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Ashbury News Fall 2016

125 years in the nation’s capital 125 ans dans la capitale nationale

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125TH YEAR

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Homecoming

2016

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Alumni

Profiles

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Ashbury

Travels


Table of Contents

Ashbury News Fall 2016 Ashbury News is published twice a year and sent to over 3,800 alumni, parents and friends.

News & Notes

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Ashbury News is printed on 35% recycled paper. Online magazine updates are available at ashbury.ca Please submit news, story ideas, alumni updates, and any address changes to:

From the Head of School 6

Born Again in Canada

Ashbury College Communications Office 362 Mariposa Avenue Ottawa, ON K1M 0T3 communications@ashbury.ca Phone: 613.749.5954

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Springfest

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Front cover: This birds-eye view of our campus shows how much the school has grown since 1891. Inside front cover: These commemorative banners were installed on street poles around the campus, and neighbouring Rockcliffe and New Edinburgh to celebrate our milestone year.

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Closings 2016

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Volunteer Recognition

Feature Articles

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Back cover: A student enjoys a fall day on campus with a good book.

A Feather in his Cap

Design and layout by AN Design Communications

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Connect with us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram!

Steering Towards Sustainability

@ashburycollege 27

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Hashtag Success

Ashbury Alumni

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Reunions

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MOVING? Update your address. alumni@ashbury.ca

Homecoming 18

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Travels

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Chatter

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In Memoriam

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NEWS & NOTES

125TH YEAR

Head of School

From the

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s we near the end of our 125th anniversary year, I am struck by a common theme running throughout our history: leadership. For more than a century, Ashbury has nurtured, prepared and launched leaders who are ready to take on the world. You will read about some of our leaders in this issue, including those who have made their marks in their respective fields. There are, of course, many more leadership examples than we have pages available, but know that we are proud of each and every one of our graduates—wherever they may be around the globe. Much of this fall at Ashbury has been spent looking back. We had many visitors for our Homecoming activities, and I was fortunate to hear wonderful memories of time spent on campus. It seems that no matter how brief the Ashbury experience is for our students—whether a few grades, or as a ‘lifer’—the school leaves a lasting impression on its students, faculty and families. Ashburians are indeed part of a unique alumni network worldwide and this gets reflected in some of the gatherings that happen formally, through our Advancement office, or informally, among old friends. We have active alumni groups across Canada, key U.S. and Mexican centres, Europe, Africa and Asia, and we are always delighted to see so many graduates return to Ashbury. Sir Michael Marshall (Ashbur y ’40–’42) recently travelled from Cambridge, England to attend our celebratory Homecoming. He encountered several AshburyCambridge dual alumni during his visit, which further spoke to the many Ashburians who share a university as an alma mater in Canada, or abroad. Another of our oldest alumni received honours at our 125th banquet with an induction into Ashbury’s Wall of Honour. Dai Vernon ’13 (that’s 1913), former captain of the Ashbury hockey team, was known as the only person to have fooled Houdini and had an internationally-respected career in magic. His legacy was presented to the school community by David Ben who noted that he was “not just the most influential magician of the 20th century, but also

Four Ashbury Headmasters gathered to celebrate the school’s 125th anniversary in September. From left to right: Norman Southward, 2014 to present, Tam Matthews, 2001–2013, Roy Napier, 1986–2000, Tony Macoun, 1981–1986.

perhaps the most influential magician in the 2000-year history of magic as a performing art.” Of course we are also grateful for the lens that Stephen Woollcombe ’57 provided us on the history of his grandfather and A s h b u r y ’s founder, G.P. Woollcombe, with his new book, The Life and Times of George Penrose Wo o l l c o m b e : Educator. The personal link from grandfather to grandson is unique and has brought us closer to our increasingly distant past. Disséminés aujourd’hui aux quatre coins du monde, nos anciens élèves constituent un réseau amical et professionnel dans lequel chacun prend plaisir partage ses expériences. Je vous invite à rejoindre et à étendre le réseau actif des anciens et anciennes élèves d’Ashbury College! Our future is built on a proud history and I encourage you to stay connected to an impressive alumni network of Ashburians. Probitas, Comitas, Virtus, Norman Southward Head of School

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It seems that no matter how brief the Ashbury experience is for our students— whether a few grades, or as a ‘lifer’—the school leaves a lasting impression on its students, faculty and families.


NEWS & NOTES

visual identity

A new

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shbury has new look to coincide with its milestone anniversary. Several months in the making, Ashbury officially unveiled its refreshed brand in September. The rebranding project was part of an effort to update the school’s corporate identity, and to streamline consistency  in the look and feel of everything from letterhead and uniforms to athletic wear and business cards. The brand refresh helps us continue our compelling visual identity informed by research and community engagement. Ashbury partnered with Alphabet Creative, an Ottawa design agency, to create both the revised collection of logos and a set of guidelines to help steer their use. “Our biggest challenge was maintaining the elements of integrity and decorum of a long-standing, well-respected educational institution, while modernizing its visual identity to appeal to a contemporary audience,” says Tony Lyons, president and creative director at Alphabet. “We had to be respectful of that history while also being an agent of change to help the school revitalize and standardize its graphics materials. The changes are not radical, but they are significant, and they enable a more consistent output of design materials.”

The new logo is not vastly different from the previous iteration, but features a crest with a rounded top, and lettering that mimics the angles on the chevron. The traditional Ashbury burgundy also received a facelift, replaced with a brighter tone incorporating more red elements. As well, the ribbon holding the school motto were refined, making both easier to read, and the lion was re-imagined to make for easier reproduction, particularly in embroidered applications, such as on clothing. Consultation with school leadership and a series of stakeholder engagement meetings provided the design firm with a better understanding of the environment at Ashbury, its core values, and the various avenues in which the brand is used. These conversations evolved into an adaptable portfolio of school logos conceived for different uses and applications. “Our goal when delivering any brand identity system is to create a logical and modular platform that can be used easily and consistently over time,” says Lyons. “Success in our mind is a brand identity system that is an evolution of Ashbury’s historic brand, while giving a nod to its heritage as an institution of academic excellence.” A visual mix of the traditional and modern is a fitting way to launch the next 125 years.

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Ashbury refreshes its brand for its 125th


125TH YEAR

NEWS & NOTES

Snapshots

School News

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Through Ashbury’s partnership with Students on Ice, a project dedicated to educating youth about climate change and sustainable development, Thom Haghighat Talab, Grade 11, visited the Canadian arctic, Greenland and other polar regions this summer.

Junior Students travelled to the Dominican Republic in June to deliver school supplies and conduct service initiatives at a local orphanage.


NEWS & NOTES

Artist Gordon Harrison unveiled his painting “l’hiver à ashbury” in November to commemorate our anniversary year. The painting now hangs in the school’s Heritage Room.

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Grade 12 students visited Rideau Hall in October to meet with Canada’s Governor General on the occasion of the school’s 125th anniversary. Photo: Office of the Secretary to the Governor General

Alexander Shelley, Music Director of the National Arts Centre Orchestra, met with music students and passed along some performance tips.


NEWS & NOTES

125TH YEAR

in Canada

Born again

Ashbury brings refugee family to Ottawa

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hey were surprised by Ottawa’s humidity and now they’ve seen their first snowfall. The Al Kaoud family from Syria have been on Canadian soil for just four months, and already they are adapting to, and learning about, their new home. The family of five—mom, dad and three kids under 10— were the focus of Ashbury’s fundraising and community engagement project: the Refugee Sponsorship Initiative (RSI). Originally established in the fall of 2015, the RSI brought together Ashbury parents, faculty, alumni and students—all with the common goal of helping to bring a refugee family to Ottawa. Working closely with the Anglican Diocese and within the parameters of the Government of Canada’s private sponsorship agreement, the committee planned initiatives to raise money to support the family, secure housing and help the family with their immediate and long-term needs, including schooling and language lessons.

