics together to share ideas and collaborate on projects spanning the broad spectrum of Industrial Biotechnology. Some of the resulting work is supported with centre funding but many other relationships are formed through the networking events that IBioIC organises. Through meetings brokered by IBioIC, Advanced Microwave Technologies, an Edinburgh based SME with an innovative approach to thermal processing of fluids at industrial scale, have made connections with Croda, a multinational speciality chemical company; CellsUnited, a UK based company producing high quality protein supplement from food waste; and Celtic Renewables, a Scottish based company creating biofuel from by-products of the whisky industry. By making these connections new market opportunities for AMT’s technology have been opened up resulting in the potential for considerable process cost savings for the companies identified.

A key purpose of IBioIC is to forge productive links between companies and academia in IB. IBioIC will establish itself as the Centre of Expertise for the IB community within Scotland that is knowledgeable, valued and internationally recognised. The supported companies could exist within Scotland, be Scottish start-ups/emerging companies with IB interest, or be based outside Scotland with an interest in investing in people, assets and/or technologies within Scotland. IBioIC will identify and approach these companies (some of whom may not know about IB or how IB can be applied to their activities) and support them to develop their ideas, capabilities and projects in IB. Once a connection with a company is made and opportunities for development identified these companies will be expected to become a fee paying member of IBioIC.

The strategic objectives for Supporting Companies are: •

Build the membership of IBioIC (target 200 members by end 2018)

Develop expertise for problem solving, trouble shooting, technology translation and solution management such that it becomes the “go to” Centre of competence and capability for IB opportunities

Run and refine the existing Exemplar Project competitions which are aimed at financially supporting members (or potential members) with identified IB related projects within academia (specific targets will be set annually in the budget, expected to be around 20-30 projects over the five year funding period, five projects and £1.3m was committed in 2013/14 but none started in that year) Proactively develop IB opportunities with members, work up these opportunities into projects and facilitate their realisation through identifying expertise, project management and other services that accelerate the project delivery (target to be set annually in the budget, expected to be around 30-50 projects over the five year funding period, no projects were committed in 2014)

Forge links and relationships with the key funding bodies primarily in Scotland (SE, HIE, SFC and SDS), UK (Innovate UK and Research Councils) and European Union (H2020, ERDF, EFSI) to identify and realise funding for all stages of the project development programme

Run events that promote, inform and provide networking opportunities for IB interested companies, academics and other interested parties (target minimum of four events in 2014/15 and thereafter set annually to meet the developing needs of members. Two events were held in 2013/14)

Attend or lead international conferences, exhibitions and missions to promote IB in Scotland and be kept informed on current developments and events that can benefit the members and establish an international reputation and brand (targets to be set and agreed annually)

Promote Scottish IB capabilities through social media, traditional media, presenting at conferences and events, publishing thought leadership articles, IBioIC website and regular communication of activities (targets set in the annual Marketing and Communications Plan)

Continually review and assess the impact of these activities and modify them to improve their effectiveness and meet the changing needs of the industry


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Industrial Biotechnology Innovation Centre 2020 Strategy Roadmap

Developing Technical Capabilities IBioIC is working closely with the IB Development Group of the National Plan where there are a number of enabling technologies which have been identified by the IBioIC Members as being both critical to success and requiring development. These are: a. Synthetic Biology b. Bio-transformations and Fermentation Technologies c. Integrated Bioprocessing In Synthetic Biology, Scotland has some established expertise, within Industry and Academia, which needs to be built on to enable the rapid development of new host strains, processes, enzymes and ultimately new products of IB. The strategic objectives are:

In the field of Bio-transformations and Fermentation, Scotland has a few companies and some established academic knowledge covering some of these technologies. Specifically, there is an industrial R&D base utilising C1 feedstocks in fermentation through INEOS and more traditional Fischer Tropsch processing through Sasol as well as well-established homo and heterogeneous catalysis plus fermentation technologies research in academia. These will be utilised where traditional processes are replaced by biological steps, or biological feedstocks are to be exploited by chemical means. The strategic objectives are:

