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Farming GUARDIAN

APRIL 2018

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Farming GUARDIAN

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INSIDE

EDITORIAL COMMENT

Guardian Farming is proudly published by the Ashburton Guardian Limited

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Read the latest Dairy Focus online at guardianonline.co.nz

PAGE 8 BEEF AND LAMB WELL PLACED

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PAGE 12

The outlook for New Zealand’s primary exports is looking pretty good, according to the latest Ministry for Primary Industries forecasts, with exports predicted to hit $42 billion in the year to June. As the story on page six notes, that 11 per cent jump would be the largest annual increase since 2014. While export revenue has been strong across all sectors during the past year, markets are increasingly competitive and it’s important for farmers and exporters to work together for a common good. So the research recently released by Lincoln academic Dr Nic Lees (see story facing page) should serve as a timely reminder that relationships between those two groups could be better. According to Lees, we’re missing out on higher market returns for meat exports because of a lack of commitment and trust between farmers and meat companies. He’s calling for a system driven more by market requirements and based around more long-term forward supply contracts with an emphasis on quality. He’s got a point.

Colin Williscroft

RURAL REPORTER

There’s a lot to be said for working smarter rather than harder and targeting the quality end of the market will result in better returns. As he says, increasing the value of exports is a surefire way of boosting earnings without having to produce more, which of course will also have an economic benefit. In the end it’s about meeting the market, and after all consumers are the ones buying our meat products. Increasingly those consumers know exactly what they want, so it’s important that farmers work with their meat companies to be able to deliver that, which in the end will go a long way towards keeping everyone happy.

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More commitment needed

Lincoln University’s Dr Nic Lees says more farmers need to commit to forward supply contracts that specify quality PHOTO SUPPLIED requirements and delivery schedules. 

• • • •

New research out of Lincoln points to “poor” relationships between farmers and their meat processors, which could be costing the country export income, but meat companies and farmers say the situation is improving and the two groups are working more closely than ever before - to the benefit of both. Lincoln’s Dr Nic Lees said he surveyed more than 1000 sheep, beef and deer farmers - three industries that together make up 12 per cent of New Zealand’s exports and currently contribute about $5 billion to the New Zealand economy. Lees said his findings indicated that improving the relationship between those farmers and meat companies was essential to New Zealand producing higher value products to meet consumer needs. “New Zealand is missing out on higher market returns for meat exports because of a lack of commitment and trust between farmers and meat companies,” he said. “The majority of farmers do

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not commit to forward supply contracts that specify quality requirements and delivery schedules. “We effectively still have a system driven by market requirements. Farmers sell stock based on their farming requirements and the number of stock and quality often does not match consumer needs.” Increasingly, consumers were making food choices based not only on quality, Lees said, but also on other factors like food safety, animal welfare, provenance and environmental stewardship. He said the research showed that long-term, committed relationships were necessary to ensure farmers supplied stock to processors that met these requirements.

It made financial sense for farmers to do that, Lees said, as closer partnerships meant farmers would also be more profitable. “This means it’s a win-win for farmers, exporters and the New Zealand economy. Though many have believed this to be the case, this is the first time research has clearly shown this.” Increasing the value of exports provides a way to earn more without having to produce more, he said, adding that this could also help to address current public concern about the impact of expanding farm production on the environment. “Therefore the environment also benefits.” Good relationships throughout the supply chain are essential for the current and future success of the industry, ANZCO agribusiness manager Alan McDermott said adding that ANZCO’s customer programmes and action groups are two examples that support this. continued over page


4

Farming

www.guardianonline.co.nz From P3

ANZCO agribusiness manager Alan McDermott says the company’s customer relationship programmes deliver higher PHOTO SUPPLIED value to farmers. 

“ANZCO’s customer programmes and Action Groups are two examples that support this.” McDermott said customer relationship programmes have been a key part of ANZCO’s business model for a number of decades. “These have delivered higher value to farmers because of the direct, strong relationship that exists between farmers, ANZCO and the customer. As a result, farmers deliver what the customer wants and the customer knows the farmers. Delivering what your customer wants is imperative and is rewarded. This builds trust and confidence in the supply chain, and a culture of continuous improvement,” McDermott said. ANZCO’s Action Groups are part of the Red Meat Profit Partnership and have been operating for three years. “The financial analysis from these groups is yet to be completed but farmers are already listing a number of benefits which reinforce Dr Lees’ findings. These include a better understanding of ANZCO’s business and the challenges and opportunities in the processing sector;

increased on-farm productivity; cost savings; enhanced business and environmental sustainability; access to specialists and knowledge; and a much stronger focus on planning and monitoring which we know are critical to successful farming. “The Action Groups have also been extremely successful in creating greater opportunities for women to be more involved in business decision-making and planning. All of this is helping farming families take greater ownership and accountability for their own success,” McDermott said. “All parties in the supply chain need to continue to work together better to build and maintain trust and transparency which in turn will maximise the value for everyone. Ensuring quality relationships will always be important to business success.” Silver Fern Farms general manager of supply chain Dan Boulton said while historically Lees may have had a point, the tide is turning and farmers are becoming more aware of the benefits of meeting the market. Boulton said SFF runs a number of programmes that

are focused on connecting farmers with consumers, such as Plate to Pasture. He said at SFF, there was a focus on the “plate” first, identifying consumer needs, and then working with farmers to grow animals to create products specifically to meet those needs. “The Plate to Pasture

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Chris and Anne-Marie Allen, far right, hosted about 70 people at their Ashburton Forks property last year at a field day they held as a result of their success in Silver Fern Farms’ Plate to Pasture competition.

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board member Chris Allen, who is currently standing for the SFF board, agrees that it’s increasingly important for farmers and processors to work together. Allen, who farms with his wife Anne-Marie near Ashburton Forks, said farmers need to support the work their processors are doing to meet the market and that required discipline. “We need to be focused on trying to grow what the market wants year-round, not just when it suits us,” he said. Boulton said Lees made strategy is focused on driving “Whoever we supply we a fair point that tying up the value chain, to achieve have to deal with the markets KG farmers into555these typesKG higher returns for our 11 they have identified. We 41/82 of programmes long-term products. This in turn will have to buy into that system could allow us to 33be HP moreONprofitable DEMAND TRUE IRS WITH 24CM be challenging 555KG TOWING 41KG but FRONT /an 82KG REAR ELECTRONIC and POWER keep the supply curve OF TRAVEL CAPACITY STEERING increasing CAPACITY number of RACKthem and pay premiumsALL-WHEEL-DRIVE to our (AWD) constant. were seeing the value of them. suppliers for livestock, which “At the moment our supply KG the future and our “They are meet the criteria for these curve is based around the 555 KG 11 farmer partners do see that.” higher returning products – grass (growth) curve. 41/82 Allen said farmers needed Mid Canterbury farmer and profitably linking the plate to KG 33 HP ON DEMAND TRUE IRS WITH 24CM 555KG TOWING 41KG FRONT / 82KG REAR ELECTRONIC POWER to develop a good relationship Federated Farmers national the pasture.” 555 KG 11 ALL-WHEEL-DRIVE (AWD) OF TRAVEL CAPACITY RACK CAPACITY STEERING KG KG

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with their processor because “they can tell you what is needed and when”, which in the end would pay off. “Your supplier will be doing that market research and once you’ve got a contact with them you need to support it.” He said longer term contracts definitely had their benefits, pointing to the example of wool growers who supplied Merino New Zealand, who generally had that type of contact. “Although wool doesn’t have a shelf life like meat does, the idea shouldn’t be that different. We’ve got to capture that idea into meat. We’ve got to stay connected to the market. Allen said there was a lot to be gained by farmers working with meat processors to be able to talk about the provenance of their product. “There’s some really neat stuff happening on the land but if we can’t tell the story it’s like it never happened.” “Having a supply chain that connects is important and we also need to think about how we can take the story of our stock all the way through.” The Allens, Pasture to Plate winners in 2016, hosted an open day at their Allendale farm late last year.