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The committee garnered wide interest—from parents and students whose own lives have been touched by war, to those who have lived the immigrant experience, and those who wanted to lend a particular skill or expertise. From drafting budgetary spreadsheets and signing up volunteer drivers, to sewing curtains, researching Middle Eastern grocery options and sourcing car seats and snow pants, our volunteers did it all. The wider Ashbury community rallied too, raising more than $18,000 to support the family. As a sponsor, Ashbury is responsible for providing assistance to the family, in the form of finances and personal guidance, for a period of one year following their arrival. The long-term goal is to give the family the tools they need to be self-sufficient, while growing and maintaining the resulting relationships and friendships. Months of volunteer work came to fruition on July 14 when the Al Kaouds arrived at the Ottawa airport. Their journey was a long one, starting from their base in Lebanon, where they had lived for two years after fleeing Aleppo, Syria, to Cairo, Egypt to Toronto and finally to Ottawa. Though tired, the family was full of smiles—mixed with a few happy tears—as they were greeted by the Ashbury contingent waving Canadian flags and welcome signs in both Arabic and English. After exchanging warm handshakes and hugs, the family was taken to their new home: an east-end townhouse, provided rent-free for a year by an Ashbury family and lovingly furnished with donations of clothing, household items, food and more, by Ashbury volunteers. Three new bicycles awaited the kids, who eagerly gave them a spin, putting off jet lag for a few more hours. Several Arabic-speaking parents and students stepped up to help with translation services for the family, who all knew very little English. A carefully organized list of apps, websites and phone numbers were put into play, allowing volunteers to communicate with the family about transportation, bus schedules, and even grocery shopping. The first weeks were busy with the necessities any newcomer to the country may be familiar with: obtaining health cards, scheduling appointments with dentists and doctors, finding bearings in a new city, and signing up for school. The children showed particular youthful enthusiasm for their new surroundings, and all three kids happily attended some of Ashbury’s day camps just a week after they arrived. It didn’t take long to get the parents enrolled in Englishlanguage lessons near their home, the kids were kept busy


NEWS & NOTES

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expectations.” With each new word learned, every new experience embraced, and each history shared, our expectations have been met—and surpassed. Welcome, Al Kaouds. We’re happy you’re here.

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The Ashbury community welcomed the Al Kaoud family as they arrived at the Ottawa airport on July 14.

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Some of the many volunteers who helped the family get from Syria to Ottawa.

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The Al Kaoud children at Ashbury’s summer camp.

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in summer day camps at a nearby community centre, and registered for school for the start of September. Volunteers continue to help with weekly budgets for groceries and other bills, planning and executing tutoring lessons, teaching Canadian customs, and researching options to get driving licences for both parents. Coffee traditionally accompanies most visits, allowing the parents an opportunity to beam with pride as they explain how well their children are doing in Canadian classrooms. Slowly but surely, the family is learning about the city of Ottawa; navigating the bus system, taking trips to Mooney’s Bay for a swim, and to an apple orchard to pick apples earlier this fall. All members of the family are now thriving in their respective schools, and all are eager to practise their English—and French—whenever possible. They’ve learned about Canadian Thanksgiving, donned costumes for Halloween, and are now looking forward to putting their donated coats, boots, mitts and toques to use for their first-ever Canadian winter. From sheltering U.K. Abinger Hill students displaced during the Second World War, to offering refuge to Afghanistan’s Roya Shams in 2011, the Al Kaoud family is just the latest example of Ashbury’s tradition of caring for others. Their journey and story is a good lesson for Ashbury’s current students on the importance of global responsibility. And while this is just the beginning of what will be a challenging road for this family, they remain supported by the incredible committee of volunteers—now friends— who laid the groundwork for their future. As the father told Ashbury’s Head of School, “We are born again in Canada and we hope we will meet your


NEWS & NOTES

125TH YEAR

Vietnam

Volunteering in

Ashbury’s Susan Wall helps teachers in Hanoi through Uniterra program

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any teachers spend the summer break taking part in professional development opportunities to complement their classroom activities or individual interests. Ashbury science teacher Susan Wall opted to spend part of her summer helping teachers in another country improve their classroom practice. Wall travelled to Vietnam in July through Uniterra, a unique program that matches volunteers with private, non-profit and public organizations in developing nations around with the world with a goal of increasing empowerment, and incomes for youth and women. Ashbury partnered with Uniterra last year, and Wall is the first member of the teaching faculty to complete a placement. The opportunities available with Uniterra cover a range of fields, including marketing and human resources, construction, office work, computer science and more. Short and long-term placements are available for everyone from students to staff. Ashbury’s corporate partnership with Uniterra covers a ‘leave for change’ mandate, where employees can apply for a rewarding professional development experience in another country to contribute to lasting change. Wall initially looked at the Uniterra offerings with an eye to utilize her background in science and education background. With nothing matching that criteria available, she broadened her search. “I have been teaching a number of years and I have tried to be reflective about my practice,” Wall says. “So when a school posting came up, I thought that I might be able to offer direction about teaching in general. My mandate in Vietnam became the development of strategies that would help the teachers work more effectively with at risk students.” Stationed in Hanoi, Wall set herself up from a base in a hotel organized by Uniterra, and made her way each day to the school, called BTL College, a state-owned vocational institution. Dealing with busy Hanoi street traffic, high summer temperatures, and sampling lots of local cuisine made for busy, stimulating days outside of the classroom. Inside the school, Wall says she found new experiences as well. “I was very surprised by the starkness of the classroom setting,” she says of her first impression. “In my teaching practice at Ashbury I often rely on visuals or manipulatives to develop an idea. I brought pencils with me not realizing that there wasn’t a pencil sharpener in the room.”

Susan Wall and two of her colleagues engage in some hands on learning in a Hanoi classroom.

Counselling teachers representing a variety of disciplines was challenging, says Wall, and this was compounded by the lack of resources on site. “Suggesting a Kahoot [an online game-based learning platform] was not an option,” she says. Instead, Wall opted to deliver workshops that teachers would want to attend because they found them useful. Topics included inserting activity plans into lessons, dividing content into smaller modules, and understanding student differences. Wall felt that the best part of her trip was meeting new people. And in spite of the fact that she broke a few Vietnamese hearts by dispelling the myth that there are penguins in Canada, her interactions with fellow educators left a lasting impression. “On a daily basis I had interesting conversations with people whose life experiences were very unlike my own in Ottawa,” she says. “The teachers I encountered inspired me.” For more on the Uniterra program, visit Uniterra.ca

Ashbury’s partnership with Uniterra provides faculty and staff with the opportunity to volunteer in developing nations around the world.


NEWS & NOTES

the sky

The eyes in

Ashbury’s drone duo capture history from the air

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ook up. Look waaaay up. It’s a bird, it’s a plane, it’s a… drone? More and more recreational drones are occupying air space above our heads these days. Known commonly as unmanned aerial vehicles, civilian drones are powered by remote control, and often are equipped with cameras. Behind—or more accurately below—most drones, are operators on the ground, who navigate and direct. Kevin Hu and Max Kelland, both Grade 11, are both barely old enough to drive cars, but they’ve each been operating drones for a number of years. “It started as a hobby,” says Hu of his interest in drones. “We started to buy parts online and do the basic programming to build them ourselves.” “Then we became interested in the video and photo side of things,” pipes in Kelland. The boys often collaborate on drone builds and filming projects, hence their familiarity answering questions in the ‘we’ plural. It was a drone operated by Kelland and Hu that snapped the historic 125 image of Ashbury staff and students on campus in January. They’ve also teamed up on several locations to take overhead shots of the school grounds and buildings, and of the recent Homecoming festivities. Word of their expertise has spread off campus as well, with the boys clinching a few contracts to take drone footage for real estate agents, local construction companies, and indoor paintball facilities. The boys are not only advocates for the drone technology; they are resoundingly keen on ensuring the vehicles are used safely. “People can be irresponsible when it comes to flying drones,” says Hu, who explains that close drone

Kevin Hu and Max Kelland

contact with people is ill advised. “That’s why the regulations around them are increasing. We never compromise safety when we fly.” With the potential for drone use expanding by the day, Kelland and Hu say the future for drone use is exciting. A mainstay in the military, the pair say drones are being utilized in search and rescue operations, and some are even being equipped with thermal imaging cameras and defibrillators. Kelland predicts that age restrictions will soon come into play, and expresses disappointment at stories where drones are used for malicious intent. “It’s kind of sad that people are taking the fun out of a useful tool,” he says. This fall, the pair is teaming up again to share their drone expertise with fellow students in Ashbury’s new STEAM club (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Mathematics) and they’re investigating live streaming options for Ashbury sporting events. The students, both of whom are thinking about pursuing aeronautical engineering at university, and who are studying to become recreational pilots, hope their passion for flight technology will live on at Ashbury after they’re gone. “We really want to encourage the use of drones in learning at the school after we graduate,” says Kelland.

Max Kelland gets a drone set up to capture images of Homecoming 2016.


NEWS & NOTES

125TH YEAR

Springfest 2016

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hallway. Rugby rounded out the afternoon with our Varsity girls, Junior and Senior boys teams going head to head with Smiths Falls, followed by an Alumni Touch Sevens game. Visitors enjoyed another delicious BBQ lunch prepared by Brown’s and the Guild-run canteen. A casual alumni reception followed in Maclaren Hall where returning grads enjoyed catching up with old classmates and former teachers. Thanks to everyone who came out to celebrate! You can look forward to Springfest 2017 taking place on Saturday, May 13.