Assess where Scotland’s capabilities fit into the UK Synthetic Biology and develop a plan on how to best engage with, augment and contribute to this network Create and promote a cluster of Synthetic Biology excellence around the nascent Edinburgh hub of the recently funded centres at the University of Edinburgh (genome foundry and mammalian cell centre) and the start-up companies that these centres create such that Edinburgh becomes a recognised centre of excellence for Synthetic Biology Support and reinforce the existing Synthetic Biology based companies within IBioIC membership (Ingenza, Thermo Fisher Scientific and Synpromics) with connections, promotion, projects, skills and developing new links in an extended cluster

• •

Assess current capabilities in both biotransformations and bio-catalysis to determine where this needs additional development and support Develop and support projects that develop capability in bio-catalysis and fermentation Form international collaborations to broaden the knowledge base

Integrated Bioprocessing incorporates pre-treatment, preparation, clean-in-place, fermentation, chemical reaction and downstream processing. In Scotland, there is limited industrial expertise in these areas and some academic capabilities. The area needs to be investigated to understand the opportunities and gaps. The strategic objectives are:

CASE STUDY 2

Developing Capabilities in Synthetic Biology - Ingenza Synthetic Biology has been identified as an area where Scotland has world class potential, with a high concentration of both academic and industrial expertise. Ingenza, a Scottish SME with relevance across the spectrum of IB is at the heart of a growing centre of excellence for Synthetic Biology in Edinburgh. Their “inABLE®” system of combinatorial genetics allows the development and screening of many recombinant protein constructs highlighting the optimal sequence for each new IB application. This technology, has been used to develop novel process routes to existing chemicals for multi-national companies such as Invista and Lucite. IBioIC is working with SMEs such as Ingenza to support the continued development of this key enabling technology with the objective of attracting new business investment into Scotland and well as supporting the growth of existing companies.

Assess the capabilities in Integrated Bioprocessing within the UK and Europe and determine how best to exploit capabilities within this environment, this assessment will include IBioIC’s Equipment Centres for prototyping, process development and scale up Support the needs of IBioIC members in their Integrated Bioprocessing requirements, particularly in identifying facilities for process development These enabling technologies require the development of competencies in the HEIs and recognition of the imperative for constant rapid improvement with these fast developing global fields


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Strategy Roadmap

Strategy Roadmap 2014 Priority

Action

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

1. Supporting Scottish Companies Build membership to 200

10 Members

Run & Refine Exemplar projects (2 competitions/year) Proactively develop funded projects with members Promotional and networking events (4 in 2015) International conference promotion of IB IB promotional activities (Internet hits/month:twitter followers:presentations:published articles)

1000:300:3:1

2. Develop Scottish IB capabilities Synthetic Biology Assess current status and develop plan Create and promote a Cluster of Excellence Promote activities and capabilities of cluster locally and globally Biotransformations Assess current status and develop plan Develop projects for processing for bio-feedstocks Form international collaborations in biocatalysis Integrated Bioprocessing Assess current status and develop plan Support Member projects requiring Integrated Bioprocessing 3. Support case for Scottish Biorefineries Wood to HV Chemicals Develop projects into lignin chemistry and de-polymerisation and fuels Develop projects to convert forestry products to HV chemicals Develop projects that convert wood celluloses to sugars Develop projects optimising forestry growing and harvesting Waste to Fuels and Develop studies into feedstock availability, standardisation, economic scale Chemicals Support biotransformation projects using waste Support process development through facilities Pilot studies in waste to jet fuel Macroalgae to HV Develop studies into production of macroalgae Chemicals Support Member projects requiring macroalgae 4. Support the development of IB facilities Complete and commission equipment centres Develop pipeline of projects to use equipment centres Market audit of UK to build credible case for National IB investment in Scotland Support access to precommercialisation facilities for members 5. Support IB skills development a) Fund annual PhD Studentships via competitive calls b) Support delivery of newly developed MSc in IB c) Support development of HNC and HND courses with HEIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s d) Support development of pilot STEM program with local authority and key schools

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Industrial Biotechnology Innovation Centre 2020 Strategy Roadmap

