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Ashbury News Spring 2013 Autumn/Winter 2017

EVERY DIPLOMA TELLS A STORY CHAQUE DIPLÔME RACONTE UNE HISTOIRE 125TH YEAR

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University

Admissions

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Homecoming

2017

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Alumni

Profiles


Ashbury News Autumn/Winter 2017

Table of Contents

Ashbury News is published twice a year and sent to over 3,800 alumni, parents and friends.

News & Notes

Ashbury News is printed on 35% recycled paper. Online magazine updates are available at ashbury.ca

This place is home

Please submit news, story ideas, alumni updates, and any address changes to:

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Every diploma tells a story

Ashbury College Communications Office 362 Mariposa Avenue Ottawa, ON K1M 0T3 communications@ashbury.ca Phone: 613.749.5954

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Front cover: Ashbury’s 125th graduating class celebrates by throwing their school ties into the air.

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Inside front cover: Music students perform during the school’s Remembrance Day service.

Springfest

Features Volunteer recognition 8

Ashbury Charity Golf Classic

Back cover: Maria Latofski Kott ziplines at Mont Tremblant as part of Grade 12 camp activities. (photo courtesy of Todd Lamont)

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Hamilton Southam

Design and layout by AN Design Communications

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Liz Archdale

Connect with us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram!

@ashburycollege

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Ashbury Alumni

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Reunions

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MOVING? Update your address alumni@ashbury.ca

Homecoming

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Home and Away 26

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Chatter

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We remember

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NEWS & NOTES

Head of School

From the

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shbury remains a busy place as 700 students from 50 countries around the world are well settled into our 126th academic year. It has been a beautiful Canadian autumn on campus, and our Homecoming weekend was no exception, with many alumni returning from different corners of the globe—including as far away as Chile, Columbia, and the Netherlands—representing classes from the 1940s to our most recent graduates. Our unique alumni network remains strong with various events to connect you with each other. Two exciting sets of plans are in place for Ashbury that seek to further build on both our academic and experiential promise to students. First is our recent announcement to develop our now aged science facilities with a new Centre for Science & Innovation in concert with an ongoing emphasis in strengthening our Scholarship and Bursary Program. We will have much more to share on this exciting project in the coming months, and I invite you to read about our plans in this issue of Ashbury News. Second, Ashbury’s delegation to the Round Square International Conference in Cape Town returned in October as Ashbury prepares to host students and educators from around the world in Ottawa next September. Round Square is made up of over 150 international schools, representing 60 nations with a focus on a set of IDEALS (Internationalism, Democracy, Environmentalism, Adventure, Leadership and Service) and which speak to our own school values. In one year’s time, the entire Ashbury community will be involved at some level in this international conference, and we encourage our local alumni to consider hosting our international delegates for what is sure to be enriching experience. As we hold our international orientation dearly at Ashbury, we also cherish our Canadian values of democracy and freedom. With the vastness of our geographic spaces, one can often lose sense for who makes up our diverse demographic, and how our democracy functions. In 1975, a group of idealistic educators from Ashbury College had a unique idea: to create a bilingual, nonpartisan youth education program to promote understanding of the role and function of our national government, and the meaning of Canadian citizenship. The Forum for Young Canadians was born. Gathering students from every province and territory, the Forum was founded using the resources of the National Capital Region for a series of one-week seminars with the Ashbury campus and residences as a home base. Over 22,000 students have since

Norman Southward with John Nesbitt ’48 and son David Nesbitt ’82 at 2017 Homecoming.

participated in the Forum, and the program’s alumni often associate the Forum with Ashbury. I am pleased to announce that we have recently signed an agreement that renews and deepens our historical relationship with Forum for Young Canadians. With this partnership, four partial scholarships are available for deserving Ashbury students, and a Forum Founders Award that will be available to a student who demonstrates an awareness of the many aspects of our country: languages, diversity, politics, history and people. Many Ashburians have participated over the years, and several weeks ago, a Forum alumni event on campus saw some of our current students in the crowd. Citoyenneté, Démocratie, Gouvernance. Ces concepts font partie intégrante du fonctionnement de notre pays, mais que signifient ils vraiment? Que signifient-ils pour les jeunes? Le Forum a deux objectifs : Faire comprendre aux jeunes Canadien(nes) le rôle et la fonction des trois niveaux d’administration publique démocratique au Canada et promouvoir la citoyenneté canadienne. We look forward to our ongoing relationship with Forum, and many others within the National Capital Region as we celebrate the end of Canada’s 150th year, our combined rich history, and bright future.

Probitas, Comitas, Virtus, Norman Southward Head of School – Directeur


Ashbury College’s Centre for Science & Innovation

CLASSROOM

30'X40'

LAB 6

Building a passion for science

Coming 2019

740sf

SCIENCE DISPLAY

Inquire and Discover

and innovation spaces in 2017, followed by the development of all Senior science and innovation spaces on three levels, replacing the current science wing, during the 2018–19 school year. A focus on increasing financial assistance will also be an important part of the project.

SCIENCE GALLERY

PREP 5 12'x18'

The building includes a beautiful courtyard and outdoor classroom adjacent to Ashbury’s historic chapel

1500sf

LAB 5 1,500

1,200-square foot labs

square foot innovation lab

EXIT STAIR

6

40% increase to classroom areas

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100%

33%

new multi-purpose classrooms and study areas

state-of-the-art equipment

of graduates go into science and engineering

LOW HEIGHT STORAGE SPACE

30'X40'

Moveable furniture in consolidated labs and lightfilled classrooms

INNOVATION LAB

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Ashbury’s new spaces for science will increase teaching areas by 40%, and will provide students with six university-level labs, setting a new standard for independent school facilities

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Our new Centre for Science & Innovation will involve two phases: renewed Junior science

SCIENCE DISPLAY

Ashbury’s current science facilities are almost 45 years old. And with over 1/3 of our graduating students heading into science or engineering programs, there’s a need to support innovative lines of discovery and critical thinking that will meet the needs of tomorrow.

Visit

ashbury.ca/innovation to learn more


This place is home

David McRobie knows Ashbury’s campus well, and has helped shape Ashbury’s plan for the new Centre for Science & Innovation

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or an architect who has designed primarily corporate and commercial buildings, David McRobie often says that his most rewarding work has involved a school. “The most satisfying projects of my professional career have been with Ashbury College,” says McRobie, who is the father of Ashburians, Deane ’08 and Audrey and Chase, both ’11. McRobie is the name behind his Ottawa firm, MCROBIE Architects + Interior Designers. His designs have literally shaped much of the modern campus at Ashbury College, including Maclaren Hall, the new gymnasium, Matthews House and the Creative Learning Centre (CLC), as well as renovations throughout the school. His latest project is the design of our new Centre for Science & Innovation, planned for 2019. It’s likely not to come as a surprise to anyone who has sat in a science classroom at Ashbury in the past decade or so, that the current science wing is one of the more deficient areas of the campus.

“That area of the school was identified as being in need of a fresh approach, which recognizes how teaching methods and their facilities have changed,” McRobie says. Once Ashbury’s Board of Governors gave the okay to begin the process of design in May 2017, McRobie and his colleagues got started on the process of planning a new centre for science at the school, generally within the footprint of the original lab wing. But before pen was set to paper, or more accurately, planning software was launched, McRobie needed to understand how the spaces would be used. “One of our biggest challenges was to understand where teaching is going in the sciences,” he says, explaining that dialogue with teachers was the starting point for the creative process. “Teaching spaces are personal,” McRobie says. “Teachers are really invested in their spaces, so their style for instruction should be reflected in what the architect proposes.”


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David and Kyle McRobie are parents to Deane ’08, who lives in London, England, and works for Acuris, a media company specializing in corporate financial news and analysis. Audrey ’11 lives in California, where she works as a content strategist at Facebook. Chase ’11 works in Kingston, Ontario with Octane Biotech, a medical technology company serving the field of regenerative medicine.

The goal is to support Ashbury’s program needs, McRobie says.

disciplinary classroom will be used by various faculties, and McRobie hopes many of the added features of the building will be attractive to everyone at Ashbury. “We’ve hope this will be a space for the overall school community,” he says. Design details Ashbury’s new Centre for Science & Innovation will be three storeys: two above ground and one at a lower level, housing seven labs and one classroom. Six of the labs will be designated by subject (Biology, Chemistry and Physics), and there will be one multi-disciplinary Innovation Lab. McRobie describes all the labs as, “university-quality spaces, in terms of their functionality, flexibility and services, meeting the highest standard for independent schools in Canada.” In addition, they will be bright and welcoming, with opportunity, where appropriate, for generous natural light. As well as high-calibre work areas, the entire space will have a defining look to make it a unique space within the school.

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Ashbury’s science faculty talked with McRobie and outlined some of the issues with their existing classrooms. Together, they discussed solutions that could take shape in the new building. One challenge was visibility for teachers and students of all activity within the labs; specifically, orienting all workspace to promote group participation in a flexible and collegial teaching environment. As a result, the labs are has designed with a completely open view, so students will be able to face the teacher—and each other—as they conduct experiments. While accommodating the unique services needs of Physics, Biology and Chemistry programs, McRobie had to design the labs to be flexible to accommodate the possibility that, due to scheduling, some crossover between programs’ use of valued lab space may be required. “Labs are a lot less flexible than regular classrooms, because one needs to factor in plumbing, power and gas services, fume hoods and ventilation requirements,” he says. “Once those labs are completed, they’re going to be there for 20, 25 years or more. We need to get them right from the start.” While the spaces will truly be a home for the sciences at Ashbury, it’s not just science students who are set to benefit from this new addition to campus: a multi-


NEWS & NOTES

Two Words

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David McRobie says he always wanted to be an architect. “It likely happened as a result of planning, drawing and building things at an early age,” he says. McRobie attended Lower Canada College, and found his passion at McGill University, in the architecture program. “I really had to prove myself at McGill,” he says. “There were 40 of us in my class, of whom only 20 graduated.” Summers between university semesters were spent working in architectural offices in Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver. After graduation, one of those summer jobs eventually resulted in an opportunity to open an office for the firm in Ottawa.

