Page 1

Focus Summer / Fall 2012

the american school foundation, a.c.

Farewell,

Class of 2012 A Look Back at the Graduation Ceremony Welcome, Wellness Center! A Fun-Filled First Event

Thank You, Thank You

Honoring All Who Gave in 2011-2012

Thinking About College? Some Tips from Recent Grads

A magazine for alumni, parents, students, faculty & friends


contents

Summer/Fall 2012

02 From the Executive Director 02 Contributors Introducing some of our writers

03 From the Editorial Board

26 good decisions The valedictorian’s address BY maría andrea arroyo ornelas

27 goodbye, hello The salutatorian’s address BY mai-lee picard

campus currents 28 ringing in the new A spectacular event for the Jenkins Foundation Wellness Center

31 bears abroad What New York and Las Vegas had to offer

04 From the Board of Trustees

focus on education 32 voiceS of experience

New faces on the Board

College application tips from recent ASF grads

05 News & Events Stepping up, helping out, taking the stage … and other goings-on

DIVISIONS & DEPARTMENTS 13 Early Childhood Center A day at the farm by leslie barnhizer

14 Lower School

BY isabel oliveres (’10)

34 q&a: deborah lawrence The performing arts coordinator talks about what’s in store for students family forum 36 why sleep matters An expert’s view of an often ignored health topic BY dr. frucutoso ayala guerrero

BY valeria bravo, laura checa, anisa estrada, ana paula garcía,

Institutional Advancement 38 generous students

andrea konigs, ana paola mendoza and mariana reide

And other news from the Capital Campaign and the Annual Scholarship Drive

15 Middle School

40 donors 2011-2012 With a huge thank you to everyone

behind the exhibition

digital devices in the classroom BY charles pawlik

16 Upper School

STUDENT VOICES 42 the life of a day in chiapas

better communication

An ode to its beauty and its people

BY gabriel lemmon

BY nina sachdev

17 The Arts student art on display

Alumni 43 profile: betsy castillo (’70)

By PAT PATTERSON

asf student, teacher, parent and inspiration

18 Parent Association a chat with bernardo berruga (’12), featured at the upcoming art fair

BY CINDY TANAKA (’91)

44 Events Spirit, careers and football

BY paloma porraz

19 Athletics & Extended Learning new offerings

graduation 2012 20 congratulations to the class of 2012 23 dress code The meanings behind the graduation garb

24 the graduating class of 2012 Who they are, where they’re going

45 Class notes Keeping in touch with the ASF family, far and wide

46 Reunions Who got together ... and what they did

48 From the Mailroom & In Memoriam kids’ corner 49 a message in song A trip to Los Pinos, with a purpose


contents

Summer/Fall 2012

02 From the Executive Director 02 Contributors Introducing some of our writers

03 From the Editorial Board

26 good decisions The valedictorian’s address BY maría andrea arroyo ornelas

27 goodbye, hello The salutatorian’s address BY mai-lee picard

campus currents 28 ringing in the new A spectacular event for the Jenkins Foundation Wellness Center

31 bears abroad What New York and Las Vegas had to offer

04 From the Board of Trustees

focus on education 32 voiceS of experience

New faces on the Board

College application tips from recent ASF grads

05 News & Events Stepping up, helping out, taking the stage … and other goings-on

DIVISIONS & DEPARTMENTS 13 Early Childhood Center A day at the farm by leslie barnhizer

14 Lower School

BY isabel oliveres (’10)

34 q&a: deborah lawrence The performing arts coordinator talks about what’s in store for students family forum 36 why sleep matters An expert’s view of an often ignored health topic BY dr. frucutoso ayala guerrero

BY valeria bravo, laura checa, anisa estrada, ana paula garcía,

Institutional Advancement 38 generous students

andrea konigs, ana paola mendoza and mariana reide

And other news from the Capital Campaign and the Annual Scholarship Drive

15 Middle School

40 donors 2011-2012 With a huge thank you to everyone

behind the exhibition

digital devices in the classroom BY charles pawlik

16 Upper School

STUDENT VOICES 42 the life of a day in chiapas

better communication

An ode to its beauty and its people

BY gabriel lemmon

BY nina sachdev

17 The Arts student art on display

Alumni 43 profile: betsy castillo (’70)

By PAT PATTERSON

asf student, teacher, parent and inspiration

18 Parent Association a chat with bernardo berruga (’12), featured at the upcoming art fair

BY CINDY TANAKA (’91)

44 Events Spirit, careers and football

BY paloma porraz

19 Athletics & Extended Learning new offerings

graduation 2012 20 congratulations to the class of 2012 23 dress code The meanings behind the graduation garb