2015 Q1

Q2

2016

Q3

Q4

Q1

Q2

30 Members

2017

Q3

Q4

Q1

Q2

Q3

70 Members

2 Projects 3 Projects

Q1

Q2

Q4

Q2

175 Members 4 Projects

Q3

Q4

Fully funded

Partially funded

200 Members

Not funded

5 Projects

Discrete activity

Ongoing activity

5 Projects

4 Projects

2000:1000:8:5

Q1

5 Projects

4 Projects

KEY

2019

Q3

4 Projects

3 Projects

1500:600:6:3

Q4

120 Members

3 Projects

4 Projects

2018

6 Projects

2500:1500:8:8

3000:2000:8:10

3500:2500:8:10

Published Plan Spin-out 1 Project

Spin-out 1 Project

Spin-out

1 Project

Spin-out

1 Project

1 Project

Published Plan 1 Project

1 Project

1 Project

4 Collaborations

1 Project

2 Projects

6 Collaborations

8 Collaborations

Published Plan 1 Project

1 Project

1 Project

2 Projects

1 Project

1 Project

2 Projects

1 Project

2 Projects

2 Projects

1 Project

3 Projects

1 Project

1 Project

2 Projects 2 Projects 1 Project

2 Projects

3 Projects

1 Proposal

2 Proposals

2 Pilot studies 1 Project

2 Projects

2 Projects

1 Project

1 Project

1 Project

1 Project

1 Project

Centres Operational 2 Projects

4 Projects

2 Members Projects

6 Projects

3 Members Projects

4 Projects

4 Members Projects

6 Projects

5 Members Projects

9 Funded Studentships 8-10 Funded Studentships 8-10 Funded Studentships 8-10 Funded Studentships Students

30 Places

35 Places

20 Places

40 Places

45 Places

40 Places 30 Places

50 Places


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Biorefineries producing high value products

Biorefineries producing high value products One of the four key themes of the IB National Plan is to support the plan for the establishment of biorefineries that convert native feedstocks into high value chemicals and fuels. In all cases the production of the highest value product from each feedstock needs to be the goal. This is unlikely to be first generation biofuel; it is likely that the production of biofuel would be a co-product from the production of higher value chemicals.

CASE STUDY 3

Biorefinery - Borregaard In 2014, IBioIC led a trade visit to Norway to visit the Borregaard biorefinery. Located in South East Norway, the Borregaard biorefinery started operations as a paper pulping mill in 1889. The factory has evolved over the years into one of the world’s most advanced bio-refineries. It is fed by 1 million cubic metres of Norwegian Spruce, and manufactures a range of ligno-sulphonates, specialty celluloses, vanillin and bio-ethanol and generates electricity from burning the otherwise unusable parts of the tree. In 2012 Borregaard listed on the Norwegian stock market since then its share price has tripled.

The table below gives a qualitative analysis of feedstocks available in, and in some cases unique to Scotland. From this three potential types of biorefinery have been determined from which a clear economic case for capital investment will be constructed.

Scotland’s timber production is set to equal Norway’s by 2020. IBioIC is supporting projects that convert native wood varieties into valuable chemical products with the aim of encouraging investment in a wood based biorefinery producing high value products and creating positive economic impact.

Relative Supply

Cost to the Gate

Typical Value of Biorefinery Products

Competition for Feedstock

Technical Readiness

Final Score**

Whisky Residues

3

3

1

3

2

54/81

Wood Residues

2

2

2

3

2

48/72

Feedstock Secondary Production

Organic Arisings*

2

3

1

3

2

36/54

Agricultural Residues

1

2

2

1

2

8/12

Wood

2

2

2

3

2

48/72

Macroalgae

3

1

3

3

1

27/81

Primary Production

Coal Based Methane

2

2

2

1

2

16/24

Grains

2

1

2

1

3

12/12

Vegetables

2

1

3

1

2

12/18

Oil Crops

1

1

2

1

2

4/6

Key:

3 = Sufficient & unique

3 = Negative 3 = High value cost chemicals

2 = Sufficient 2 = £0 & competitive £100/tonne

2 = Chemicals and fuels

1 = 1 = >100/ Insufficient or tonne uncompetitive

1 = Fuels

3 = Little or increasingly available 2 = Some restricting availability 1 = Limited or reducing availability

