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ASHLEY LEPRE

ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO

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TABLE OF CONTENTS 2 Architecture and Wilderness: an exchange of order 16 UMass Aquatic Center 26 Sunflower Farmer’s Market Pavilion 30 Brookwood Edge 36 Amethyst Overlook 42 Cabrini Green Livable Community 54 Pattern Book for Holyoke, MA, excerpts 56 North Chiller Plant Poster and Brochure 57 Winterfest Photobooth for Amherst, MA

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EDUCATION

ASHLEY.LEPRE@GMAIL.COM|203.247.4299

EXPECTED 2019 UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS AMHERST| AMHERST, MA Master of Architecture, GPA 3.91 2013 BATES COLLEGE| LEWISTON, ME Bachelor of Arts, Dean’s List Year-long creative writing thesis, Major in English literature and creative writing, Minor in education, Minor in philosophy

EXPERIENCE

2017–PRESENT ASSISTANT PROJECT MANAGER UMass Design and Construction Management| Amherst, MA Managed FF&E projects, contributed to management of design and construction projects, generated educational materials for LEED certification, facilitated project meetings SUMMER 2016 DESIGN INTERN Steffian Bradley Architects| Enfield, CT Developed South Holyoke pattern book and presented to clients, collaborated on creation, assembly and delivery of construction documents for several projects SPRING 2016 ARCHITECTURE RESEARCH ASSISTANT Professor Pari Riahi| Amherst, MA Copyedited writings for publications and grant proposals, researched and generated comprehensive bibliography for continuing research on the Parisian suburbs 2013–2016 HIGH SCHOOL ENGLISH TEACHER PVPA, Hadley, MA |Fulbright ETA, Sofia, Bulgaria|The REAL School, Falmouth, ME

RECOGNITION

2018 2017 2017 2016, 2017 2014 2013

SKILLS

Second Place, WMAIA Graduate Design Award Hadley Family Merit Scholarship “Best Model” Recognition, “Just Big Enough” housing design competition Architecture Department Merit Scholarship Fulbright Fellowship Education Award, AmeriCorps State and National

SOFTWARE Revit, Rhino, Grasshopper, Illustrator, InDesign, Photoshop, MS Office FABRICATION Lasercutter, 3D printer, CNC router, Hand modeling OTHER Writing, Research, Public Speaking

AFFILIATIONS

Tau Sigma Delta National Honors Society|Western Massachusetts AIA|NCAARB 1


The more one knows of its peculiar history, the more one realizes that wilderness is not quite what it seems. Far from being the one place on earth that stands apart from humanity, it is profoundly a human creation—indeed, the creation of very particular human cultures at very particular moments in human history. –William Cronin, The Trouble with Wilderness

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graduate thesis| spring 2019

ARCHITECTURE AND WILDERNESS: an exchange of order

a dissection of the notion of “wilderness” and its power to assign human value to new and even unlikely types of spaces This thesis looks critically at the notion of “wilderness”, its constructed-ness but ultimately, its importance as a language that humans use to understand and relate to various types of spaces. Throughout time, cultures and experiences, humans have defined “wilderness” in a number of difference ways and, as a result, they have treated those spaces that they consider to be wildernesses in different ways as well. When we define wilderness in a particular way and then we assign that label to a space, we have made a design decision. By identifying entropied or abandoned architecture as a type of wilderness, this thesis investigates the ways in which architecture can apply the label of wilderness to new and even unlikely types of spaces in order to expand the lens through which we, as humans, value and appreciate this Earth.

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KLEIN DIAGRAM

ectural Attitudes Wilderenss A Klein diagram Toward is a method of logical expansion that Rosalind Krauss uses in her essay titled, “Sculpture in the Expanded Field.” Here, it is used to dissect the perceived dichotomy between spaces that are “human” and spaces that are “wild,” in order to identify four distinct architectural attitudes toward “wilderness”.