24 the graduating class of 2012 Who they are, where they’re going

45 Class notes Keeping in touch with the ASF family, far and wide

46 Reunions Who got together ... and what they did

48 From the Mailroom & In Memoriam kids’ corner 49 a message in song A trip to Los Pinos, with a purpose


fr o m t h e e x e c u t iv e dir e c t o r

fr o m t h e e di t o ria l b o ard

Focus

c o n t rib u t o r s

Dear ASF Community, Another school year is starting. For those who are or will be on campus, welcome or welcome back! For our alumni far and wide, we hope you’ll take a moment to think of us here at ASF and enjoy some nostalgia as you remember packing up your school supplies, meeting new teachers and seeing friends again after a relaxing summer. But, this isn’t just any normal school year — this school year, ASF is celebrating 125 years of history! Founded in 1888, we will technically turn 125 in 2013. This is too important of a birthday to celebrate just for a year or a month. So, we invite you to join us as we undertake a year of making many of our events special with another reason to celebrate. For example, we hope you’ll join us September 1 for our Parent Association Welcome Picnic and the Alumni Bowl. At ASF, as an International Baccalaureate World School, an Advanced Placement International Diploma site and a SACS-accredited institution, we believe in continual improvement. We not only expect our students at all levels to reach, accomplish and reach again, but we also strive as individuals and as a school to improve on a yearly — even a daily — basis. As you page through this issue of Focus, you’ll see how we’re improving in all our divisions this school year, from new after-school programming to new ways of communicating with Upper School students. This is all part of a pattern: ASF started in 1888, with a handful of kindergarten students in one classroom, and has grown to a premiere K-12 educational institution, almost 2,600 students strong. With nearly 99% of our students continuing to universities, and thousands of alumni living, working and thriving around the world, we are happy to boast of our accomplishments and our improvements. But, we’re never an institution to rest on our laurels. We encourage every member of the community to commit to improvement this school year, in whatever role you play. Here’s to another 125 years full of growth and successes! Sincerely,

A magazine for ASF Alumni, Parents, Students, Faculty and Friends Summer/Fall, 2012 Vol. XI | No. 2 | Mexico City

Isabel Oliveres (’10) (“Voices of Experience,” page 32) A Mexico City native and a double major in English and history at the University of Pennsylvania, Isabel writes for numerous Penn student publications, is president of the Mexican student organization on campus and works in the Undergraduate Admissions Office, where her experience with stressed-out prospective college students (and their parents) inspired her to write this article.

The summer/fall issue of Focus can be a tough one to bring together because it’s a time of great transitions. At the same time, we’re wrapping up one school year

and starting another. On the plus side, there’s no lack of news!

Bret Sikkink (“Dress Code,” page 23) Originally from Des Moines, Iowa, Bret Sikkink and his wife Leslie Barnhizer have completed their first year as teachers at ASF — he in Upper School economics, she in K3. Bret’s master’s degree is in special education, and he previously taught elementary school in Phoenix.

Of course, our cover story for this issue is the graduation of the Class of 2012. On pages 20-23, you can read about the ceremony that made it all official, including a very interesting piece on decoding those different flourishes that make up academic regalia for students and faculty. Then, on pages 26-27, read the valedictorian’s and salutatorian’s addresses, and feel like you were really there (in the unfortunate case that you were not). Our newest graduates are scattered around the world as the new school year begins — on pages 24-25, you can see exactly where. But for those of us back here at ASF, it’s time to get a move on another year of teaching, learning and parenting. We hope you will start the year well-rested, and will continue to find time to recuperate as the chaos of another year starts. Starting on page 36, learn about sleep, why it’s important and what you can do to stay healthy on that front.

Gabriel Lemmon (“For Students, By Students,” page 16) As Upper School Dean of Students, Gabriel Lemmon oversees student activities and the efforts to enhance the use of technology throughout the Upper School. His experience integrating multimedia, the web and school communication is helping to guide the development of ASF’s Connected Learning Community. Charles Pawlik (“Bring Your Own,” page 15) Middle School Dean of Students Chuck Pawlik has been an educator for the past 14 years, including time as a photography teacher at ASF, chair of the visual and performing arts department at the American School of Tegucigalpa in Honduras and a return to ASF in 2011. Chuck has been involved in the connectivity movement throughout the school.

Also, for those who are soon to graduate — a word of advice. Not from their peers, their counselors, their teachers and their parents, but from Bears who have gone before. What’s important to think about in a university and a major? Check page 32 for some words of wisdom on the college search and decision process, direct from the mouths of recent ASF graduates.

Focus Summer / Fall 2012

THE AMERICAN SCHOOL FOUNDATION, A.C.

FAREWELL,

CLASS OF 2012 A Look Back at The Graduation Ceremony WELCOME, WELLNESS CENTER!

Finally, mention of her retirement on ASF’s Facebook page brought in a record number of comments. After 35 years on the job (not including her time as an ASF student), Betsy Castillo (’70) has closed out her ASF career, with distinction. On page 43, our Alumni Profile reveals why she cried on her first day as a teacher, what kept her going and what philosophy she has implemented every year. We hope you enjoy this issue of Focus, full of goodbyes and new beginnings. Best wishes for a great year, wherever you may be.

A Fun-Filled First Event

Paul Williams Executive Director

2

Fructuoso Ayala Guerrero (“Why Sleep Matters,” page 36) Dr. Fructuoso Ayala, an internationally known researcher in the field of sleep, heads the Neurosciences Laboratory at the School of Psychology at UNAM. He has published in Spanish, English, Portuguese and Russian and lectured widely in Mexico, the United States, Canada, South America and Europe.