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ur second-annual Springfest was a sun-filled day ready to usher in the season! The morning started off with the Guild Plant Sale and a refreshing yoga class led by Julia Aimers to get everyone energized for our now-famous Colour Run. Students, staff, faculty and our Head of School all participated in this fun and colorful activity around Rockcliffe Park and Ashbury campus. Led by parents Fedwa Choudhri and Jenny SmithWindsor, the community also contributed to a collaborative 125th anniversary mural which now hangs in our main

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NEWS & NOTES

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Photobooth fun

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Andrea Laurin, Karen Abrahamsen and Anna Rumin at our annual plant sale

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Junior boys rugby

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Another successful A-Club canteen

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Varsity girls rugby

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Students taking part in our collaborative 125th mural

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Our Colour Run warm up team

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Young alumni at our evening reception

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Head of School, Norman Southward, and some Junior School students finishing the Colour Run

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NEWS & NOTES

125TH YEAR

2016

Closings

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ons t i t a l u t a r g n o C an our graduates s! award winner

100% of university graduates entering university; 86% of graduates admitted to their first-choice university; 78% of graduates received postsecondary scholarships

Top university University of T (28), Queen’s U (17), U.K. and international University (16),


choices: Toronto University

(17), McGill , U.S. (12)

ting a u d a r g f o 65% her t i e d e v i e c e r class loma p i d B I l l u f a e or certificat

40% of headed graduates 35% sci into the a busines ence; 23% rts; s; 2% f ine art

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to nd

NEWS & NOTES


NEWS & NOTES

125TH YEAR

125 years

Help us fund the next

Every gift has an impact

We have identified four areas where the Ashbury experience for all of our students can be augmented above and beyond what tuition alone can cover.

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Access & Excellence We are building a meaningful financial assistance program through the Endowment Fund which will help expand access to an Ashbury education for students with merit and potential.

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Heritage Renewal Through renewal of our Heritage spaces such as the former residences (Advancement House), Rhodes Hall, and Memorial Gym Hall, we want to celebrate our history and manage our resources for the long term.

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Science & Innovation Developing our culture of excellence and innovation in teaching and learning is important to ensure that our students receive an education that is relevant in today’s world. We are improving our Science and Innovation facilities and creating Teaching Chairs in areas of excellence.

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Community Partnerships & Engagement Ashbury has long had a tradition of service to others. From hosting students fleeing danger during the Second World War, to sponsoring a refugee family from areas of conflict today, our students, staff and families have stepped up to help when help is needed. Engaging in our community whether through service or experiential learning, makes the Ashbury experience an enduring one. We have created a fund to help our students accomplish and experience all that the world has to offer.

Visit ashbury.ca/give to make your gift today


NEWS & NOTES

Recognition

Volunteer

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shbury’s spring volunteer appreciation reception celebrated the school’s varied community of volunteers including parents, alumni and friends. It was a wonderful evening in the Creative Learning Centre where the Jean Teron Award for Outstanding Service to Ashbury College was presented by Jean Teron to E.N. “Ned” Rhodes ’55 for his outstanding volunteer service to the College and its community. Ned’s extensive volunteerism and engagement spans from chairing the Board of Governors from 1972–75, supporting all campaigns from Action Ashbury, right through to our recent campaign for the Creative Learning Centre, and in 1994, establishing the Ned Rhodes ’55 Family Bursary. The night continued with a new set of volunteer awards to a very deserving set of recipients. Sahir Khan ’88, received the Outstanding Alumnus Volunteer Award presented by Janice McDonald, for his work with the Alumni Executive where he served as President from 2011–14, as well as helping plan our annual homecoming and alumni events. The Outstanding Parent Volunteer Award was awarded to two

parents: Christine Jones and Marci Groper. Our 2015–16 Guild President, Cindy Tomlinson Keon, presented the awards to the two very active Guild and Ashbury Ball Committee members. Christine also spearheaded the Used Uniform initiative and Marci worked tirelessly with the swim team and A Club. Thank you both! Junior School teacher, Megan Boyd presented the Outstanding Student Support Volunteer Award for engagement and commitment to student life at Ashbury College to P.C. Wong. His many years of support to the alpine ski team and competitive swim team have been invaluable. Thank you to all the Ashbury volunteers who work to make the school a better place for our students.

Do you know a volunteer who has helped make Ashbury College a better place for our students? Our service awards recognize contributions from our parents, alumni and friends. Nominate someone today via the online form at ashbury.ca/about/volunteer/award

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Megan Boyd and P.C. Wong

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Cindy Tomlinson Keon, Marci Groper and Christine Jones

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Head of School, Norman Southward, with Jean Teron and Ned Rhodes ’55

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Sahir Khan ’88

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ASHBURY ALUMNI

125TH YEAR

2016

Reunions

HONOURED YEARS 1966, 1971, 1976, 1981, 1986, 1991, 1996, 2001, 2006, 2011 Reunion weekend was busy for our honoured years, as several off-site celebrations took place across Ottawa. Classmates were able to reconnect and catch up in an informal setting, in addition to the Homecoming festivities that happened on Ashbury campus. Thank you to our class reps who helped organized such successful reunions!

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Matthew Merkley ’96, Norman Southward, Kathleen De Jesus ’96

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Norman Southward, Olivier Cullen ’01

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Kwesi Bourne ’06, Angus McCallum ’06, Eric Plaskacz ’06, Dustin Kennedy ’06, Matthew Pitre ’06, Norman Southward, Jena Hall ’06, Jonathon Brooks ’06, Greg Black ’06, Tyler Ham Pong ’06

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Class of ’86, Norman Southward

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Adrian Conway ’78, Peter Harcourt ’76, Kevin Reeves ’76, Norman Southward, Chris Teron ’76, George McKenna ’76

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The Class of ’91 gathered off campus for a reception

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Norman Southward, Andrew Nichols ’91, Waleed Qirbi ’91, Robbie Citrin Lang ’91, Andre Valiquette ’91, Waseem Al-Qaraguli ’91, Ozan Isinak ’91, Christian Lloyd ’91

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Adrian Sark ’66, David Johnson ’66, Norman Southward, Ronald Seltzer ’66

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ASHBURY ALUMNI

125TH YEAR

Homecoming 2016

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his year, in celebration of our 125th anniversary, we had events on and off campus starting on Thursday, September 22 and ending on Monday, September 26. We welcomed former Guild members back to campus for a gathering on Thursday evening at an event at Ashbury House hosted by Head of School, Norman Southward, and his wife, Anna Rumin. Norman and Anna also welcomed alumni from the class of ’66 and older for a reception at their house on Friday evening. The new Creative Learning Centre was home to an alumni art show, The Ashbury Creative Collective, which kicked off with a vernissage on Friday evening. The show was led by Creative

Director Justin Steinburg ’06. Campus was buzzing on Saturday with our usual Homecoming festivities, including the Guild welcome BBQ, alumni and student sporting events and our Homecoming ceremony. Stephen Woollcombe ’57 also launched his book on the life of his grandfather, G.P. Woollcombe, in the chapel on Saturday morning. Saturday evening saw a fantastic dinner at the Royal Ottawa Golf Club with special keynote speaker, David Ben. Alumni were back on campus on Sunday for chapel service officiated by Archbishop Terence Finlay ’56 and assisted by Canon Graham Jackson ’54. The weekend concluded on Monday with a celebratory golf game at the Royal Ottawa Golf Club.


ASHBURY ALUMNI

A special thanks to our class reps: Class of 2006: Hakim Garuba and Sareena Anand Class of 1996: Kerry Starr, Andres Beltran and Greg Taylor Class of 1991: Andrew Nichols and Waleed Qirbi  Class of 1976: Chris Teron and Jeff Beedell  Class of 1966: Duncan MacTavish  Some of our old boys made it out to celebrate their 50 year (+) reunions! Michael Shenstone ’45, Chris Hampson ’48, Doug Moulton ’48, Arthur MacRae ’49, Sir Michael Marshall ’51, Graham Jackson ’54, Ned Rhodes ’55, John Boone ’56, Archbishop Terence Finlay ’56, Bruce Hillary ’57, Stephen Woollcombe ’57, Guy Morrison ’58, Vic Rivers ’58, John Rogan ’59, Kent Cook ’61, Alan Gill ’62, Rev. John Brown ’63, James MacLaren ’65, David Johnson ’66, Duncan MacTavish ’66, Adrian Sark ’66 and Ron Seltzer ’66.

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A warm thanks to our Ashbury partners: Sezlik Luxury Properties and Doherty & Associates, as well as our beer sponsor, the Clocktower Brew Pub.


