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Factotum Bukowski

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Factotum Bukowski


Factotum Bukowski

7 We were still in Louisiana. The long train ride through Texas layed ahead. They gave us cans of food but no openers. I stored my cans on the floor and stretched out on the wooden seat. The other men were gathered in the front of the coach, sitting together, talking and laughing. I closed my eyes. After about ten minutes I felt dust rising through the cracks in the plank seat. It was very old dust, coffin dust, it stank of death, of something that had been dead a long time. It filtered into my nostrils, settled into my eyebrows, tried to enter my mouth. Then I heard heavy breathing sounds. Through the cracks I could see a man crouched behind a seat, blowing dust into my face. I sat up. The man scrambled out behind the seat and ran to the front of the car. I wiped my face and stared at him. It was hard to believe. “If he comes up here I want you fellows to help me.,” I heard him say. “You gotta promise to help me...” The gang of them looked back at me. I stretched out on the seat again. I could hear them talking: “What’s wrong with him?” “ Who does he think he is?” “He don’t speak to nobody. He just stays back there by himself.” “When we get out there on those tracks we’ll take care of him. The bastard.” “You think you could take him Paul? He looks crazy to me” “If I can’t take him, somebody can. He’ll eat shit before we’re done.”

Sometime later I walked to the front for a drink of water. As I walked by they stopped talking. They watched in silence as I drank from the cup. Then as I turned around and walked back to my seat they started talking again. The train made many stops, night and day. At every stop there was a bit of green and a small town nearby, one or two of the men would jump off. “Hey what the hell happened to Collins and Martinez?” The foreman would take his clipboard and cross them off the list. He walked back to me. “Who are you?” “Chinaski” “You staying with us?” “I need the job.” “O.K.” He walked away. At El Paso the foreman came through and told us we were switching trains. We were given tickets good for one night at a nearby hotel and a meal ticket to use at a local cafe; also directions oh how, when and where to board the next train in the a.m. I waited outside the cafe as the men ate and as they came out picking their teeth and talking, I walked in. “ We’ll get his ass good, that son of a bitch!” “Man I hate that ugly bastard.” I went in and ordered a hamburger steak with onions and beans. There wasn’t any butter for the bread but the coffee was good. When I came out they were gone. A bum was walking up the sidewalk toward me. I gave him my hotel ticket. I slept in the park that night. It seemed safer. I was tired and the park bench didn’t bother me at all. I slept. Some time later I was awaken by what sounded like a roar. I never knew that alligators roared. Or more exactly it was many things: a roar. an agitated inhale, and a hiss. I also heard the snapping of jaws. A drunken sailor was in the center of a pond and he had one of the alligators by the tail. The creature try to twist and reach but found it difficult. The jaws where horrifying but very slow and uncoordinated. Another sailor and a young girl stood watching and laughing. Then the sailor kissed the girl and they walked off together leaving the other fighting the alligator...


Factotum Bukowski

7 We were still in R. The long train ride through q layed ahead. They gave us cans of food but no openers. t stored my cans on the floor and stretched out on the wooden seat. The other were gathered in the front of the coach, sitting together, talking and laughing. t closed my eyes. After about ten minutes t felt n rising through the cracks in the plank seat. It was very old n, coffin n, it stank of d, of something that had been d a long time. It filtered into my nostrils, settled into my eyebrows, tried to enter my mouth. Then t heard heavy breathing sounds. Through the cracks t could see a man crouched behind a seat, blowing n into my face. t sat up. The man scrambled out behind the seat and ran to the front of the car. t wiped my face and stared at him. It was hard to believe. “If he comes up here I want you fellows to help me.,” t heard him say. “You gotta promise to help me...” The gang of them looked back at me. t stretched out on the seat again. t could hear them talking: “What’s wrong with him?” “ Who does he think he is?” “He don’t speak to n. He just stays back there by himself.” “When we get out there on those tracks we’ll take care of him. The 2.” “You think you could take him Paul? He looks B to me” “If I can’t take him, somebody can. He’ll eat shit before we’re done.”

Sometime later t walked to the front for a drink of water. As I walked by they stopped talking. They watched in silence as t drank from the cup. Then as t turned around and walked back to my seat they started talking again. The train made many stops, night and day. At every stop there was a bit of 1 and a small town nearby, one or two of the would jump off. “Hey what the hell happened to Collins and Martinez?” The foreman would take his clipboard and cross them off the a. He walked back to me. “Who are you?” “u” “You staying with us?” “t need the job.” “O.K.” He walked away. At El Paso the foreman came through and told us we were switching trains. We were given L good for one night at a nearby hotel and a meal L to use at a local cafe; also directions oh how, when and where to board the next t in the a.m. t waited outside the cafe as the ate and as they came out picking their teeth and talking, t walked in. “ We’ll get his ass good, that son of a u!” “Man t hate that ugly 2.” t went in and ordered a C with onions and beans. There wasn’t any butter for the bread but the coffee was good. When t came out they were gone. A = was walking up the sidewalk toward me. t gave him my hotel L. t slept in the park that night. It seemed safer. t was tired and the park bench didn’t bother me at all. t R.

Some time later I was awaken by what sounded like a r. t never knew that q r. Or more exactly it was many things: a r. an agitated inhale, and a U. t also heard the snapping of jaws. A drunken sailor was in the center of a pond and he had one of the q by the tail. The creature try to twist and reach but found it difficult. The jaws where horrifying but very slow and uncoordinated. Another sailor and a youngf stood watching and laughing. Then the sailor h the f and they walked off together leaving the other fighting the q...