THANK YOU, THANK YOU

Honoring All Who Gave in 2011-2012

Saludos,

Paul Williams Executive Director Susan Olivo Head of Early Childhood Center Evan Hunt Head of Lower School Rebecca Crutchfield Head of Middle School Amy Gallie Head of Upper School Robert Wilson Head of Athletics & Extended Learning Board of Trustees Rosa Marentes de Pisinger (’87), Chair Catherine Austin (’78), 1st Vice Chair Jeffrey Scott McElfresh, 2nd Vice Chair Carla Ormsbee, Secretary Joan Liechty, Treasurer Aliki Botton de Elías (’85) César Buenrostro (’85) Murray H. Case Sara Craig Francisco Demesa Sebastian Fernández Steve Finley Fernando Franco Fernando Gutiérrez Ochoa Frances Huttanus Antonio Rallo John Santa Maria Otazúa

Editorial Board Adele Goldschmied, Cindy Tanaka (’91) Clementina Aguilar, Michele Beltran Paul Williams, Juan de Jesús Breene Editorial Staff Violeta Ayala, Director of Communications Sloane Starke, Editor-in-Chief and Chair of the Editorial Board Kelly Arthur Garrett, Editorial Consultant Daniela Graniel, Art Director Marisela Sanabria, Photography Alumni Relations Cindy Tanaka (’91) alumni@asf.edu.mx

THINKING ABOUT COLLEGE? Some Tips from Recent Grads

A magazine for alumni, parents, students, faculty & friends

On the cover: Graduation celebration: goodbye to the Class of 2012 Photo by: Marisela Sanabria

Sloane Starke Editor-in-Chief and the Focus Editorial Board

Parent Association Alma Rosa Rodríguez, President Lilián Toro, Vice President Advertising Sales: 5227 4942 FOCUS es una publicación cuatrimestral editada por The American School Foundation, A.C., Sur 136 #135, Col. Las Américas, México, D.F., C.P. 01120. Editora Responsable: Sloane Alexandria Starke. Derechos de Autor: Licitud de Título y de Contenido 16220. Reserva de Derecho: 04-2008-111212240200-102. Distribuido por The American School Foundation, A.C. Sur 136 #135, Col. Las Américas, México, D.F., C.P. 01120. Se prohibe la reproducción total o parcial de los textos de esta revista sin previa autorización escrita de The American School Foundation, A.C.

3


fr o m t h e e x e c u t iv e dir e c t o r

fr o m t h e e di t o ria l b o ard

Focus

c o n t rib u t o r s

Dear ASF Community, Another school year is starting. For those who are or will be on campus, welcome or welcome back! For our alumni far and wide, we hope you’ll take a moment to think of us here at ASF and enjoy some nostalgia as you remember packing up your school supplies, meeting new teachers and seeing friends again after a relaxing summer. But, this isn’t just any normal school year — this school year, ASF is celebrating 125 years of history! Founded in 1888, we will technically turn 125 in 2013. This is too important of a birthday to celebrate just for a year or a month. So, we invite you to join us as we undertake a year of making many of our events special with another reason to celebrate. For example, we hope you’ll join us September 1 for our Parent Association Welcome Picnic and the Alumni Bowl. At ASF, as an International Baccalaureate World School, an Advanced Placement International Diploma site and a SACS-accredited institution, we believe in continual improvement. We not only expect our students at all levels to reach, accomplish and reach again, but we also strive as individuals and as a school to improve on a yearly — even a daily — basis. As you page through this issue of Focus, you’ll see how we’re improving in all our divisions this school year, from new after-school programming to new ways of communicating with Upper School students. This is all part of a pattern: ASF started in 1888, with a handful of kindergarten students in one classroom, and has grown to a premiere K-12 educational institution, almost 2,600 students strong. With nearly 99% of our students continuing to universities, and thousands of alumni living, working and thriving around the world, we are happy to boast of our accomplishments and our improvements. But, we’re never an institution to rest on our laurels. We encourage every member of the community to commit to improvement this school year, in whatever role you play. Here’s to another 125 years full of growth and successes! Sincerely,

A magazine for ASF Alumni, Parents, Students, Faculty and Friends Summer/Fall, 2012 Vol. XI | No. 2 | Mexico City

Isabel Oliveres (’10) (“Voices of Experience,” page 32) A Mexico City native and a double major in English and history at the University of Pennsylvania, Isabel writes for numerous Penn student publications, is president of the Mexican student organization on campus and works in the Undergraduate Admissions Office, where her experience with stressed-out prospective college students (and their parents) inspired her to write this article.

The summer/fall issue of Focus can be a tough one to bring together because it’s a time of great transitions. At the same time, we’re wrapping up one school year

and starting another. On the plus side, there’s no lack of news!

Bret Sikkink (“Dress Code,” page 23) Originally from Des Moines, Iowa, Bret Sikkink and his wife Leslie Barnhizer have completed their first year as teachers at ASF — he in Upper School economics, she in K3. Bret’s master’s degree is in special education, and he previously taught elementary school in Phoenix.

Of course, our cover story for this issue is the graduation of the Class of 2012. On pages 20-23, you can read about the ceremony that made it all official, including a very interesting piece on decoding those different flourishes that make up academic regalia for students and faculty. Then, on pages 26-27, read the valedictorian’s and salutatorian’s addresses, and feel like you were really there (in the unfortunate case that you were not). Our newest graduates are scattered around the world as the new school year begins — on pages 24-25, you can see exactly where. But for those of us back here at ASF, it’s time to get a move on another year of teaching, learning and parenting. We hope you will start the year well-rested, and will continue to find time to recuperate as the chaos of another year starts. Starting on page 36, learn about sleep, why it’s important and what you can do to stay healthy on that front.