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“The goal is to support Ashbury’s program needs,” McRobie says. “We hope to excite students to science opportunities that exist in the world.” A green wall is being considered, which will be naturallylit from a skylight, with supplementary illumination powered by rooftop solar panels—as McRobie puts it, “a science project in its own right.” A science gallery at the heart of the building will provide students with a prominent venue to display their work. “We are working to showcase the green themes and sustainable design already present on campus,” says McRobie.

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McRobie later bought the Ottawa practice from his former firm, recognizing the opportunity for influencing design within a growing National Capital Region, largely spurred by the emerging hightechnology sector. In 2004, Arnie Vered, a friend, client and former governor of Ashbury College, alerted McRobie to the school’s intention to build a new dining hall and gymnasium, and asked if he would be interested in bidding on the job. “I was a bit surprised, because we had never done educational work before, but the job sounded exciting,” McRobie remembers. His firm ended up getting the job, and Maclaren Hall and the adjoining gymnasium opened in 2004. Later, as Ashbury’s residential program was expanding, McRobie was fortunate enough to design the Matthews House for boys.

The centre will also form an important link with the rest of the school. On the second level, there will be a clear connection to the Creative Learning Centre, literally joining science with the arts. “Our design incorporated the needs of the various programs, but connectivity is the most important aspect of what we do,” he says. While the centre will be Ashbury’s newest contribution to the campus, McRobie is quick to say that the school’s heritage will be evident in the new building. One of his favourite parts of the project is a small courtyard along the Glenwood side of campus. McRobie has envisioned an outdoor seminar space—all in the shadow of Ashbury’s historic chapel. “It will be a quiet, landscaped place, and I imagine classes happening out there as a bridge between the old and the new.” And what is McRobie most looking forward to in the finished build? “I really want to see how the space is used,” he says. “The CLC made the library a more accessible part of the school. It will be interesting to see how many non-science students use the new space.


NEWS & NOTES

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David McRobie

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McRobie consults with colleagues at his firm, MCROBIE Architects + Interior Designers

For more information on the Centre for Science & Innovation, visit ashbury.ca/innovation or contact Bruce Mutch, Executive Director of Enrollment and Advancement (bruce.mutch@ ashbury.ca) or Stephanie Young, Director of Development (stephanie.young@ashbury.ca).

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McRobie’s last design for the school was the Creative Learning Centre, with its light-filled music rooms

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Six new labs will be university-quality spaces

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The Centre for Science & Innovation will sit adjacent to Ashbury’s historic chapel, and will provide a western axis to the Creative Learning Centre

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The new Centre for Science & Innovation plans

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Matthews House, the boys residence

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The new science building will consolidate all senior sciences in one space, allowing for easier collaboration

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When Ashbury turned its sights to a dedicated space for music and the arts, McRobie was back to work again, and was pleased to see the doors to the Creative Learning Centre he designed open in 2014. “Working with the school community has been an expanding experience for me as an architect,” he says. McRobie says he is fortunate that his work with Ashbury has mixed with his personal life, and he is able to view changes to campus not just from a professional point of view, but from that as parent of Ashbury students as well. “To me, the school and its people, are family,” he says. “This place is home.”  

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Navigating the future with university admissions

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igh school can mark many milestones in a student’s life, but perhaps most significant is the transition to university. The process can be challenging to negotiate, and can be the first time students need to rely on themselves to achieve the results they want. “It really is the student’s journey,” says Sarah Kehoe, Ashbury’s academic and university counsellor. “Students need to learn to navigate and self advocate. For many, applying to university is the first real step on the road to becoming an adult.” Assisting graduating students along the way is the work of Ashbury’s university admissions office, who combined, bring more than 30 years of experience to the role. Director of University Admissions, Christine Tordon, and Kehoe, assisted by Sheryl Johnston, provide their skilled guidance to all senior students, with particular focus on those in Grade 12. Ashbury’s university admissions program is a wellknown, and frequently touted, element of the school’s advantage—and selling point. With all of Ashbury’s graduating students heading to post-secondary learning, the

office is responsible for helping to chart the course of many futures. Providing one-on-one counselling to a graduating class of upwards of 150 students is a daunting task. Tordon, who did the job solo for over 15 years, has counselled more than 2,500 students over the course of her career at Ashbury. In 2016, she was joined by Kehoe, who brought 10 years of university counselling experience with her. Together, the pair advise each graduating student on their post-secondary options, and the myriad of processes, applications and steps to get them there. “We work collaboratively to design and deliver workshops to address specific aspects of the application process,” explains Kehoe, who’s quick to praise her colleague’s wealth of subject knowledge. “It’s a way for us to introduce ourselves to students, so they can hear our philosophies and approaches.” “I was initially worried that we wouldn’t present well together, but we do,” says Tordon. “And the fact that Sarah is a teacher is so helpful in our work, and the way we approach things.”


NEWS & NOTES

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“I know that some of my counterparts at other schools counsel on everything, including emotional health and wellness” says Tordon. “But I’m fortunate to be able to contain my work to my specific area of expertise. I’m also fortunate to have excellent colleagues available for referral when I need them.” Another difference to public schools is the international makeup of the Ashbury student population, and its relative affluence. With upwards of 50 countries represented in the student body, post-secondary interest is spread internationally. “Our job can be more complex, because we have to understand so many different admission processes around the world,” explains Kehoe. “We’re there to advise and troubleshoot throughout the whole process.” With such a diverse group of schools on offer, it’s a fulltime challenge understanding so many programs and admission policies. Kehoe says it’s not uncommon for a Grade 11 or 12 student to express interest in applying to a never-before-heard-of university. “I do a lot of research between the first and second meetings,” she says. One way both Kehoe and Tordon gain first-hand experience of a university is through in-person visits. It’s not

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Tordon, who has an English degree and a master’s in adult learning, worked previously at a university on Canada’s east coast—a background that comes in handy for her current position. But she had to give up her work advising first-year students when her husband was initially transferred to Oakville, and then to Ottawa. She soon found work at Turnbull School, and then spotted an ad in the paper for a counselling position at Ashbury. Her university advising background turned out to be an asset during the interview. “I didn’t realize I was going to be a guidance counsellor, but I think the Head at the time [Roy Napier] wanted someone who had experience on the other side of the university advising desk,” she says. Knowing what universities were looking for proved to be an advantage, but Tordon says there was still a huge learning curve after she landed her new role. “Being from the Maritimes, I didn’t even know where a lot of the schools were located in Ontario, ” she says, with a laugh. As a high school teacher, Kehoe brings her secondary education experience to the advisor role. And although she taught social science and career studies, she always knew her calling was in counselling. “I did some alternate practicum placements in guidance offices when I was training, and I knew it was where I wanted to be,” she says. “I like working one on one with students, and helping them with their journey.” Both Tordon and Kehoe say their work is unique—both when compared to public schools, and other independent schools as well. Ashbury’s university admissions function is part of the Student Services Office that provides students with a range of resources, from course selection, to wellness support. Counsellors are separated by grade, or IB, but advisors collaborate via regular meetings, or when needed. It’s a network that comes in handy, says Tordon, particularly when the stress of the application process affects a student.


NEWS & NOTES

uncommon for each of them to visit two or three schools each year, anywhere around the world. Tordon says that schools invite counsellors on tours, depending on the number of Canadian students, or Ashbury students, who apply. In just the past few years, Ashbury’s university admissions staff have visited universities across Scotland, the Netherlands, Alberta and the U.S. Kehoe says the visits provide a good opportunity for her to experience the campuses she might recommend to students, and to speak in person with the admissions staff who will be making admission decisions. “The best visits incorporate student panels, so we can hear directly from current students about their experience at that school,” says Kehoe. “It helps me get a sense of which type of Ashbury student would thrive in that particular learning and student life environment.” In addition to learning more about programs, touring labs and residences, Tordon says she also takes the opportunity to get off campus whenever she makes a visit. “I like to walk around the city, to get a sense of the environment, and because parents always like to know how safe it is.” While students may be less concerened with campus safety than their parents, they are interested in scholarship opportunities, diversity of programs, campus location, and residence spots. But more and more, Toron and Kehoe say students are choosing a university that will land them a job after graduation.