Villa Mairea, Alvar Aalto Finland, 1938

Thorncrown Chapel, Fay Jones USA, 1938

Abstractions

HUMAN

Falling Water, Frank Lloyd Wring USA, 1935

Total abandonment

WILD

Boscoe VerticalBoeri Studio Italy, 2009

Budludzha, Georgi Stoilov Bulgaria, 1974

Terrariums

Recreated Entropy

Vestiges

Central Park, Frederick Law Olmstead USA, 1857

The Highline, Diller, Scofidio + Renfro, Piet Oudolf USA, 2009

Constant Renewal

NOT WILD

NOT HUMAN

Machu Picchu, Incan Citadel Peru, 15th century

Habitat Wall, Joyce Hwang 2015

Outposts Gemma Observatory, Nick Winton USA, 2017

Reindeer Pavilion, Snohetta Norway, 2011

Forest Cabin, Bernd Reigger Switzerland, 2011

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SITE PLAN Four architectural interventions are placed throughout the site of an abandoned ski area and water park. The interventions engage abandoned swimming pools scattered along the slope of the mountain as well as a collapsing cabin. Each intervention seeks to engage, reflect and respect the site’s existing conditions while offering visitors a moment in which to have an experience of wilderness that, like the site itself, is out of the ordinary.

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R A I N P O O L

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F I R E P O O L

W O O D

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P O O L


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APART WALL

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B R I D G E P O O L

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CONCEPT SKETCH


graduate design V | fall 2018

UMASS RECREATION CENTER

design a recreation center with an Olympic-size pool and diving well on a prominent corner of campus. To celebrate and reflect the grandness of an Olympic-size swimming pool and diving well, this project incorporates a 320-meter indoor track into the program. This fifth-of-a-mile-long track cantilevers off the perimeter of the building to create a precisely curated series of experiences of the building and of the surrounding campus. Above all, this project emulates the balance achieved through physical activity by connecting occupants more fully to their surroundings. As one rounds the southern bend of the track they find themselves suspected within an equilibrium of unique moments: the pool below, the natatorium’s robust structure overhead, the bustling campus out to their side and the mountain range beyond.

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EXPLODED AXON

3. THE TRACK

The building is composed of three physical and organizational components.

Cantilevered around the first two pieces is a 320-meter running track. The six legs of the track offer runners a tour of the building, the campus, and the valley beyond.

2. THE NATATORIUM

Held within the bar is the lighter and more transparent natatorium.

1. THE BAR

A three-story concrete bar houses the circulation and all the programmatic elements besides the pools and pool deck. The heavy, monolithic nature of this component relates to the prominent brutalist structures that characterize the campus.

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SITE PLAN The building is sited at the corner of Commonwealth Avenue and Massachusetts Avenue, a prominent intersection that greets the majority of vehicular traffic into campus. The obtuse L-shaped footprint allows the building to hold the corner while agreeing with the existing conditions of both streets. Its west-facing facade is parallel to the neighboring Boyden Gym in order to maintain the established line of frontage along Commonwealth Avenue. The south-facing facade runs parallel to Massachusetts Avenue as well as perpendicular to the grade that rises in the eastern direction.

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OVE

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A SAUN

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DIVIN

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LOCK E

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E1 POOL

FLOOR PLAN, LEVEL ONE

S1 20

SECT IO MOD N EL


LEVEL ONE

One passes through the locker rooms and saunas to access the pool deck. A central meeting room offers views into the natatorium. Vertical circulation is at the two ends of the bar.

ENTRANCE

closet

conce ssio n

ticket

OPEN

TO B E

LOW

LEVEL TWO

FLOOR PLAN, LEVEL TWO lo track

area ading

danc

e stu

dio

The main entrance in on the second level where the grade at the back of the building is one story higher than on the street side. Upon entry, occupants face an unobstructed view into the natatorium. The lobby is flanked by grandstand seating. restro

om

restro

om

st io ud danc

OPEN

e stu

dio

LEVEL THREE

TO B E

LOW

The third level houses three exercise studios with interior windows looking down onto the natatorium. Additionally, the third floor provides access to the indoor track.

FLOOR PLAN, LEVEL THREE

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SECTIONS

11-foot deep trusses span across the natatorium and are level with the third story. This creates a condition in which occupants can investigate the structure of the natatorium by seeming to move through it. The terminal members of the trusses elaborate this experience by extending slightly over the track on the street side of the building.