Gabriel Lemmon (“For Students, By Students,” page 16) As Upper School Dean of Students, Gabriel Lemmon oversees student activities and the efforts to enhance the use of technology throughout the Upper School. His experience integrating multimedia, the web and school communication is helping to guide the development of ASF’s Connected Learning Community. Charles Pawlik (“Bring Your Own,” page 15) Middle School Dean of Students Chuck Pawlik has been an educator for the past 14 years, including time as a photography teacher at ASF, chair of the visual and performing arts department at the American School of Tegucigalpa in Honduras and a return to ASF in 2011. Chuck has been involved in the connectivity movement throughout the school.

Also, for those who are soon to graduate — a word of advice. Not from their peers, their counselors, their teachers and their parents, but from Bears who have gone before. What’s important to think about in a university and a major? Check page 32 for some words of wisdom on the college search and decision process, direct from the mouths of recent ASF graduates.

Focus Summer / Fall 2012

THE AMERICAN SCHOOL FOUNDATION, A.C.

FAREWELL,

CLASS OF 2012 A Look Back at The Graduation Ceremony WELCOME, WELLNESS CENTER!

Finally, mention of her retirement on ASF’s Facebook page brought in a record number of comments. After 35 years on the job (not including her time as an ASF student), Betsy Castillo (’70) has closed out her ASF career, with distinction. On page 43, our Alumni Profile reveals why she cried on her first day as a teacher, what kept her going and what philosophy she has implemented every year. We hope you enjoy this issue of Focus, full of goodbyes and new beginnings. Best wishes for a great year, wherever you may be.

A Fun-Filled First Event

Paul Williams Executive Director

2

Fructuoso Ayala Guerrero (“Why Sleep Matters,” page 36) Dr. Fructuoso Ayala, an internationally known researcher in the field of sleep, heads the Neurosciences Laboratory at the School of Psychology at UNAM. He has published in Spanish, English, Portuguese and Russian and lectured widely in Mexico, the United States, Canada, South America and Europe.

THANK YOU, THANK YOU

Honoring All Who Gave in 2011-2012

Saludos,

Paul Williams Executive Director Susan Olivo Head of Early Childhood Center Evan Hunt Head of Lower School Rebecca Crutchfield Head of Middle School Amy Gallie Head of Upper School Robert Wilson Head of Athletics & Extended Learning Board of Trustees Rosa Marentes de Pisinger (’87), Chair Catherine Austin (’78), 1st Vice Chair Jeffrey Scott McElfresh, 2nd Vice Chair Carla Ormsbee, Secretary Joan Liechty, Treasurer Aliki Botton de Elías (’85) César Buenrostro (’85) Murray H. Case Sara Craig Francisco Demesa Sebastian Fernández Steve Finley Fernando Franco Fernando Gutiérrez Ochoa Frances Huttanus Antonio Rallo John Santa Maria Otazúa

Editorial Board Adele Goldschmied, Cindy Tanaka (’91) Clementina Aguilar, Michele Beltran Paul Williams, Juan de Jesús Breene Editorial Staff Violeta Ayala, Director of Communications Sloane Starke, Editor-in-Chief and Chair of the Editorial Board Kelly Arthur Garrett, Editorial Consultant Daniela Graniel, Art Director Marisela Sanabria, Photography Alumni Relations Cindy Tanaka (’91) alumni@asf.edu.mx

THINKING ABOUT COLLEGE? Some Tips from Recent Grads

A magazine for alumni, parents, students, faculty & friends

On the cover: Graduation celebration: goodbye to the Class of 2012 Photo by: Marisela Sanabria

Sloane Starke Editor-in-Chief and the Focus Editorial Board

Parent Association Alma Rosa Rodríguez, President Lilián Toro, Vice President Advertising Sales: 5227 4942 FOCUS es una publicación cuatrimestral editada por The American School Foundation, A.C., Sur 136 #135, Col. Las Américas, México, D.F., C.P. 01120. Editora Responsable: Sloane Alexandria Starke. Derechos de Autor: Licitud de Título y de Contenido 16220. Reserva de Derecho: 04-2008-111212240200-102. Distribuido por The American School Foundation, A.C. Sur 136 #135, Col. Las Américas, México, D.F., C.P. 01120. Se prohibe la reproducción total o parcial de los textos de esta revista sin previa autorización escrita de The American School Foundation, A.C.

3


fr o m t h e b o ard o f t r u s t e e s

NE W S & E V ENTS

The ASF Board of Trustees is happy to welcome four new members, officially elected at the May Foundation meeting. Aliki Elías (’85), an ASF alumna, parent of two ASF students and former Parent Association president, was elected into office this year after a year as an ex-officio Trustee. She has also been working as a dedicated volunteer with Institutional Advancement. “I truly believe that my years both as a student as well as a parent volunteer will make me a valuable asset as a member of the Board of Trustees,” Aliki says. Steve Finley is a rabbi at Beth Israel Community Center and is the father of an ASF Middle School student. He was born in California but spent many years living in Israel starting after high school. Now living with his family in Mexico, Steve says, “I feel that the place and time is right for me to heighten the bar of my involvement. I would like to be part of something bigger than the Middle School community, and in addition, I would like to better know the mechanisms and how such an institution operates.” Fernando Gutiérrez is a father of two current ASF students, in 8th and 12th grades. An engineer and lifelong resident of Mexico, he is the director of Gimsa Construcciones. He has also used his technical knowledge as an ASF volunteer. “Being part of the Building and Grounds Committee and the Capital Campaign Steering Committee has made me aware that ASF needs committed parents who are ready to work hard, give back and support ASF in any and every way,” Fernando says.