NEWS & NOTES

125TH YEAR

Ashbury College Charity Golf Classic

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he Ashbury College Charity Golf Classic had another successful tournament on May 30 at The Gatineau Golf and Country Club. It was a beautiful day for guests to enjoy both the golf course and the spa, put on by Carte Blanche Spa in one of Richcraft’s beautiful model homes. This year, with the support of all those involved, we raised over $45,000 towards the Ashbury College Association Scholarship Fund. Thanks to our on-the-course sponsors: Beyond the Pale Brewery, Tamarack Homes, CIBC Wood Gundy, Sakto Corporation, Jeff Hill, BMO Nesbitt-Burns, PerleyRobertson, Hill & McDougall, Emerion, TD and the Hadziomerovic family. The day ended with a reception which brought all the golfers and spa guests together to kick off the evening

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portion of the event. Guests also enjoyed delicious food and wine and an exciting live and silent auction. A special thanks goes out to our event sponsors, without whom the day would not be possible: Dilawri Auto, the Aliferis family, Richcraft Homes, Sussex Capital and Carte Blanche Spa. As always, a sincere thank you to our exceptional Ashbury Partners for their continued support: Mark Motors, Sezlik Ottawa Luxury Properties and Doherty & Associates. Thanks again to everyone who participated in and supported the Ashbury College Charity Golf Classic 2016. See you all next year on June 5, 2017 for another amazing event!


NEWS & NOTES

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Phil von Finckenstein ’89, Vanessa von Finckenstein, Tracy RaitParkes, Scott Parkes ’88

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Kris McGinn entertains at the silent auction table

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The winning foursome: Gary Godkin, Maneesh Sharma, John Lindsay and Anil Mital

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Meena Roberts, Tazim Lal, Cheryl Rodrigues and Vicky Wilgress

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Rob Bateman, Mark Groper and Brendan Timmins

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Shamir Daya ’03

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125TH YEAR

F E AT U R E S

in his cap

A feather 

Dr. Guy Morrison ’59 receives the Order of Canada for his work conserving shorebirds

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By Stephanie Brooks ’07

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or Dr. Guy Morrison, two years at Ashbury helped carve a path for a 38-year career in shorebird research and conservation, culminating with his appointment to the Order of Canada this past summer. Morrison started at Ashbury in Grade 9 in 1955 where a range of subjects, including science, the outdoors, cricket, squash and music, piqued his interest. After his father was posted to England for work, Morrison attended Merchant Taylors’ School and credits his Ashbury lessons, and faculty members like Mr. Arthur Brain, for his acceptance to the British independent school.

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“Between Ashbury and Merchant Taylors’, I often think of those as two of the most influential experiences really in the rest of my life,” says Morrison. In his senior year of high school, Morrison led a camping and hiking expedition across the centre of Iceland—an experience that stirred his interest in returning to the country. Years later, after an undergraduate degree in biochemistry at the University of St Andrews, he was completing his PhD at Cambridge University where he met researchers working in bird migration studies. They were planning an expedition to Iceland to study shorebird migration. The trip appealed to Morrison, as did the opportunity


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—Order of Canada nomination citation to return to Iceland, so he tagged along. That marked his first of three research trips to the country, the final of which, in 1972, lasted six months. The following year, Morrison accepted a job as a research scientist with the Canadian Wildlife Service to study shorebirds in the Americas. “It was stimulating work,” he says, “because not a lot of research was being done on shorebirds.” He also enjoyed travelling, which came in handy when tracking species that are among nature’s longest-distance migrants, clocking 30,000 km roundtrip every year from the Canadian Arctic to the tip of South America. Spending so much time in the Arctic gave Morrison a chance to see first-hand the effects of climate change, particularly on the coastal habitats he studies. Climate change, says Morrison, directly affects the food sources and migration patterns, and most certainly is responsible for their declining populations. But environmental factors aren’t unique to the north. Morrison says one of his most notable projects involved conducting aerial surveys of key migration sites around the coast of South America. Findings from this work led to his concept for an international network of wildlife reserves to help protect shorebirds, which became the

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Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network (WHSRN). WHSRN is now a major NGO, with more than 90 reserves stretching across 15 countries from Alaska to Tierra del Fuego. His efforts to develop this strategy for conserving shorebirds and their natural habitats helped earn him the designation of the Order of Canada in June. “I was absolutely thrilled,” he says, of receiving the news. “It is quite humbling because there are a lot of people doing great work in the world who probably equally deserved one, but it’s very special to receive a nationallyrecognized honour in your lifetime.” Since his retirement in 2012, Morrison continues to travel and do field work in his position as Scientist Emeritus with Environment and Climate Change Canada, providing mentorship and input in assessing the status of birds and wildlife. While he credits his schooling with helping him to uncover and develop his passions, Morrison says he can’t imagine a better career path than the one he’s had. “Ashbury played a significant role in my education and in encouraging excellence,” he says. “I’m fantastically fortunate in life to have found a career where I get paid to do something I love.” When it comes to advice for the next generation of scientists—or any Ashbury graduates, for that matter— Morrison says if you have a vision for something you want, you have to go for it. “It’s amazing what you can make happen in life,” he says. “If you set your sights on something you want, don’t let anything stop you.”

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Morrison near Canadian Forces Station Alert, northern Ellesmere Island.

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Morrison at Ashbury in 1957. His Ashbury studies, along with supportive faculty members, were influential in his admittance to Merchant Taylors’ School in England.

(photos courtesy of Guy Morrison)

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Richard Ian Guy Morrison’s work has had a profound impact on the conservation of Arctic shorebirds. As a research scientist at Environment Canada, his low altitude aerial population surveys of migratory sites in Mexico, Central and South America led to the creation of a network of wildlife reserves stretching across 15 countries from Alaska to Tierra del Fuego. A role model and mentor to ornithologists throughout the Americas, he continues working as a scientist emeritus, spending considerable time in the field and in recent years has focused on Arctic bird species most vulnerable to climate change.


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Steering towards sustainability Cristina Venables ’02 joins crew of women scientists on leadership expedition to Antarctica

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other Nature needs her daughters. That’s the tagline of the Homeward Bound project, an international state-of-the-art leadership program for women in science. In December, 80 women with scientific backgrounds from around the world will travel to Antarctica for a ground-breaking experience. Cristina Venables ’02 is one of those women. Venables, who currently works as an Environmental Water Planner, in Australia’s New South Wales Office of Environment and Heritage, admits that she almost didn’t apply for the opportunity to travel to Antarctica for 20 days to research the effects of climate change alongside other female scientists. Ultimately, it was the purpose and goals of Homeward Bound that convinced her to submit an application. Homeward Bound 2016 will be the first year of a 10-year outreach initiative to build a global network of 1,000 women in science, all of whom have had the same training and experience at sea, Venables says. The project is supported by a world-leading faculty of experts, including academics, researchers, film makers, policy makers, singers, environmental activists and more. By building a critical mass of women in science with strong project management and leadership skills, Homeward Bound hopes to ensure economies and societies are adaptable and resilient in the face of climate change and other challenges, and that women have an equal number of seats at the decisionmaking table. “That, and Jane Goodall, a childhood hero of mine, is part of the faculty!,” Venables says.

Preparation for the trip began a year ago, with Venables launching a fundraising campaign to help pay for the travel, and completing online courses, which will culminate on the ship. The onboard program will involve a series of leadership and innovation courses led by a range of experts from around the world, says Venables, and seminars at sea will give the participants a chance to talk about their work and interests, and spark any possible opportunities for collaboration. “We will also be conducting scientific research whilst in Antarctica to develop a broad understanding of the effect of global change on our planet, and the role of the continent as an indicator for climate change,” says Venables. The science curriculum is currently being developed by members from the Australian Antarctic Division and will include visits to six different research stations from five different countries. Still relatively new to her chosen career, Venables says she’s eager to make connections on the trip that will help her in the future. Women from different scientific fields, at different stages of their career, from all over the world have been chosen to participate in this once in a lifetime opportunity. “I’m really looking forward to meeting the other amazing women who will be on board the ship with me,” she says. Venable says her biggest challenge will be to implement what she will learn on board the ship, and continue to collaborate when she returns home to her job and dayto-day life. “As leaders and policy makers seek to navigate their way through the current global issues, such as food


F E AT U R E S

Some of the highlights of the job included field trips along Australia’s east coast tagging Grey Nurse sharks, and participating in several necropsies to improve our understanding of the species’ reproductive biology. Venables went on to complete a Masters of Environmental Management at the University of Newcastle, and has continued to work in the environmental sector, in both public and private roles. Her engineer father first sparked a love of science, and Venables credits her dad Michael Venables ’71, for instilling a deep sense of curiosity. “Growing up, he was always trying to show me how something worked, like the engine of a car, when I really just wanted to get my driver’s licence, or explain the development of various scientific theories, even if I just wanted to know if I had a math question right

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security, water scarcity, species extinctions and climate change, we need the aggregate talents of both women and men more than ever to come up with the best solutions possible,” she says. “Also, I’m excited to see penguins!” Her home base in Australia wasn’t originally in the cards, says Venables, who completed a degree in biology at Queen’s University after graduating from Ashbury. She originally travelled down under in 2007 on a holiday, expecting to stay only a year. “About six months into my trip, I found myself in the beautiful coastal town of Port Stephens, New South Wales, working for the state government in marine conservation and research—a job I never imagined finding whilst on vacation!” she says.