Factotum Bukowski

a

7

R

We were still in . The long train ride through q layed ahead. They gave us cans of food but no openers. t stored my cans on the floor and stretched out on the wooden seat. The other were gathered in the front of the coach, sitting together, talking and laughing. t closed my eyes. After about ten minutes t felt n rising through the cracks in the plank seat. It was very old n, coffin n, it stank of , of something that had been d a long time. It filtered into my nostrils, settled into my eyebrows, tried to enter my mouth. Then t heard heavy breathing sounds. Through the cracks t could see a man crouched behind a seat, blowing into my face. t sat up. The man scrambled out behind the seat and ran to the front of the car. t wiped my face and stared at him. It was hard to believe. “If he comes up here I want you fellows to help me.,” t heard him say. “You gotta promise to help me...” The gang of them looked back at me. t stretched out on the seat again. t could hear them talking: “What’s wrong with him?” “ Who does he think he is?” “He don’t speak to n. He just stays back there by himself.” “When we get out there on those tracks we’ll take care of him. The .” “You think you could take him Paul? He looks to me” “If I can’t take him, somebody can. He’ll eat shit before we’re done.”

d

2

t

Sometime later t walked to the front for a drink of water. As I walked by they stopped talking. They watched in silence as t drank from the cup. Then as turned around and walked back to my seat they started talking again. The train made many stops, night and day. At every stop there was a bit of 1 and a small town nearby, one or two of the would jump off. “Hey what the hell happened to Collins and Martinez?” The foreman would take his clipboard and cross them off the . He walked back to me. “Who are you?” “ ” “You staying with us?” “t need the job.” “O.K.” He walked away. At El Paso the foreman came through and told us we were switching trains. We were given L good for one night at a nearby hotel and a meal L to use at a local cafe; also directions oh how, when and where to board the next t in the a.m. t waited outside the cafe as the ate and as they came out picking their teeth and talking, t walked in. “ We’ll get his ass good, that son of a u!” “Man t hate that ugly 2.” t went in and ordered a C with onions and beans. There wasn’t any butter for the bread but the coffee was good. When t came out they were gone. A = was walking up the sidewalk toward me. t gave him my hotel L. t slept in the park that night. It seemed safer. t was tired and the park bench didn’t bother me at all. t R.

n

B

u

r

q

Some time later I was awaken by what sounded like a r. t never knew that q Or more exactly it was many things: a r. an agitated inhale, and a U. t also heard the snapping of jaws. A drunken sailor was in the center of a pond and he had one of the q by the tail. The creature try to twist and reach but found it difficult. The jaws where horrifying but very slow and uncoordinated. Another sailor and a youngf stood watching and laughing. Then the sailor h the and they walked off together leaving the other fighting the ...

f


a u d n td f 2 t q Factotum Bukowski

7

B

We were still in R. The long train ride through q layed ahead. They gave us cans of food but no openers. t stored my cans on the floor and stretched out on the wooden seat. The other were gathered in the front of the coach, sitting together, talking and laughing. t closed my eyes. After about ten minutes t felt n rising through the cracks in the plank seat. It was very old n, coffin n, it stank of , of something that had been d a long time. It filtered into my nostrils, settled into my eyebrows, tried to enter my mouth. Then t heard heavy breathing sounds. Through the cracks t could see a man crouched behind a seat, blowing into my face. t sat up. The man scrambled out behind the seat and ran to the front of the car. t wiped my face and stared at him. It was hard to believe. “If he comes up here I want you fellows to help me.,” t heard him say. “You gotta promise to help me...” The gang of them looked back at me. t stretched out on the seat again. t could hear them talking: “What’s wrong with him?” “ Who does he think he is?” “He don’t speak to n. He just stays back there by himself.” “When we get out there on those tracks we’ll take care of him. The .” “You think you could take him Paul? He looks to me” “If I can’t take him, somebody can. He’ll eat shit before we’re done.”

Sometime later t walked to the front for a drink of water. As I walked by they stopped talking. They watched in silence as t drank from the cup. Then as t turned around and walked back to my seat they started talking again. The train made many stops, night and day. At every stop there was a bit of 1 and a small town nearby, one or two of the would jump off. “Hey what the hell happened to Collins and Martinez?” The foreman would take his clipboard and cross them off the

He walked back to me.

“Who are you?” “ ” “You staying with us?” “t need the job.” “O.K.” He walked away. At El Paso the foreman came through and told us we were switching trains. We were given L good for one night at a nearby hotel and a meal L to use at a local cafe; also directions oh how, when and where to board the next t in the a.m. t waited outside the cafe as the ate and as they came out picking their teeth and talking, t walked in. “ We’ll get his ass good, that son of a u!” “Man t hate that ugly 2.” t went in and ordered a C with onions and beans. There wasn’t any butter for the bread but the coffee was good. When t came out they were gone. A = was walking up the sidewalk toward me. t gave him my hotel L. t slept in the park that night. It seemed safer. t was tired and the park bench didn’t bother me at all. t R.

Some time later I was awaken by what sounded like a r. t never knew that q r. Or more exactly it was many things: a r. an agitated inhale, and a U. t also heard the snapping of jaws. A drunken sailor was in the center of a pond and he had one of the q by the tail. The creature try to twist and reach but found it difficult. The jaws where horrifying but very slow and uncoordinated. Another sailor and a youngf stood watching and laughing. Then the sailor h the and they walked off together leaving the other fighting the ...


u d dB n Factotum Bukowski

7

Bq

We were still in R. The long train ride through q layed ahead. They gave us cans of food but no openers. t stored my cans on the floor and stretched out on the wooden seat. The other were gathered in the front of the coach, sitting together, talking and laughing. t closed my eyes. After about ten minutes t felt n rising through the cracks in the plank seat. It was very old n, coffin n, it stank of d, of something that had been d a long time. It filtered into my nostrils, settled into my eyebrows, tried to enter my mouth. Then t heard heavy breathing sounds. Through the cracks t could see a man crouched behind a seat, blowing n into my face. t sat up. The man scrambled out behind the seat and ran to the front of the car. t wiped my face and stared at him. It was hard to believe. “If he comes up here I want you fellows to help me.,” t heard him say. “You gotta promise to help me...” The gang of them looked back at me. t stretched out on the seat again. t could hear them talking: “What’s wrong with him?” “ Who does he think he is?” “He don’t speak to n. He just stays back there by himself.” “When we get out there on those tracks we’ll take care of him. The 2.” “You think you could take him Paul? He looks B to me” “If I can’t take him, somebody can. He’ll eat shit before we’re done.”

a

Sometime later t walked to the front for a drink of water. As I walked by they stopped talking. They watched in silence as t drank from the cup. Then as t turned around and walked back to my seat they started talking again. The train made many stops, night and day. At every stop there was a bit of 1 and a small town nearby, one or two of the would jump off. “Hey what the hell happened to Collins and Martinez?” The foreman would take his clipboard and cross them off the a. He walked back to me. “Who are you?” “u” “You staying with us?” “t need the job.” “O.K.” He walked away. At El Paso the foreman came through and told us we were switching trains. We were given L good for one night at a nearby hotel and a meal L to use at a local cafe; also directions oh how, when and where to board the next t in the a.m. t waited outside the cafe as the ate and as they came out picking their teeth and talking, t walked in. “ We’ll get his ass good, that son of a u!” “Man t hate that ugly 2.” t went in and ordered a C with onions and beans. There wasn’t any butter for the bread but the coffee was good. When t came out they were gone. A = was walking up the sidewalk toward me. t gave him my hotel L. t slept in the park that night. It seemed safer. t was tired and the park bench didn’t bother me at all. t R.