“Students are definitely more concerned with employability now,” says Kehoe, adding that more students are prioritizing co-op, research, and study abroad opportunities in their decision-making process. And while Kehoe admits that job prospects should be a factor, it needn’t be the first priority when students are selecting post-secondary options. “Students always think they won’t be able to find a job with an arts or a general degree. I say ‘I did’, and lots of other people did too,” she says. “My belief has always been that if you follow your strengths, you will find a job.” Advising timeline Most of the work Tordon and Kehoe do with students begins in Grade 11, when they meet with students to introduce the concept of university applications and timelines, and get them thinking about options. Then, when students enter Grade 12, they hit the ground running working on their applications. The entire process can range massively, from the most-straightforward option of a student who applies to three universities in Ontario, fills out the form from the Ontario Universities’ Application Centre, and pays the $150 fee. For other students, the options are more complicated and diverse. Many students who apply to fine arts or architecture programs require portfolios of between eight to 15 pieces. Other applications demand essays that range from 250 to 650 words. Tordon says that Ashbury students apply to eight different schools on average, encompassing three or four different application systems. Students who apply to schools in the U.S. or U.K. require reference letters with their applications. Tordon and Kehoe customize and write each of their counsellor letters,

UNIVERSITY ADMISSIONS CALENDAR

JANUARY–FEBRUARY:

first meetings and workshops with Grade 11s, first set of marks due, check averages, grades

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sent to Ontario Universities’ Application Centre, Canadian supplementary essays due MARCH–APRIL:

Grade 12 marks go in, meet again with Grade 11s, curriculum meetings and set up for Closing

MAY:

offers start come in, advise Grade 12s on selections and acceptances

JUNE:

Closing (prepare diplomas and awards)

JULY–AUGUST:

prepare and produce school profile and update website, ensure offers come through

SEPTEMBER–OCTOBER:

meet with Grade 12s and parents, start meetings for U.K. and U.S. admissions, university visits to campus. U.S. and U.K. applications due

NOVEMBER–DECEMBER: follow-up essays, prepare transcripts. U.S. and U.K. applications due


NEWS & NOTES

We know our students are impressive Carleton Brown Western Queen’s Northeastern Oxford U of T Cornell Ottawa NYU Harvard McGill Mount Allison UBC Waterloo London

These universities think so too

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learning exceptionality for several years in high school. When it came time for him to choose a university, Kehoe says she was determined to find the right fit program, and a school that offered strong support services. “Years later, I happened to be at a conference at that university, and asked the admissions team about this young man, who was in third year at the time,” she says. “The response I got was, ‘everyone knows him, he’s such a great guy, and involved in everything.” It was such a good feeling knowing he landed in the right spot.” Tordon too has many memories of student successes over the years, ranging from admission to Ivy League schools, to acceptance at niche programs, where she knows a student will flourish. She’s particularly fond of conversations with parents that happen at graduation, where the challenges of the application process are forgotten, and the future is celebrated. Now in the middle of another year of advising, Tordon and Kehoe are already looking forward to the next school year, to the workshops and university visits they’ll plan, and to the acceptance offers that will come in the spring. First though, they need to steward Ashbury’s 126th graduating class through to June, when they will accept their diplomas, and begin the next chapter of their academic careers. “I love being a part of Closing,” says Tordon. “As each student is called up, we know the story of their journey. I love the fact there are 150 folders that we’ve stuffed with care, and each one represents a person and a story.”  

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Head of School, Norman Southward, hands out diplomas at the 125th Closing

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Sarah Kehoe, Academic Advisor & University Counsellor

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Christine Tordon advises a student about admissions procedures in Hong Kong

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Ashbury’s university admissions office coordinates the awards at graduation each year

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We celebrated our Class of 2017’s remarkable university offers in the Ottawa Citizen in the spring of 2017

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spending between three to four hours on each one. Last year, they wrote more than 60 different letters for students. Throughout the process, Tordon and Kehoe keep in touch with teachers, who also write reference letters, as well as provide feedback about student strengths and identify any issues. “Teachers are really good about letting us know about a concern,” says Tordon. Complementing the practical components of applications, Tordon and Kehoe hold specialized workshops for students on such topics as applying to the U.S., or essay writing. An integral part of the whole process are also the one-on-one sessions with students, where the important conversations about fit and potential happen. “A lot of our job really comes down to managing expectations,” says Kehoe. “Our students apply to the most competitive schools in the world, so the stakes are high and admission decisions are often subjective.” For this reason, Tordon and Kehoe advise students to develop a list of schools that offers a range of viable options. “We are really about finding the right fit for the student,” says Torond, “and not every school is right for every student.” Meetings with parents are also part of the process—a necessary, and sometimes emotional one. Tordon says that she often encounters parents and children who are on opposite pages when it comes to their views on which universities to pursue. Open minds are important, and Tordon encourages families to broaden their list of choices to find the right fit for the student. By the time the last application letters are submitted each fall, it’s not uncommon for a student’s final choices to be vastly different from the schools on their list at the start of Grade 12. “Our job is to suggest options that might be better in the long run,” says Tordon. And while the admissions process can be trying at times, the results are worth it. Kehoe can recall many happy stories throughout her advising career, but one in particular stands out. She recalls counselling a boy, a “great kid” with a

Grades 4–12 | Coeducation ashbury.ca


Springfest 2017

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ur annual Springfest was a sun-filled day ready to usher in the season! The morning started off with the Guild Plant Sale and our now-famous Colour Run. Students, staff, faculty and our Head of School all participated in this fun and colourful activity around Rockcliffe Park and Ashbury’s campus. Rugby rounded out the afternoon with games from our Junior School, Varsity girls, Junior and Senior boys teams. Visitors enjoyed another delicious BBQ lunch prepared by Brown’s, and the Guildrun canteen. A casual alumni reception followed, where returning grads enjoyed catching up with old classmates and former teachers. Thanks to everyone who came out to celebrate! You can look forward to Springfest 2018 taking place on Saturday, May 12.

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The final colour blast

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Head of School, Norman Southward, and students preparing for the Colour Run

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Colourful students post-run

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Runners take their mark

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Volunteers at another successful canteen

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Junior School students ready to play some flag rugby

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Junior Boys Rugby

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9 Young alumni enjoyed an afternoon reception Senior Girls Rugby

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Counts

Every Gift

Ashbury’s Annual Giving Campaign

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ll gifts to the Annual Giving Campaign, regardless of size, are a statement of support for Ashbury’s mission. Philanthropic gifts from parents, alumni, faculty, staff, and friends help to support the people, programs, and facilities that make our school so special. Last year, gifts helped enhance the Ashbury experience through

academics, athletics, arts, clubs, and increased opportunities for students and faculty. Special acknowledgement to the Ashbury Guild, whose dedication and hard work resulted in remarkable contributions that helped bring many of these enhancements to fruition!

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Annual gifts at work

• Junior School Discovery lab and Science lab: Enhanced science facilities in the Junior School, supporting a dynamic and hands-on approach to teaching and learning • Kinesthetic furniture and classroom design: Helps to support the many ways young people learn by harnessing energy and improving concentration • Livestream infrastructure and installation: Livestreaming athletics, artistic performances, assemblies, and guest speakers will help showcase Ashbury to family and friends near and far • Upgrades to the theatre: Improved sound, lighting and flooring for both performers and audience members • Student financial assistance: Increased opportunities for deserving young people • Gym partitions: Help facilitate additional practice opportunities by allowing greater configuration of existing spaces, this helps to reduce the need for late practice times • Outdoor Education equipment/Duke of Edinburgh: Equipment upgrades and acquisition helps to support the increased number of students who are seeking outdoor education experiences • Fitness equipment: Additional exercise equipment and manipulatives have been added to The Chris and Mary Taggart Fitness Centre • Guest speakers: Opportunities for the entire community to hear from fascinating experts and leaders • Green Roof: Enhanced access to areas for quiet reflection and study, shaded areas, seating areas, space for outdoor class time and a recycled rainwater irrigation system

Everyone is invited to participate in philanthropy at Ashbury through our Annual Giving campaign, where gifts at all levels are deeply appreciated, and collectively, create a meaningful impact. For more information, please contact Stephanie Young, Director of Development at stephanie.young@ashbury.ca or visit ashbury.ca/advancement.


Volunteer

Recognition

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shbury’s spring volunteer appreciation reception celebrated the school’s varied community of volunteers including parents, alumni, and friends. It was a wonderful evening where several of Ashbury’s most devoted volunteers were recognized. Victor Saikaley and Eric Johannsen were both presented the Outstanding Student Support Volunteer Award for their engagement and commitment to advancing student life. Padme Raina thanked Victor for his tireless work with the Chess Club, as well as his dedication to the RSI (Refugee Sponsorship Initiative) Committee. Ian Mackinnon acknowledged Eric for his eight years of work with the Senior Boys Basketball team, along with assisting with many other teams. Last year’s recipient, Sahir Khan ’88, presented Kevin Bon ’92 with this year’s Outstanding Alumnus Volunteer Award. Among some of Kevin’s accomplishments, he served as president on the Alumni Executive for eight consecutive years, and now sits on Ashbury’s Foundation Board.

The 2017 Outstanding Parent Volunteer Award was awarded to Nancy Chow and Tani Sanders. Crickett Lindgren recognized Nancy for her work on the Guild where she served as treasurer, president and past president, and her continued involvement on the Parents’ Committee. Tani Sanders was congratulated by Mark Pulham and Andy Moore on her contribution to many sporting teams, and her leading role in developing the spirited ‘A’ Club. To end the night’s celebrations, The Jean Teron Award was presented to Charles Maclaren ’71 for his outstanding service to the school and its community. Longtime friend and Ashbury Relations Ambassador, Vicky Wilgress, honoured Charlie for his extensive volunteerism serving on the Alumni Executive, Board of Governors and the Foundation Board, as well as his work on the Advancement Committee, and both the Building Futures and SPARK campaigns. Thank you to all the Ashbury volunteers who work to make the school a better place for our students.