John Santa Maria (’75) started at ASF in the 1960s as a Lower School student. Today, he’s president of Coca-Cola Femsa South America and a parent of four ASF students. “To a large extent, my years at ASF gave me the basis for the successful academic and professional career I have enjoyed,” John says. “Today, I appreciate even more the multiculturalism and individuality the school attempts to instill in all students, as they are pillars of most successful individuals I have met.” Aliki, Steve and John were elected to three-year terms as proprietary directors, and Fernando Gutiérrez was elected to a three-year term as a directorat-large. Also at the Foundation meeting, Trustee and Treasurer Joan Liechty was reelected to a three-year term as a proprietary director and César Buenrostro (’85) was reelected to a three-year term as a director-at-large. We look forward to working together in 2012-2013 for the benefit of the entire ASF community. Thank you for placing your trust in us.

Rosa Marentes de Pisinger (’87) Chair of the ASF Board of Trustees 4

Beauty and the Beast Over three afternoons and evenings last May, the ASF Drama Club gave six performances of “Beauty and the Beast,” the Broadway musical that grew out of the wildly popular 1991 Disney movie, which in turn was based on the centuries-old fairy tale. The free performances showcased both the prodigious talent of ASF’s young performers and the exciting possibilities of the new Ángeles Espinosa Yglesias Fine Arts Center, where they took place. ASF alumnus Isaac Richter (’06) took in the show and gives us his thoughts:

Drama Club put on its own production of this “tale as old as time.” The cast of nearly 30 youngsters was brilliantly directed by Canek Vázquez (’07). Alina Aksyote (’12) and then-junior Stephanie Vondell shared the role of Belle (each giving her unique interpretation of the Beauty), while Fredy Trueba (’12) played the Beast in his greatest challenge and performance of a prolific acting career at ASF. The cast and crew took the audience into a world where a candelabra, embodied by audience favorite Rafael Ramos (’12), leads kitchenware in a dance to win a girl’s affection. Highlights included some complex choreography, the vocal coaching of Michelle Rohyans and a fabulous orchestra led by Carlos Balam Vázquez (’97). The ASF Drama Club smoothly navigated the immortal music of Alan Menkes, and the lyrics by Howard Ashman and Tim Rice, leading a new audience through this “tale as old as time,” with “song as old as rhyme.”

Two decades ago I went to the movies for the first time in my life. The film was “Beauty and the Beast.” This tale of a prince doomed to live as a beast until he’s earned the love of another — and of the small-town beauty who finds a home with him — has meant a lot to my generation ever since. Last spring, the ASF The ASF Drama Club thanks the following sponsors for making Beauty and the Beast possible:

The Drama Club also thanks Gabriela Cesarman, Giancarlo Besa (’11), Bruné Monterrubio, Camila Ocejo (’11), the Parent Association, cast members’ parents and all faculty and staff who went above and beyond their duties to help us. Thanks to them and the entire ASF community, we enjoyed record attendance, including record faculty and staff attendance.

5


fr o m t h e b o ard o f t r u s t e e s

NE W S & E V ENTS

The ASF Board of Trustees is happy to welcome four new members, officially elected at the May Foundation meeting. Aliki Elías (’85), an ASF alumna, parent of two ASF students and former Parent Association president, was elected into office this year after a year as an ex-officio Trustee. She has also been working as a dedicated volunteer with Institutional Advancement. “I truly believe that my years both as a student as well as a parent volunteer will make me a valuable asset as a member of the Board of Trustees,” Aliki says. Steve Finley is a rabbi at Beth Israel Community Center and is the father of an ASF Middle School student. He was born in California but spent many years living in Israel starting after high school. Now living with his family in Mexico, Steve says, “I feel that the place and time is right for me to heighten the bar of my involvement. I would like to be part of something bigger than the Middle School community, and in addition, I would like to better know the mechanisms and how such an institution operates.” Fernando Gutiérrez is a father of two current ASF students, in 8th and 12th grades. An engineer and lifelong resident of Mexico, he is the director of Gimsa Construcciones. He has also used his technical knowledge as an ASF volunteer. “Being part of the Building and Grounds Committee and the Capital Campaign Steering Committee has made me aware that ASF needs committed parents who are ready to work hard, give back and support ASF in any and every way,” Fernando says.