2

t t f

Some time later I was awaken by what sounded like a r. t never knew that q r. Or more exactly it was many things: a r. an agitated inhale, and a U. t also heard the snapping of jaws. A drunken sailor was in the center of a pond and he had one of the q by the tail. The creature try to twist and reach but found it difficult. The jaws where horrifying but very slow and uncoordinated. Another sailor and a youngf stood watching and laughing. Then the sailor h the f and they walked off together leaving the other fighting the q...


a u d

R Factotum Bukowski

7

t

We were still in Louisiana. The long train ride through Texas layed ahead. They gave us cans of food but no openers. I stored my cans on the floor and stretched out on the wooden seat. The other men were gathered in the front of the coach, sitting together, talking and laughing. I closed my eyes. After about ten minutes I felt dust rising through the cracks in the plank seat. It was very old dust, coffin dust, it stank of death, of something that had been dead a long time. It filtered into my nostrils, settled into my eyebrows, tried to enter my mouth. Then I heard heavy breathing sounds. Through the cracks I could see a man crouched behind a seat, blowing dust into my face. I sat up. The man scrambled out behind the seat and ran to the front of the car. I wiped my face and stared at him. It was hard to believe. “If he comes up here I want you fellows to help me.,” I heard him say. “You gotta promise to help me...” The gang of them looked back at me. I stretched out on the seat again. I could hear them talking: “What’s wrong with him?” “ Who does he think he is?” “He don’t speak to nobody. He just stays back there by himself.” “When we get out there on those tracks we’ll take care of him. The bastard.” “You think you could take him Paul? He looks crazy to me” “If I can’t take him, somebody can. He’ll eat shit before we’re done.”

n

Sometime later I walked to the front for a drink of water. As I walked by they stopped talking. They watched in silence as I drank from the cup. Then as I turned around and walked back to my seat they started talking again. The train made many stops, night and day. At every stop there was a bit of green and a small town nearby, one or two of the men would jump off. “Hey what the hell happened to Collins and Martinez?” The foreman would take his clipboard and cross them off the list. He walked back to me. “Who are you?” “Chinaski” “You staying with us?” “I need the job.” “O.K.” He walked away. At El Paso the foreman came through and told us we were switching trains. We were given tickets good for one night at a nearby hotel and a meal ticket to use at a local cafe; also directions oh how, when and where to board the next train in the a.m. I waited outside the cafe as the men ate and as they came out picking their teeth and talking, I walked in. “ We’ll get his ass good, that son of a bitch!” “Man I hate that ugly bastard.” I went in and ordered a hamburger steak with onions and beans. There wasn’t any butter for the bread but the coffee was good. When I came out they were gone. A bum was walking up the sidewalk toward me. I gave him my hotel ticket. I slept in the park that night. It seemed safer. I was tired and the park bench didn’t bother me at all. I slept.

L C r

t f

Some time later I was awaken by what sounded like a roar. I never knew that alligators roared. Or more exactly it was many things: a roar. an agitated inhale, and a hiss. I also heard the snapping of jaws. A drunken sailor was in the center of a pond and he had one of the alligators by the tail. The creature try to twist and reach but found it difficult. The jaws where horrifying but very slow and uncoordinated. Another sailor and a young girl stood watching and laughing. Then the sailor kissed the girl and they walked off together leaving the other fighting the alligator...


d Factotum Bukowski

a

7

R

We were still in . The long train ride through q layed ahead. They gave us cans of food but no openers. t stored my cans on the floor and stretched out on the wooden seat. The other were gathered in the front of the coach, sitting together, talking and laughing. t closed my eyes. After about ten minutes t felt n rising through the cracks in the plank seat. It was very old n, coffin n, it stank of , of something that had been d a long time. It filtered into my nostrils, settled into my eyebrows, tried to enter my mouth. Then t heard heavy breathing sounds. Through the cracks t could see a man crouched behind a seat, blowing into my face. t sat up. The man scrambled out behind the seat and ran to the front of the car. t wiped my face and stared at him. It was hard to believe. “If he comes up here I want you fellows to help me.,” t heard him say. “You gotta promise to help me...” The gang of them looked back at me. t stretched out on the seat again. t could hear them talking: “What’s wrong with him?” “ Who does he think he is?” “He don’t speak to n. He just stays back there by himself.” “When we get out there on those tracks we’ll take care of him. The .” “You think you could take him Paul? He looks to me” “If I can’t take him, somebody can. He’ll eat shit before we’re done.”

B B d

2

n

B

t

u t

Sometime later t walked to the front for a drink of water. As I walked by they stopped talking. They watched in silence as t drank from the cup. Then as turned around and walked back to my seat they started talking again. The train made many stops, night and day. At every stop there was a bit of 1 and a small town nearby, one or two of the would jump off. “Hey what the hell happened to Collins and Martinez?” The foreman would take his clipboard and cross them off the . He walked back to me. “Who are you?” “ ” “You staying with us?” “t need the job.” “O.K.” He walked away. At El Paso the foreman came through and told us we were switching trains. We were given L good for one night at a nearby hotel and a meal L to use at a local cafe; also directions oh how, when and where to board the next t in the a.m. t waited outside the cafe as the ate and as they came out picking their teeth and talking, t walked in. “ We’ll get his ass good, that son of a u!” “Man t hate that ugly 2.” t went in and ordered a C with onions and beans. There wasn’t any butter for the bread but the coffee was good. When t came out they were gone. A = was walking up the sidewalk toward me. t gave him my hotel L. t slept in the park that night. It seemed safer. t was tired and the park bench didn’t bother me at all. t R.

u

r

q

Some time later I was awaken by what sounded like a r. t never knew that q Or more exactly it was many things: a r. an agitated inhale, and a U. t also heard the snapping of jaws. A drunken sailor was in the center of a pond and he had one of the q by the tail. The creature try to twist and reach but found it difficult. The jaws where horrifying but very slow and uncoordinated. Another sailor and a youngf stood watching and laughing. Then the sailor h the and they walked off together leaving the other fighting the ...