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in my homework,” she says. “Whilst this frustrated me back then, I thank him for it now, as it definitely contributed to my interest in pursuing science at Ashbury and through university.” Venables travels back to Canada frequently to see her family, and she hasn’t left Ashbury too far behind. She was a keen athlete in school, participating in soccer, field hockey, rowing, track and field and ski racing. She credits Mrs. Holman for encouraging a continuation of track and field at Queen’s, adding, “The support and mentorship I got from all of my coaches was amazing. They taught me to have a competitive spirit and demonstrate sportsmanship at the same time, skills that are sought after in effective leaders.” Memories of Ms. Wall’s science class also stick with her to this day. “Her [Wall’s] excitement towards science was infectious,” remembers Venables. “She was always trying to find new and interesting ways of teaching us, from learning about DNA by extracting our own, or standing on the table cutting plastic straws and throwing them around to teach us about telomeres, to skipping rope in

class to help us remember the different stages of mitosis.” From those early lessons, to the most recent career milestone of the Homeward Bound Antarctica experience, Venables is making a mark for herself—and for women—in the scientific field. “Since I started working, I have been grateful for my science degree, and only now am I aware of the many career opportunities, and amazing life experiences it has presented me,” she says. For more on the Homeward Bound visit: homewardboundprojects.com.au and facebook.com/homewardboundprojects/ 1

Marine conservation along Australia’s southeast coast.

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Venables originally travelled to Australia on holiday in 2007 and ended up staying when she landed a job that utilized her science degree.

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Venables on the beaches she now studies for a living.

(photos courtesy of Cristina Venables)


F E AT U R E S

success

Hashtag

By Stephanie Brooks ’07

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t was on Rory Capern’s first trip to Silicon Valley in 1999 when he got the bug. The web was just starting to explode, and while working in consulting in San Francisco during his undergrad at Western University’s Ivey Business School, he had a ringside seat to a revolutionary industry coming to life. Capern ’96 got involved in the value end of the Internet at a time when he says it was possible to watch it work at an operational level and make an impact on business. “That was my first real exposure to the power of the web,” he says, “and I’ve been chasing it ever since.” While at Ashbury, Capern received a scholarship for advanced placement into the business program at Ivey, where he was able to explore a liberal arts education before completing his HBA (later followed by his MBA). That experience helped him get a job in consulting, whereupon he discovered a passion for the web. Capern now sits at the helm of Twitter’s Canadian operations as managing director. It’s the service almost 800 million users around the world flock to every month to share

and consume the latest on what’s happening now based on the things they care about. Capern started at Twitter in February of this year after leading partnerships for Canada at Google and, before that, business development at Microsoft Canada and Lavalife. The most enriching experience in these digital sector portfolios, he says, has been watching Canada take a front seat in the innovation agenda alongside some of the largest tech companies in the world. “That’s what I enjoy the most,” he says, “leading those efforts to keep Canada on the forefront of the speed and agility of this tech space by taking advantage of some of the inherent characteristics of the Canadian market.” It’s a market that is receptive to innovation and embraces social media, according to Capern. When it comes to video, for example, the amount being published on Twitter has grown about 240 times year over year. Still, getting the word out about what Twitter is today— with features like video, animated GIFs, Moments, and more—to users who may have their own idea of what the platform offers, is a key challenge. “Most people have seen the little blue bird and they know what Twitter is as an icon,” he says. “There are a lot of folks who have a top-line understanding of what Twitter is, who don’t come every month, and we need to explain it to them.”

27 | Ashbury News

Rory Capern ’96 rules the roost at Twitter Canada


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F E AT U R E S

125TH YEAR

Aside from tapping into this population, Capern says another way his team is trying to grow the number of active users is by making the service more approachable to newcomers. “The litmus test I put on myself is to walk newcomers to Twitter through the door and make sure they’re not having an intimidated reaction—how does all this work, how do I follow people, what kind of content am I looking for, what should I tweet… that kind of stuff,” he explains. “Those are the questions we’re trying to make much more evident to first-time users.” Twitter has made it easier for people to engage with the information they’re interested in while it’s happening—a theme the company has redefined as its core value proposition. Capern says articulating this answer to ‘why Twitter?’ is a real opportunity facing the brand. “The news breaks on Twitter,” he says, and whether it’s hard news or not, Twitter’s advantage is being able to put vast amounts of real-time content in front of people to keep them up-to-speed on their interests. Capern says tailoring the Twitter experience for individuals is something Canadian users will be seeing more of moving forward, making them feel even more at home on the platform. That sense of community is something not unfamiliar to Capern, who recalls his eight years at Ashbury as being filled with excellent friendships across different social groups in an open, interactive atmosphere. “My Junior School memories are filled with very diverse experiences,” he says. “Sports, trips, great classroom experiences and really good friends. It was a really amazing way to go through that young childhood age.” Similarly, Capern characterizes his high school years as being extremely well-rounded, from athletic and academic to social and extra-curricular. One of his most poignant memories from Ashbury is going on a tour with the choir in the U.K. where, between performances, the group played some rugby and cricket games against their billets. It was quite a surprise to the Brits, he recalls, when the Ashbury choir beat them in both. “So, the Ashbury boys choir was regularly tuning the British rugby and cricket system,” he says. “It was lots of fun.” These days, Capern’s involved in a little less singing and a little more social media. “I’ve had, over course of the past five or six years, the opportunity to go to San Francisco and Mountain View and some of tech hubs in the U.S. and plug in to those ecosystems,” he says. “I’ve met some amazing people, seen some really incredible technology, and become involved with a fascinating part of the world as it relates to both industry and science.” Needless to say, he’s still got the bug. Or, should we say, the bird.

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WAY S TO M A K E T H E M O S T OF TWITTER

Use these best practices, courtesy of Twitter Canada’s Managing Director, Rory Capern, to craft engaging Tweets and connect with your followers. 1. Keep it short: Keep each Tweet focused on one specific message. 2. Use visuals: Adding multimedia to your Tweets adds personality and leads to higher engagement rates. 3. Incorporate relevant hashtags: Use one or two hashtags per Tweet to expand your reach and tap into conversations. 4. Ask questions and run polls: Interact with and better understand your audience by Tweeting open-ended questions or using polls. 5. Curate and connect with retweets and replies: Retweet and reply to content that’s relevant to you or your brand to maintain a strong Twitter presence. Follow Rory Capern on Twitter @rorycapern and Ashbury College @ashburycollege

Photo courtesy of Rory Capern


ASHBURY ALUMNI

Travels

Ashbury 

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all was a busy time for the Ashbury alumni community! Successful 125th anniversary receptions were held in Kingston, New York City and Montreal where alumni of all ages were able to connect and catch up. A group of young alumni gathered at the Grizzly Grill in Kingston in October. They were joined by Ashbury faculty members and Deputy Head Teaching and Learning, Brian Storosko. Alumni in New York City connected in October at the Penn Club of New York, thanks to Sam Chandan ’92. They were also joined by Ashbury’s Head of School, Norman Southward and the Advancement team. Alumni of all ages gathered in Montreal in November at the McGill Faculty Club, where they connected over food and drinks with Norman Southward and the Advancement team.

UPCOMING ALUMNI EVENTS: December 22: Ottawa Alumni Holiday Party at the Sens game February 23:

Ashbury Winter Classic

March 2: Toronto May 4: London, U.K. May 13: Springfest June 5: Ashbury College Charity Golf Classic June 16: Alumni Welcome Reception

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ASHBURY ALUMNI

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125TH YEAR

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8 Kingston:

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Alumni gathered in Kingston

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Mike King and Brian Storosko gather with previous Junior School students

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Jack MacMillan ’16, Nick Morrison ’16, Paul Rodrigues ’16, Nikhil Dilawri ’16, Brian Storosko, Parker Aimers ’15, Simon Hicks ’16

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New York:

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Alumni gathered in New York City

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Hannah Hagadorn ’16, Norman Southward, Tiantian Luo ’16, Kelly Hunter ’11

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Jonathon Estabrooks ’02 and Sam Chandan ’92

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Norman Southward and Ole Book ’54 pose with Ole’s old Ashbury report card

Montreal:

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Alumni gathered in Montreal

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Emily Shore ’03, Sarah Ashton ’16, Rebecca Spiteri ’16, Alex Parizeau ’16, Katherine Hales ’10

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Gregory Saumier-Finch ’86, Ron Seltzer ’66, Ryan Aimers ’11


ASHBURY ALUMNI

Chatter

Ashbury

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ir Michael Marshall ’49 returned to Ashbury for a Homecoming visit and to speak to students about his memories of the school. A U.K. resident who fled to Canada with his family during the Second World War, Sir Michael continues to be active in business and various charities, and was invested by Her Majesty, The Queen of England for his service in 2010.