The cross-section cuts through two distinct moments along the track. On the campus side, runners experience a moment of spatial compression; the track floor is sandwiched between a solid concrete wall and floor-to-ceiling glazing. Conversely, on the street side, exterior glazing, a balcony over the natatorium and the eye-level trusses create an experience of great openness. 22


ENLARGED SECTION

SECTION MODEL

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S1 | CROSS SECTION


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E2 | UNFOLDED ELEVATION

CONCRETE

GLASS CURTAIN WALL

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METAL SIDING

KALWALL SIDING

E1 | WEST ELEVATION


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WMAIA 2019 graduate scholarship | 2018

SUNFLOWER FARMER’S MARKET PAVILION

a systematic approach to community-driven management of invasive Eurasian Milfoil in the Belgrade Lakes

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The Maine Lake Resource Center (MLRC) hires a professional milfoil removal service. Sustained management, rather than full eradication, is the best approach to battling invasive Eurasian Milfoil in lakes. A small number of local companies specialize in these removal efforts, which involve scuba diving to the affected areas and pulling up the milfoil carefully to prevent unintentional

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Extracted Eurasian Milfoil is donated to participating farms who use the plant matter as a soil additive to fertilize sunflower crops. Milfoil removal efforts FRONT PERSPECTIVE result in boatloads of extracted milfoil. In at least two instances, farmers have used it to fertilize crops such as pole beans and sunflowers.

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Participating farms donate a portion of the sunflower yield back to the MLRC where it is sold at the Belgrade Farmer’s Market to raise funds for the annual hiring of a milfoil removal service. Currently, Belgrade has a weekly farmer’s market that takes place on the property of the MLRC.

FIRE PIT PERSPECTIVE

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SECOND PLACE WMAIA 2018 GRADUATE SCHOLARSHIP


FRONT PERSPECTIVE This project proposes a system that turns the problem of invasive Eurasian Milfoil in lakes on its head; collaboration between the MLRC, local central Maine farms and the Belgrade community turn Eurasian Milfoil into fuel for its own management.

FIRE PIT PERSPECTIVE

BACK PERSPECTIVE 28

OVERHEAD PERSPECTIVE


APPROACH TO SITE

The Sunflower Pavilion is sited at the corner of the property and provides a space for volunteers to sell the sunflowers and raise lake-health awareness. The back portion of the property is zoned as a public park; a fire pit off the back of the pavilion fosters community support by offering a space to gather and enjoy all days of the week. Further, simple construction materials (dimensional lumber, rope, and screws) offers potential for a community build. The formal language of the pavilion abstracts a sunflower—turning not to the sun, but to its community as its life-giving resource.

lake smart buffer zone

Augusta Road

Maine Lakes Resource Center farmer’s market lawn

Permeable Parking

dock for boat arrivals

sunflower pavilion

fire pit

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RECOGNITION FOR “BEST PHYSICAL MODEL”

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graduate design III | fall 2017

BROOKWOOD EDGE

entry for “Just Big Enough� design competition in Northampton, MA Brookwood Edge possesses a thoughtful simplicity that engages its site on multiple scales. Decks off the far side of each home engage with the landscape of native, bird-friendly plantings and provide unique lines of sight that foster a sense of place. The central path and entry area celebrate the strength and vibrance of the Northampton community. Residents are reminded of their proximity to The Brookwood Marsh Conservation Area through generous corner windows off each open-concept kitchen/living room. Brookwood Edge is designed to reach net-zero energy goals through passive solar heating, PV-ready roofs, stack effect ventilation, double-stud framing, and rainwater collection. This sustainable design allows Brookwood Edge to engage its site on the scale of the planet. This project was designed in collaboration with Kinsey Hinrichs, UMass MArch, 2019

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SECTION

SECTION-2 BR

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SUSTAINABILITY

MODEL- lasercut chipboard DOUBLEfront STUD WALL FRAMING, perspective R-VALUE = 45