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Factotum Bukowski

u B 7

We were still in Louisiana. The long train ride through Texas layed ahead. They gave us cans of food but no openers. I stored my cans on the floor and stretched out on the wooden seat. The other men were gathered in the front of the coach, sitting together, talking and laughing. I closed my eyes. After about ten minutes I felt dust rising through the cracks in the plank seat. It was very old dust, coffin dust, it stank of death, of something that had been dead a long time. It filtered into my nostrils, settled into my eyebrows, tried to enter my mouth. Then I heard heavy breathing sounds. Through the cracks I could see a man crouched behind a seat, blowing dust into my face. I sat up. The man scrambled out behind the seat and ran to the front of the car. I wiped my face and stared at him. It was hard to believe. “If he comes up here I want you fellows to help me.,” I heard him say. “You gotta promise to help me...” The gang of them looked back at me. I stretched out on the seat again. I could hear them talking: “What’s wrong with him?” “ Who does he think he is?” “He don’t speak to nobody. He just stays back there by himself.” “When we get out there on those tracks we’ll take care of him. The bastard.” “You think you could take him Paul? He looks crazy to me” “If I can’t take him, somebody can. He’ll eat shit before we’re done.”

Sometime later I walked to the front for a drink of water. As I walked by they stopped talking. They watched in silence as I drank from the cup. Then as I turned around and walked back to my seat they started talking again. The train made many stops, night and day. At every stop there was a bit of green and a small town nearby, one or two of the men would jump off. “Hey what the hell happened to Collins and Martinez?” The foreman would take his clipboard and cross them off the list. He walked back to me. “Who are you?” “Chinaski” “You staying with us?” “I need the job.” “O.K.” He walked away. At El Paso the foreman came through and told us we were switching trains. We were given tickets good for one night at a nearby hotel and a meal ticket to use at a local cafe; also directions oh how, when and where to board the next train in the a.m. I waited outside the cafe as the men ate and as they came out picking their teeth and talking, I walked in. “ We’ll get his ass good, that son of a bitch!” “Man I hate that ugly bastard.” I went in and ordered a hamburger steak with onions and beans. There wasn’t any butter for the bread but the coffee was good. When I came out they were gone. A bum was walking up the sidewalk toward me. I gave him my hotel ticket. I slept in the park that night. It seemed safer. I was tired and the park bench didn’t bother me at all. I slept. Some time later I was awaken by what sounded like a roar. I never knew that alligators roared. Or more exactly it was many things: a roar. an agitated inhale, and a hiss. I also heard the snapping of jaws. A drunken sailor was in the center of a pond and he had one of the alligators by the tail. The creature try to twist and reach but found it difficult. The jaws where horrifying but very slow and uncoordinated. Another sailor and a young girl stood watching and laughing. Then the sailor kissed the girl and they walked off together leaving the other fighting the alligator...


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Factotum Factotum Bukowski

7

Sometime later I walked to the front for a drink of water. As I walked by they stopped talking. They watched in silence as I drank from the cup. Then as I turned around and walked back to my seat they started talking again. The train made many stops, night and day. At every stop there was a bit of green and a small town nearby, one or two of the men would jump off. “Hey what the hell happened to Collins and Martinez?” The foreman would take his clipboard and cross them off the list. He walked back to me. “Who are you?” “Chinaski” “You staying with us?” “I need the job.” “O.K.” He walked away. At El Paso the foreman came through and told us we were switching trains. We were given tickets good for one night at a nearby hotel and a meal ticket to use at a local cafe; also directions oh how, when and where to board the next train in the a.m. I waited outside the cafe as the men ate and as they came out picking their teeth and talking, I walked in. “ We’ll get his ass good, that son of a bitch!” “Man I hate that ugly bastard.” I went in and ordered a hamburger steak with onions and beans. There wasn’t any butter for the bread but the coffee was good. When I came out they were gone. A bum was walking up the sidewalk toward me. I gave him my hotel ticket. I slept in the park that night. It seemed safer. I was tired and the park bench didn’t bother me at all. I slept.

“Who are you?”

“I need the job.”

We were still in Louisiana. The long train ride through Texas layed ahead. They gave us cans of food but no openers. I stored my cans on the floor and stretched out on the wooden seat. The other men were gathered in the front of the coach, sitting together, talking and laughing. I closed my eyes. After about ten minutes I felt dust rising through the cracks in the plank seat. It was very old dust, coffin dust, it stank of death, of something that had been dead a long time. It filtered into my nostrils, settled into my eyebrows, tried to enter my mouth. Then I heard heavy breathing sounds. Through the cracks I could see a man crouched behind a seat, blowing dust into my face. I sat up. The man scrambled out behind the seat and ran to the front of the car. I wiped my face and stared at him. It was hard to believe. “If he comes up here I want you fellows to help me.,” I heard him say. “You gotta promise to help me...” The gang of them looked back at me. I stretched out on the seat again. I could hear them talking: “What’s wrong with him?” “ Who does he think he is?” “He don’t speak to nobody. He just stays back there by himself.” “When we get out there on those tracks we’ll take care of him. The bastard.” “You think you could take him Paul? He looks crazy to me” “If I can’t take him, somebody can. He’ll eat shit before we’re done.”

I closed my eyes. It was very old dust, coffin dust, it stank of death, of something that had been dead a long time.

stared at him. It was hard to believe.

He’ll eat shit before we’re done.”

“Man I hate that ugly bastard.” It seemed safer. I slept.

Some time later I was awaken by what sounded like a roar. I never knew that alligators roared. Or more exactly it was many things: a roar. an agitated inhale, and a hiss. I also heard the snapping of jaws. A drunken sailor was in the center of a pond and he had one of the alligators by the tail. The creature try to twist and reach but found it difficult. The jaws where horrifying but very slow and uncoordinated. Another sailor and a young girl stood watching and laughing. Then the sailor kissed the girl and they walked off together leaving the other fighting the alligator...

Then the sailor kissed the girl and they walked off together leaving the other fighting the alligator...