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Eric Johannnsen, Outstanding Student Support award recipient, with Ian MacKinnon and Norman Southward

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Current parent and Outstanding Alumnus Award recipient, Kevin Bon ’92, with Sahir Khan ’88

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Jean Teron Award winner, Charlie Maclaren ’71, with Norman Southward and Vicky Wilgre

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Marcus Saikaley ’15, with his father, Outstanding Parent Volunteer Award recipient, Victor Saikaley

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Outstanding Parent Volunteers Nancy Chow and Tani Sanders

AWARDS FOR OUTSTANDING SERVICE TO ASHBURY COLLEGE Ashbury College regularly recognizes outstanding volunteer contributions made to the school by members of its parent, alumni or volunteer communities.

Ashbury is seeking nominations for future recipients of these awards. The next awards will be presented in the spring of 2018 at a reception honouring volunteer service.

To nominate an individual from the Ashbury community, please complete the online form at: ashbury.ca/about/ volunteer/award

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ASHBURY ALUMNI

2017

Reunions

H O N O U R E D Y E A R S : 1 9 6 7, 1 9 7 2 , 1 9 7 7, 1 9 8 2 , 1 9 8 7, 1 9 9 2 , 1 9 9 7, 2 0 0 2 , 2 0 0 7, 2 0 1 2 Reunion weekend was busy for our honoured years, with an on-campus reception at Ashbury House on Friday evening, and an off-campus reception on Saturday evening. Classmates were able to catch up and connect in an informal setting, in addition to the Homecoming activities. Thank you to our class reps who organized successful reunions!

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Christopher Power ’77, Philip McMahon ’78 and Robert Morrison ’77

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The Class of ’82, wearing their class ties, at Ashbury House

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The Class of ’82 gathered at Homecoming

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Andrew Stersky ’87, Richard Trevisan ’87, Pierre Heroux ’87, Don Chapdelaine ’87 and Pawan Dilawri ’87

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Alex Graham ’82, Cameron Morrison ’12, Brian Morrison ’82 and Pawan Dilawri ’87

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Greg Scorsone ’92, John Craig ’92, Kevin Bon ’92 and Simone Crooks ’92

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Armen Ashekian ’97, Tabitha Martel ’97 and Hanna (Dreyer) Schelp ’97

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Stefano Taucer ’02 and Kate Poulin ’02

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Elli McKean ’07, Corey Arnold ’07, Tais McNeill ’07, Julian Mirsky ’07, Matt Cameron ’07 and Brendan Alexander ’07

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The Class of ’12 at Ashbury House

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Benji Oppenheimer ’12, Mike King, Patrick Rhodes ’12 and Brian Storosko

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Homecoming 2017

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hank you to everyone who attended Homecoming 2017 and made it a huge success. The unseasonably warm day was appreciated by many as they caught up with former classmates, fellow parents, current students, and enjoyed a delicious BBQ.


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Thank you to our dedicated class reps for their efforts. Class of 1982: Brian Morrison, Jeff Mierins, Kaveh Rikhtegar and James Posman Class of 1987: Pawan Dilawri Class of 1992: Kevin Bon Class of 1997: Michael Nicolini Class of 2002: Stefano Taucer Class of 2012: Cameron Morrison and Veronica Bleeker

Some of our old boys made it out to celebrate their 50 year (+) reunions! David Fair ’48, John Nesbitt ’48, John Boone ’56, John Rogan ’59, David Polk ’67. A special thanks to our beer sponsor, the Clocktower Brew Pub.

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We hope to see you all for Homecoming and Reunions 2018 as we celebrate all reunion years ending in a ’3 or ’8: September 22, 2018


Ashbury College Charity Golf Classic 2017

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he Ashbury College Charity Golf Classic had another successful tournament on June 5 at The Gatineau Golf and Country Club. It was a great day for guests to enjoy both the golf course and the spa, put on by Texture Hair Salon in one of Richcraft’s beautiful model homes. This year, with the help of all those involved, we raised almost $60,000 to help support the Ashbury College Association Scholarship Fund. The day ended with a reception that brought all the golfers and spa guests together to kick off the evening portion of the event. Guests also enjoyed delicious food and wine and an exciting live and silent auction. A special thanks goes out to our event sponsors, without whom the day would not be possible: Dilawri Auto, the

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Aliferis family, Glenview, Nautical Lands Group, 1251 Capital Group, Urbandale Corporation, Sussex Capital and Texture Hair Salon. Thanks to our on-the-course sponsors: CIBC Wood Gundy, Huntington Properties, Smith & Bradley’s Insurance, Tamarack Homes, MSI, and Mark Taggart: Freedom 55 Financial. As always, a sincere thank you to our Ashbury Partners for their continued support: Sezlik Ottawa Luxury Properties and Doherty & Associates. On behalf of the 2017 Golf Committee, thanks again to everyone who participated in and supported the Ashbury College Charity Golf Classic 2017. See you all next year for another amazing event!


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Montsé Bouvier, Laurie LeGallais, Jane Forsyth and Jill Dickinson

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Charlie Sezlik ’86

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Jeff Smith ’94, Michael Nicolini ’97 and Mark Taggart ’94

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Louis Lemieux

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Adam Kane ’94, Alfonso Movilla ’91, Jean-Paul Yong ’97 and James Hickman

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Ashbury staff foursome: Jon Landon, Ross Holman, Kelly Mecredy and Geri-Lee Godkin

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Peter Maclaren ’05 and Charlie Maclaren ’71

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Richard Emmerson and Norman Southward

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Bibbi Alfredsson, Kathryn Tremblay, Jacqui Wilson and Mike Wilson

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With the NAC, Hamilton Southam ’34 gave Ottawa ‘a heart’

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amilton Southam ’34 was such a patriot, it’s not surprising he died on Canada Day. Among his myriad accomplishments—which include war hero, diplomat and founding director-general of the National Arts Centre—it was the NAC that shone brightest for Southam, the man for whom the sprawling complex’s signature 2,000-seat concert hall is named. It was there, after his 2008 death, that guests at a reception in the NAC’s main foyer sipped on wine and nibbled on a spread of fine food before taking their seats inside the hall for a special tribute concert performed by Southam’s beloved NAC Orchestra. A representative of the theatre’s stage employees’ union on that day coyly invited Southam’s spirit to keep an eye on the place from the great beyond. “Brother Southam, when the teardown is over and the last piece of equipment has been put away and that particular stillness has settled on the stage, we look forward to your hauntings.”

Gordon Hamilton Southam was born in Rockcliffe Park on Dec. 19, 1916, in a house that now serves as Spain’s embassy. His father, Wilson Mills Southam, was publisher of the Ottawa Citizen, while his grandfather founded the Southam chain of newspapers. He lived a life of great privilege, but with it came a sense of obligation to do something with it. “I believe that those who have been given much should give much,” he once told the Citizen. Southam attended Ashbury College, the University of Toronto and Oxford University. He fought in the Second World War with distinction as an officer of the Royal Artillery, the Royal Canadian Artillery and the Royal Canadian Horse Artillery. He was briefly a journalist, first in London and later Ottawa, before beginning a career in the public service. Postings to Stockholm and


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Warsaw, where he was the first Canadian ambassador to Poland, followed. After he returned to Canada, the lack of a proper concert hall in the nation’s capital spurred him to form the National Capital Arts Alliance, a group of city arts organizations that raised money for a study to propose exactly what Ottawa has today: a concert hall and two theatres in a centrally located building. By then it was 1963, and Southam shared his grand vision with Lester B. Pearson, for whom he had worked at what was then the Department of External Affairs. The newly elected prime minister was casting about for a significant project to mark the celebration of Canada’s centennial in 1967. “Mr. Pearson, this is your plan,” Southam urged. About a month later, the prime minister called Southam to say, “Yes, that’s what we’ll do, we’ll build that.” The initial pricetag was $9 million, but the NAC ultimately cost more than $40 million. Nonetheless, Southam thought it was a bargain because it transformed Ottawa and “gave the city a heart.” At the NAC’s official opening in 1969, Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau said the building represented “a promise for the future” for all Canadians.

“In a country often accused of a complex of inferiority, there is nothing inferior about this complex,” Trudeau said. Southam’s tenure at the NAC lasted a decade, until his retirement in 1977. But his desire to help shape Canada, and particularly the way it remembers its heroes and battles, persisted. He was a driving force behind the creation of the Canadian War Museum and the visionary behind the Valiants Memorial, the 14 bronzes of military heroes and heroines placed on Confederation Square, unveiled less than two years before Southam’s death.

The public Southam had a commanding presence, rugged good looks and an enormous appetite for friendship. He was charming, charismatic and self-assured; a man with vision who could bring others along to achieve his grand plans. He remained on affectionate terms with each of his three wives throughout his life; a man whose wit, even in later years, when his hearing was failing and he walked with the aid of a cane, was said to be drier than a well-made martini. Privately, he was something else.

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The public Southam had a commanding presence, rugged good looks and an enormous appetite for friendship. He was charming, charismatic and selfassured; a man with vision who could bring others along to achieve his grand plans.