John Santa Maria (’75) started at ASF in the 1960s as a Lower School student. Today, he’s president of Coca-Cola Femsa South America and a parent of four ASF students. “To a large extent, my years at ASF gave me the basis for the successful academic and professional career I have enjoyed,” John says. “Today, I appreciate even more the multiculturalism and individuality the school attempts to instill in all students, as they are pillars of most successful individuals I have met.” Aliki, Steve and John were elected to three-year terms as proprietary directors, and Fernando Gutiérrez was elected to a three-year term as a directorat-large. Also at the Foundation meeting, Trustee and Treasurer Joan Liechty was reelected to a three-year term as a proprietary director and César Buenrostro (’85) was reelected to a three-year term as a director-at-large. We look forward to working together in 2012-2013 for the benefit of the entire ASF community. Thank you for placing your trust in us.

Rosa Marentes de Pisinger (’87) Chair of the ASF Board of Trustees 4

Beauty and the Beast Over three afternoons and evenings last May, the ASF Drama Club gave six performances of “Beauty and the Beast,” the Broadway musical that grew out of the wildly popular 1991 Disney movie, which in turn was based on the centuries-old fairy tale. The free performances showcased both the prodigious talent of ASF’s young performers and the exciting possibilities of the new Ángeles Espinosa Yglesias Fine Arts Center, where they took place. ASF alumnus Isaac Richter (’06) took in the show and gives us his thoughts:

Drama Club put on its own production of this “tale as old as time.” The cast of nearly 30 youngsters was brilliantly directed by Canek Vázquez (’07). Alina Aksyote (’12) and then-junior Stephanie Vondell shared the role of Belle (each giving her unique interpretation of the Beauty), while Fredy Trueba (’12) played the Beast in his greatest challenge and performance of a prolific acting career at ASF. The cast and crew took the audience into a world where a candelabra, embodied by audience favorite Rafael Ramos (’12), leads kitchenware in a dance to win a girl’s affection. Highlights included some complex choreography, the vocal coaching of Michelle Rohyans and a fabulous orchestra led by Carlos Balam Vázquez (’97). The ASF Drama Club smoothly navigated the immortal music of Alan Menkes, and the lyrics by Howard Ashman and Tim Rice, leading a new audience through this “tale as old as time,” with “song as old as rhyme.”

Two decades ago I went to the movies for the first time in my life. The film was “Beauty and the Beast.” This tale of a prince doomed to live as a beast until he’s earned the love of another — and of the small-town beauty who finds a home with him — has meant a lot to my generation ever since. Last spring, the ASF The ASF Drama Club thanks the following sponsors for making Beauty and the Beast possible:

The Drama Club also thanks Gabriela Cesarman, Giancarlo Besa (’11), Bruné Monterrubio, Camila Ocejo (’11), the Parent Association, cast members’ parents and all faculty and staff who went above and beyond their duties to help us. Thanks to them and the entire ASF community, we enjoyed record attendance, including record faculty and staff attendance.

5


NE W S & E V ENTS New Leadership Team Members ASF is welcoming several new members to its Leadership Team for 2012-2013: Monique Autrique, Lower School House Dean Monique has been at ASF as a teacher since November 2011. She has also worked at The American School of Tampico, where she served as middle school principal. With an undergraduate degree from the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México and a master’s in education from Framingham State University, Monique has more than 13 years of experience in education. She is replacing Diego Zaragoza, who is now the Lower School academic dean.

Celebration and Recognition Faculty and staff celebrated the end of the year May 8 at the annual Staff Appreciation Celebration. Amidst an Olympics theme, a parade and torch-lighting, the following individuals were recognized for having reached milestones in service to the school.

Javier Landeros, Director of Information Tecnology ASF’s new director of technology comes to the school from the corporate world, most recently working at Alsea. He has a bachelor’s degree in electronic systems engineering and an MBA, both from the Instituto Tecnológico de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey. Javier is replacing Carlos Reyes, who after five years at ASF has moved to the United States with his family.

• 5 Years of Service: María del Carmen Espinosa, Anna Siegal, Lilia Vargas, Helen Woroszylski, Terri Bakken, Jordan Maas, Dani Miller, Mariela Rico, Michael Seifert, Isabel Fernández, Kristen Leutheuser, Alejandra Salazar, Carlos Reyes, Guy Cheney, Megan Ver Duin, Pat Patterson, Jeffrey Loomis, Gustavo Cárdenas, Ricardo González, Lisa Keeler, Omar Rodríguez, Sloane Starke, Ismael Hernández, Magy Álvarez, María José Marín, Javier Eguía, Lilia Caballero, Jorge Paz • 10 Years of Service: Jean Rivard, Isabel Yuziuchuk, Salvador Retana, Bárbara Estrada, Memi Piccaluga, Yvonne Rencher, Miriam Canizal, Juan Antonio Pérez, José María Ramírez, Leo Trías, Martha Domínguez, María Elena Caballero, Edgar López, Tavane Estañol, Mercedes Pailles

A Week for the Environment ASF’s commitment to sustainability was on display April 16-22 during Environment Week, combining what have been known internationally as Earth Week and TV-Turnoff Week. Activities focused on improving our mental and physical environments, and included an electronics recycling campaign, gardening and composting, a presentation on climate change, entertainment by a mime and an environmental fair. In related activities, on Wednesday, the entire school community was invited to La Feria de Chapultepec after an early dismissal. From Monday through Friday, donated books were on sale at the Used Book Fair, which promotes sustainability by recycling books and also promotes alternatives to recreational screens, such as watching TV, playing video games and using computers and handheld devices for fun. All proceeds went to support the school through the Parent Association. The most noteworthy event took place on Thursday, when students, faculty and support staff were asked to keep their screens turned off. Lower School students patrolled campus, and those caught with their screens turned on were cited and “sentenced” to community service. Only a few special permits were given out to those for whom daily screen use is essential (security personnel, Cashier’s Office, etc.).