Farmers who attended that day heard about a Plate to Pasture European market tour the couple went on which gave them a firsthand look at some of the markets SFF is selling into, which in turn gave them a better understanding of those consumers. At the time Anne-Marie said it was important for farmers to grasp just how important it was for farmers to connect with markets and an integral part of that was farmers being able to tell their own story, which is something farmers needed to get better at. In the meantime, Lees said the Lincoln research had also developed tools for companies to measure the quality of their relationship with suppliers and identify what they can do to improve. Although a number of exporters were already using those tools, Lees said there was potential for their wider use by agricultural and horticultural companies who want to improve relationships with their suppliers. “Expanding the use of these tools to other sectors, such as the dairy and horticultural industries, could significantly increase the benefits of this research to the New Zealand economy.”

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Primary sector exports forecast to New Zealand’s primary industry exports are forecast to rise nearly 11 per cent in the year ending June 2018, to reach $42.2 billion. That would be the largest annual increase since 2014, according to the Ministry for Primary Industries’ latest quarterly update, out last month. “Our Situation and Outlook for Primary Industries report shows export revenue for all sectors has been incredibly strong over the past year, particularly for dairy, meat and forestry,” Jarred Mair, MPI policy and trade acting deputy director general, said. “Dairy export revenue is expected to increase by more than 14 per cent in 2018 due to a recovery in prices over the past 12 to 18 months. It is also the result of more milk being processed into higher value products such as infant formula. “At the same time, the latest numbers show dairy cow numbers have fallen since 2016,” he said. “In addition, global red meat prices are expected to increase export revenue in the meat and wool sector by nearly 10 per cent in 2018. “Forestry exports are also forecast to grow by more than 11 per cent in 2018, supported by record harvest levels and ongoing demand for New Zealand logs from China.” High returns and new policies are likely to create investment opportunities across the primary industries, Mair said. “For example, high horticulture returns are driving investments in productivity and competition for suitable land. “The Government’s One Billion Trees programme is another catalyst for investment and changing

Colin Williscroft

RURAL REPORTER

land use, primarily through increased replanting rates and new production forest area.” The report said that New Zealand’s primary industry exports have benefited from a supportive macroeconomic environment, which is expected to continue in the short term. However, it noted that one caveat to the outlook is the risk of protectionism, which could limit opportunities for our export-orientated primary sector. The United States’ withdrawal from the TransPacific Partnership Agreement was an example of this. Fortunately, the alternative Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for the Trans-Pacific Partnership, which the report described as a significant free trade agreement, was signed last month. The New Zealand dollar traded below 70 cents to the US dollar for most of the December 2017 quarter, which provided a boost to New Zealand export prices. However, since mid-December, that rate has risen to between 73 to 74 cents. “In addition to a positive economic outlook for New Zealand, global GDP is forecast to grow by nearly 4 per cent in both 2018 and 2019, according to the International Monetary Fund. This would be the highest growth rate since 2010 and will help support consumer demand for New Zealand’s

primary sector exports,” the report said.

Dairy

The report said that extreme weather conditions experienced by much of the country are expected to lead to a 1 per cent fall in milksolid production for the 2017/18 season. “Despite this expected production fall, strong global prices for butter and whole milk powder are forecast to contribute to dairy export revenue rising to $16.7 billion for the year ending June, 2018, up from 14.6 billion the previous year. “Milk fat prices are forecast

to decline in the following year, but whole milk powder prices should remain near current levels and production should bounce back from a poor season, leading to forecast dairy exports rising slightly to $16.8 billion for the year ending June 2019.” There are both opportunities and challenges in front of the New Zealand dairy industry, the report said. Opportunities included manufacturers continuing to increase the proportion of raw milk used for higher value products rather than commodities, driving a higher value dairy product export

basket. On top of that China, our largest dairy market, continues to show strong demand for imported whole milk powder and infant formula. Ongoing farm system improvements and genetic gains are expected to continue to lead to increased production per cow in the future, which will also lead to more opportunities. However, we need to bear in mind that EU production and exports also continue to rise, placing downwards pressure on international prices. Then there’s mycoplasma


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7

rise to $42 billion the Japanese market since its 2015 free trade agreement, but the CPTPP will put New Zealand on a level playing field once the agreement has been fully implemented, a process which will take several years.” One of the challenges facing the beef sector is the dry weather that has characterised this summer, which has contributed to higher production and export volumes in the December quarter than expected, although the report said overall the drought has had a minimal impact nationally on the sector. “Average slaughter weights, which often decline in drought situations, are on target to reach last year’s very good result, and farmgate prices have remained high despite the higher throughput.” The continued struggles of the crossbred wool market is another challenge, with few indications of an imminent rebound. “Export volumes are rising but there are still large inventories built up from the previous season and demand for crossbred wool remains low.”

Arable

bovis, not far from the minds of many dairy farmers in the lower half of the South Island. The report noted that if the disease does become established dairy production will be negatively affected, while farm management costs may also increase. How to deal with the pressures dairying can place on the environment is another challenge, the report said. “Domestic environmental policy is likely to constrain cow numbers and the land area used for dairy farming in the future, with growth becoming more reliant on productivity increases and rising proportions of value-add products.”

Meat and wool

Meat and wool exports are forecast to increase 9.6 per cent to $9.2 billion in 2018, up significantly from the previous report. Prices across the sector are predicted to remain strong, with 2018 red meat prices forecast to increase 14.7 per cent for lamb, 20.5 per cent for mutton, 2 per cent for beef and 11.7 per cent for venison. New Zealand beef prices remain at or above $7 per kg, even though production is expanding in the US and elsewhere. The report said this was because beef consumption is trending upward in key markets including the US, China, Japan and South Korea. One of the biggest potential beneficiaries of the CPTPP is likely to be beef exports to Japan, the report said. “Australia has enjoyed a tariff advantage over all other countries in

Arable exports are expected to rise to $240 million in the year ending June 2018, up from $197 million in 2017. Higher export volumes of vegetable seeds are the main contributor, lifting the vegetable seed export value to $95 million, an increase of $24 million on the previous year. As those in the arable industry will know it’s been a season of extremes for cropping farmers, who came from a wet winter and early spring into one of the driest summers on record. The report noted that the hot, dry summer brought the Canterbury cereal harvest forward a couple of weeks and while yields for some dryland crops are lower, overall an average yield is expected. Food trends are providing new cropping opportunities for New Zealand farmers, the report said, adding that areas of cropping potential identified by the Foundation for Arable Research include nutritional beverages, ancient grains, high value oils, plant proteins, durable water containing crops and some native species. The legislative amendments under way to permit hemp seed to be grown for human consumption will provide another cropping opportunity for New Zealand farmers. One of the challenges faced by the arable industry is that world grain production in 2017/18 is expected to be the second largest ever at 2100 million tonnes, which will continue to restrain domestic grain prices. On top of that high transport costs continue to make it difficult for South Island grain suppliers to compete in the North Island market, where major flour and animal feed mills and most poultry and pork production is based. The report said Australian and North American grain can be landed more cheaply in Auckland and Tauranga than grain from Timaru or Lyttelton.

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8

Farming

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Environment under spotlight at The sheep and beef sector is well-placed to turn the challenges into opportunities and reap the rewards, farmers were told at Beef + Lamb New Zealand’s recent annual meeting in Gisborne. James Parsons, outgoing chairman at Beef + Lamb New Zealand (B+LNZ) said strong prices and recent trade gains such as the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) will undoubtedly help lift the profitability of sheep and beef farming. However, Parsons said, despite the progress and achievements, the sheep and beef sector could not afford to be complacent. “That’s why we are committed to a number of important initiatives such as the Red Meat Story and the New Zealand Farm Assurance Programme, so the sector can capture more value from key markets. “We are also continuing to invest in supporting farming excellence with our research and development

and extension programmes to boost productivity and reduce costs.” Parsons, who farms in Northland, stepped down last month as chairman of B+LNZ after four years in the role and another five years as a director. He was first elected to the board as a farmer director representing the Northern North Island region in 2009. He has been replaced by King Country sheep and beef farmer Martin Coup. Gore farmer and Southern South Island director and deputy chairman Andrew Morrison has assumed the chairman’s role. The Government has been constructive in its discussions with the sheep and beef sector since the general election last year, and Parsons encouraged the sector to work closely with them. “We all agree with the goal of improving water quality, having a lighter environmental footprint and moving further up the value curve. “We accept sheep and beef farming has an environmental

Left – Former Beef + Lamb New Zealand chairman James Parsons says the sheep and beef sector can’t afford to be complacent.