PASSIVE SOLAR AND PV-READY ROO

12” width from 2”x12” bottom and top platte 2” x 4” studs every 24” per side

INE

LIN E

NL

E GL AN

NT 49˚ ER DE SIG 30˚ N

sheathing

ESIG RD

X NO UI

WI

68˚

ME

SUM

EQ

dense pack cellulose insulation

PV READY ROOF

4’ OVERHANG

building paper

wood furring creates air barrier

exterior surface

SOUTH FACING WALL

CONCRETE THERMAL MASS FLOOR

side perspective STACK EFFECT PASSIVE COOLING

WARM

HIGH PRESSURE

COOL

LOW PRESSURE

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RAIN WATER COLLECTION SYSTEM


SITE AND FLOOR PLANS

3 BR-LEVEL 2

2 BR-LEVEL 2

3 BR-LEVEL 1 998 SF

2 BR-LEVEL 1 822 SF

1 BR-LEVEL 1 595 SF

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PASSIVE SOLAR AND PV-READY ROOF

DOUBLE STUD WALL FRAMING, R-VALUE = 45

12” width from 2”x12” bottom and top platte 2” x 4” studs every 24” per side

OX

E

LIN E

LIN

E GL AN

NT 49˚ ER DE SIG 30˚ N

GN

N UI

WI

sheathing

ESI RD

68˚

ME

SUM

EQ

dense pack cellulose insulation

PV READY ROOF

4’ OVERHANG

building paper

SOUTH FACING WALL

wood furring creates air barrier

CONCRETE THERMAL MASS FLOOR

exterior surface

STACK EFFECT PASSIVE COOLING

WARM

RAIN WATER COLLECTION SYSTEM

HIGH PRESSURE

COOL

LOW PRESSURE

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graduate design III | fall 2017

AMETHYST OVERLOOK

Design a mixed-use housing plan to activate a downtown area for Pelham, MA. Amethyst Overlook takes a steep corner lot at a busy intersection and imagines it as a welcoming downtown focal point for Pelham residents, new and old. The project is composed of five residential buildings with mixed-use spaces on the ground levels. The buildings are situated in two offset rows to create a central pedestrian walkway. The buildings cascade across and down the site resembling a series of rotated domino stacks; this massing optimizes each building’s exposure to sunlight and maintains a sense of welcoming permeability to residents, visitors and passerbys. This project was designed in collaboration with Sarah Welch, UMass MLA

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SITE PLAN

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FLOOR PLAN- TYPICAL

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SITE PERSPECTIVE

INTERIOR- TYPICAL

EDIBLE STREETSCAPE

PRESERVED STREAM

HEMLOCK TERRACE

SECTION 40


SITE MODEL AND GRADING PLAN

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ENTRY FOR ACSA LIVABLE COMMUNITY COMPETITION 2018

graduate design IV | spring 2018

CABRINI GREEN LIVABLE COMMUNITY

design an affordable, mixed-use urban housing development at the demolished Carbini Green The history of The Cabrini-Green Homes, a largely demolished public housing project near downtown Chicago, is a testament to the complexities of urban design. This project seeks to learn from its site’s history by identifying four main criteria of what makes a livable urban community—human scale, health, sustainability and city context—and weaving them into all aspects of the design of this mixed-use and mixed-income housing community. In addition to proposing new construction with sustainability, community and recreation at the forefront, it preserves a prized community center, extends an urban garden, prioritizes pedestrian and bikerfriendly streetscapes, and welcomes a diversity of housing needs.

human scale

sustainability

health 43

city context


MID-RISE

LOW-RISE

RESTORED FRANCIS CABRINI ROW HOUSES

JESSE WHITE COMMUNITY CENTER

EXISTING NEW RESIDENTIAL

COMMUNITY FIELD EXTENSION

URBAN GARDEN EXTENSION

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PROGRAM 5 MID-RISE HOUSING UNITS EACH WITH: - studio apartments: 20 at 400SF - 1 bedroom apartments: 20 at 600SF - 2 bedroom apartments: 10 at 900SF - 3 bedroom apartments: 10 at 1,200SF - Co-working space 4,000SF 18 LOW-RISE APARTMENTS EACH WITH: - 1 bedroom apartments: 10 at 600SF - 2 bedroom apartments: 10 at 900SF - 3 bedroom apartments: 5 at 1,200SF - Co-working space 2,000SF SUPPORTING PROGRAM - Jesse White Community Center (existing) - Urban Garden (existing and extended) - Daycare - Senior Center - Retail