Factotum Factotum Bukowski

Sometime later I walked to the front for a drink of water. As I walked by they stopped talking. They watched in silence as I drank from the cup. Then as I turned around and walked back to my seat they started talking again. The train made many stops, night and day. At every stop there was a bit of green and a small town nearby, one or two of the men would jump off. “Hey what the hell happened to Collins and Martinez?” The foreman would take his clipboard and cross them off the list. He walked back to me. “Who are you?” “Chinaski” “You staying with us?” “I need the job.” “O.K.” He walked away. At El Paso the foreman came through and told us we were switching trains. We were given tickets good for one night at a nearby hotel and a meal ticket to use at a local cafe; also directions oh how, when and where to board the next train in the a.m. I waited outside the cafe as the men ate and as they came out picking their teeth and talking, I walked in. “ We’ll get his ass good, that son of a bitch!” “Man I hate that ugly bastard.” I went in and ordered a hamburger steak with onions and beans. There wasn’t any butter for the bread but the coffee was good. When I came out they were gone. A bum was walking up the sidewalk toward me. I gave him my hotel ticket. I slept in the park that night. It seemed safer. I was tired and the park bench didn’t bother me at all. I slept.

They watched in silence as I drank from the cup.

7

“Who are you?”

“I need the job.” “O.K.” He walked away. We were still in Louisiana.

We were still in Louisiana. The long train ride through Texas layed ahead. They gave us cans of food but no openers. I stored my cans on the floor and stretched out on the wooden seat. The other men were gathered in the front of the coach, sitting together, talking and laughing. I closed my eyes. After about ten minutes I felt dust rising through the cracks in the plank seat. It was very old dust, coffin dust, it stank of death, of something that had been dead a long time. It filtered into my nostrils, settled into my eyebrows, tried to enter my mouth. Then I heard heavy breathing sounds. Through the cracks I could see a man crouched behind a seat, blowing dust into my face. I sat up. The man scrambled out behind the seat and ran to the front of the car. I wiped my face and stared at him. It was hard to believe. “If he comes up here I want you fellows to help me.,” I heard him say. “You gotta promise to help me...” The gang of them looked back at me. I stretched out on the seat again. I could hear them talking: “What’s wrong with him?” “ Who does he think he is?” “He don’t speak to nobody. He just stays back there by himself.” “When we get out there on those tracks we’ll take care of him. The bastard.” “You think you could take him Paul? He looks crazy to me” “If I can’t take him, somebody can. He’ll eat shit before we’re done.”

I closed my eyes. It was very old dust, coffin dust, it stank of death, of something that had been dead a long time.

stared at him. It was hard to believe. I could hear them talking:

He’ll eat shit before we’re done.”

“Man I hate that ugly bastard.” It seemed safer. I slept.

Some time later I was awaken by what sounded like a roar. I never knew that alligators roared. Or more exactly it was many things: a roar. an agitated inhale, and a hiss. I also heard the snapping of jaws. A drunken sailor was in the center of a pond and he had one of the alligators by the tail. The creature try to twist and reach but found it difficult. The jaws where horrifying but very slow and uncoordinated. Another sailor and a young girl stood watching and laughing. Then the sailor kissed the girl and they walked off together leaving the other fighting the alligator...

Then the sailor kissed the girl and they walked off together leaving the other fighting the alligator...


Factotum Factotum Bukowski

r 7

We were still in Louisiana.

We were still in Louisiana. The long train ride through Texas layed ahead. They gave us cans of food but no openers. I stored my cans on the floor and stretched out on the wooden seat. The other men were gathered in the front of the coach, sitting together, talking and laughing. I closed my eyes. After about ten minutes I felt dust rising through the cracks in the plank seat. It was very old dust, coffin dust, it stank of death, of something that had been dead a long time. It filtered into my nostrils, settled into my eyebrows, tried to enter my mouth. Then I heard heavy breathing sounds. Through the cracks I could see a man crouched behind a seat, blowing dust into my face. I sat up. The man scrambled out behind the seat and ran to the front of the car. I wiped my face and stared at him. It was hard to believe. “If he comes up here I want you fellows to help me.,” I heard him say. “You gotta promise to help me...” The gang of them looked back at me. I stretched out on the seat again. I could hear them talking: “What’s wrong with him?” “ Who does he think he is?” “He don’t speak to nobody. He just stays back there by himself.” “When we get out there on those tracks we’ll take care of him. The bastard.” “You think you could take him Paul? He looks crazy to me” “If I can’t take him, somebody can. He’ll eat shit before we’re done.”

I closed my eyes. It was very old dust, coffin dust, it stank of death, of something that had been dead a long time.

stared at him. It was hard to believe. I could hear them talking:

He’ll eat shit before we’re done.”

Sometime later I walked to the front for a drink of water. As I walked by they stopped talking. They watched in silence as I drank from the cup. Then as I turned around and walked back to my seat they started talking again. The train made many stops, night and day. At every stop there was a bit of green and a small town nearby, one or two of the men would jump off. “Hey what the hell happened to Collins and Martinez?” The foreman would take his clipboard and cross them off the list. He walked back to me. “Who are you?” “Chinaski” “You staying with us?” “I need the job.” “O.K.” He walked away. At El Paso the foreman came through and told us we were switching trains. We were given tickets good for one night at a nearby hotel and a meal ticket to use at a local cafe; also directions oh how, when and where to board the next train in the a.m. I waited outside the cafe as the men ate and as they came out picking their teeth and talking, I walked in. “ We’ll get his ass good, that son of a bitch!” “Man I hate that ugly bastard.” I went in and ordered a hamburger steak with onions and beans. There wasn’t any butter for the bread but the coffee was good. When I came out they were gone. A bum was walking up the sidewalk toward me. I gave him my hotel ticket. I slept in the park that night. It seemed safer. I was tired and the park bench didn’t bother me at all. I slept.

They watched in silence as I drank from the cup. “Who are you?”

“I need the job.” “O.K.” He walked

“Man I hate that ugly bastard.” It seemed safer. I slept.

Some time later I was awaken by what sounded like a roar. I never knew that alligators roared. Or more exactly it was many things: a roar. an agitated inhale, and a hiss. I also heard the snapping of jaws. A drunken sailor was in the center of a pond and he had one of the alligators by the tail. The creature try to twist and reach but found it difficult. The jaws where horrifying but very slow and uncoordinated. Another sailor and a young girl stood watching and laughing. Then the sailor kissed the girl and they walked off together leaving the other fighting the alligator...

Then the sailor kissed the girl and they walked off together leaving the other fighting the alligator...