Right – Beef + Lamb New Zealand chief executive Sam McIvor says the organisation will continue to undertake in-depth analysis of consumers and markets and look to the future to identify new opportunities and challenges. PHOTOS SUPPLIED

impact, yet despite this, our sheep and beef farmers are world leaders. “The Government has set an ambitious target of being carbon neutral by 2050 and

the sheep and beef sector has reduced its carbon emissions by 19 per cent since 1990 whilst maintaining production. The opportunity is to continually improve and share

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the innovations we develop in tackling these challenges with other countries, so we make the world a better place. “With 2.7 million hectares, almost a quarter of New Zealand’s indigenous bush, located on sheep and beef farms, coupled with riparian plantings and exotic woodlots, we are in a strong position.” B+LNZ’s mission was to ensure future policies did not have unintended consequences for the sheep and beef sector, he said. “For instance, planting 1


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9

annual meeting

billion trees should not be at the expense of productive sheep and beef farms and thriving rural communities. There is, however, the opportunity to integrate

woodlots into sheep and beef farms using a land use capability approach.” Parsons also paid tribute to the staff and former and current board members for

their efforts. “It has been satisfying to see the organisation steadily improving over my nine years on the board and credit needs to go to all those that have made that happen, including the farmer council, management and both current and previous board members.” Farmers attending the annual meeting received an update on the organisation’s strategy, draft environment strategy and the Red Meat Story. Sam McIvor, chief executive of B+LNZ, said the organisation’s strategy puts more emphasis on enhancing farmers’ environmental position, unlocking market potential and greater government and public engagement, while still supporting farming excellence. “Our draft environment strategy is the first step in our quest to return the hero status back to farmers, so they are valued by the wider community. It is focused on four key areas: improving water quality, advancing towards carbon neutral,

enhancing our biodiversity and ensuring healthy productive soils. “The aim is to give farmers the tools and information, so they have confidence to make decisions that will have the greatest environmental impact for a profitable future.” Subject to discussions with the sector, the Red Meat Story is expected to be rolled out to global markets later this year in partnership with processors. B+LNZ is finalising the proposed brand mark, story and Go-to-Market Strategy. “New Zealand’s red meat story is more than a brand,” McIvor said. “It is about ensuring we understand what is important to our consumers; that we protect our natural food production systems and are doing more to ensure consumers globally recognise New Zealand farmers are in the natural food business. “To support this, B+LNZ will continue to work on the New Zealand Farm Assurance Programme, undertake ongoing in-depth analysis of

the consumer and markets and look to the future to identify new opportunities and challenges. “All of these things are absolutely necessary to ensure the success of our ultimate objective of raising the value of New Zealand’s sheep and beef exports. “Farmers will also see B+LNZ taking stronger action on other emerging issues that could affect the sheep and beef sector. Our recent world-leading work on alternative proteins is one such example. “We are determined to be at the forefront of issues on farmers’ behalf. Farmers rightly want to see value from their investment, so we are committed to ensuring our activities have a tangible impact on farmers’ bottomlines.” McIvor said Parsons had made a significant contribution to the sector over the past nine years. “His wise stewardship of B+LNZ and championing the interests of farmers have been invaluable.”

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Farming

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Meeting the agri challenges DairyNZ has launched Go Dairy, an interactive website designed to encourage young people to consider a career in the diverse and vibrant dairy sector. The website is aimed at high school students, people in their 20s, people seeking a career change, parents and teachers. It includes information on recommended school subjects, tertiary study and training. There are also links to job search sites and information on DairyNZ’s awards and scholarships. Channel marketing manager Andrew Fraser said: “The sector needs motivated and passionate people with a range of skills to ensure we continue to have a successful industry, and to meet current and emerging challenges.” New Zealand leads the world in dairy and the sector is one of the country’s largest employers. Challenges include continually improving the relationship between dairying and the environment, and ensuring New Zealand dairy remains competitive in the international market.

Athol New had no farming background but after studying agricultural commerce at Lincoln University, he worked up to become operations manager for a large farming operation with a sustainability focus, Rakaia Island-Woodstock. He oversees three farm managers and co-ordinates PHOTO SUPPLIED the business plan across two dairies, milking up to 3000 cows.

“Working in the dairy sector gives young people many opportunities. It is a dynamic and ever-changing sector. Young people get the chance to learn new skills, gain qualifications, get promotions, learn to think strategically

and be innovative,” Fraser said. “Depending on the role, young people can work with technology, outdoors, with other people, with animals and even be their own boss. There’s a job for everyone and

opportunities to continually grow a career throughout a lifetime.” Roles range across dairy farming, agri-business and agri-science. The website has a fun quiz, giving suggestions for which type of career would

suit each individual best. The quiz ranks a range of suitable role types in order. “A great thing about the dairy sector is you learn skills that are transferable to other roles. You may start as a farm assistant and end up as a farm owner or rural professional, for instance,” Fraser said. “As well as hard working and strategic people on-farm, the dairy sector needs rural professionals to help farmers improve their farm businesses, research scientists to find answers to complex questions with benefits in real life, and environmental and greenhouse gas specialists to find new solutions. These are just a few of the many roles.” “We encourage young people interested in a career in dairy to visit the Go Dairy website, talk to others in the sector, visit workplaces they are interested in, ask questions and research areas of interest on the internet. We also encourage people to get a mentor who can share their knowledge and experience and be a sounding board,” Fraser said.


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11

Herbicide to target weeds in wheat A herbicide to control problematic weeds in wheat crops and so increase crop yield, has been approved by the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA). An application from Bayer New Zealand Limited to import Sakura 850 WG was considered by a decisionmaking committee convened by the EPA. This product contains pyroxasulfone, an active ingredient not used before in New Zealand. It will be imported ready-packaged for sale, and is intended for use by commercial growers and contractors, not homegardeners. “The EPA has concluded that this product offers considerable benefits to wheat growers,” general manager of hazardous substances and new organisms, Dr Fiona Thomson-Carter, said. “We are confident that, with the required controls in place, Sakura 850 WG poses negligible risk to aquatic organisms, earthworms, nontarget plants, birds and bees. Risks to human health and

The EPA has approved a herbicide to control weeds in wheat, which can only be used by commercial growers and contractors. PHOTO ASHBURTON GUARDIAN

the environment that could arise from using Sakura 850 WG will be managed by the controls we have set.” “These include creating a 15metre buffer zone around any bodies of water, and restricting use to once a year at any given location. The

product may only be used in the April to May period, which reduces the risk of groundwater contamination.” “Application is restricted to ground-based methods only, with no aerial spraying permitted. The EPA has set a maximum application rate, and

there is a range of information that must be included on product labels,” ThomsonCarter said. “These controls are designed to ensure that wheat growers can reap the benefits of the product, which include controlling problematic weeds,

and so increasing wheat yields and profitability.” “No formulations using a herbicide of this sort are currently available in New Zealand, and no local weed species are known to have developed a resistance to them.”


12

Farming

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Cattle welfare regulations New animal welfare regulations, announced recently by the Ministry for Primary Industries, have been endorsed by Beef + Lamb New Zealand and DairyNZ. Their introduction, to support compliance with New Zealand’s animal welfare legislation, will add further weight to New Zealand’s animal welfare standards, according to Beef + Lamb. Dave Harrison, general manager policy and advocacy, said World Animal Protection has given New Zealand an A ranking on its Animal Protection Index, one of only four countries to achieve that standard. “This reflects the fact we have some of the highest animal welfare standards in the world, and it is important that these high standards are maintained,” he said. B+LNZ worked alongside Federated Farmers and the Ministry for Primary Industries to develop the new regulations to ensure that the high expectations the industry has around the care of animals is upheld in a sensible and practicable way. “There is still some work to do to achieve the outcomes we want to see. Requiring pain relief for dehorning and disbudding, for example, is a good step forward. But we also need to ensure farmers have easier and more cost-effective access to analgesics,” Harrison said. “Farmers want to do the right thing and feel a duty of responsibility to ensure the care of their animals. As an industry, it is important to support this by setting an expectation and holding people to account for meeting it. “But as our expectations evolve we need to make sure farmers have the tools to

CATTLE REGULATIONS WRAP The significant proposed regulations relating to cattle include: ƒƒ Stock transport – animals with ingrown horns or horn injuries, lame animals, animals with injured or diseased udders, and with advanced cancer eye, will not be acceptable for transport unless a veterinarian has provided a certificate. ƒƒ Tail docking – a person must not shorten or remove the tail of any cattle beast. ƒƒ Castration – when castrating or shortening the scrotum of a bull over the age of six months, pain relief must be used (for any method of castration). If high tension bands are used to castrate an animal, local anaesthetic must be used to provide pain relief (at any age). ƒƒ Disbudding – pain relief required at all ages. DairyNZ strategy and investment portfolio manager Jenny Jago said the new regulations are a positive move 

PHOTO SUPPLIED

meet them, and the focus of B+LNZ will be on making sure that that is the case,” he said. DairyNZ strategy and investment portfolio manager Jenny Jago said the new regulations are a positive move. “New Zealand is already recognised as having a strong reputation for animal welfare and these regulations will further strengthen the framework that underpins this,” she said. “We support regulations which benefit animal welfare outcomes. Cows, and people are the heart of every farming business and the majority

of dairy farmers take real pride in their herd’s care and how farming practices are undertaken on-farm. “Many dairy farmers are meeting these regulations now and it is positive that standards have been set so, as a sector, we all meet high standards of animal welfare. “DairyNZ has worked closely with MPI to ensure the new regulations will enhance New Zealand’s reputation for good animal welfare and this aligns with the Dairy Tomorrow aim for New Zealand farmers to be world leading in on-farm animal care.”