LOW-RISE FLOOR PLAN, TYPICAL *supplementary construction documents

LOW-RISE LONGITUDINAL SECTION

LOW-RISE SOUTH ELEVATION 45


MID-RISE FLOOR PLAN, TYPICAL

MID-RISE FLOOR PLAN, CROSS SECTION

MID-RISE, EAST ELEVATION 46


MID-RISE WALL SECTION

SUSTAINABILITY/HEALTHY LIVING PERSPECTIVE

SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS AND HEALTHY LIVING - cross ventilation in co-working spaces - chilled flow beam cooling - private outdoor space - community roof deck - optimized solar orientation - green roofs - daylighting of north facade 47


Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

West Oak Street

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

-

A-101 ---

North Cambridge Ave

North Larabee Street

North Hudson Ave

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

West Locust Street

Description

Date

North Sedwif Street

No.

Cabrini Green Livable Community Site Plan Scale Project number

1

Site Plan 1" = 100'-0"

Drawn by Checked by

Project Number Issue Date Author Checker

A-100

48

1" = 100'-0"

12/6/2018 12:29:04 PM

West Chicago Ave


126'

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

80'

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

Description

Date

Cabrini Green Livable Community Partial Site Plan Scale Project number

0'

1'

Drawn by Checked by

1

Project Number Issue Date Author Checker

A-101

partial site plan 1" = 20'-0"

49

1" = 20'-0"

12/6/2018 12:29:09 PM

No.


1 A-401

A-300 1

1

2

3

4

5

6

135' - 10"

5' - 8"

23' - 11"

5' - 8"

DG

106-A1

2-1

DS

8-1

Meeting Room

SI

DS

SI

14' - 1 5/8" 12' - 8"

Living/Kitchen

Vestibule

104-C

4

Bedroom

SI

SI

Living/Kitchen SI

DS

103-C

SI

Bedroom

Bedroom

105-A2

105-A3

DG

DG

C

DG

103-A

DG

A-302 -

102-C

Living/Kitchen

SI DS

1-

SI

Bedroom

104-A SI

102-B2

SI

103-B

SI

DG

102-A1

SI

Bathroom

DS

Bedroom

SI

Bathroom

3-1

DG

104-B 105-C

102-B1

SI

Bathroom Living/Kitchen

Bathroom

S2

Corridor

SI SI

Stair

SI

7-1

6-1

SI

SI

SI

Office

9

Office

105-B2

Office

89' - 11"

S1

Bathroom

11-1 DS

25' - 0"

105-B1

11' - 4 3/4"

10-1

5-1

SI

Stair

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

B

DS

No.

35' - 0"

Office Bathroom

DS

SI

Bathroom

14' - 0"

3' - 0"

SI

Bedroom

DG

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

SI

Bathroom

SI

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

SI

101-B1

DS

A-400

101-A2

Bathroom SI

106-B1

1

Bedroom

SI

11' - 8"

12' - 2"

101-C

DS

SI

SI

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

Living/Kitchen

Lobby Bedroom

105-A1

15' - 8"

DG

101-A1

DG

SI

DS

DG

DG

DG

Date

DS

Bedroom Bedroom 102-A2

DS

Description

SI

102-A3 DS

D 3' - 0"

3' - 0"

2' - 1"

5' - 8"

7' - 10" 26' - 5"

5' - 8"

15' - 4"

5' - 8"

13' - 10"

5' - 8"

26' - 4"

7' - 10"

5' - 8"

11' - 6"

5' - 3 1/2"

26' - 3"

Cabrini Green Livable Community Floor Plan Level 1

1 A-301

Scale Project number Drawn by

Floor Plan Level 1 1 1/8" = 1'-0"

Checked by

Project Number Issue Date Author Checker

A-102

50

1/8" = 1'-0"

12/6/2018 12:29:11 PM

A-303 1

Bedroom

DG

SI SI

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

7' - 11"

A

DS

106-C

106-A2

12' - 2"

DG

1-1

Bedroom Living/Kitchen

DS

5' - 1"

Vestibule

DG

1 A-500

8' - 11"

DG

DG

Bedroom

27' - 0"