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avid Tamblyn ’80 became the new chair of Lakehead University’s Board of Governors in October. He is proud to be continuing in his father’s legacy as his father, William Tamblyn, was the university’s founding president. Tamblyn is also the Director of Education with the SuperiorGreenstone District School Board.

Author Stephen Woollcombe ’57 launched his book on the ambitious vision of his grandfather, Ashbury College founder G.P. Woollcombe, on September 24, during the school’s Homecoming/125th anniversary celebration weekend. In The Life and Times of George Penrose Woollcombe: Educator, Woollcombe tells the extraordinary story of his Oxford graduate grandfather who began teaching 17 boys in an upstairs room directly across from the Parliament Buildings in Ottawa on September 16, 1891. Over the next 42 years, G.P. Woollcombe imagined, built and ran Ashbury College with an insight that shaped that period of Canadian history and education. As a researcher and historian, Stephen Woollcombe collected anecdotal and archival information that provides a comprehensive and factual narrative. With a unique perspective however, he also provides personal memories of G.P. Woollcombe amongst his family, friends and former students. The book, he notes, is “a labour of love and curiosity.” The book can be purchased from the Ashbury College school store or Books on Beechwood in Ottawa, and is available for order from the FriesenPress Bookstore, Amazon, and most other major online book retailers.

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eff Mierins ’82 was knighted into the order of St. George. Linked to its Christian foundations and to the chivalric code, the Order of St. George has grown to encompass people of many faiths, and maintains its timeless commitments to faithful service and to helping people in need. The Order’s Foundation contributes funding in

support of our wounded or fallen military personnel and their immediate families through such agencies as the Military Families Fund and the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre (Veterans & Community). The Order also offers its support to programs of Royal Canadian Sea, Army and Air Cadet Corps, and the Junior Rangers, as well as to other charitable organizations.

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Proceeds from the sale of the book will be contributed to a new student award created by Stephen Woollcombe to honour his grandfather’s legacy. The award will provide a student, who embodies the school founder’s values of service to others and doing one’s best, with financial assistance in his/her final year of study. Please visit ashbury.ca/give to contribute to this fund.


ASHBURY ALUMNI

125TH YEAR

R E F L E C T I O N S O N T H E PA S T The Spring 2016 issue of Ashbury News, marking the school’s 125th anniversary, took me back 25 years and made me reflect on some significant political, technological and personal change that has occurred since Ashbury’s 100th birthday in 1991. The fantastic drone photo of students, faculty and staff forming a giant 125 against a snow background reminded me of the similar image I took for the school’s 100th anniversary. In that case, I rented a Cessna 172 from the International Airport and coordinated with air traffic control to be overhead the school at a predetermined time. With no communication between the plane and the organizers on the ground, it was a testament to staff and students that the photo turned out as well as it did. I used a Hasselblad film camera to capture the image, so it would be days before the film was processed and printed and we knew that we had the image we wanted. Back then, 10 years before 9/11, it was possible to fly a light aircraft over Ashbury at relatively low altitude. Today a restricted area established around the Governor General’s residence would make such a flight much more difficult. Finally, I was very sad to read that Andy Moore ’77 passed away in April. Andy and his older brother, Michael ’75, also deceased, attended Ashbury in part due to the generosity of school patrons such as C.E. Pickering, who established scholarships to offer an Ashbury education to students who would otherwise not have had the opportunity. Despite the sad news of his death, it was nice to read that “Andrew always said that he learned ‘to fight for those who are unable to fight for themselves’ from his Ashbury education.” Rest in peace, Andy. —Peter Wilson ’75

have done over my career. I feel it is important to acknowledge the role Ashbury played in my schooling and development. I was at Ashbury for two years, before going on to England for the last five years of school, an undergraduate degree at St Andrews, and a PhD at Cambridge. All these experiences were important in leading to a 38-year career with Environment Canada as a Research Scientist carrying out research on shorebirds. After retiring in 2012, I continue activities in this field as a Scientist Emeritus with the department. My work led to some important conservational initiatives for shorebirds, for which I have been recognized. Ashbury played a significant role in my education and in encouraging excellence. I note that Ashbury continues to play this role and am proud to be an alumnus of this distinguished school.” For more on Morrison’s work, see page 22.

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esides raising chickens, Krista Nicholds ’84 went back to school and is now studying and working in the field of historic preservation. Her children are 13 and 14 years old and they live in the historic, small city of San Juan Capistrano, California.

Spring break, 1975 at the home of Mike and Andy Moore, Brooklyn, New York. Front row (l-r): Michael Moore ’75, Andrew Moore ’77, Claude Pardo ’75. Back row (l-r): Peter Wilson ’75, Timothy Wilson ’80, Hugh Wilson ’82 . Note the Ashbury College football team photo on the shelf in the background.

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ohn Scoles ’83 hiked to the top of the Matterhorn in Switzerland on August 8, 2016 and was thinking of Ashbury.

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.I. Guy Morrison ’58 was recently appointed as a Member of the Order of Canada for his work on the conservations of shorebirds. Dr. Morrison writes, “I am very humbled, and also thrilled, to have received this national recognition for the work I

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am Mikhael ’85 dropped by the school this fall. He is the senior partner in a four person ophthalmic surgery practice in Nassau, Bahamas and, for the last 10 years, has served as Chief of Staff at the Doctors Hospital in Nassau.

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he NYU School of Professional Studies (NYUSPS) has named Dr. Sam Chandan ’92 as the new associate dean, clinical professor, and Larry and Klara Silverstein Chair in Real Estate Development and Investment


ASHBURY ALUMNI

at the School’s Schack Institute of Real Estate. A leader in both the professional and academic real estate arenas, Sam is the founder of Chandan Economics, a leading real estate debt market data and research firm; adjunct associate professor of real estate at The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania; and, partner and global head of strategy at Capri Investment Group, with approximately $3.4 billion of assets under management in the United States and investment platforms in Sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, and India. In

addition, he is the National Economist Laureate, honoris causa, of the Real Estate Lenders Association. Named one of the commercial real estate industry’s most influential people by Multi-Housing News, Dr. Chandan is a sought-after speaker at industry events and is frequently called upon by the media as an expert commentator on issues relating to real estate capital markets, financial services regulation, housing finance reform, and the macro economy. He is the editor and lead author of Real Estate Financing, published by PERE, a

columnist for the New York Observer and GlobeSt.com, co-host of The Real Estate Hour on SiriusXM Business Radio, and a frequent industry expert on CNBC, Bloomberg Business, and other business media. Sam earned a PhD in Applied Economics from The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, a BSc in Economics, also from Wharton, and holds master’s degrees in economics and engineering from the University of Pennsylvania. Prior to joining the faculty at Wharton, he was a visiting assistant professor in the Economics

to recreate himself numerous times. He might not have done homework, but he was a quick study. I admired him. We all did. At this point in our lives, I had no boyhood 15-year old envy of a new kid that had travelled the world and was clearly intent upon conquering it. I just had total pride in having him as one of my closest friends. I would go farther because I was part of his inner circle. A teammate. A classmate. A bar mate. A roommate. The brother I never had.

I met Price at a soccer tryout in high school when I was 15; we were called by our last names at Ashbury. He had a big mouth for a new boy. Within two minutes he had told me, among other things, of his motocross successes in Kenya and his windsurfing triumphs in Trinidad. I thought he was full of it. During our first scrimmage he didn’t pass me the ball once. It was evident that he didn’t need to. Eighties music and discos were “the thing” and the international boy wonder could dance, too. As I discovered, there wasn’t much he didn’t try or couldn’t do; other than homework. We both went to the University of Western Ontario. For three solid years I was known as, Shawn’s roommate. I had no first name at high school; and now, no first or last name at university! He rowed, skateboarded, drove a motorbike without a licence, danced, watered, modelled underwear and became the face of Beaver Canoe. People knew him. People wanted to be around him. And I started to like my new name. Having him as a best friend had collateral benefits. I met and dated Miss Western thanks to him. After university, he applied for his first IT sales job with Corel. Pretty hilarious for a guy that had never turned on a computer. And rarely did his homework. He got the job. A few years later, he was leaping up the corporate ladder faster than all of us could have slid down it. He was good. Really good. On his feet, nobody better. Smart. Clever. Charismatic. And able

Others know Shawn’s career better than me. I saw the titles and job descriptions. All I knew was that he was the real deal. Always was. Years later, I verified his position in that windsurfing competition when he was a kid. He hadn’t lied or even exaggerated. The real deal. As for his motocross interests as a kid, he elevated that too. Not in Kenya. Only the longest road race on the planet. 6,000 miles. Over mountains and deserts. Across Europe and Northern Africa. And completed it. Not in the safety of a car or a truck. A motorbike! Typical Shawn. Typical death-defying Shawn. He crushes his leg trying to repeat his 6,000 mile “bike ride” so he goes back to the water. Not the wee windsurfers like he had in Trinidad, but much bigger and, of course, faster. People refer to him as “The Legend”; packing in more life time adventures, successes, fun times, sports, friends and experiences than anyone we ever knew. Let’s face it, the “cat” had nine lives and he lived every one of those lives to the fullest. And how lucky we are that he took us along for the ride. I’ll miss you, Price. We all will. —Stuart Grainger ’83 Stuart Grainger, current Headmaster of Trinity College School, was a classmate of Shawn Price, who died in October 2016. For more, see the In Memoriam section.