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Hamilton Southam was loving, lovely, sweet and gentle, says Henrietta Southam, the youngest of his six children. He would listen to her “boy troubles” without thinking such topics were beneath him and only truly lost his temper once—after she returned from summer camp with a mouth full of swear words. He never listened to music if it wasn’t live, never shopped for groceries and always wore heavy gold chains around his neck and wrist, pulling off such sartorial flourishes “without looking an iota like Liberace,” Henrietta says. Peter Herrndorf, the NAC’s long-serving president and CEO, also saw both sides of the man. Herrndorf occupies the same office overlooking the Rideau Canal that Southam once did. Nobody would have guessed, for instance, that Southam could be shy, often reluctant to go backstage after a show because he didn’t want to impose on the performers. Herrndorf also recalls a level of personal kindness that extended far beyond a cursory first meeting with Southam after the much younger Herrndorf arrived in town in 1999 to head the NAC. “He became very much like my second dad and although he had six kids, I became very much a kind of seventh during that period of time,” Herrndorf says.

The pair would meet for lunch every three weeks or so, sitting at the same corner table at the bar of downtown’s posh Rideau Club, Southam beginning almost every meeting by saying, “Now Peter, my boy, I have a few things I want to discuss with you.”

Were Southam alive today, there’s no doubt he’d be discussing the NAC’s current renovation, an ambitious, $110-million project designed to finally give the 48-yearold centre a magnificent new entrance on Elgin Street, across from Confederation Square. One of the largest capital investments made by the federal government as part of celebrations for the 150th anniversary of Confederation, it is scheduled to open July 1, 2017—exactly nine years after Southam died. He had picked Polish architect Fred Lebensold to design the NAC to stand with gravitas and look like a bunker. But times have changed, and Southam, says his daughter, would be “overjoyed” by what’s happening now because it is evident Donald Schmitt, of the Toronto firm Diamond Schmitt Architects, admires and respects what is already there.


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“I believe that those who have been given much should give much”

him and loved him pass on the Hamilton stories to each coming generation of people who work here.” “My sense is that Hamilton Southam continues to live in this building and continues to bring us good luck.”   The original version of this story, by Matthew Pearson, ran in the Ottawa Citizen in the spring of 2017 as part of the paper’s Capital Builders series, for Canada’s 150th.

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Photo of Hamilton Southam, Chairman Valiants Commitee, and Former Ambassador to Poland, after being given the Vimy Award in Ottawa on November 18, 2004. JANA CHYTILOVA/POSTMEDIA

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Hamilton Southam in 2003. JEAN LEVAC/POSTMEDIA

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The newly-renovated NAC opened in 2017 NATIONAL ARTS CENTRE

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Hamilton Southam receives the Order of Canada from governor-general Jules Leger. TIM O’LETT/OTTAWA CITIZEN

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“It’s not a renovation,” says Henrietta, herself a clever interior designer. “It’s a deeply admiring and sensitive rejuvenation.” Her father, she adds, “would probably say that’s exactly the way it was always meant to look.” The feeling of youthful vitality sweeping the NAC would also please Southam. From the arrival of hip new conductor Alexander Shelley to the creation of a department of indigenous theatre to the ambitious Canada Scene festival unfolding later this year, the NAC has a real swagger, standing firmly in the spotlight as Canada’s stage. It’s the largest performing arts organization in the country, with 1,200 performances last year and an annual budget of $75 million. Southam had once feared the NAC was becoming smaller and less ambitious, but, in his final years, felt proud of his life’s work, which he would soon leave behind, Herrndorf says. But Southam, his name and his spirit, have never actually left. “He’s a very real presence,” Herrndorf says. “In the way that lore and culture is passed on, those of us who knew


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The only girl in a school of boys Liz Archdale remembers the Ashbury she knew in the early 1940s

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By Anna Rumin

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nside the Ashbury Chapel, towards the back, on the wall, there is a plaque that reads “Nicholas Archdale.” Admittedly, I never paid it much attention, if in fact noticing it at all. It is one of several plaques that I might read in passing without giving any thought to the person behind the name; what he liked to read, what he liked to eat, who his children were. Mr. Archdale was in fact the third Headmaster to lead Ashbury. His term covered the difficult years of the Second World War. He left England in 1935 with his wife and two daughters and moved into Ashbury House where 82 years later, we now reside. At last year’s 125th anniversary celebrations, former Heads Tony Macoun and his wife Ann, Roy Napier and his wife Dorothy, and Tam Matthews and his wife Jan, came back to Ashbury House, and I invited them to have a walkabout to rekindle those memories hiding in the cubby under the main stairs, the attic bedrooms and the kitchen, which has since been remodelled. This fall, I had the pleasure of doing the same, with Mr. Archdale’s daughter Liz Riddell (née Archdale) who is now 84. True, she couldn’t physically walk through the house because she is living in Hermanus on the Western Cape in South Africa. Nevertheless, her memories as a little girl, from ages eight to 11, running up and down the back


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watch whales breaching where the Atlantic and Indian Oceans intersect. We arrived and there was Liz; all smiles with blue eyes and a warm hug. She had reserved a table with the best view of the ocean and whales. You may have had the opportunity to meet someone who once lived in your home, and so you will understand the sense of connection we immediately felt with Liz, who began by saying how much she loved her time in Ottawa, living in Ashbury House, and yes, attending Ashbury College. Liz pulled out a long, scrolled photo, and we spotted her right away; the same curly hair and friendly welcoming smile, except that she was about 73 years younger and the only girl in a school of boys. “I only wore the Ashbury uniform at school,” she said. “After school, it

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staircase, were vivid and full of stories of Ashbury House and Ashbury College. Norman and I met Liz at the end of trip to South Africa where we accompanied eight students to the Round Square conference in Capetown. When Vicky Wilgress found out we were both going, she immediately connected us with Liz, and at the end of the conference, we waved the group of students goodbye, and journeyed down the coastal road to Hermanus. Even if you haven’t been to the Western Cape of South Africa, it only takes a smidgen of imagination to realize how different it is to Ottawa. Instead of raccoons and squirrels running across the road there are baboons, instead of the Gatineau hills, mountains rise out of the ocean, and if you are the passenger like I was, you can


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was back to normal girl clothes!” Liz was at Ashbury for three years before moving to Rockliffe Elementary. We traded stories about the house; our son’s room was her parents’ room, 5 the office was the nursery, her room was our daughter’s room, the TV room was where the cook slept. The cook, as it turned out, was a Jehovah’s Witness, who used the kitchen for meetings when her parents were out! (Keep in mind minority religious groups were not well accepted at that time.) Young 6 Liz skated, skiied in Rockcliffe Park, and has fond memories of eating maple syrup. In warmer weather, she remembers swimming in McKay Lake. Liz was safe at Ashbury at the height of the Second World War. Her father initiated the relationship with Abinger Hill School in Surrey, England, which sent over 55 evacuee boys to study at Ashbury—some of whom we have met at various alumni functions. Liz eventually boarded a ship and returned to the U.K., where she was teased because of her Canadian accent. She spent two years in the damp, cold stone buildings at St Leonard’s in Scotland, which she described as the female version of Gordonstoun (the Scottish school known for being the birthplace of Round Square). Eventually Liz went

to secretarial college and worked as a purserette, responsible for administration on board The Union Castle Line, which had weekly sailing service from Southhampton to Capetown. Her work led to happiness. “I married my boss,” she told us with us a grin. She and her husband settled in South Africa in 1966, where Liz lives to this day. Just before our visit ended, Norman handed Liz an envelope, and her eyes grew teary when she saw the photograph of the plaque, engraved with her father’s name, that hangs in Ashbury’s chapel. Liz might be 84, but in that moment, as she looked at the photo, I saw the face of a seven-year-old girl remembering the man who first opened up the world to her. And so, the next time I am in the chapel and see Nicholas Archdale’s name, I will remember not only that he was Ashbury’s Headmaster, but also Liz’s dad.   Dr. Anna Rumin is the spouse of Head of School, Norman Southward. She travelled to South Africa in October with Ashbury’s Round Square delegation.

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Class of 1944: Ashbury’s class of 1944, with its only girl pupil, Liz Archdale (circled)

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Anna Rumin with Liz Riddell in Hermanus, Cape Town

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The Archdale Plaque that hangs in Ashbury’s chapel

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Ashbury House, where Liz Archdale lived as a girl. The house, and the snow, are part of the memories Liz carried with her to South Africa

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Union Castle: One of the Union Castle fleet, where Liz worked as a purserette

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Rockcliffe Park skiing: Liz fondly remembers her winters in Canada, spent skiing in Rockcliffe Park


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uccessful receptions were held in Kingston and Montreal where alumni of all ages were able to connect and catch up. Kingston alumni gathered at the Grizzly Grill on October 26. Montreal alumni gathered at the McGill Faculty Club on November 2. UPCOMING ALUMNI EVENTS

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DECEMBER 2017

Ottawa Alumni Holiday Party at the Sens game

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Ashbury Alumni Winter Classic in Ottawa

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London, U.K.

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Springfest at Ashbury

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Ashbury College Charity Golf Classic

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Alumni Welcome Reception at Ashbury

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Fall was a busy time for the Ashbury alumni community!