ƒƒ Dehorning – pain relief required at all ages. ƒƒ Assisting calving cows – no use of traction with a moving vehicle, motorised winch or any other device that does not allow for the quick release of tension for the purposes of calving cows. ƒƒ Other regulations – not owning cattle with ingrown horns, prohibited methods of milk stimulation, a minimum weight for the use of electric prodders, approved methods of castration. Most of the regulations come into force on October 1 this year, except for pain relief requirements for disbudding and dehorning cattle, which come into effect on October 1, 2019. Farmers can find out more information about the new regulations and the related fines and regulatory offence information at www.mpi.govt.nz

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Building a network of communicators Last month communicators from across the biosecurity system started a conversation about setting up a Biosecurity Communication Network (BCN) to create a systemwide approach for clear and collaborative communication. By combining forces this group of communicators will work together to support the development and launch of an implementation plan as well as the ongoing needs during implementation. Group members plan to integrate and amplify stories about the people involved and to highlight how everyone can play a part in protecting livelihoods, lifestyles, the economy and New Zealand’s unique environment. BCN will apply their collective brain power to reallife cross-industry issues that’ll dramatically affect our people and our country, sharing resources, success, plans, progress, and lessons learned. The concept behind the creation of the group is that by strategically communicating as a collective, using shared key messages and

Participants work on a table-top exercise at the Biosecurity Communication Network forum held in March. 

co-designed/shared material, the effect will be magnified. That means more people and more businesses will learn and know about biosecurity, the risks, what they can do, what they need to do and why it is also their responsibility. More than 240 communicators from across the biosecurity system were invited to the inaugural forum, with over 50 people attending from: regional

PHOTO SUPPLIED

councils, Maori, tourism, primary industries, research organisations, government agencies, universities, communication agencies that work for organisations within the system, transport, airlines and NGOs. A second forum will be held in July and a third is planned to coincide with the New Zealand Biosecurity Forum, which is scheduled for November this year.

Based on engagement to date, membership of BCN is expected to grow because of the benefits it would provide to communicators, such as: ƒƒ The opportunity to create a cohesive approach and support each other to deliver biosecurity messages that are mutually supporting. ƒƒ Allowing networking and the creation of long-lasting connections across the system. ƒƒ The availability and access to information and knowledge they can use for their own organisations. ƒƒ The ability to draw on the collective knowledge of over 240 communicators and their support on a biosecurity issue. ƒƒ Being the fence at the top of the cliff and not the ambulance at the bottom, because members will be involved in the development of national, regional and sector-wide communication campaigns, crafting the messaging and working together to build awareness and understanding.

How the BCN will help promote Biosecurity 2025 Communicators play an important role in making it easy for people to understand what they need to do and how to get involved. By coming together as a network of communicators it allows them to use storytelling to explain how everyday people, farmers, industry and government are working together. They will tap into other people’s experiences and knowledge, learning from each other so they’re not reinventing the wheel, but improving that wheel to run faster. It’s not too late to join. The second forum will again be co-hosted by the Ministry for Primary Industries, Federated Farmers and Horticulture New Zealand along with other BCN members. If you’d like to join, please email biosecurity2025@mpi. govt.nz

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14

Farming

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Focus on reducing farm vehicle Farming groups are united behind a major drive to reduce the number of injuries and fatalities involving vehicles on farms. WorkSafe initiative Safer Vehicles, Safer Farms, launched last month, follows research that shows there is almost always a vehicle involved when someone dies as a result of a farm workplace accident. Over the next three years the Crown agency will focus on reducing the critical risk of working in and around farm vehicles. These are the instances where the decision by the farmer can be the difference between life or death. “Making even a small improvement in this area will have a significant impact on reducing injuries and saving lives on farm,” WorkSafe deputy general manager assessments Jo Pugh said. “As part of this focus, our inspectors will be discussing safer use of vehicles with farmers during assessments. They will be asking farmers about how vehicles are used on their farm and what they are doing to ensure vehicles are not a factor for them or their workers being hurt or killed.” Through the Safer Vehicles, Safer Farms programme, WorkSafe will also be encouraging farmers to share their knowledge, expertise and ideas to help create safer ways of working with vehicles and machinery. “Engaging farmers, to tell us what works for them, will be crucial,” Pugh said. “Farmers will know safer ways of doing jobs, which equipment is safest in different situations, and what engineering solutions are out there, that make vehicles and machinery safer. “In addition, we will be

Federated Farmers president Katie Milne says farmers should know where the risky parts of the farm are in terms of steep country or country that can get more dangerous depending on the PHOTO SUPPLIED weather. 

working with the sector on new and improved guidance, standards and training to help farmers make the right decisions.” The project has the support of DairyNZ, Federated Farmers and Beef + Lamb New Zealand. Greater focus on how quad bikes and other farm vehicles are used is a necessary change to farm health and safety inspections, Vanessa Winning, DairyNZ’s general manager for farm performance, said. “We see injuries and fatalities from quad bikes in particular far too frequently within our farming communities,” Winning said. “We all need to be looking more closely at the vehicles we use on farm and consider ‘what’s the safest vehicle for the job?’ “DairyNZ has already removed most quad bikes from its research farms because

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there are safer ways for our staff to move around the farm. “Getting people to really think about what farm vehicles they use, and whether the vehicles are being used safely, is a behavioural change we need to start seeing now. The sector’s fatality and injury rates are just too high. “It’s good to get these conversations going, but we know that education alone won’t change the way people use quad bikes. We also need to see rollover protect bars and other safety devices becoming commonplace on farm vehicles.” Beef + Lamb New Zealand general manager of policy and advocacy, Dave Harrison, said the evidence was clear: vehicles and machinery are

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almost always involved when someone dies as a result of an accident on a farm “Sheep and beef farmers all want less accidents, injuries and fatalities on our farms. Accidents have a significant impact on families, businesses and rural communities. “We are supportive of any effort to help farmers understand the risks of working in and around farm vehicles. “Many farmers now accept they can take simple steps to improve safety around vehicles and reduce the chances of an accident occurring such as overturning, crushing or collisions with others. “Since 2015, more than 4000 farmers have attended our B+LNZ Farm Management

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Safety workshops and vehicle safety is always a key area of interest.” B+LNZ is also committed to working with WorkSafe to look at developing safer ways of working with vehicles and machinery, Harrison said. Federated Farmers president Katie Milne also weighed in, pointing out that every time a vehicle was involved in farm work, there was an elevated level of risk. “Because vehicles are part of everyday farm work but the numbers show that they are the biggest risk to our safety, and the safety of our staff and family, so it’s crucially important we don’t get complacent or lose focus. “In particular - know where the risky parts of the farm