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REMEMBERING SHAWN PRICE ’83

He met Sarah in Toronto and I watched him cry as she walked down the aisle. He was so happy. California and two talented kids later, he had a gorgeous family and an impressive team. And boy could they run and pass the ball. Certainly better than he did! Basketballs, lacrosse balls, soccer balls and they could run like the wind. I followed their progress from north of the 49th parallel with a smile on my face.


ASHBURY ALUMNI

125TH YEAR

Department at Dartmouth College and a doctoral scholar at Princeton University.

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harini Woollcombe ’93 was the lead writer and co-producer of a new short film that premiered September 7, 2016 at the CaribbeanTales International Film Festival in Toronto. Entitled See Me Now, Dharini’s first film captures the poignant journey of an AfricanCanadian woman lost in the drudgery of daily existence who rediscovers her creative spirit and self-identity after a chance encounter with a compassionate elderly prima ballerina. Her new film company, Light the Girl Productions, is focused on changing women’s roles in front of the camera and broadening the diversity of women’s stories.

Dharini Woollcombe, great granddaughter of Ashbury’s founder, with her daughter and Zac Harding ’92.

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avid Collacott ’95 and his family took a flight to Vancouver, BC recently and found himself seated next to Rebecca Rawlinson ’97. The two hadn’t seen each other since David graduated 21 years ago, and

Michelle Taggart ’00 and her husband, Alex Wilson, are thrilled to announce the arrival of their baby girl, Margot Taggart Wilson, on August 3, 2016. Margot is their third daughter and big sisters Lucy and Vivia are loving their new sister.

they spent most of the flight catching up on each others lives.

YOU CAN

MAKE A

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DIFFERENCE

Ashbury Annual Fund

Your donation this year will help to: • Build a meaningful financial assistance program • Renew our heritage assets • Develop our culture of excellence in teaching and learning

Make your gift today! ashbury.ca/give


ASHBURY ALUMNI

Darcy Walsh ’95, Senior Vice President and General Manager of Edelman’s Ottawa office, paired with Ashbury to create an internship program for students. This program will provide students in Grades 11 and 12 the opportunity to participate in public affairs in the world of communications, working with clients, gaining valuable work experience and an understanding in the field. Mi Yen Ho ’17 was chosen as the first intern at Edelman, working in July of 2016. “This internship really pushed me to

get out of my comfort zone and try new things. Public affairs was an unfamiliar field to me and I was very lucky to experience it first hand.” Darcy says it’s important to show students what is out there and to broaden their vision and skill set. “I can think of no better school to be involved with and it’s a real pleasure to give back to Ashbury College after all it has done for its students and myself.”

From left (Back): Darcy Walsh ’95, Matt Salvatore ’00, Julia Fottinger ’11, Chris Vivone. (Front): Mi Yen Ho ’17 and Alexa Naccarato ’14 at Edelman’s Ottawa office.

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rooks Hunter ’02 has launched a website called Rebrand Mental Health to showcase his short films about his experiences. Visit rebrandmentalhealth.com

Darcy Walsh ’95 and Peter Nicolini ’95 took Guy Valentine and Mike King to a Senators hockey game as a celebration of their teaching careers at Ashbury College. Both teachers retired in June 2016. What you can’t see is the back of their jerseys: Valentine 29 and King 27.

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anielle Sweetnam Holmes ’03 graduated magnum cum laude from St. Georges University School of Medicine and now is working as a pediatric resident at SUNY University Hospital Downstate in New York. Danielle attended three years at Ashbury College in Ottawa and completed her high school education in 2003 by traveling around the world on a tall ship with the Class Afloat program, offered through West Island College International. Danielle is a 2009 graduate of University of Victoria where she graduated with Honours as a Bachelor of Science in Biology major with a minor in Microbiology. Continuing her U Vic studies she completed a Masters of Neuroscience

serving as a student member of U Vic Society for Neuroscience. While earning her graduate degree, Danielle contributed to neuroscience research projects in diabetes and stroke recovery at the U Vic Division of Medical Sciences. There she coauthored two published peer-reviewed journal articles, as well as a feature story on this research, and gave numerous presentations, two of which garnered awards. Danielle was then accepted into medical school in 2012. Making the Dean’s list, Danielle’s strong academic performance earned her induction into Iota Epsilon Alpha International Medical Honor Society, comprised of students who excel academically and fulfill community service requirements.

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aroline Fulop ’05 married Luke Witherspoon ’05 on August 6, 2016 in the Thousand Islands. Alumni in the bridal party included Larissa Fulop ’09, Ian Gillespie ’05, Andrew

35 | Ashbury News

If you are an alumnus interested in mentorship and internships, please contact alumni@ashbury.ca


ASHBURY ALUMNI

125TH YEAR

Vanessa Smith ’96 married Sean Dempsey on July 30, 2016 in the chapel of Ashbury College. There were many Ashbury alumni at the wedding, both as guests and bridesmaids.

Hall ’05, Geoff Seaborn ’05, Samuel Witherspoon ’03, Cristina Fulop ’03 and Laura Langford ’04.

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ameron Fraser ’11 graduated from the Dalhousie University in 2015 with a bachelor’s degree of Environmental Design Studies. Cameron is currently pursuing a graduate degree in the Masters of Architecture program, at Dalhousie University, where he received a scholarship prize.

John Biewald ’12 was given the opportunity to play in the Ottawa Redblacks pre-season game versus the Hamilton Tigercats here in Ottawa. He was offered a position on the practice roster, which he declined in order to play out his final season for Western University Mustangs.

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36 | Ashbury News

aniel ’08 and Michael Tarnowski ’05 dropped by the school this summer. They were visiting from Germany.

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livia Froislie ’10, is working in New York City at Spring, a fashion-forward mobile shopping app. After Ashbury, Olivia graduated from Queen’s and then received an Associate Degree in Fashion Marketing from Parsons.

ecilia Scoles ’13 was one of nine StFX students to receive the prestigious McKenna Centre Irving Research Mentorship Awards. Cecilia is planning to do an honours degree in anthropology with a subsidiary in history, and is looking forward to working with anthropology professor Dr. Jane McMillian and the Mi’kmaq community in Nova Scotia. They plan to seek and collect additional relevant materials related to the experiences of residential school survivors in Atlantic Canada, and collaboratively construct an exhibit related to regional community desires for the ongoing mobilization of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action. The central goal of her research is to monitor and document the regional activities of implementing the 94 Calls to Action. “I am very excited to be a part of this research opportunity here at StFX. Doing research with Dr. McMillian is an opportunity that I would not have otherwise had if it was not for the Irving grant,” she says, noting she is

John Beiwald ’12 surrounded by his friends, Keith Hoddinott ’12, Andres Diaz ’12, Duncan Lurie ’12 and Benjamin Oppenheimer ’12

hoping the research will provide important insights and connections moving into her last year at StFX.

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itch Kurylowicz ’15, current University of Toronto student and founder of Project Jenga, joined


ASHBURY ALUMNI

Katrine Lightstone ’12 is currently pursuing her master’s degree in International Business at the Copenhagen Business School in Denmark. While completing her undergraduate degree in Accounting and International Business at McGill University, she continued her Ashbury rugby career as a member of the McGill Women’s Rugby team. She is currently a member of the Norwegian National Women’s Rugby 7s team having represented Norway in International competitions in the Czech Republic, Bulgaria and France. Photo: Katrine Lightstone ’12 and her father Albert Lightstone past Ashbury Guild President and co-chair of the 125th anniversary committee, Ashbury College, were at the European Rugby championships in Prague.

Rick Hansen, Margaret Trudeau and others at the Canadian Museum of History for the final Project Jenga gala on November 8. To top the $750,000 Mitch has already raised, the evening collected the finishing funds for the Ngulot Mountain View All Boys Secondary School in the Nkori Nkori region of Kenya. Several Ashbury friends and families were present at the gala, and will be on hand in Kenya for the school’s historic opening in December.

Thank You to our Partners

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OTTAWA LUXURY PROPERTIES

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he Ottawa Association of Fundraising Professionals announced that Jonathan Chow ’16 and Alyssa Chow, Grade 10, are this year’s recipients for the 2016 Outstanding Philanthropic Youth Award. Jonathan’s personal health struggles throughout his childhood led the siblings to develop a keen interest in the health and well-being of their community. Through various mediums they work to support and promote multiple charities both at home and abroad. Jonathan and Alyssa see the true value of being engaged with community organizations, and as such their philanthropic footprint has made a positive impact on some of our community’s most vulnerable residents. Congratulations Jonathan and Alyssa!