3= Commercially ready 2= Demostration required 1 = Proof of concept required

* = consisting of industrial co-products and municipal/food waste ** = Final score is the multiple of the 5 category scores with a second score given if the technical readiness was 3


Industrial Biotechnology Innovation Centre 2020 Strategy Roadmap

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IBioIC will focus on each of these three areas as follows: •

Wood based feedstock into Chemicals and Fuels:

• Research into lignin chemistry and its partial de- polymerisation • Research the extraction of higher value chemicals from forestry products • Research the conversion of wood cellulose to sugars • Research into optimising forestry growing and harvesting for biorefineries

Municipal and food waste and industrial co-products into Fuels and Chemicals

• Research the availability, economic scale and standardisation of waste streams • Support biotransformation projects using waste as feedstocks • Support process development through providing access to suitable facilities • Investigate opportunities for the development of a pilot study into waste to jet fuel

Macro algae feedstock into Speciality Chemicals

• •

Investigate the funding of studies in farming, harvesting, processing and storage of macro algae Selectively support projects utilising species unique or particularly well adapted to Scotland’s conditions with a number of SMEs currently working in this field

Through working with the IB Development Group and SE within these three areas it is expected to generate a compelling case for investment for biorefineries in Scotland. We will understand the issues of collection, processing, cost of transport and logistics then balance them with high value products with lower carbon footprints, novel properties or reduced cost to the consumer. Through a mix of economic evaluation and funding for applied research a significant contribution can be made to the Scottish economy from each of these focus areas. Investment will be expected to realise full scale production facilities but these will be based on proven technologies and to meet a real market need.


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IB Pilot and Demonstration Facilities

IB Pilot and Demonstration Facilities IBioIC will support its members to ensure they have access to the necessary pilot and demonstration scale up facilities to accelerate the development and commercialisation of IB in Scotland. In July 2014, IBioIC was awarded funds from the SFC together with contributions from the host institutions to support the equipping of two pilot centres. These centres will significantly support the research programs planned by IBioIC over the next four years and provide opportunities for Scotland to increase its competitiveness. These centres will be unique facilities in Scotland and are entirely complementary to existing Centres such as the National Bioprocess Industries Centre, National Biologics Manufacturing Centre and the National Formulation Centre facilities at the CPI while filling significant gaps in available resources. They will provide IBioIC academic partners and industrial members with the opportunity to transform the development of their products and processes and support the National Plan for IB. We will actively collaborate with CPI (part of HVM Catapult) to provide larger scale industrial demonstration and also to accelerate the development of large and complex biorefinery projects.

Flexible Downstream Bioprocessing Centre, Heriot Watt

Simple kit available in many HEIs 1L

Lab Scale

The strategic objectives are: •

Complete the construction and commissioning of the Rapid Bioprocess Prototyping Centre by mid-2015 and the Flexible Downstream Bioprocessing Centre by end 2015 Develop a pipeline of projects for these centres with prioritisation given to IBioIC members Undertake a market audit of UK IB facilities to help develop the case for a Scottish based UK National investment in infrastructure to support IB by 2016 Support access to both technical and commercial demonstration facilities for members

Rapid Bioprocess Prototyping Centre, Strathclyde

CPI, Teesside 75-10,000 L

15-200 L

1-15L

Technical Demonstration Scale

Technical Demonstration Scale

Commercial Demonstration Scale

CASE STUDY 4

The value of pilot facilities – Celtic Renewables A number of IBioIC members have cited difficulty accessing demonstration or pilot scale facilities as a barrier to developing a profitable business from concepts that have been proven in the laboratory. Celtic Renewables Ltd. who, in seeking to scale their production of biofuels derived from by-products of the whisky industry, needed to partner with a Flemish facility as nothing existed in the UK that met their specific needs. IBioIC has invested in capability for strain development and is in the process of commissioning a demonstrator scale down-stream processing facility. The centre will evaluate the landscape and utilisation of current facilities and invest at a scale that is relevant for the early commercial demonstration of a technology without duplicating capability (pre-existing or planned) within the UK.