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Bigger, Stronger Buildings! with no knee or apex braces! are in terms of steep country or country that can get more dangerous depending on the weather. A short amount of time spent planning for risky situations can make the job a lot easier and more efficient, as well as safer. “Because vehicles are such a big part of farming, not only do we need to be aware of the risk but we have to focus on forming good habits right from the very start. So farmers should really focus on good training and competency. Make sure your staff or family are competent using the vehicles they will be using on the farm, before they set out on a job.” Al McCone, WorkSafe’s sector lead for agriculture, said farmers need to always consider if their vehicle is the right one for the job. Using the safety mechanisms provided with those vehicles is also essential. “Operator protective devices and the use of seat belts in vehicles are two key areas farmers can reduce the likelihood of an accident occurring. “Among front seat passengers and drivers, seat belts reduce the risk of death by 45 per cent and the risk of serious injury by 50 per cent. People not wearing a seatbelt are 30 times more likely to be ejected from a vehicle during a crash. “While rollover protection has contributed to a decrease in fatal injuries, most of the recent tractor fatalities could have been prevented by the driver wearing the seat belt. “This focus isn’t about telling farmers how to farm but helping them make the right decisions when using vehicles, so they can go home to their families safe and well at the end of every day.” Julie Dee, whose husband Paul died in an ATV side-by-side rollover

close to their Waihao Downs home, near Waimate last year, supports the greater focus on vehicles. “Accidents can happen at any time and to anyone and when things go wrong they escalate quickly and can result in death. “Getting some basic safety procedures in place for every trip can make the difference and save lives in that one time in a million when the unexpected occurs. “Lives are lost on small margin mistakes and can be saved also by making small changes. Wearing seat belts in all vehicles on farm that have them fitted are a very good step in the right direction for getting every member of the farming team, including the boss, home safely every day. “This change in seatbelt culture on farm will not happen unless a change of thinking in our culture occurs and farm bosses step up in their responsibilities and expectations for their farm. Changing the concept or wearing a seat belt on farm from one of annoyance to one of feeling they are ensuring they get home safely is key. “The unforeseen might not happen on their patch - but if it was to happen, if a seat belt culture has already been established, it might just save a life.” Tony Watson of the Agricultural Leaders’ Health and Safety Action Group, agreed. “It’s clear that vehicles are a critical risk. Farmers need to check that they and their people are doing everything they can to minimise the chance of things going wrong. “Farmers should be asking: ‘What could go wrong? What am I doing about it? Is it enough?”

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Farming

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BULL SALES FEATURE

Five steps to finding the best bull for The decision you make about which bull to buy this season will affect your business for four cow generations, so taking 10 minutes to read this now should yield you an exceptional return. Step one: what do you want to achieve on your farm? There are two parts to this question. First, what is your high level farm operational goal? Maybe it’s to increase kilograms of carcase per hectare? Or to be at minimal stock numbers by December 1, as a drought management strategy? Secondly, with an eye on that broad objective, what performance do you need from your beef animals to help achieve your big picture goal? This will help you identify your “beef breeding objective”. For example, “I need minimal stock numbers going into winter. Therefore, I want calves that will grow quickly, so I can quit them at weaning.” Step two: Mindful of your beef breeding objective, find a bull breeder who focuses on similar breeding objectives to what you are looking for. Because you want to make progress towards your operational farm goal,

ask the breeder for genetic trend graphs and percentile band tables for the breed. These will show whether the breeder is improving in the traits you want to change and where their bulls rate for traits you want to “hold” (e.g. if you are happy with your mature cow weight and you want it left unchanged). The genetic trend graphs should show a positive upward trend for the traits that impact on your goals. If not, look for another breeder. Step three: choose the bull that will do the job for your operation. First up, you need to identify which “traits” are important to you. There are 20 traits for which bulls are rated (based on what they will pass on to their offspring) by the genetic evaluation Breedplan. So, if you want to increase the weight of your calves at weaning, then you’ll need to look closely at a bull’s “200 day weight” trait. Genetic merit for traits is communicated as a number, called an “estimated breeding value” (EBV). EBVs are in units relevant to the trait (e.g. 200 day weight is in kilograms, while gestation length is in days). By concentrating on the EBVs that are relevant to the trait/s that you are interested in, you can readily see

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Figure 1: Comparing a bull’s EBVs with breed averages:

Figure 2: Breed percentiles table (with the example bull’s EBVs highlighted):

which bull on offer is strongest in a particular trait and will therefore help you reach your goals more quickly. You can compare “your bull” to a breed average, which gives you a feel for how he rates for that trait, relative to other bulls of that breed. You do this by using the breed averages that are always published below the EBVs for “your bull”(figure 1). You can get a better feel for how your bull compares to other bulls of the breed by using a percentile bands table. It will tell you if you bull is a standout, or more middle of the road. The Breed Percentiles Table makes this super simple (figure 2). What’s the story with our example bull? He’s in the top 95 per cent (i.e. only 5 per cent are more lowly rates) of the breed for gestation length, with an EBV of -0.3 days – telling us he will leave daughters with an extended gestation.

He’s also in the top 90 per cent (i.e. bottom 10 per cent) for birth weight, so his calves will be born heavy, and this will likely be exaggerated further by his long gestation length (a longer time in utero results in a larger calf at birth). His milk EBV is strong, as are his 200, 400 and 600 day weight figures. Also consider his heavy mature cow weight EBV (top 10 per cent of the breed). In a nutshell, this bull would wean heavy calves and his daughters would be exceptional milkers. However, they will be large cows to feed and will more than likely need calving assistance. Good milking cows that put a lot of their energy towards lactation may struggle to get back in calf as they have little energy left to cycle. A bull like this would fit well into a farming system that did not keep replacements, where all progeny were processed.




BULL SALES FEATURE

17

your operation Figure 3: EBV graph for the example bull:

annUal BUll sale Friday 15th June 2018 11am tHe gRampians 420 Cascade Rd, Culverden north Canterbury

The decision you make about which bull to buy this season will affect your business for four cow generations

Another useful tool is the EBV graph, (figure 3) which shows relative genetic merit at a glance. Basically, you want a bull to have bars towards the right hand side of the graph for the traits you care about. Most simple to use is a bull’s selection index. Indexes identify “overall profitability” and weigh up the balance of genetic merit across all the traits for a particular production system. It’s a single figure and presented as a dollar value, so it takes the confusion out of using lots of EBVs with a range of different units. Some breeds have a range of indexes targeted at different markets, according to the traits of key importance in those markets. The example bull has an index value of $149, putting him in the top 15 per cent of his breed for overall profitability in that market and production system. However, this bull may not score as well on a different index, because of EBV make-up. NB: if you are focused on making progress in a particular trait, it’s worth taking the time to dig down into the EBV level of detail, rather than just using the index figure. Step four: check your bull over for sexual and structural soundness.

Figure 4: The Beef Class Structural Assessment (BCSA)

BUll Walk selling agents

The Grampians May 24th Rural livestock 9 – 4pm Cody Clark 0274 730 902 Hazlett Rural livestock Travis Dalzell 027 202 0196 No matter how good a bull’s index and EBVs are, if he can’t serve a cow then he can’t pass on his genetics. The Beef Class Structural Assessment (BCSA) system (figure 4) is a good objective way to make your assessment. Step five: welcome your bull home. Take the time to settle your bull into his new home and book him in with the vet for an annual pre-mating Bull Breeding Soundness Evaluation (BBSE). Information kindly supplied by Beef + Lamb New Zealand Genetics

COntaCt Us @

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18

Farming

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It’s time to rethink the plastic waste Plastics recycling has always been mediocre at best and cannot keep pace with the explosion of plastics on the market — and it never will. As recyclers come to terms with China’s National Sword policy and search for new recycling markets, the situation is being made all the worse by those capitalising on the downturn and using it as an excuse to say that recycling has failed. While there is no doubt that China’s actions have upended the recycling industry’s “business as usual”, there’s something bigger bubbling to the surface: a watershed moment on the future of “junk” plastics. The real problem isn’t China. The real problem is that the prolific, ever-increasing production of plastics is choking our planet, our oceans and our bodies. Recyclers did not create the plastic waste crisis — the plastics industry did, and it’s time we said enough is enough. We, as the recycling industry, need to be honest: plastics recycling cannot

Sheryl Stivens

ECO EFFICIENCY

keep pace with the explosion of plastics on the market — and it never will. The use of plastics has increased 20-fold in the past 50 years, yet only 9 per cent of plastics made since 1950 have been recycled. Most of those plastics that were recycled were down-cycled into lower-grade, single-use products rather than kept in a continuous loop. Yet recyclers now find themselves on the frontlines of this international crisis. As an initial response, we need to rapidly develop stronger domestic markets for plastics recycling and more expansive education programmes to reduce contamination. We also really need to stop the onslaught of plastic waste

by first acknowledging that recycling alone cannot solve the problem. Then, we need a meaningful dialogue with all stakeholders, including the plastics industry, about how and when plastics do or don’t fit into the circular economy of the 21st century.