ASHBURY ALUMNI

125TH YEAR

Memoriam

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. Christie Arnold passed away on April 18, 2016. He was the beloved husband of Louise (née Proulx) and loving father of John ’76, Daniel ’78, Marc (Valerie) and David ’85 (Beth). Christie grew up in Toronto and Bermuda and enlisted in the Royal Canadian Navy at the age of 17 and served on HMS Sheffield from 1943–1946. He went on to graduate from the University of Toronto in 1950, Western University in 1953 and to marry his soulmate Louise in Chicoutimi in 1954. He had a rewarding career and used his engineering and business talents with such organizations as Alcan, Canron, Studebaker-Worthington, Government of Canada, Wilson Machine, and Canadian British Consultants. His work allowed him to travel extensively throughout the world. Additionally, he was the Executive Director for The Engineering Institute of Canada, the Canadian Society for Electrical & Computer Engineering, and The Canadian Society for Mechanical Engineering. Christie was an active volunteer at Ashbury College. He served on the the Foundation Board for many years and later became a Life Governor. He established the T. Christie Arnold Mathematics and Science Bursary in 1994.

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stelle Brown passed away on May 28, 2016 at the age of 98. In the late ’60s Estelle was the chapel organist at Ashbury College, along with Godfrey Hewitt, the choir director.

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eter Donald Golding ’69 passed away on August 28, 2016 in Vancouver after a yearlong struggle with brain cancer. Peter will be dearly missed by Kathy (nee Kay), his devoted and loving wife of 21 years; the children he adored, Jessica and Jeremy; their mother and dear friend Ginny; brother Michael ’65 (Robin); sister Susie Langley (Shane). Peter’s work as a journalist took him from the east coast to the west coast in 1977 to work with Pacific Diver as an editor. He moved on to CP Air as the public relations rep for B.C. and the Yukon, pursued a passion for the visual arts as an art broker in western Canada, and returned to end his career, where it first began, as editor of Diver magazine. Peter held a

lifelong fascination with the underwater world and was a consummate aquanaut and wordsmith. A loving father and husband, Peter was an insightful man with a curious mind, always a good listener, and possessing a sharp wit which delighted those around him.

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ntonio (Toni) Guimarães passed away on September 28, 2016 in Ottawa. Toni was the co-founder of Excel Human Resources and Altis Professional, He was a loving father to four daughters: Morgan ’14, Brooklyn, Torey ’20 and Camryn. He was proud to watch them grow and develop their interests over the years. Toni was a true hockey fan, and coached or participated in the Nepean Girls Hockey Association for over 10 years.

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onald Lambe ’46 passed away on April 25, 2016 in Oakville, Ontario. He attendened Ashbury College from 1939–1941. Ron and his parents moved to Beamsville in 1947 and he worked in Toronto for many years in the financial business.

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ames C. Langley ’41 died in Ottawa December 24, 2015 at the age of 93. Jim was educated at the German School, Omori, in Japan before arriving at Ashbury. After Ashbury, he went on to earn degrees at Oxford and the U of T. During World War II, Jim served in the British Army (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) in the U.K. and the Far East. He joined the Canadian Foreign Service in 1950. As a career diplomat he served in many capacities, including as Ambassador to Mexico and Guatemala. Retiring from the public service, he immersed himself in Meso-American culture, earning a PhD in archaeology from the University of London and becoming a world expert on the pre-Columbian civilization of Teotihuacan in Mexico. Jim was made an Officer of the Order of Canada in 2003, and was awarded the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal in 2012.

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icholas Polk ’74 passed away on June 29, 2016. Following Ashbury, he earned his BA at Carleton University and later became an assistant to Evelyn Gigantes, when she was an NDP Ontario Cabinet Minister. He is survived by his brothers Michael ’66 and David ’67, former teacher in the Junior School.

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hawn Price ’83, died October 25, 2016 in California at the age of 53. Shawn spent more than two decades in the technology sector, most recently as a top executive at


ASHBURY ALUMNI

Oracle. Outside of work, he was well known in Silicon Valley as a lover of race cars, sailing and motorcycles, winning several high-profile competitions.

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nne Pritchard, house matron at Ashbury College from 1986–1996, died peacefully, surrounded by love, on August 6, 2016, at Northumberland Hills Hospital. Born in Cardiff, Wales, she was proud of her roots, but embraced Canadian life wholeheartedly after emigrating here with her husband in 1959. She was a teacher, a lifelong Guider, an active member of the United Church, and a volunteer for countless organizations.

important legacy and a list of significant accomplishments—personal, professional and in public life. Mike was a trusted friend and advisor to many of the most respected politicians, business leaders and government affairs professionals across Canada. His relationships transcended partisan politics and business competition-to know Mike was to like him. He started his career as a Parliament Hill staffer in the 1970s and went on to hold a number of senior volunteer positions with the Liberal Party of Canada including a stint as Chief Financial Officer from 1986-90. A close friend and confidante of Prime Minister Paul Martin, he was Chair of Mr. Martin’s leadership campaign in 1990 and headed the transition team in preparation for Mr. Martin assuming office as Prime Minister. Mike was a co-founder of public affairs company Earnscliffe and served as a mentor, leader, friend and role model to many. His community work was equally important to him as a way of giving back. He served on the Board of Governors at Ashbury College. He was Chair of the Board from 2001– 2004. He and ML also established the Michael Robinson and M.L. Walsh Family Bursary to assist students on financial aid participate in school trips.

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r. Harold Elford Gilmour Short ’55 passed away in West Vancouver on March 19, 2016. He attended Selwyn House, Ashbury College, the University of New Brunswick and finally, McGill University for his degree in dental surgery. He established a family dental practice and served on several hospital staffs in New Westminster. He was respected and admired by both colleagues and patients for his professional and kind nature.

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rthur Skolnik ’72, passed away on January 27, 2016. He lived a full and passionate life devoted to his career as a landscape contractor and ran a successful business in Toronto. His love of Canadian art, UFC and everything Japanese was legendary. Arthur was a longtime serious Bonsai enthusiast and was instrumental in spreading the word about this beautiful living art form throughout Canada. His positive attitude and wonderful sense of humour was an inspiration to all that knew him.

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ike Robinson died suddenly on July 1, 2016 at his beloved home in Normandy, France, at the age of 65, leaving behind his large, loving family and a legion of friends and colleagues in public life and business. He is survived by his wife, ML Walsh; four children Craig (Katherine), Drew ’00 (Vanessa), Stuart ’02 (Jodi) and Katie (Sean); four grandchildren (John, Ellie, Charlotte and Jacob); and his mother Jan Robinson. Mike leaves an

ucian (Luke) Wells ’51 passed away in Rochester, New York on April 22, 2016. He was a devoted and thoughtful husband, father, grandfather and great-grandfather. Following graduation from Ashbury College, Luke served in the U.S. Army. He began his career as an electrical engineer at Raetheon, worked at Xerox, and then became a building contractor. Luke made a point of returning to Ashbury College’s homecoming every year, with his wife Florence. He attended 38 homecoming weekends following his graduation in 1951.

Please feel welcome to submit memories of departed Ashburians to communications@ashbury.ca

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Ashbury in 2141

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e asked our Grade 4 students what they think Ashbury will be like 125 years from now.

eople are going to come here on hoverboards and there will be screens on desks. I think there is going to be a swimming pool, and a hockey rink! —Jaiden tudents will have a little flying robot that has a pullout screen, phone, pencils, erasers and other things. —Jennifer

40 | Ashbury News

he school will be completely electric and the uniforms will be robosuits. The kinds of subjects will be programming and at lunch, there will be butlers giving you healthy Jello! —Julian

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nstead of uniforms there will be suits with wings on them and you will be able to fly to school. —Waka

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he food will probably be very healthy and people will probably teleport to school and to classes. —Diego

eople will come in flying cars and people will be double as smart. People will have robots that will give you your iPad and laser computer. —Kamal think there will be chairs that will move alone and that you can program where you want them to go. —Alya here will be new cars with blasting engines and there will be new food, like a new type of fish. —Maryam

think that the school will be super big and there will be an elevator and escalators. —Matteo

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he lunches will be candy and the school would be made of candy, so if we were hungry, we could eat the school. —Sara

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here will be robot teachers, massage chairs, hover boards and everyone would wear glitter. We would have flying computers and flying shoes, metal clothes and magical lunches. —Diya


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The universities that will benefit from the global perspectives of our 2016 graduates

Class 2016


Ashbury College 362 Mariposa Avenue Ottawa, ON K1M 0T3 ashbury.ca

Address errors and corrections can be forwarded to alumni@ashbury.ca Returns requested Address Correction Required

Ashbury News Fall 2016