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Industrial Biotechnology Innovation Centre 2020 Strategy Roadmap

Skills Programmes from IBioIC A critical component to the successful development of IB in Scotland will be the availability of a skilled workforce. IBioIC is developing the following all encompassing program that the industry is demanding:

• PhD Studentships: The first cohort of IBioIC PhD students started in October 2014 with nine projects funded. The second cohort will start in September 2015 with a further 8-10 studentships funded. The funded projects are selected by the SAB from an open competition. The process will be repeated annually. The students funded by IBioIC will participate in cohort training programmes developed in coordination with IBioIC industrial members, that aim to equip the students with technical knowledge and transferable skills.

• Collaborative MSc in Industrial Biotechnology: Started in 2014, this programme harnesses the expertise of many HEIs and combines them into one bespoke course. The students are expected to complete an Industrial Placement as a pre-requisite to graduating.

CASE STUDY 5

Skills program – establishing a Collaborative MSc in Industrial Biotechnology September 2014 saw the first group of 17 MSc students start the course. It is the UK’s first collaborative MSc programme in Industrial Biotechnology, which is administered and awarded by the University of Strathclyde but taught by eight Scottish HEIs.

• HNC/HND: IBioIC, alongside Forth Valley and Glasgow Kelvin Colleges, are developing a bespoke HNC/HND in Industrial Biotechnology. This programme has been validated by the SQA and will launch in August 2015. This qualification aims to produce graduates with key skills for employment in the IB sector in response to industry demand. The course will pilot with 20 candidates at one college, rising to fifty candidates in 2018 across a number of colleges, thereby filling the skills gap that exists currently. The HNC can be awarded after one year, while HNDs take two years. These courses will also act as a feeder program to numerous IB related degree courses.

• STEM programme: Increasing awareness of STEM and in particular increasing the participation of girls in STEM subjects is a key policy area and very much in the public eye. By 2016 IBioIC is planning to work with a local authority on a pilot project, identifying a few key schools and areas of the CfE that can be improved by supplying teachers with toolkits to increase participation in the subject and aid teaching. IBioIC will also attend school events and PhD students funded under the auspices of IBioIC will act as STEM Ambassadors in the local authority in which their host institution falls.

• Modern Apprenticeships: SDS has established a Life and Chemical Sciences MA. IBioIC will work in partnership with SDS and our industrial members to develop and promote this MA.

The students spend the last semester with an IBioIC industrial member on a real project in an industrial environment. IBioIC has secured 30 funded places for the 2015 intake. Course content and numbers will be reviewed annually.

MSc Cohort 2014/15


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Critical Success Factors

Critical Success Factors There are five Critical Success Factors that must be developed to deliver these strategic areas:

Engaging the Industry: Engaging and supporting the current company base in Scotland as well as making a compelling case for inward investment is at the core of this strategy. IBioIC will inspire business leaders and entrepreneurs with the transformative and disruptive opportunity that IB offers. The current landscape consists of both small and large enterprises with differing needs which the centre will address. IBioIC will troubleshoot and horizon-scan to help companies understand the root cause of their issues then find the most appropriate remedy involving new technology from a carefully constructed collaboration with appropriate HEIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and companies.

High impact projects: The centre will develop high impact projects within each strategic area. Where there are no existing collaborations the centre will broker them, and where necessary provide project management support to drive commercially viable industrial biotechnology solutions to the market sooner. To enable the generation of productive collaborative projects the centre must effectively mine the current academic capability and look outside the current HEI partners where additional expertise is needed to complement what is already available and develop capability within the current HEI partners where appropriate.

Funding for activities: The Centre will focus on securing grants and other funding in order to be able to finance larger, more complex and/ or highly collaborative projects with multiple partners both from the UK and further afield. Finally, it will be critical to secure funding for the running of the Centre itself post-2018 if the strategy detailed above is to support the delivery of the National Plan for Industrial Biotechnology culminating in 2025. Critical funders are SFC, BBSRC, EPSRC, Innovate UK, H2020 and ERDF.