The real problems with plastic

Plastics play a valuable role and have led to many advancements in medicine, technology and transportation. However, the gravity of the environmental, health and

climate problems from the explosion of plastics in just half a century demonstrates that we can no longer turn a blind eye to the challenges they’re creating. Here’s a samples of the staggering problems unfolding worldwide:

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problem cent today. Only about 50 per cent of plastics could be recovered using the best systems available today. Manufacturers continue to churn out countless plastics without creating end markets for recycling or reuse. Simply put, if the images of turtles choking on plastic bags and remote islands covered with plastic litter don’t turn your stomach now, just wait — it’s only going to get worse if we don’t change course soon.

Vision for the future: 50-30-20

The United Nations has called plastic pollution in the oceans a “planetary crisis”. The amount of plastics in the oceans is projected to outnumber fish by 2050 (by weight). The equivalent of one garbage truck full of plastic is

dumped into our oceans every single minute, more than 8 million metric tons per year. Nearly one-third of plastics produced end up in our oceans, in our soil or as litter because they are not captured by collection systems. Plastics production is

We as recyclers and consumers need to coalesce on a vision and platform for change so we’re not just fighting against junk plastics, but organising around a concrete game plan toward a better future. One suggestion is that we start building from the New Plastics Economy vision put forth from the Ellen MacArthur Foundation. Ellen MacArthur has quickly become a leading global advocate for the circular economy and its

expected to double in the next 20 years and nearly quadruple by 2050. Ninety per cent of plastics are made from non-renewable fossil fuels. By 2050, 20 per cent of oil production will be used to make plastics, up from 6 per

environmental and financial benefits. Its 2017 report, “The New Plastics Economy: Rethinking the Future of Plastics & Catalysing Action” doesn’t mince words on the idea that plastics don’t fit into a circular economy, stating, “Without fundamental redesign and innovation, about 30 per cent of plastic packaging will never be reused or recycled.” This includes plastic straws, caps and multimaterial packaging. The point is that it’s time to change. We need a new path that doesn’t accept the projected onslaught of plastic waste as a given. Recyclers have the spotlight now but consumers also have a part to play. Let’s make this a turning point and use our power and our voice to reframe the discussion and create a future that better serves our health, our economies and the rest of the planet. If you would like help with getting your farm waste and recycling systems in place, contact Deidre Nuttall, phone 0275 490 904, email Deidre. nuttall@envirowaste.co.nz

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Farming

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Broom gall mite making an impact Weeds are a major headache for farmers and managers of conservation land alike. Broom is one of the worst ones – it is vigorous, it can withstand wet conditions and drought, it can invade riverbeds, scree and other Mary FOREST low-nutrient sites and once Ralston AND BIRD established, it will seed prolifically and that seed can of the Canterbury Broom last for decades in the soil. Group. After a rigorous The cost of control with process of checking that it herbicides is enormous and would not attack other plants spraying often has collateral or displace native insects, it damage – native species such was approved for release in as matagouri are often killed 2008. Landcare distributed the as well. Another issue is that broom, mite to regional councils, the Department of Conservation unlike gorse, tolerates shady and other groups and it has conditions so can establish A close-up of the galls seen on broom bushes. PHOTO SUPPLIED established well in Canterbury amongst native forest and and Southland. exotic timber plantations, The tiny mite’s presence can Many generations of the naturally dispersing on the making control especially be seen by the formation of mites live together in the galls, wind. They have also been difficult. galls on the host plant. They which protect the insects from deliberately moved – in one Biological control offers are about 1-2cm in diameter, predation. area by the simple method of great potential for the longwhitish in colour and at first The overall vigour of the throwing stems of infected term control of this difficult glance, they look like small broom is reduced by the mites, broom out the window of weed. Of the several different there is less flowering, stunted a helicopter on to broominsects that have been released, white flowers on the stems of the broom. growth and even death of the the broom gall mite seems to invaded riverbed. Landowners The mites over-winter in be making the most impact. whole plant. The effectiveness could easily do some DIY This tiny insect was brought the stems and then come out of the mites is improved in hot biological control by collecting to feed on the new shoots in MM into the country Landcare droughty summers. some broom that had the galls METAREX 1/2 by PAGE GUARDIAN FARMING 250W X 180H Research in 2006 on behalf spring and form the galls. The mites seem to be on them and placing them in

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patches of uninfected broom on their farms. Biological control is a longterm approach and, for many places, it will still be better to use herbicide. Biocontrol definitely has a role where there is a mix of native vegetation and broom – mites could be employed on broom control without any risk to native vegetation. Landcare Research is working on promising leads for the biocontrol of other problem weeds, including a mite that controls old man’s beard and a rust for Chilean needle grass. The green thistle beetle is very successful at the control of Californian thistles and has mixed results on nodding thistles. Control of ragwort with a biocontrol agent has also progressed well. So although there have been biocontrol disasters in the past (eg stoats introduced to control rabbits), it seems this form of weed and pest control, when done with care and after a lot of research, has much to offer.


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Farming

FARM SHEDS FEATURE

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Things to consider when choosing a shed Why choose a steel framed building? Using steel to create the frame of the building results in a building that is exceptionally stable. Steel is a superior construction material and the proper use of steel will produce a building frame that exceeds all building codes.Out of all the possible building materials, steel has the highest strength to weight ratio, resulting in a building frame that will not warp or crack. It is also resistant to weather related expansion and contraction, which helps ensure that the materials used to create the rest of the building will not crack or buckle. Steel is also lighter than other types of framing materials making it easier to use.

Why should I choose a “ProShed” building? Quite simply for the quality. While you may pay a little extra you will receive the strongest steel shed, quality roller doors, aluminium opening windows, the best fittings, clear roof span up to 24m wide, heights up to 7m, and a shed tailored to your needs - not an “off the shelf ” standard model. ProShed are qualified registered builders with over 50 years’ experience in the building trade in the South Island.

What size shed can I build?

With our modern “Multibuild” software we design your shed to meet your requirements. Our designs are not based on a modular system - each shed is custom built with the ability to make adjustments in 10mm increments. Your order goes electronically to the factory where the components are cut to size.

Can I change the way my shed looks? With ProShed your shed is built to meet your requirements. There are different cladding options, roof angles, and a variety of doors and windows available. Colorsteel has 24 different colours, or you can choose unpainted “Zincalume”.

How long will it take to build? Once you have your building consent from the local council

we can soon start on your floor (weather permitting) and shortly after that on your shed. You will be amazed how quickly the steel portals and walls are erected. Our expert local builders have the experience and knowledge to build you a shed to be proud of.

How do I obtain my building consent from the council? We normally obtain the consent for you. The “Multibuild” software prints all the drawings, plans, and technical information the council needs. All you supply are the details of your legal title, and we meet with you on site to prepare a site plan. Our shed designs meet all the requirements of the local building code.

What will my shed look like, and what is it built from? Our “Multibuild” software prepares a layout plan for you showing how your shed looks, with doors and other features, and a specification sheet showing all the material sizes, bracing, and engineer approved technical data. We use .40 gauge steel cladding or both roof and walls or .55 gauge if you prefer it. You can have a schedule of every component! It is all free of charge with your quote.

Do we lay the floor too? Yes, we normally prepare and lay the concrete footings

and floor. We use 20MPa concrete for strength and finish, polythene underneath, steel mesh, steel rod in the footings and construction cuts to minimise cracking to the floor.

Can I buy a kitset? We are happy to provide you with a kit – they are straightforward to erect with our plans, manual, dvd, and our advice. Delivery takes about four weeks with everything you need included in the kitset.

Can I have a sleepout or live in part of my shed? We will install building paper and thermal break materials in the walls and roof as we construct the shed. You can then line the shed and we can advise on the most suitable material and methods to comply with council rules.

What will my shed cost? Our sheds are reasonably priced, for the quality you receive. The software calculates the exact price. We will provide an estimate at no charge and a full quote after meeting you on site.