26' - 8"

5' - 4"

27' - 0"

12' - 8"

12' - 2"

27' - 0"

15' - 8"

6' - 9"

25' - 11"

14' - 5"

28' - 3"


1 A-401

A-300 1

1

2

3

4

5

6

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

A

Bedroom

Bedroom

1-1

Bedroom 101-A1

Living/Kitchen

106-A2

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

Vestibule

106-A1

106-C

Living/Kitchen Bedroom

101-A2

Bathroom

2-1

106-B1

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

Bedroom

101-C

Lobby 101-B1

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

B Office

Bedroom 105-A1

---

5-1

Bathroom 105-B1

Office

Stair

105-B2

1

Bathroom

10-1

11-1

8-1

Bathroom 102-B1

Office

6-1

S1

A-400

9

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

Office

Meeting Room

Bathroom A-303 1

Bathroom

Stair

7-1

S2

Bedroom 102-A1

Bathroom

1-

A-302 -

102-B2

Corridor 3-1

Living/Kitchen

C

Bathroom

Bathroom

104-B

103-B

105-C

Bedroom

Living/Kitchen

Vestibule

104-C

4

Living/Kitchen Living/Kitchen

102-C

103-C

Bedroom

104-A

103-A No.

Bedroom

Bedroom

Bedroom

Bedroom

105-A2

105-A3

102-A2

102-A3

Description

Date

RCP LEGEND

= return

1

RCP Level 1 1/8" = 1'-0"

1

Cabrini Green Livable Community RCP Level 1

A-301

= supply = ACT

Scale Project number

= drywall

Drawn by

= light fixture

Checked by

Project Number Issue Date Author Checker

A-200

= sprinkler

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As indicated

12/6/2018 12:29:31 PM

D


1 A-400

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

A

B

C

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

D

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

26' - 8"

25' - 0"

35' - 0"

Level 6 65' - 0"

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

Level 5 52' - 0"

65' - 0"

Level 4 39' - 0"

Level 3 26' - 0"

No.

Description

Date

Level 2 13' - 0"

Level 1 0' - 0"

Cross Section 1/8" = 1'-0"

Cabrini Green Livable Community Cross Section Scale Project number Drawn by Checked by

Project Number Issue Date Author Checker

A-401

52

1/8" = 1'-0"

12/6/2018 12:29:48 PM

1


B

C

1 A-501

Level 5 52' - 0"

Level 5 52' - 0"

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

Level 4 39' - 0"

Level 4 39' - 0"

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

Level 3 26' - 0"

Level 3 26' - 0"

Level 2 13' - 0"

Level 2 13' - 0" 3 A-501

C

2 A-501

Date

Level 1 0' - 0"

Enlarged Elevation 1/4" = 1'-0"

2

Wall Section 1/4" = 1'-0"

Cabrini Green Livable Community Details Scale Project number Drawn by

2

Checked by

A-500

1

Description

Project Number Issue Date Author Checker

A-500

Partial Plan 1/4" = 1'-0"

53

1/4" = 1'-0"

12/6/2018 12:29:59 PM

3

Level 1 0' - 0"

No.


Recommended Approach

Steffian Bradely Architect | Summer 2017

PATTERN BOOK FOR HOLYOKE, MA

In collaboration with Steffian Bradely Architects, this project researches design precedents and standards in downtown Holyoke in order to propose a design approach to the Holyoke Housing Authority. The projects focuses on several residential and mixed-use blocks in the canal district. created in collaboration with SBA Architects

Architectural Guidelines for New Development Around Carlos Vega Park

South Holyoke The 17 lots for which this study makes proposals directly surround Carlos Vega Park. The park narrows as it moves northwest toward Sargeant Street. While much of the housing in South Holyoke sits close to the sidewalk, Carlos Vega Park offers a unique opportunity to imagine a shared, front-yard space. This study proposes construction that responds to the progressing scale of the park as well as to the existing style and program of its surroundings. The zoning of these lots is downtown residential district (DR).

Architectural Guidelines for New Development Around Carlos Vega Park Architectural Guidelines for New Development Around Carlos Vega Park

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Proposed Park Connection

Streetscape

ET

A tree line should be considered on Clemente Street and South East Street to add to the residential feel of the neighborhood. Street trees should be planted at regular intervals where space permits, and the species selection shall be coordinated with the City Tree Warden.