How to Help Build a House One Saturday last May, at the height of the IB exam season, a group of ASF Upper School students and teachers traveled to the State of Mexico town of Villa del Carbón to help build a house. For five hours they labored under the sun, putting up walls using the machihembloque system, an adobe variation with blocks made of local earth and less than 10 percent cement. “The experience was exhausting and left me sunburned and without feeling in my arms for a few days,” said Rafael Ramos (’12), an ASF senior at the time and an organizer of the project. “But it resulted in a spacious house that a family would be able to call their own.” The home construction was the work of a new community service group that Rafael and others created at the Upper School. Its purpose is to help improve the living standards of people in marginalized areas. The program basically revives the former Habitat for Humanity club, but it is now linked with the award-winning non-governmental organization known as “Ayúdame que yo también soy mexicano,” or ATM for short. The ASF group, therefore, is called ATM@ASF. Rafael has graduated, but a team of student coordinators is planning more ATM@ASF projects for the new school year under the guidance of teacher Carlos Alaniz. “If you’re looking for community work, you need service hours or you’re just looking for something to do on a Saturday, you should join this group,” Rafael says. “It’s a wonderful experience.”

• 15 Years of Service: Yolanda Galán, Adriana de Ávila, Lorena Ramón, Paty Benítez, Consuelo Novoa, Amalia Noriega, Luz Tamez, Sacramento Farfán, Manuel Mendoza, José Morales

Susan Victor, ECC Academic Dean Originally from the Washington, D.C. area, Susan holds two master’s degrees, in educational leadership and special education, from Lehigh University and James Madison University. A teacher for more than 18 years, she has spent the last 13 years as an international educator, most recently in Syria, where she was a primary school principal at an international school. She has also lived in Hong Kong and Sri Lanka. Susan is replacing Jean Rivard, who has accepted a leadership position at a school in Qatar.

• 20 Years of Service: Brenda Santander, Patricia Sánchez, Tere Rivera, Manuel Hernández, Maribel Morales, Alfonso Segura, Edith Herrera, Rosa María Garduño, Hugo González, Manuel Infante • 25 Years of Service: Agustina Alcántar, María Ángeles Rodríguez • 30 Years of Service: Rogelio Ledesma • 35 Years of Service: Betsy Castillo • 40 Years of Service: Lorenza Ortega • Retiring: Diana Gerson, Felicitas Ochoa, Jolanta Nitoslawska, Felice Hubbard, Betsy Castillo, Martha Guadalupe Martínez

Virtual Summer School Students who needed to make up failed classes benefited from a new program over the summer. Rather than struggling to provide as much material as possible to students with diverse coursework needs, the school contracted with Florida Virtual School, a SACS-accredited institution offering a variety of courses, to provide credit recovery for students in grades 7-12. ASF counselors registered students for their courses and those who passed their failed courses are able to continue their studies this year at ASF.

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NE W S & E V ENTS New Leadership Team Members ASF is welcoming several new members to its Leadership Team for 2012-2013: Monique Autrique, Lower School House Dean Monique has been at ASF as a teacher since November 2011. She has also worked at The American School of Tampico, where she served as middle school principal. With an undergraduate degree from the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México and a master’s in education from Framingham State University, Monique has more than 13 years of experience in education. She is replacing Diego Zaragoza, who is now the Lower School academic dean.

Celebration and Recognition Faculty and staff celebrated the end of the year May 8 at the annual Staff Appreciation Celebration. Amidst an Olympics theme, a parade and torch-lighting, the following individuals were recognized for having reached milestones in service to the school.

Javier Landeros, Director of Information Tecnology ASF’s new director of technology comes to the school from the corporate world, most recently working at Alsea. He has a bachelor’s degree in electronic systems engineering and an MBA, both from the Instituto Tecnológico de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey. Javier is replacing Carlos Reyes, who after five years at ASF has moved to the United States with his family.

• 5 Years of Service: María del Carmen Espinosa, Anna Siegal, Lilia Vargas, Helen Woroszylski, Terri Bakken, Jordan Maas, Dani Miller, Mariela Rico, Michael Seifert, Isabel Fernández, Kristen Leutheuser, Alejandra Salazar, Carlos Reyes, Guy Cheney, Megan Ver Duin, Pat Patterson, Jeffrey Loomis, Gustavo Cárdenas, Ricardo González, Lisa Keeler, Omar Rodríguez, Sloane Starke, Ismael Hernández, Magy Álvarez, María José Marín, Javier Eguía, Lilia Caballero, Jorge Paz • 10 Years of Service: Jean Rivard, Isabel Yuziuchuk, Salvador Retana, Bárbara Estrada, Memi Piccaluga, Yvonne Rencher, Miriam Canizal, Juan Antonio Pérez, José María Ramírez, Leo Trías, Martha Domínguez, María Elena Caballero, Edgar López, Tavane Estañol, Mercedes Pailles