How does a steel shed compare in price to a wooden frame shed? In smaller buildings timber may have a price advantage, but as the shed size increases,

especially the span, steel becomes more cost effective and can work out cheaper. There does become a point where timber is uneconomic to use.The numerous advantages of using steel for the building frame greatly outweigh any

additional cost. The increased stability of the building will save the owner money over time, off-setting any extra construction costs. Information kindly supplied by ProShed


There is no better shed than a ProShed. Residential, rural, industrial, garages and workshops - ProShed customises the right design to suit your kiwi lifestyle. Kit only or full build option. All ProShed buildings’ meet the NZ Building Code requiring a 50-year durability statement, 50-year structural guarantee and 10-year workmanship guarantee.

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STEEL STRUCTURES THE FUTURE OF RURAL NZ The opportunity to build bigger, better steel frame buildings is fuelling increased productivity throughout rural New Zealand. “The process often begins when a farm or business reaches its capacity and needs to create a custom-designed building that allows a greater, more simplified workflow,” says Heather Harding, General Manager, Coresteel Buildings South Canterbury. Coresteel Buildings has constructed significant rural buildings throughout New Zealand. The company’s premium design features have proven successful for bulk storage facilities including kumara, potato, onion and seed storage warehouses. Fertiliser bulk stores have also been a success, with specialised designs tailored to the corrosive environments.

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- Save time and money by utilising farm saved seed

Synlait managing director and chief executive John Penno says the Canterbury company is building its lactoferrin business with long-term growth in mind. PHOTO SUPPLIED 

Synlait to double lactoferrin capacity Synlait Milk has secured a multiyear lactoferrin supply agreement that will underwrite an investment of approximately $18 million to double lactoferrin manufacturing capacity at Synlait Dunsandel. “Lactoferrin is a high value, specialty ingredient used in a range of nutritional food products around the world. This agreement is a major step forward for our growing lactoferrin business and delivers to our strategic commitments,” John Penno, managing director and CEO says. Lactoferrin is an iron-binding protein recognised for its antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties. As a naturally occurring milk protein, it is commonly used in infant formula products throughout the world. “We’re deliberately building our lactoferrin business with stable, longterm growth in mind. This agreement is a major step forward in this direction and continues to build our credibility as a producer of specialty dairy nutrition ingredients to worldleading nutritional companies,” Penno said. “Our investment decision to double our lactoferrin manufacturing capacity is underpinned by three factors: a strengthening global market for lactoferrin, growing internal demand for our own infant formula manufacture and a secure portfolio of reputable lactoferrin customers,” he said. Synlait observed in their FY18

interim results that a demand and supply imbalance is driving global strengthening of lactoferrin prices and demand is notably driven from increasing use of lactoferrin in infant formula, particularly in China. The expansion to Synlait’s lactoferrin facility is expected to be completed by October 2018. “As a specialty ingredient, lactoferrin commands a much higher price per metric tonne than many other dairy-based ingredients. This is because of its unique functional properties, as well as the complexity of production processes,” said Dr Elizabeth Reid, group category manager. Reid said Synlait’s unique production processes, experience making lactoferrin and access to a range of laboratory and technical expertise makes them one of the few producers in the world offering reliable access to significant quantities of infant nutrition-grade lactoferrin. “It’s a coveted position we’ve worked towards since we started producing lactoferrin in 2014. Our growing customer base use lactoferrin in a range of products from health supplements to infant formula,” she said. In April 2017 Synlait became the second company in the world to receive a GRAS (Generally Recognised As Safe) notice from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to export its lactoferrin to the United States for use in infant formula and toddler formula.

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26

Farming

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How laminitis episodes happen The current weather over much of New Zealand with lots of rain followed by hot dry days creates the ideal conditions for laminitis. Very potent grass shoots and clover spring out of the ground overnight. Many people are caught unawares. Here is a list of scenarios which lead to laminitis episodes. We too have made many of these fatal mistakes over the years, suffering the painful learning curve before learning how to be proactive and focus on prevention! Avoid these common errors/ scenarios which lead to laminitis episodes: • Thinking that any grass is good grass for horses and having no idea about the potentially disastrous effect that changes (in the grass) can have on their metabolism. All grass is not equal, it varies from property to property and its nutritional profile depends on many factors including the soil it grows in, the time of the year and the weather • Not eliminating legumes

Jenny Paterson

BSC ZOOLOGY AND BIOLOGY

like lucerne and clover and other broad-leaf plants like plantain • Grazing dairy or other rich, lush pasture • Not nurturing the flora in the hind-gut with a constant supply of suitable high fibre forage • Applying fertilisers in order to increase yield • Overgrazing so the grass is short all the time, thinking horses on Jenny Craig paddocks will lose weight. • Not having access to a dry lot option to enable the customising of grass intake according to individual requirements. This could be because grazing is rented. • Focusing solely on sugars in the grass instead of

also addressing mineral imbalances which includes being mindful of potassium intake and adding salt to feeds rather than relying on salt licks • Going on holiday and leaving in charge someone else who feels sorry for your horse in his dry lot and lets

• Missing the early warning signs: walking stiffly/ slowly, tender footed on hard ground, shifting weight from foot to foot, crest of neck goes rock hard, and not getting them off the grass soon enough • Being pulled in different directions by conflicting

him out onto the grass • Meaning to give him only half an hour but for one reason or another he ends up being out for several hours • Failing to understand how incredibly quickly laminitis can happen! (overnight in some cases)

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information • Not having any kind of pasture management strategy for the long-term, eg keeping more mature grass ahead of your horse. • Irrigating the short grass to keep it green • Confining horses and ponies to small yards or areas

depriving them of any movement • A hard trim – we all tend to trust our farriers and hoof trimmers, however it is unbelievable how many times a horse is put in even more pain because he was trimmed too hard, before, during or after a laminitis

27

episode. • Not providing vital minerals, vitamins and amino acids to horses with laminitis to facilitate repair of the damaged tissue and promote new, quality hoof growth. These are noncalorie nutrients without sugars or potassium.

The hooves in the pictures belong to a pony who had serious laminitis. The before picture (left) was taken when he first came under our care and was very sore. The after picture (centre) shows his hooves now. He has been fed the Premium MVA for about six months. The last picture is of him (right) (the bay) – completely sound on very hard ground! PHOTOS SUPPLIED 


28

Farming

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Don’t be a fool this April The recent spell of warm and dry weather has been welcome for final harvest and crop growth. However, it has also meant there is a need to consider a “final” irrigation (or two). Although I began to write this article on April Fools’ Day I did not intend to pull some practical joke or to spread a hoax. Nor encourage you to become an April fool. And it would not be practical for this publication to report a fake story, especially given it wouldn’t be printed for days after April 1. All joking aside our weather over the last two-to-three weeks has been mild and dry (other than the night the Crusaders played the Bulls). So irrigation - is it worth it? The decision needs to consider: • soil moisture deficit; • water use by crops and/or pasture; • soil temperature; and

Tony Davoren

HYDRO SERVICES

• growth rates. As of April 3, all the above considerations “tick the box” for an irrigation to be considered. The boxes “tick” deficit nearing stress, water use what is expected, soil temperature 4-5 degrees above base temperature and still good growth rates forecast. On this farm a 1012mm irrigation around April 7-8 would be beneficial and economic.

(Right top) Tick box #1 and 2 – deficit 30mm and water use 1.6mm/day.

(Right middle) Tick box #3 – soil temperature ~14.5 degrees C at 9am. (Right bottom) Tick box #4 – pasture growth 30-35kg DM/ha/day. PHOTOS SUPPLIED


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29

Of bovis, bulls and cricket balls What a month it has been. We have had the results of the milk testing for mycoplasma bovis that all dairy farmers participated in and most of the farmers in Mid Canterbury are wearing relieved smiles. It is good to hear that our Ministry of Primary Industries believes that it may still be possible to eradicate the disease but it is going to be a very sad and challenging time for those of our farmers who are going to have their cows killed. It is concerning however how a disease can suddenly appear from out of the blue. It is another reminder of how vulnerable we are to imported challenges. We may be a small country away down in the South Pacific but in this modern world of fast travel the risks are still there. On one hand we are all for increasing tourism and increasing the number of visitors to New Zealand, but on the other hand the rapid increase in numbers creates biosecurity risks and puts all sorts of pressure on our facilities and the environment.

