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Using Drones: The Eye in the Sky

Using Drones: The Eye in the Sky How can drones make the home inspector’s job easier and better? By Ron Greene, Golden Eagle Home Services, 425-640-5949

Filling a Need Inspecting a roof can be a tricky and dangerous business. Safety is always a primary concern for the inspector and others in the vicinity. “Accidents waiting to happen” revolve around the use of ladders, steep roof slopes and unsure footing. In addition, inspectors should not traverse roofs that are in poor condition or that have a roof covering that can easily be damaged. Finally, some roofs are out of a ladder’s reach and are just not accessible. My biggest nightmare is a low-slope roof that cannot be viewed from the ground and is out of the reach of my ladder. Now what? For me, reporting that the roof was inaccessible and could not be inspected is not an option. 12

ASHI Reporter • April 2017

Enter the Drone Every so often, a product that makes inspections easier and better hits the market. One example is the thermal imaging camera, which is increasing in popularity and becoming more affordable. Another product gaining popularity in the recreational and photography markets is the unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) or drone. By definition, a drone is an unmanned, rotary-wing aircraft. Aircraft are of two types: fixed and rotary wing. Fixed-wing aircraft include gliders, commercial airliners and the like. They get their lift from air moving over the wings. These aircraft must maintain a minimum, forward speed to fly. This type of drone will not work for roof inspections.

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April 2017 Reporter  

Home inspection news and tips for inspectors, home owners and realtors.

April 2017 Reporter  

Home inspection news and tips for inspectors, home owners and realtors.

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