Factotum

Factotum Factotum Factotum Bukowski Bukowski

7

They They watched watched as in siin silence lence as I drank from Ithe drank thecup. cup. from “Who are “Who are you?” you?” “I need job.” “I need the the job.” Sometime Sometimelater laterIIwalked walkedto tothe thefront frontfor foraadrink drinkof ofwater. water. As As IIwalked walkedby bythey theystopped stoppedtalking. talking. They Theywatched watchedin insilence silenceas asIIdrank drank from fromthe thecup. cup. Then Thenas asIIturned turnedaround aroundand andwalked walkedback backto tomy myseat seatthey they started startedtalking talkingagain. again. The Thetrain trainmade mademany manystops, stops,night nightand andday. day. At At every everystop stopthere therewas wasaabit bitof ofgreen greenand andaasmall smalltown townnearby, nearby,one oneor ortwo two of ofthe themen menwould wouldjump jumpoff. off. “Hey “Heywhat whatthe thehell hellhappened happenedto toCollins Collinsand andMartinez?” Martinez?” The Theforeman foremanwould wouldtake takehis hisclipboard clipboardand andcross crossthem themoff offthe thelist. list. He Hewalked walkedback backto tome. me. “Who “Whoare areyou?” you?” “Chinaski” “Chinaski” “You “Youstaying stayingwith withus?” us?” “I“Ineed needthe thejob.” job.” “O.K.” “O.K.” He Hewalked walkedaway. away. At AtEl ElPaso Pasothe theforeman foremancame camethrough throughand andtold toldus uswe wewere were switching switchingtrains. trains. We Wewere weregiven giventickets ticketsgood goodfor forone onenight nightat ataanearby nearby hotel hoteland andaameal mealticket ticketto touse useat ataalocal local cafe; cafe;also alsodirections directionsoh ohhow, how, when whenand andwhere whereto toboard boardthe thenext nexttrain trainin inthe thea.m. a.m. IIwaited waitedoutside outsidethe thecafe cafeas asthe themen menate ateand andas asthey theycame cameout outpicking picking their theirteeth teethand andtalking, talking,IIwalked walkedin. in. ““We’ll We’llget gethis hisass assgood, good,that thatson sonof ofaabitch!” bitch!” “Man “ManIIhate hatethat thatugly uglybastard.” bastard.” IIwent wentin inand andordered orderedaahamburger hamburgersteak steakwith withonions onionsand and beans. beans. There Therewasn’t wasn’tany anybutter butterfor forthe thebread breadbut butthe thecoffee coffeewas wasgood. good. When WhenIIcame cameout outthey theywere weregone. gone. AAbum bumwas waswalking walkingup upthe thesidewalk sidewalk toward towardme. me. IIgave gavehim himmy myhotel hotelticket. ticket. IIslept sleptin inthe thepark parkthat thatnight. night. ItItseemed seemedsafer. safer. IIwas wastired tiredand andthe thepark parkbench benchdidn’t didn’tbother botherme meat atall. all. IIslept. slept.

“O.K.” He We were still We were still in Louisiana. walked away. in Louisiana. “Man I hate that I closed my eyes. Itdust, was very old bastard.” “Manugly I hate that ugly bastard.” coffin dust, it stank It was very old dust, cofof death, of fin dust, it stank of death, something that of something that had a It seemed safer. had been dead been dead a long time. It seemed safer. long time. I slept. stared at him. at It was hard stared him. to believe. It was hard to Then the believe. sailor kissed the girl and I could hear them talking: I could hear they walked them talking: off together leaving “O.K.” He walked

We We were were still still in in Louisiana. Louisiana. The The long long train train ride ride through through Texas Texas layed layed ahead. ahead. They They gave gave us us cans cans of of food food but but no no openers. openers. II stored stored my my cans cans on on the the floor floor and and stretched stretched out out on on the the wooden wooden seat. seat. The The other other men men were were gathered gathered in in the the front front of of the the coach, coach, sitting sitting together, together, talking talking and and laughing. laughing. II closed closed my my eyes. eyes. After After about about ten ten minutes minutes II felt felt dust dust rising rising through through the the cracks cracks in in the the plank plank seat. seat. It It was was very very old old dust, dust, coffin coffin dust, dust, it it stank stank of of death, death, of of something something that that had had been been dead dead aa long long time. time. It It filtered filtered into into my my nostrils, nostrils, settled settled into into my my eyebrows, eyebrows, tried tried to to enter enter my my mouth. mouth. Then Then II heard heard heavy heavy breathing breathing sounds. sounds. Through Through the the cracks cracks II could could see see aa man man crouched crouched bebehind hind aa seat, seat, blowing blowing dust dust into into my my face. face. II sat sat up. up. The The man man scrambled scrambled out out behind behind the the seat seat and and ran ran to to the the front front of of the the car. car. II wiped wiped my my face face and and stared stared at at him. him. It It was was hard hard to to believe. believe. “If “If he he comes comes up up here here II want want you you fellows fellows to to help help me.,” me.,” II heard heard him him say. say. “You “You gotta gotta promise promise to to help help me...” me...” The The gang gang of of them them looked looked back back at at me. me. II stretched stretched out out on on the the seat seat again. again. II could could hear hear them them talking: talking: “What’s “What’s wrong wrong with with him?” him?” ““ Who Who does does he he think think he he is?” is?” “He “He don’t don’t speak speak to to nobody. nobody. He He just just stays stays back back there there by by himself.” himself.” “When “When we we get get out out there there on on those those tracks tracks we’ll we’ll take take care care of of him. him. The The bastard.” bastard.” “You “You think think you you could could take take him him Paul? Paul? He He looks looks crazy crazy to to me” me” “If “If II can’t can’t take take him, him, somebody somebody can. can. He’ll He’ll eat eat shit shit before before we’re we’re done.” done.”

He’ll eat shit before He’ll eat shit before we’re we’re done.” done.”

Some Sometime timelater laterIIwas wasawaken awakenby bywhat whatsounded soundedlike likeaaroar. roar. II never neverknew knew that thatalligators alligatorsroared. roared. Or Ormore moreexactly exactlyititwas wasmany many things: things:aaroar. roar.an anagitated agitatedinhale, inhale,and andaahiss. hiss. IIalso alsoheard heardthe thesnapsnapping pingof ofjaws. jaws. AAdrunken drunkensailor sailorwas wasin inthe thecenter centerof ofaapond pondand andhe hehad had one oneof ofthe thealligators alligatorsby bythe thetail. tail. The Thecreature creaturetry tryto totwist twistand andreach reach but butfound foundititdifficult. difficult. The Thejaws jawswhere wherehorrifying horrifyingbut butvery veryslow slowand and uncoordinated. uncoordinated. Another Anothersailor sailorand andaayoung younggirl girlstood stoodwatching watchingand and laughing. laughing. Then Thenthe thesailor sailorkissed kissedthe thegirl girland andthey theywalked walkedoff offtogethtogether erleaving leavingthe theother otherfighting fightingthe thealligator... alligator...

the other fighting the alligator...