Rodger Letham

PROPERTY BROKERS

Our border controls and inspection facilities must be of the very highest quality. One other recent major talking point is the ball tampering incident involving the Australian cricket team. Reaction has been swift and widespread and punishments have been handed out by Australian cricket authorities. So what to say about it? Some have said it couldn’t have happened to a nicer team. Some have said too much has been made of it, as ball tampering of various degrees has been going on for years. In this case however it is my opinion that it was a deliberate planned action designed to result in an unfair advantage. On top of that it appears that

senior members of the team persuaded a younger member of the team to actually do the deed. Whatever the truth of the matter we may never know all the details. Oh how the mighty have fallen. We should though have some compassion for those involved. Warner and Smith

in particular. Yes, they broke the law. Yes, the punishment has been swift and they have fallen from grace. Yes, they as relatively young men have made a big and terrible mistake but perhaps we should be mindful of the mistakes we have made in the heat of the moment when the pressures

were great and desires were high. There have been greater men than them make big mistakes. Having said that though, I got the distinct impression that the tears and apologies had been carefully scripted by the PR department and that the culprits were sorry they had got caught rather than apologising for cheating. Because that’s what it was - blatant, arrogant cheating and they will be labelled cheats for the rest of their lives. The underarm bowling incident pales into insignificance. It makes a travesty of sportsmanship and particularly in a game that has the tradition of gentlemanly sportsmanship where to play up and play the game was more important than winning or losing. However life will go on. We will continue to go to work, go to school, get on with our lives and our businesses until the next sensation arrives. It has been a pleasant and peaceful Easter, so let’s enjoy this season of mists and mellow fruitfulness while we can.

South Island Rural Team at Property Brokers Rural Conference Palmerston North 2018. Absent; Rodger Letham, Jude Livingstone, Michael Robb

WE DON’T JUST SAY TEAM. WE GUARANTEE IT.

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Hastings McLeod Ltd / Buller Real Estate Ltd / EV Arthur Ltd Licensed REAA 2008 Rangiora 03 313 8022 Ashburton 03 307 9176 Rolleston 03 929 0306 Darfield 03 929 0306 Timaru 03 687 7166 Oamaru 03 434 3347 Westport 03 789 8777 Greymouth 03 768 7145

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Farming

30

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Hunting licences on sale A good duck breeding season in many parts of the country is holding the promise of a good gamebird hunting season. Licences allow people to hunt waterfowl and upland gamebirds from the first weekend in May (Saturday, May 5) to the last weekend in August. Fish & Game New Zealand’s chief executive Martin Taylor said the start of the gamebird season is eagerly awaited by keen hunters. “Hunting remains a well-established and popular tradition in New Zealand and very much part of the Kiwi way of life. “People value the opportunity to harvest gamebirds for the dinner table and feed their families and friends,” Taylor said. “Free range game meat is a healthy and tasty addition to anyone’s diet as the birds have grown up in the wild without chemical additives,” he said, adding that gamebird hunting remains popular. “Every year, upwards of 40 thousand people buy licences to go gamebird hunting. “On top of that, landowners and some members of their family can

Game meat is ... healthy and tasty

hunt on their own properties without a licence, so the actual number of hunters is bigger than licence sales indicate.” He said the environment also benefits from the sale of gamebird licences. “All hunting licences are required to have a gamebird habitat stamp on them to be valid. The money raised from the sale of these stamps is used to enhance wetlands and other environments. “It is not only gamebirds which benefit – native species also benefit from Fish & Game’s active efforts to protect our wild places, especially wetlands,” he said. And he is urging non-hunters to also buy a habitat stamp. “You don’t have to be a hunter to buy a habitat stamp, which will help the environment – anyone can go and buy one and do their bit to protect vital wetlands.”

Flying high Malcolm has been flying since 1992 and 99 per cent of his flying has been mountain flying, both in the fixed wing or helicopter. Having flown for his father in a Hughes 500 and a MD Notar for several years, he recently purchased Station Air Ltd and a MD Notar. Station Air Ltd is based at Mesopotamia Station providing the closest access to the prime DOC blocks in and around the Rangitata River headwaters for thar hunting. Station Air can provide access for hunters to Crooked Spur, Potts Hut, Growler through to Mistake Flat, St Winifreds and McCoy. As well as Forest Creek, Camp Creek and

Carney’s. They also do flights for fly camping on the West Coast for chamois or the Lyall Hut in the Rakaia catchment. For fly camping, Malcolm’s local knowledge of animal movements puts hunters in great stead for a top hunt. The helicopter is perfect for scenic flights in some of New Zealand’s pristine scenery bordering the Southern Alps. Easily located for pickup and drop-off for trampers, and hunters alike and for those wanting to make the most memorable occasions such has proposals and wedding photos. 

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Based at Mesopotamia Station, the helicopter is ideally located for pick-up and drop-offs to DOC huts and hunting blocks or prime fishing areas in the upper reaches of the Rangitata region. Telephone: Sue or Malcolm on 03 696 3738 or email: mesopotamia@ruralnet.co.nz


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31

Strong demand for calves

PGG Wrightson Livestock Auctioneers Greg Cook and John Farrell look for bids at the Mt Arrowsmith calf sale.

PHOTO SUPPLIED

Mount Arrowsmith Station held its second on-farm calf sale last Tuesday. PGG Wrightson livestock auctioneer John Farrell said there were 210 angus calves – 133 steers and 77 heifers – on offer. “Mt Arrowsmith Station is located up the Ashburton Gorge and there has been a good supply of feed this year, which has provided ideal growing conditions for their stock. “As a result, they presented well-bred calves in top condition at their sale.” Farrell said the calves averaged around $1000 a head across steers and heifers. The 133 steers averaged $4.45 per kg liveweight and the 77 heifers averaged $4.20 per kg LW. He said the average weight over the calves was up 20kg on last year’s sale. Buyers came from throughout Mid Canterbury and North Canterbury.”

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John Deere 6820 Premium 6274 Hrs

$38,000 + GST

Case IH MXU115

6400Hrs C/W Pearson 20-43 Loader

$35,000 + GST

Case IH MXU100

John Deere 6220 Loader ready

$44,000 + GST

Case IH MXU115 X Pro

New Holland T7.170

$39,000 + GST

$69,000 + GST

Giltrap Slurry Spreader

Claas Quadrant 3400

$8,000 + GST

Pottinger 1252 C S Line Four Rotor Rake

$49,000 + GST

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Case IH MXU115X

Case IH Maxxum 115 MC

Case IH MXM 120

Case IH MXU115

6113 Hrs

Amazone ZAM SBS Spreader

$32,000+GST

$116,000 + GST

$POA

Kuhn VBP2190 17000 bales

C/W Pearson 20-39 Loader

4975 Hrs

5250 Hrs

$68,000 + GST

$33,000 + GST

Same Explorer 85

Same Silver 90

Massey Ferguson 4270

$24,000 + GST

$25,000 + GST

$49,000 + GST

New Holland T7040

$29,500 + GST

Case IH CVX130

5100 Hrs

$34,000 + GST

ROPS c/w MX Loader 5280 Hrs

12,000Ltrs

John Deere 6610SE

6000 Hrs

6400Hrs, C/W Pearson, 20-43 Loader

8100Hrs, C/W Pearson, 20-39 Loader & Silage Grab $32,000 +GST

$64,500 + GST

John Deere 7230R

4,800Hrs

New Holland TL100A 7360Hrs

$35,000+GST

Case IH 6088

1500 Mill Hrs 24ft Vario Front

$POA

McHale 998 Bale Wrapper

C/W Sigma Loader

$34,000 + GST

Case IH 8010 Axial Flow

Case IH 8575 3’ x 3’

Case IH 1680 Axial Flow

Case IH 2188

Simba SL500 DTD

Sam Ag Trailer

$250,000 + GST

$45,000 + GST

$17,000 + GST

$105,000+GST

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$75,000 + GST

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5mtr Disc Tine Cultivator

Kuhn PH2 6 Row Planter

McIntosh CP900SF

Amazone Cirrus 4001

Goweil G3020Q

$22,000 + GST

$40,000 + GST

$25,000 + GST

$25,000 + GST

Silage Wagon

$59,000 + GST

Super 4 mtr Drill c/w Rear Rollers

For more information, or to view any of our tractors, contact: Ashburton 03 307 8027 Amberley 03 314 9055 Leeston 03 324 3791 Timaru 03 688 2179 www.cochranes.net.nz

Profi Bale Wrapper

Guardian Farming - April 2018  
Guardian Farming - April 2018