RE

A physical connection could be created between Carlos Vega Park and Valley Arena Park to allow the community to easily move between them and encourage their use.

HA

A small scaled, shared public way, free of vehicular trafc, would offer an opportunity for another type of neighborhood space. Its character could be inspired by the community and physically dened by landscaping, public art, pedestrian scaled lighting, and built in seating.

M T

CL EM EN TE

ST R

E RE ST

EE T

ON ILT

Site lighting should be carefully located and screened so as to not shine in the eyes of pedestrians and drivers, but ensure a feeling of security. Safety lighting should also be considered throughout the Carlos Vega Park. Lighting shall be at a pedestrian scale and keep within the character of the neighborhood.

CARLOS VEGA PARK T

EE

H UT

R ST ST EA

SO

R PA CT NE ON KC

T

E RE ST NT EA RG SA

T

N IO

EE

H

UT

SO

GE

ID

BR

R ST

VALLEY ARENA PARK

Park

Building Transition Zone

Pedestrian Clearway

Street Transition Zone

Pedestrian Clearway

Building Transition Zone

Shopfront

Architectural Guidelines for New Development Around Carlos Vega Park

Architectural Guidelines for New Development Around Carlos Vega Park

DR Zoning District The majority of existing lots under consideration do not meet the requirements for minimum lot size and minimum frontage. This proposal suggests ways to strategically combine lots/ change lot lines in order to meet the 60 feet minimum frontage requirement, which will also ensure they meet the minimum lot size requirement. Setback variances will need to be considered for the row home/townhomes option illustrated in this proposal.

HIGH DENSITY RESIDENTIAL- Multi-Family Dwellings (Townomes) JACKSON STREET

HIGH DENSITY RESIDENTIAL- Multi-Family Dwellings (Condominiums with potential rst oor commecrial) 549 SOUTH BRIDGE STREET

BH Zoning District – Per the City of Holyoke Zoning Ordinance dated February 19, 2002, the dimensional regulations are as follows: Minimum Lot Size: Minimum Setbacks: Minimum Frontage: Maximum Height:

10,000 square feet 30 feet (front), 25 feet (rear), 10 feet (side) 100 feet 35 feet (2 stories)

The existing lot under consideration in the BH zoning district does not conform to the minimum lot size and will not accommodate the front and rear setback requirements, therefore variances will need to be considered in order to build on this lot.

328-364 MAPLE STREET

BH Zoning District

Parking Requirements In both the DR and BH zoning districts, the minimum parking requirement is 2 parking spaces per residential unit. The graphics within this proposal identify the amount of street parking available on each street under consideration. Parking needs for each housing option are identied and compared with existing available parking. Where there are deciencies, additional parking should be considered as part of future development.

Architectural Guidelines for New Development Around Carlos Vega Park

Architectural Guidelines for New Development Around Carlos Vega Park

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74 CABOT STREET


UMass Design and Construction Management | 2017–2019

PLANT SUMMARY

NORTH CHILLER PLANT POSTER AND BROCHURE

create educational materials about the systems in the building in order to achieve LEED Gold certification and educate the campus community.

HOW IT WORKS

THE REFRIGERATION CYCLE

• 4 variable-speed chillers (2 new, 2 relocated) + extra bay for future growth CH-1, CH-2 (1,200 tons each) CH-3 (910 tons) CH-4 (1,000 tons) • 3 chilled water variable-speed primary pumps + 1 free cooling variable-speed pump CHWP-1,2,3 (5.800 gpm @300 HP each) CHWP-4 (1.000 gpm @30 HP) • 3 variable-speed condenser water pumps CDWP-1,2,3 (7,200gpm @250HP each) • 3 counter flow cooling cells + extra bay for 4th, and one “winter” cooling tower CT-1,2,3 (1,600 tons each) CT-5 (200 tons) • Monitored and controlled by campus-wide building automation system (BAS)