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Montreal 1

Liam Murray ’14, Alex Parizeau ’16, Sarah Ashton ’16, Pierre Murzereau ’16, Emily Shore ’03

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Pierre LaTraverse ’80, Norman Southward, David Berger ’68

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Mike King, Emilio Baston ’16, Anna Von Finkenstein ’17, Sarah Vickers ’17, Alex Parizeau ’16, Brian Storosko, Sarah Ashton ’16, Justin Rapp ’17

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Alumni gathered in Montreal

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Jasmine Mussani ’16, Brian Storosko, Molly Marland ’16

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Kyle Charron ’15, Raphael Lessard ’15, Nicholas Morrison ’16, Nikhil Dilawri ’16, Mike King, Paul Rodrigues ’16, Brian Storosko, Nicholas De Lallo ’15, Parker Aimers ’15

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Maddie Monaghan ’13, Molly Marland ’16, Jasmine Mussani ’16, Parker Aimers ’15, Adam Cook ’14, Nicholas Morrison ’16, Alyssa Shenassa ’14

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Alumni gathered in Kingston

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Ashbury

Happy birthday to Ashbury’s oldest alumnus

At 103 years old, Bill Baskerville ’35 is Ashbury’s oldest living alumnus. He is the only old boy alive today who attended the school during the headmastership of the Founder, G.P. Woollcombe. Born on November 7, 1914, he was a boarder at Ashbury from 1928 to 1935.

but with a strong presence. He taught Baskerville Latin. He took a special kindly interest in each boy, and always visited the boarders in their rooms before lights out, seeing how they were, and whether their “socks were turned inside out”. Once the Head noticed lurid posters of movie stars on Bill’s wall and took them right down. Bill recalled other teachers: Mr. Brodie, the housemaster, was an Englishman but taught French, and lived with his family downstairs in the Annex. He liked the way Mr. Johnson taught physics, and he was in awe of Sergeant Major Stone, from the British Army, the legendary gym teacher who also led the cadet corps. Bill Baskerville went on to Bishop’s University and McGill. He served with the RAF in World War II. He then had a lengthy career in the aeronautics industry, mainly in Montreal. Since the eighties he has been retired and living in Ottawa, enjoying reminiscing with a diminishing number of friends and acquaintances still alive. —Stephen Woollcombe ’57

Bruce Firestone ’68 was featured in the Ottawa Citizen this summer in the Capital Builders section for his work establishing the Ottawa Senators hockey team in the early 1990s. Bruce also helped develop the arena where the Sens play (now called Canadian Tire Centre) and the local charity the Ottawa Senators Foundation. Bruce is currently a real estate broker and developer, as well as an entrepreneur, speaker and author.

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long with Vicky Wilgress, I recently had the good fortune to meet this historic witness to the school’s distant past. We spoke with him for nearly an hour in his room in his retirement home. Bill recalled his life at Ashbury in amazing detail. His room in his first year, shared with two other boys, was on the top storey of the Annex (now admin offices). Chapel was twice a day, after breakfast and after supper. The food was far from tasty: the boys called their tapioca pudding “fish-eyes-inglue”. Bill was not a great athlete, but said his continuing good health, compared to his contemporaries at Ashbury, may be due to not getting his “head bashed in” playing football. He was sergeant-major of the cadet corps and would go on route marches going past Elmwood School with the bugle band blaring to impress the girls. Bill had clear memories of the headmaster, my grandfather. G. P. Woollcombe was strict and stern but always very fair. He was a short man,

Stephen Woollcombe ’57 presented a new award, the Founder’s Award for Service and Effort, at the school’s 125th Closing in June. Ashbury launched the award to honour the legacy of the founder, George Penrose Woollcombe. Throughout his 42 years as Head, GP sought to instill in all his students these two core values: service for others and doing one’s best. This award is offered annually to the Grade 11 student, entering Grade 12, who is judged to best exemplify these values. It takes the tangible form of a sum of money to be used by the recipient for some specific service for others. This year’s recipient is Gabrielle Hicks.


ASHBURY ALUMNI

Remembering David Graham ’55 to ensure that weight gains resulting from quantities of wonderful food were kept to a minimum? Some of us will never forget David’s enthusiasm for earlymorning walks. These events locally included loud discussions of Rockcliffe real estate values, standards of gardening past and present, and the names of those who had lived in this or that house 60 or more years ago. Mention needs be made about David’s constant interest in visiting new places and doing so on the spur of the moment— much along the lines of a John Steinbeck travelogue. This past May, just 10 days before he became ill, it was suggested to him one morning that a trip to Vimy would be well worth the effort at some point during this anniversary of the famous battle. ‘Some point’ was not acceptable to David, and he sprang immediately into action. Within half an hour a same-day excursion was launched, including a Channel Tunnel train to Lille, France, a taxi to Vimy, and a return to London in time for a party that evening.

Alumnus David Graham served as a longtime host of Ashbury’s London alumni reception each spring. He maintained strong ties to the school throughout his life. He died on September 2, 2017 in Toronto. Alan Gill ’62 delivered a version of this eulogy at a ceremony remembering David in October. I had an association with David for over 60-odd—some of them very odd—years, and he had a lasting impact on my life. I was particularly intrigued by David’s broad range of interests. Over and above his entrepreneurial brilliance regarding chickens, Christmas trees, desk blotters, and cable TV, there was also a deep interest in passing similar enthusiasms on to younger generations. While still a teenager, I sold Christmas trees and distributed blotters for David, and he, in fact, issued me my very first paycheque—for five dollars, if I remember correctly. My father covered the cheque, and suggested that I keep the document as a source of future inspiration. How right he was! What was particularly relevant to me about David’s connection with education was that while his take on the learning experience might reflect more than a little Adam Smith content, there were never other biases involved. Absolutely none.

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Three other facts certainly impressed me about David’s faith in the value of education. First, he was the only student I know who paid his own way through Ashbury College. Secondly, he talked his way into the Harvard Business School. And thirdly, he dedicated his body to science. He taught me that perseverance, determination and optimism are major factors in explaining success. Two other qualities of David—the ever-helpful friend, and the ever-restless traveller—must be mentioned. Many of us will recall that two of David’s major fixations were diet and exercise. As years passed, these concerns reached out to many appreciative friends, many of whom, at some point received literature from David regarding the latest in dietary and exercise programs, usually followed by requests for progress reports. And weren’t those of us fortunate enough to visit with David impressed by the exercise classes for holidaying guests

David loved such spontaneous adventures, particularly if they challenged conventional wisdom or broadened horizons. Finding a $3 per night hotel room on the border between Bhutan and India was a source of delight. And discovering last year, on a trip to the Scilly Isles, that a whole other world existed beyond the range of his cell phone was a real eye opener. This spring’s meanderings in the English Cotswolds made him decide that, having lived in London for 37 years, much of the U.K. still deserved attention. He therefore had decreed that a trek would occur next year across northern England, in the shadow of Hadrian’s Wall. Finally, David was the master of exotic birthdays, bringing friends together at one of his homes, or a few years ago, in Phuket, Thailand. His address book and his ever-present notebook may have been full, but he always ensured that work allowed for new contacts with local populations. David once discovered that I was about to live in the Philippines, so he gave me the name of a young lady whom he suggested I should meet. On arrival in Manila, I discovered that the lady concerned was one Aurora Pijuan, not only a former Miss Philippines, but also a former Miss Universe. Word of my connection, needless to say, worked strongly to my advantage. In a country which deems beauty pageants to be its national sport, I was well on my way. Once again, David had provided for my well-being. Perhaps unwittingly, he also encouraged me in the selection of a bride. At the time of our wedding, David acknowledged that by marrying into a Filipino family, I finally seemed to have done something right! So, there we are; five lessons from David—and perhaps a sixth: some people have all the luck. Haven’t we all been so lucky to have had David Graham as a friend, associate and neighbour. We will miss terribly the smile, and the self-deprecating sense of humour, and we will always be grateful to David for his thoughtful and ever-generous friendship. Amongst ourselves we will, I’m sure, continue to reminisce about various aspects of his life. One thing is certain, however: there will never be closure on our fond remembrances of him, and of his time with us. Would that more time had been allowed.


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Piero Mangifesta ’74 went on to graduate from Laurier University with a Bachelor of Arts and Geography. Piero is now happily semi-retired, and on the days where he is not working at Grand Erie District School Board in Brantford, Ontario, you can catch him fly fishing with both two-handed and single-handed rods on the Grand River. Piero also volunteers with Trout Unlimited Canada and is a devoted father to his two daughters, Sarah and Elana, who are the centre of his world.

Charlie Sezlik ’86 celebrated a milestone birthday with his friends from the Class of 1986. Front: Graham Butler ’86, Davidson Myers ’86, Jeff Cogan ’86. Back: Will Teron ’86, Philip Kelly ’86, Charlie Sezlik ’86, Andy Sommers ’86

20 years he was a motion graphics and visual FX artist. He started his career in Toronto, and was recruited to New York City about 16 years ago, where he eventually became creative director at a company called Ntropic. Although Steve says it was an amazing time working on music videos, commercials, TV shows, and movies, he felt like it was time to move on and try something completely different. So about six months ago, he decided to get back to his engineering roots, and took a position as a product manager at a bicycle manufacturing company called Xtracycle.

Andrew Stersky ’87 married his spouse, Jenn, on July 1, 2017 at Edinburgh Castle in Scotland. The wedding was an intimate affair with humorous vows that included the guests’ participation. The couple exchanged custom-made rings, and the ceremony ended with a traditional Scottish blessing.

Luc Soucy ’82 with his first grand daughter, Emma, who was born on July 31. Emma is the daughter of Luc’s son, Pierre Luc, and daugther-in-law, Laila.