Engaging with supporters and stakeholders: IB is a global industry and there are many support organisations that IBioIC must form high impact relationships with. Within Scotland these are SE (including SDI and Scotland Europa), SFC, HIE, SDS, ZWS, SG, other ICs, RSE and the partner HEIs. Within the UK these are IBLF, SBLC, Innovate UK (including KTNs and Catapults), relevant HEIs, NIBBs, BIA, CIA, CPI, professional institutions, RS, RAE and BIS. Further afield these include national and regional IB networks, BIO and the EU.

Recruiting and retaining talented staff: Crucial to the success of all of the above is the adequate staffing of the IC Centre, with individuals possessing both knowledge and expertise across the spectrum of IB. These individuals will work in a truly collaborative and enabling manner in all aspects of centre activity and will be skilled in recognising and defining new opportunities for IB within Scotland. A core team is already in place but essential strategic hires will be sought to compliment the expertise already in house and create a truly expert organisation.


15

Industrial Biotechnology Innovation Centre 2020 Strategy Roadmap

Key Milestones Activities

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

No. of Fee Paying Members

35

60

90

120

160

200

No. of Projects started

10

15

20

25

30

35

No. of Students engaged

50

60

65

70

70

70

No. of Engagements with Companies

100

150

200

250

300

350

No. of Events organised

4

5

6

7

8

9

No. of Trade Missions led

10

11

12

13

14

15

2200

2600

3000

3500

4000

4700

No. of Projects Completed

2

8

14

18

22

26

IP Generated from Projects

0

1

2

4

5

6

No. of Students Graduated

15

22

45

58

64

69

No. of new B2B connections made

20

30

40

50

60

70

No. of International collaborations

4

6

8

10

11

12

IB Sales generated (£m)

250

275

300

330

365

>400

No. of new jobs created

50

120

200

290

400

>500

Investment made in Scotland (£m)

3

10

20

40

70

>100

No. of start-ups created

2

3

4

5

6

7

No. of Inward Investments

0

0

1

1

1

1

No. of Social Media followers Outputs

Impacts

Glossary of Terms BBSRC BIA BIS BIO CfE CIA CPI EFSI EPSRC ERDF EU GVA H2020 HEI HIE HNC HND HVM IB IBioIC

Biology and Bio-Science Research Council Bio Industry Association (UK) Department for Business Innovation and Skills (UK) Biotechnology Industry Organization (USA) Centre for Excellence Chemical Industries Association (UK) Centre for Process Innovation (UK) European Fund for Strategic Investment Engineering and Physical Science Research Council (UK) European Regional Development Fund European Union Gross Value Added Horizon 2020 (European Research Funding Programme) Higher Education Institution Highlands and Islands Enterprise (Scotland) Higher National Certificate (UK) Higher National Diploma (UK) High Value Manufacturing (UK) Industrial Biotechnology Industrial Biotechnology Innovation Centre (Scotland)

IBLF KTN MA MSc NIBBs PhD R&D RAE RS RSE SBLC SDS SDI SE SFC SG SME STEM SWOT ZWS

Industrial Biotechnology Leadership Forum (UK) Knowledge Transfer Network (UK) Modern Apprenticeship Masters of Science Networks in Industrial Biotechnology and Bioenergy Doctor of Philosophy Research and Development Royal Academy of Engineering (UK) Royal Society (UK) Royal Society of Edinburgh (Scotland) Synthetic Biology Leadership Council (UK) Skills Development Scotland Scottish Development International (a part of SE) Scottish Enterprise Scottish Funding Council Scottish Government Small and Medium sized Enterprises Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats Zero Waste Scotland


Acknowledgements The IBioIC thanks the Governing Board, Scientific and Commercial Advisory Boards as well as industry members and the HEIs who all contributed to the content for the Strategic Plan to Deliver the Vision. Prepared by: Industrial Biotechnology Innovation Centre (IBioIC) For further information, please contact: info@ibioic.com

www.ibioic.com The contents of this booklet are, as far as possible, up-to-date and accurate at the time of publication (April 2015).

IBioIC - Strategic Plan to Deliver the Vision  
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