Then the sailor kissed the girl and they walked off together leaving the other fighting the alligator...


q t

We were still in Louisiana. I closed my eyes. It was very old dust, coffin dust, it stank of death, of something that had been dead a long time.

We were still in Louisiana.

It seemed safer. I slept.

“Who are you?”

stared at him. It was hard to believe. I could hear them talking:

7

He’ll eat shit before we’re done.”

“Man I hate that ugly bastard.”

Some time later I was awaken by what sounded like a roar. I r t knew that alligators q rroared. Or more exactly it was many never r t hiss. I also heard the snapthings: a roar. an agitated inhale, U. and a ping of jaws. A drunken sailor was in the center of a pond and he had q one of the alligators by the tail. The creature try to twist and reach but found it difficult. The jaws where horrifying but very slow and uncoordinated. Another sailor and a young girl stood f watching and f walked off togethlaughing. Then the sailor kissed the girlhand they er leaving the other fighting the alligator... q

They watched in silence as I drank from the cup.

We were still in Louisiana. The long train ride through Texas layed ahead. They gave us cans of food but no openers. I stored my t cans on the floor and stretched out on the wooden seat. The other ntogether, talking men were gathered in the front of the coach,t sitting n n and laughing. d d I closed my eyes. After about ten minutes I felt dust rising through the cracks in the t very old dust, coffin dust, it stank of death, of plank seat. It was t that had been dead a long time. It filtered into my nostrils, n something t settled into my eyebrows, tried to enter my mouth. Then I heard heavy t I could see a man crouched bebreathing sounds. Through the cracks hind a seat, blowing dust into my face. I sat up. The man scrambled out t face and behind the seat and ran to the front of the car. I wiped my stared at him. It was hard to believe. “If he comes up here I want you fellows to help me.,” I heard him say. t “You gotta promise to help me...” The gang t of them looked back at me. I stretched out on the seat again. I could hear them talking: n him?” “ Who does he think he is?” “He don’t speak “What’s wrong with to nobody. He just stays back there by himself.” 2we get out there on those tracks we’ll take care of him. The “When B bastard.” “You think you could take him Paul? He looks crazy to me” “If I can’t take him, somebody can. He’ll eat shit before we’re done.”

“I need the job.” “O.K.” He walked

“I need the job.” “O.K.” He walked

I closed my eyes. It was very old dust, coffin dust, it stank of death, of something that had been dead a long time. R.

“Who are you?”

“Man I hate that ugly bastard.”

stared at him. It was hard to believe. I could hear them talking:

They watched in silence as I drank from the cup.

Sometime later I walked to the front for a drink of water. As I walked by they stopped talking. They watched in silence as I drank from the cup. Then as I turned around and walked back to my seat they started talking again. The train made many stops, night and day. At every stop there was a bit of green and a small town nearby, one or two of the men would jump off. “Hey what the hell happened to Collins and Martinez?” The foreman would take his clipboard and cross them off the list. He walked back to me. “Who are you?” “Chinaski” “You staying with us?” “I need the job.” “O.K.” He walked away. At El Paso the foreman came through and told us we were switching trains. We were given tickets good for one night at a nearby hotel and a meal ticket to use at a local cafe; also directions oh how, when and where to board the next train in the a.m. I waited outside the cafe as the men ate and as they came out picking their teeth and talking, I walked in. “ We’ll get his ass good, that son of a bitch!” “Man I hate that ugly bastard.” I went in and ordered a hamburger steak with onions and beans. There wasn’t any butter for the bread but the coffee was good. When I came out they were gone. A bum was walking up the sidewalk toward me. I gave him my hotel ticket. I slept in the park that night. It seemed safer. I was tired and the park bench didn’t bother me at all. I slept.

We were still in Louisiana. The long train ride through Texas layed ahead. They gave us cans of food but no openers. I stored my cans on the floor and stretched out on the wooden seat. The other men were gathered in the front of the coach, sitting together, talking and laughing. I closed my eyes. After about ten minutes I felt dust rising through the cracks in the plank seat. It was very old dust, coffin dust, it stank of death, of something that had been dead a long time. It filtered into my nostrils, settled into my eyebrows, tried to enter my mouth. Then I heard heavy breathing sounds. Through the cracks I could see a man crouched behind a seat, blowing dust into my face. I sat up. The man scrambled out behind the seat and ran to the front of the car. I wiped my face and stared at him. It was hard to believe. “If he comes up here I want you fellows to help me.,” I heard him say. “You gotta promise to help me...” The gang of them looked back at me. I stretched out on the seat again. I could hear them talking: “What’s wrong with him?” “ Who does he think he is?” “He don’t speak to nobody. He just stays back there by himself.” “When we get out there on those tracks we’ll take care of him. The bastard.” “You think you could take him Paul? He looks crazy to me” “If I can’t take him, somebody can. He’ll eat shit before we’re done.”

7

t Sometime later I walked to the front for a drink of water. As t by they stopped talking. They twatched in silence as I drank I walked from the cup. Then as I turned around and walked back to my seat they started talking again. The train made many stops, night and1 day. At every stop there was a bit of green and a small town nearby, one or two of the men would jump off. “Hey what the hell happened to Collins and Martinez?” a.foreman would take his clipboard and cross them off the list. The He walked back to me. “Who are you?” u “Chinaski” “You staying with us?” “Itneed the job.” “O.K.” He walked away. At El Paso the foreman came through and told us we were L switching trains. We were given tickets good for one night at a nearby L hotel and a meal ticket to use at a local cafe; also directions oh how, t when and where to board the next train in the a.m. I waited outside the cafe as the men ate and as they came out picking their teeth and talking, I walked tin. u “ We’ll get his ass good, that son of a bitch!” t 2 “Man I hate that ugly bastard.” t C I went in and ordered a hamburger steak with onions and beans. There wasn’t any butter for the bread but the coffee was good. t out they were gone. A bum was = walking up the sidewalk When I came t L. toward me. I gave him my hotel ticket. t I slept in the park that night. It seemed safer. t tired and the park bench didn’t bother me at all. I was t R. I slept.