Steve Zourntos ’88 received a graduate degree in engineering, but somehow found himself drawn into the world of post-production, where for

Dr. Dugald Seely ’89 is the recipient of the 2017 Dr. Rogers Prize for Excellence in Complementary and Alternative Medicine. The $250,000 prize is awarded every two years to celebrate the achievement of researchers, practitioners, and others in the field of complementary and alternative healthcare. In its congratulatory message, the Dr. Rogers organization cited Seely’s “leadership in the development of the field of integrative and naturopathic oncology.” Seely is the founder and executive director of the Ottawa Integrative Cancer Centre, and the executive director of research at the Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine. He has recently launched the largest integrative naturopathic cancer care clinical trial ever conducted in North America. Clem Bélanger ’93 threw his hat into the race to be the next Mayor of

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Peter Croal ’74 spent part of his summer as the Geologist in Residence at the Fogo Island Inn, Newfoundland. David Khazzam ’17 was also at the Inn this summer and connected with Peter. Both were in Connaught house while at Ashbury!


ASHBURY ALUMNI

Gatineau in the November municipal elections. A lawyer, Bélanger is a senior bureaucrat in Public Services and Procurement Canada, and took his holidays to run for office.

Marc Weatherill ’93 and Ben Valiquette ’93 completed the Reebok Spartan obstacle course race near Duntroon, Ontario on September 10, 2017. During the event, they each referenced drills they did as members of the football team under Bob Gray (4th Quarters), and of the basketball team under Andrew Sparks (Hot Foot). They said there was never much doubt that those drills would leave an impression on anyone who did them, but it was nice to experience a benefit from them so many years after the physical effects had worn off.

Tom Hyde ’95 and his spouse, Stacey, welcomed their son Aiden James on April 21 in Toronto.

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Mike Varley ’95 and his spouse, Jill, welcomed their fourth son, Lionel James Varley. Rory Capern ’96 has left the helm of Twitter Canada and is now working as vice president of partnerships at Pelmorex/The Weather Network in Toronto. Nanakarina Kwofie ’98 and her spouse, Robert van Andel, welcomed the arrival of boy and girl twins, Ophelia and Gabriel van Andel, on

February 13, 2017. They were delivered 11 weeks early, and spent some time in intensive care at Chelsea Westminster hospital in London, UK. The twins came home in April, and are now in great health!

empower moms to embrace, nurture and enjoy their bodies and their lives. The book dives into how the transition into Motherhood is a window of opportunity to transform the core of your being as a human and a leader. Jen’s FitMama Foundations™ framework outlines the journey for new moms to transform their core from the inside out. The book is available on Amazon and is going to be in print before Christmas.

Winston Bennett ’99 and his spouse, Erin, welcomed their daughter, Sloane McKinley Bennett on June 29, 2017. Sloane weighed 7lbs. 11oz. at birth, and mom and baby are doing great. Andrew Parkes ’00 and his spouse, Regina, welcomed their daughter, Alexa Wai Yin Parkes, on April 27, 2017 at the Ottawa Civic Hospital.

Jen (Bittner) Oliver ’00 recently published her first book called The Love FitMama Way: Transforming the Core of Motherhood. After graduating from Ashbury, Jen studied Psychology and Physical Education at Queen’s University. After two years in the fitness industry, Jen returned to school to complete an MSc in Exercise and Health Psychology at McMaster University. After graduating, she got married to her spouse Chris and they have two daughters, ages 6 and 4. Jen works entirely online now and travels globally teaching, training and coaching both FitMamas and other entrepreneurs. In 2016, Jen and her family travelled around the world in 80 days. Ask her about it by email: jen@ jenoliver.com. In 2014, Jen founded FitMama Global Inc., a mindset-based coaching movement, centred on education, inspiration and motivation to

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ASHBURY ALUMNI

Alexa Young ’01 was a member of the 2017 Governor General’s Leadership Conference, joining 200 fellow Canadians to explore where Canada has been, and what needs to be done to accelerate innovation, productivity, inclusion and entrepreneurship from coast to coast. Stefano Taucer ’02 and his spouse, Andrea, welcomed their first child, William Hugo Taucer, born in Ottawa on July 14, 2017. William tipped the scales at over 10lbs and has not stopped growing. Stefano and Andrea are thrilled to be parents and are proud to show off the newest member of the family.

Benjamin Barry ’01 was asked “did your years at Ashbury contribute to your success? If so, how?” Ben responded by saying, “Did it ever! I met my two best friends when I started Ashbury in Grade 5. They’re such an important part of my life today. The school also taught me to believe in myself and gave me so many opportunities to explore my interests. And when I got to university, I had a much easier time than most because I had practice reading critically and writing essays. All that homework is actually worth it. Trust me.” Alexander Littlechild ’01 dropped by the school this fall for the first time since 2005. He is currently the Economic Development Officer for Ermineskin Cree Nation, and was in Ottawa for an aboriginal First Nations meeting.

Hilary Kilgour ’03 was awarded Canada’s 2018 Clean50 Emerging Leader award. Canada’s Clean50 Awards are announced annually by Delta Management Group and the Clean50 organization to recognize those individuals or small teams who have done the most to advance the cause of sustainability and clean capitalism in Canada over the past two years. Delta Management Group also selected 10 outstanding younger Canadians as Emerging Leaders. Hilary was chosen after rigourous screening and research by Delta Management, with advice from internal researchers and external advisors, and was among Honourees selected from an initial pool of approximately 600 well-qualified nominees. Hilary also attended the Clean50 Summit 7.0 on Toronto Island, to spend a day among peers and colleagues tackling common sustainability challenges. Hilary is currently building the Federation of Canadian Municipalities’

Innovation Network, a first-of-its-kind forum for collaboration, information sharing and education that brings stakeholders together to explore how to use innovations in technology and practice to build prosperous, inclusive and sustainable communities for 2,000 member municipalities representing 91% of Canadians. Alex Patrick ’03 and Caitlin (Sparks) Patrick ’03 currently live in Ottawa with their two children, John and Blake. John will be four years old in January, and Blake turned one in November. Alex and Caitlin previously lived in St. John’s, but have since returned to Ottawa with their family.

Holly Ralph-Ormsby ’03 started a business with two friends, where she is the managing vice president of health and charity. Their first event was a gala for CHEO (Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario) that had six Ashbury student volunteers. The students took a photo with Holly and Mayor Jim Watson at the gala.

Tyler Wilgress ’03, along with his partner Julie Chabot, Travis Maclean ’02 and a friend, came in first place out of 900 teams of four to win the

35 | Ashbury News

Adam Taggart ’00 married Amanda Hynes this July in Ottawa surrounded by their family. They both live and work in Ottawa, and are excited about the arrival of their baby girl this fall.


ASHBURY ALUMNI

world’s largest scavenger hunt in Ottawa on September 10, 2017. The scavenger hunt was achieved and organized by Escape Manor and will be listed with the Guinness World Records.

Julianne Zussman ’04 scored two tries to lift Canada to a 43–12 victory over Australia in August, helping the Canadian team win a fifth-place finish at the Women’s Rugby World Cup in Belfast, Ireland. Julianne, who recovered from a neck injury in time to travel to Ireland, was named to the World Rugby’s dream team, as chosen by the tournament’s commentators.

Ian Tattersfield ’06 has joined the Campus and Space Planning Office in the role of Geospatial Data Administrator. He will be working to maintain the McGill database of how every m2 of space at McGill is used, provide space data analysis, and make the annual submission to the Province of Quebec. He has also been engaged to develop new geographic (GIS) datasets and standards for facilities operations. He has extensive experience with spatial data, web development, and SQL database administration. As a student intern within the office, Ian was responsible for the technical development and implementation of the interactive campus map. Rebecca Glover ’07 and Alyssa Novick got together in London, England this summer.

Rachael Rodrigues ’07 married Zachary Stevenson on October 14, 2017 in Dallas, Texas.

Sophie Dechange ’08 studied marketing in the U.K. and is now living in Munich, Germany working as a marketing manager for a U.K. fashion brand. She dropped by the school for a visit with Christine Kienzle ’09 this fall.

James Patrick ’05 and his partner, Jessica Anderson, welcomed their baby girl Rosemary Attenborough Patrick on April 13, 2017. The family live together in St. John’s, Newfoundland, where James works as an editor for film and television.

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Alexandra Grand ’06 married James Blake on June 17, 2017 at his parents’ farm in Kawarthas. The couple lives in Toronto, and are planning their honeymoon this fall in Italy.

Adam Scotti ’07, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s personal photographer, was mistaken for Prince Harry while he was in Toronto for the Invictus Games this September. The PM captured the photo of Adam and Prince Harry together.


ASHBURY ALUMNI

Bank Hoontrakul ’08, with his spouse and their son, Mate, in Bangkok, Thailand.

law firm of Addelman Baum Gilbert in criminal law. John was called to the bar in 2017 and returned to Addelman Baum Gilbert as an associate. Lyndsay Kotarba ’11 received her Bachelor of Science degree from Queen’s University. She is now in her second year of medicine at St. George’s University in Grenada.

Jeff Black ’09 visited a Grade 10 Careers class at Ashbury this fall to talk about his job as a social worker. Jeff completed his BA in labour studies and bachelor of social work concurrently at McMaster University. Afterwards, Jeff worked for a specialized treatment group home for male youth, and then moved into the area of housing and homelessness at the Good Shepherd Family Centre. Jeff then returned to McMaster University for a master of social work. In recent years, Jeff’s main area of focus has been with the Children’s Aid Society of Hamilton completing forensic investigations regarding the physical and sexual abuse and neglect of children.