WARM AIR OUT

NORTH CHILLER PLANT

BENEFITS AIR IN

AIR IN

• variable primary pumping system optimizes CHW services at low energy use • Chiller plants tied together increases resiliency for the buildings served by the overall distribution loop by its availability and spare capacity can be leveraged for emergency O&M needs • chiller sequencing can allow each unique equipment to operate at its most optimal operation (i.e. low kW/ton), thus optimizing energy usage for both plants

cool water out

CONDENSER WATER PUMP VARIABLE FREQUENCY DRIVE

COOLING TOWER MOTOR

A visual learning tool for The University of Massachusetts, Amherst with LEED Gold certification projected

PUMP

DESIGN FEATURES EXPANSION VALVE

CONDENSER

PERIMETER GLAZING

COMPRESSOR

book your next adventure.

fan

TYPICAL CHILLER COMPONENTS

cooling tower SHAPE AND LOCATION

EVAPORATOR CONDENSER

HOW A CHILLER Call now to PLANT WORKS

warm air out

highlights building as a visual learning tool

EVAPORATOR

allows better servicability without “bottlenecking”

fill material

cool water out rooftop cooling towers

CHILLED WATER TO CAMPUS BUILDINGS

FREE COOLING

CHILLED WATER FROM CAMPUS BUILDINGS

PUMP VFD

VARIABLE FREQUENCY DRIVE

leverages low outdoor tempuratures during cooler months to chill water

1 (800) 000-0000 Open Note: because the chillerMon–Fri plant is not designed for the purpose of cooling 9am–5pm PST itself, chilled water travels through underground pipes to the buldings served by the plant and their air handling units

Respects campus master plan vision

air handling unit unconditioned air

conditioned air

MOTOR

CHILLED WATER PUMP PUMP

REFRIGERANTS Refrigerants are the substances used to transfer heat in cooling cycles such as the refrigeration cycle. Their low boiling points, along with the help of a compression tank and expansion valve, cause the refrigerant to cyclically evaporate and condense. This results in both latent and sensible heat transfer. In the evaporator, heat is conductively transferred from the return chilled water to the refrigerant thus creating supply chilled water. In the condenser, the refrigerant conductively transfers that heat to the condenser water. The condenser water travels to the cooling towers where the heat is released into the atmosphere. Note that the chilled water and the condenser water do not actually mix but rather exchange heat via the refrigerant in the refrigeration cycle. Chlorofluorocarbons (CFC) were common refrigerants in the 20th century but have since been phased out due to their high ozone depletion potential (ODP) and global warming potential (GWP). They were replaced by hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFC) and eventually hydrofluorocarbons (HFC).

cooling coil

MOTOR

ODP and GWP

(Ozone Depletion Potential)

(Global Warming Potential)

pump

Boiling Point

Specific Heat @ 86°F (Btu/lb°F)

ODP

R-11 (CFC)

74.7

0.21

1.00

4600

45

R-12 (CFC)

-21.6

0.24

.82

10600

100

R-22 (HCFC)

-41.4

0.31

0.034

1900

11.8

R-123 (HFC) CH-1,2,4

82.0

0.21

0.012

120

1.4

R-134a (HFC) CH-3

-15.0

0.36

0

1600

13.6

Refrigerant

GWP

condenser glycol functions as an anti-freeze during cooler months

refrigeration cycle

Atmospheric life (years)

evaporator

The black encolsure is the evaporator which chills and distributes retun chilled water (blue pipe). The grey enclosure is the condensor which recieves and delivers water to the cooling towers (green pipe).

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pump

a pump fascilitates distribution


In collaboration with Erika Zeikos and Givan Carrero | 2017

PIECE E MAY RUN PAST CORNERS AND BE CUT AT RIGHT ANGLE

S1

AMHERST WINTERFEST PHOTOBOOTH

Design, create construction drawings and build a photobooth for the annual Amherst, MA Winterfest community celebration. E

A

frame face

B

D

P1 C

angled face

E1

FRONT ELEVATION

1”=20’

CUT DIAGRAM: 1

4’

8’

8’

D E F A

C

8’ X 8’ PLYWOOD SHEET

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B

G

H

H

G

H

H

8’ X 8’ PLYWOOD SHEET

1/2”=1’

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Ashley Lepre Architecture Portfolio  

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