It seemed safer. I slept.

He’ll eat shit before we’re done.”

Then the sailor kissed the girl and they walked off together leaving the other fighting the alligator...

Factotum Bukowski

Some time later I was awaken by what sounded like a roar. I never knew that alligators roared. Or more exactly it was many things: a roar. an agitated inhale, and a hiss. I also heard the snapping of jaws. A drunken sailor was in the center of a pond and he had one of the alligators by the tail. The creature try to twist and reach but found it difficult. The jaws where horrifying but very slow and uncoordinated. Another sailor and a young girl stood watching and laughing. Then the sailor kissed the girl and they walked off together leaving the other fighting the alligator...

Factotum

Then the sailor kissed the girl and they walked off together leaving the other fighting the alligator...

Factotum Bukowski

Factotum


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7

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Factotum Bukowski

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Sometime later I walked to the front for a drink of wat I walked by they stopped talking. They watched in silence as I dr from the cup. Then as I turned around and walked back to my se started talking again. The train made many stops, night and da every stop there was a bit of green and a small town nearby, one of the men would jump off. “Hey what the hell happened to Collins and Martinez?” The foreman would take his clipboard and cross them off the li He walked back to me. “Who are you?” “Chinaski” “You staying with us?” “I need the job.” “O.K.” He walked away. At El Paso the foreman came through and told us we w switching trains. We were given tickets good for one night at a hotel and a meal ticket to use at a local cafe; also directions o when and where to board the next train in the a.m. I waited outside the cafe as the men ate and as they came out pic their teeth and talking, I walked in. “ We’ll get his ass good, that son of “Man I hate that ugly b I went in and ordered a hamburger steak with onions an beans. There wasn’t any butter for the bread but the coffee was When I came out they were gone. A bum was walking up the side toward me. I gave him my hotel ticket. I slept in the park that night. It seemed safer. I was tired and the park bench didn’t bother me at all. I slept.

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We were still in Louisiana. The long train ride through Texas ahead. They gave us cans of food but no openers. I stored my on the floor and stretched out on the wooden seat. The other ere gathered in the front of the coach, sitting together, talking ughing. I closed my eyes. r about ten minutes I felt dust rising through the cracks in the ank seat. It was very old dust, coffin dust, it stank of death, of hing that had been dead a long time. It filtered into my nostrils, ed into my eyebrows, tried to enter my mouth. Then I heard heavy hing sounds. Through the cracks I could see a man crouched bea seat, blowing dust into my face. I sat up. The man scrambled out nd the seat and ran to the front of the car. I wiped my face and stared at him. It was hard to believe. comes up here I want you fellows to help me.,” I heard him say. gotta promise to help me...” The gang of them looked back at me. I stretched out on the gain. I could hear them talking: ’s wrong with him?” “ Who does he think he is?” “He don’t speak body. He just stays back there by himself.” n we get out there on those tracks we’ll take care of him. The d.”

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He’ll eat shit before we’re done.”

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Some time later I was awaken by what sounded like a roa never knew that alligators roared. Or more exactly it was man things: a roar. an agitated inhale, and a hiss. I also heard the s ping of jaws. A drunken sailor was in the center of a pond and one of the alligators by the tail. The creature try to twist and r but found it difficult. The jaws where horrifying but very slow uncoordinated. Another sailor and a young girl stood watchin


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Factotum Bukowski

Sometime later I walked to the front for a drink of water. As I walked by they stopped talking. They watched in silence as I drank from the cup. Then as I turned around and walked back to my seat they started talking again. The train made many stops, night and day. At every stop there was a bit of green and a small town nearby, one or two of the men would jump off. “Hey what the hell happened to Collins and Martinez?” The foreman would take his clipboard and cross them off the list. He walked back to me. “Who are you?” “Chinaski” “You staying with us?” “I need the job.” “O.K.” He walked away. At El Paso the foreman came through and told us we were switching trains. We were given tickets good for one night at a nearby hotel and a meal ticket to use at a local cafe; also directions oh how, when and where to board the next train in the a.m. I waited outside the cafe as the men ate and as they came out picking their teeth and talking, I walked in. “ We’ll get his ass good, that son of a bitch!” “Man I hate that ugly bastard.” I went in and ordered a hamburger steak with onions and beans. There wasn’t any butter for the bread but the coffee was good. When I came out they were gone. A bum was walking up the sidewalk toward me. I gave him my hotel ticket. I slept in the park that night. It seemed safer. I was tired and the park bench didn’t bother me at all. I slept.

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Some time later I was awaken by what sounded like a roar. I never knew that alligators roared. Or more exactly it was many things: a roar. an agitated inhale, and a hiss. I also heard the snapping of jaws. A drunken sailor was in the center of a pond and he had one of the alligators by the tail. The creature try to twist and reach but found it difficult. The jaws where horrifying but very slow and uncoordinated. Another sailor and a young girl stood watching and laughing. Then the sailor kissed the girl and they walked off together leaving the other fighting the alligator...

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We were still in Louisiana. The long train ride through Texas layed ahead. They gave us cans of food but no openers. I stored my cans on the floor and stretched out on the wooden seat. The other men were gathered in the front of the coach, sitting together, talking and laughing. I closed my eyes. After about ten minutes I felt dust rising through the cracks in the plank seat. It was very old dust, coffin dust, it stank of death, of something that had been dead a long time. It filtered into my nostrils, settled into my eyebrows, tried to enter my mouth. Then I heard heavy breathing sounds. Through the cracks I could see a man crouched behind a seat, blowing dust into my face. I sat up. The man scrambled out behind the seat and ran to the front of the car. I wiped my face and stared at him. It was hard to believe. “If he comes up here I want you fellows to help me.,” I heard him say. “You gotta promise to help me...” The gang of them looked back at me. I stretched out on the seat again. I could hear them talking: “What’s wrong with him?” “ Who does he think he is?” “He don’t speak to nobody. He just stays back there by himself.” “When we get out there on those tracks we’ll take care of him. The bastard.” “You think you could take him Paul? He looks crazy to me” “If I can’t take him, somebody can. He’ll eat shit before we’re done.”

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Visual Interpretation of Factotum by Bukowski  

I made this for a semiotics class I took this Fall.

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