Christine Kienzle ’09 studied business and law in Switzerland, worked in the legal office of an international company, and is currently travelling around the world. She dropped by the school for a visit with Sophie Dechange ’08 this fall.

John Wright ’09 attended the University College Dublin and received a master’s in common law. During that time he was also the Irish Open fencing champion. He has since returned to Ottawa to article at the

Adil Abdulla ’12 was a finalist for The Lieutenant Governor’s Visionaries Prize in the category of social cohesion. The Lieutenant Governor’s Visionaries Prize was announced in September 2016 by the Honourable Elizabeth Dowdeswell, Lieutenant Governor of Ontario, and is administered in partnership with the Walrus Foundation. Adil presented the idea of teaching empathy in high school and is currently pursuing a law degree and an MA in economics at the University of Toronto. John Biewald ’12 attended the Redblacks training camp in 2016 and, after an extremely successful final football season at Western University, attended training camp again this spring. John left the camp early this year due to an injury, however, his rehabilitation has been going well and he expects to make a full recovery by February. John has been helping coach the Ashbury Senior Boys Football team during his recovery, and intends to return to Redblacks training camp again next spring. Marlow Stainfield ’12 is an actor based in London, England. He received his BAH from the University of Toronto in spring 2016 as a theatre specialist, and his master’s in classical acting from The Royal Central School of Speech and Drama in 2017. He recently performed in the production, The Devils, by John Whiting this July in London. 37 | Ashbury News

Saho (Kajiwara) Sakiyama ’08 visited Ashbury this fall with her spouse, Kay Sakiyama, and their daughter, Juno (3.5 years), and son, Hayato (1.5 years), while on vacation from Japan. Saho and Kay met in Ottawa while she was a boarding student at Ashbury. They hadn’t been back to Ottawa since they moved to Japan 6 years ago.

Bobby Kelly ’09 spoke to the Grade 11 students during the first week of school on the importance of leadership and shared his leadership experiences. Bobby was school captain in 2009, and later attended McGill University, where he received his BA in history. He now works as a lobbyist at Hill & Knowlton. Bobby spoke about the importance of kindness and the ability to listen as a leader.


ASHBURY ALUMNI

Olivia Kotarba ’13 is in her final year at the Ontario College of Art and Design University. She is studying graphic design, and looking into branding and packaging. Olivia dropped by the school for a visit with Justin Yan ’13 this fall.

Justin Yan ’13 was awarded a University Senate Medal for Outstanding Academic Achievement and the Nicholas Scolozzi Scholarship in Architecture for his final fourth-year design studio project. He is currently pursuing his master’s of architecture at Carleton University. For the past two summers, Justin was working in Toronto at Hanson + Jung Architects

Inc. He worked on various projects in retail, corporate, institutional, health care and accessibility. Bessie Zhang ’13 graduated from Harvard University last spring, and was chosen by the Senior Class Committee to share the stage with former Vice President of the United States Joseph R. Biden, Jr. for the college’s annual Class Day celebrations. Bessie was chosen to deliver the Harvard orations at the festivities. The Harvard orations are more formal graduation speeches, where speakers often reflect on their time at the school. Noah Kirkwood ’17 has signed to Harvard University as a top basketball recruit, starting next year. Considered the top Canadian prospect, 6’7” Noah chose Harvard over Tulane, Pittsburgh, George Washington, and several other schools. In July, Noah brought home gold for Canada with the U-19 Canadian basketball team at the FIBA World Cup. He also earned gold with Ashbury’s Senior Boys Basketball team, as they claimed OFSAA boys’ AA title for 2017. In November, Noah dropped by the school and played a game of pickup with the Grade 10 boys during PE class.

Paris Molokwu-Ogwuda ’17 selfpublished his first fiction novel in June. Titled Like Sheets of Ice, the story follows a boy named Transit, whose cognitive decline throughout the story only worsens as he trailblazes abstract terrains in order to understand the circumstances of his past, present and future. Paris launched the book with a reception at Alpha Art Gallery in downtown Ottawa. Several Ashbury friends were in attendance. Alexa Shabinsky ’17 competed for Canada at the Maccabiah Games in Israel this July in 200m and 400m sprints. She also competed in the 100m hurdles where she received a silver medal. Alexa also received the Parliament Lodge Graduating Student Athletic Achievement Award from the Soloway Jewish Community Centre in June. Alexa is now studying broadcast journalism at the University of Miami.

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We remember Robert Campeau, past parent Lewin H. Chapman’44 Gordon Cooper, former staff Richard “Dick” Kemp’54 David R. Graham’55 Cliff J. Inns, former staff Alexander (Sandy) C. Miller’06 Gerald S. Nudelman’53 Catherine Ruddy, past parent Fred Vokes, former staff Ron Zambonini, past parent


polar bear dip

The 

40 | Ashbury News

T

By Dr. John M. Richardson, Head of English, Senior School

he news that all teachers at my school would attend camp with their students at the beginning of September left me feeling unsettled. As a Grade 9 teacher advisor, it meant that I would board one of four yellow school buses and, for the first time in more than 20 years, drive two hours to spend three days in the early autumn bush with 120 14-year-olds. I am a committed teacher, and I love spending time with teenagers. Learning to see the world through their eyes is endlessly fascinating. But I teach Grade 12 English, and am past the mid-point of a deeply satisfying and rewarding career. There is a difference between a literary seminar on King Lear, no matter how lively it may be, and late-night hijinks in a campground. Besides, my idea of “outdoors” is biking on the Ottawa bike paths, or sitting in the backyard with a cup of tea and a good book, one eye on the bird feeder. Departure day arrives. I find myself in a gym filled with eager students, sleeping bags, duffle bags and backpacks. I don’t so much feel as though I am going to camp, but more that I am watching a movie of myself going to camp.  I watch the city melt away as we pass gas stations and coffee shops made unfamiliar by the journey. I pass out snacks. I chat with my fellow passengers. I read my novel. Eventually, we turn down a long, bumpy dirt track that dives deep into a scrubby forest and then emerges near a woodplanked dining hall, a dark lake shimmering in the moonlight behind rustling pines.  I attend the inaugural camp fire and stand at the back, in the shadows. There are songs. There are skits. People laugh and have a good time. The wind shifts direction and I am wreathed in smoke. My mind returns to the timetable, and I calculate the hours remaining.  The next morning, I arise early. It is cold, and splashes of red patch and flare against the slate-coloured sky. It is 7 a.m.: time for the daily polar bear dip. My insecurities and misgivings cinch together around this old camp ritual. I don’t want to be seen in my bathing suit. I don’t want to hoot and holler. I don’t want to talk about the temperature of the water. I want to look at the lake, not swim in it.  But I also know that the polar bear dip is a litmus test of whether at my age I am still up for a bit of fun. If I don’t swim, I will regret it. I know that. But I can’t bring myself to do it.

Everyone I see asks me if I am going to swim. I respond with lame excuses and then loiter, like a Grade 8 boy at the edges of a middle school dance. Kids charge in, great plumes of water rising up around them as they shriek with joy. My colleagues, who I like and respect enormously, link arms, count down, and run into the water triumphantly. Toweling off, the swimmers discuss the water temperature.  I glance up in the direction of my cabin and weigh whether there is enough time to run up, get changed, and leap into the water before the last stragglers head up to camp. There is not. Regret kicks in, right on cue. I walk slowly up to the dining hall and resolve that from that moment on I will commit fully to camp life. My reluctance to do anything is replaced with a burning desire to do everything. The next morning, I arise before dawn and don my bathing suit for the polar bear dip. At 7 a.m., I am the first person on the beach. Teenagers stumble sleepily toward the dock and I urge them on, cheering and clapping as though leaping into cold lakes is something I do every morning, 12 months a year. I dive into the water like a seal. I splash. I frolic. I exclaim about how good it feels. Vigorously toweling off on the beach afterwards, I talk to anyone within earshot about the temperature of the water.  Later that day, as the camp winds down, I volunteer to make friendship bracelets. The director leads each knot of young people in an earnest discussion about what they have learned during their time together. I am moved by how genuine she is, and by how carefully the students listen and respond. I melt the ends of the red and blue cords, and fuse them together around slender, tentative wrists. It is very quiet, and I am struck by how seriously we all take the ritual. Something has happened in this camp. To the students, for sure, but also to me.  When the last camper leaves, I extend my own arm toward the camp director. “What colour would you like?” she asks. I stretch out on the ground, reach my hand towards the clear blue sky, and listen to the contented thrum of the young people preparing to leave our temporary home. “I want both”, I say. I feel the two cords wrap around my wrist, snug against my skin. At school the next week, and for weeks after, I wear my bracelets with pride.   A longer version of this story was accepted for publication by The Globe and Mail.


It takes

125

years of HISTORY to build a bright FUTURE On June 17, 152 young men and women become members of Ashbury College’s 125th graduating class Congratulations to them, and to the global universities that welcomed them this fall. Carleton Brown Western Queen’s Northeastern Oxford U of T Cornell Ottawa NYU Dalhousie McGill Bocconi University Concordia York OCADU Surrey Laval Harvard Carlos III University of Madrid Guelph Frankfurt School of Finance and Management Ryerson European Business School Mount Allison Northwestern UBC Augustana University University of the Arts London StFX Emily Carr Brandon Amherst College Brock Saint Mary’s Laurier Czech Technical University Manchester Belmont Tecnologico de Monterrey Trent University of Miami Southern Methodist Waterloo University College London


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Ashbury News Fall 2017  
Ashbury News Fall 2017