A Week for the Environment ASF’s commitment to sustainability was on display April 16-22 during Environment Week, combining what have been known internationally as Earth Week and TV-Turnoff Week. Activities focused on improving our mental and physical environments, and included an electronics recycling campaign, gardening and composting, a presentation on climate change, entertainment by a mime and an environmental fair. In related activities, on Wednesday, the entire school community was invited to La Feria de Chapultepec after an early dismissal. From Monday through Friday, donated books were on sale at the Used Book Fair, which promotes sustainability by recycling books and also promotes alternatives to recreational screens, such as watching TV, playing video games and using computers and handheld devices for fun. All proceeds went to support the school through the Parent Association. The most noteworthy event took place on Thursday, when students, faculty and support staff were asked to keep their screens turned off. Lower School students patrolled campus, and those caught with their screens turned on were cited and “sentenced” to community service. Only a few special permits were given out to those for whom daily screen use is essential (security personnel, Cashier’s Office, etc.).

How to Help Build a House One Saturday last May, at the height of the IB exam season, a group of ASF Upper School students and teachers traveled to the State of Mexico town of Villa del Carbón to help build a house. For five hours they labored under the sun, putting up walls using the machihembloque system, an adobe variation with blocks made of local earth and less than 10 percent cement. “The experience was exhausting and left me sunburned and without feeling in my arms for a few days,” said Rafael Ramos (’12), an ASF senior at the time and an organizer of the project. “But it resulted in a spacious house that a family would be able to call their own.” The home construction was the work of a new community service group that Rafael and others created at the Upper School. Its purpose is to help improve the living standards of people in marginalized areas. The program basically revives the former Habitat for Humanity club, but it is now linked with the award-winning non-governmental organization known as “Ayúdame que yo también soy mexicano,” or ATM for short. The ASF group, therefore, is called ATM@ASF. Rafael has graduated, but a team of student coordinators is planning more ATM@ASF projects for the new school year under the guidance of teacher Carlos Alaniz. “If you’re looking for community work, you need service hours or you’re just looking for something to do on a Saturday, you should join this group,” Rafael says. “It’s a wonderful experience.”

• 15 Years of Service: Yolanda Galán, Adriana de Ávila, Lorena Ramón, Paty Benítez, Consuelo Novoa, Amalia Noriega, Luz Tamez, Sacramento Farfán, Manuel Mendoza, José Morales

Susan Victor, ECC Academic Dean Originally from the Washington, D.C. area, Susan holds two master’s degrees, in educational leadership and special education, from Lehigh University and James Madison University. A teacher for more than 18 years, she has spent the last 13 years as an international educator, most recently in Syria, where she was a primary school principal at an international school. She has also lived in Hong Kong and Sri Lanka. Susan is replacing Jean Rivard, who has accepted a leadership position at a school in Qatar.

• 20 Years of Service: Brenda Santander, Patricia Sánchez, Tere Rivera, Manuel Hernández, Maribel Morales, Alfonso Segura, Edith Herrera, Rosa María Garduño, Hugo González, Manuel Infante • 25 Years of Service: Agustina Alcántar, María Ángeles Rodríguez • 30 Years of Service: Rogelio Ledesma • 35 Years of Service: Betsy Castillo • 40 Years of Service: Lorenza Ortega • Retiring: Diana Gerson, Felicitas Ochoa, Jolanta Nitoslawska, Felice Hubbard, Betsy Castillo, Martha Guadalupe Martínez

Virtual Summer School Students who needed to make up failed classes benefited from a new program over the summer. Rather than struggling to provide as much material as possible to students with diverse coursework needs, the school contracted with Florida Virtual School, a SACS-accredited institution offering a variety of courses, to provide credit recovery for students in grades 7-12. ASF counselors registered students for their courses and those who passed their failed courses are able to continue their studies this year at ASF.

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NE W S & E V ENTS They Came, They Saw, They Debated

Stepping Up ... From Middle School to Upper School On Wednesday, June 13, the class of 2016 celebrated the culmination of their Middle School years. Eighth grade students, teachers, staff, family and friends gathered for a formal ceremony in the new Jenkins Foundation Wellness Center to mark the occasion. This rite was followed by a lovely reception marking the end of a wonderful three years, and the attendees could feel the excitement of the new beginning that was soon to follow. The ceremony opened with a procession of staff, teachers and students. Executive Director Paul Williams and Head of Middle School Rebecca Crutchfield then shared words of wisdom with the class before the students took the stage to receive their certificates and awards. Valedictorian Emma Raiteri prepared an inspiring speech for her classmates, thanking the parents in particular for their support. Finally students exited the ceremony, large smiles on their faces as they filed out. Family members and special guests, including several members of the Board of Trustees, staff and teachers, witnessed the culminating event of a three-year period in the lives of these young men and women. Members of the class of 2016 truly embody the mission and vision of our institution and will surely continue their success throughout the next stage of their academic careers.

Just a few years ago, school debate competitions were little known in Mexico. Since then, a fledgling debate circuit has begun to operate and Mexico has sent a strong national team abroad to two world competitions. ASF has played a major role in the debate scene, and last April 20-22 it hosted the first official Mexican Debating Championships, organized by the Red Mexicana de Debate, A.C. and recognized by the young debaters as the most anticipated event of the year. Churchill School, Churchill College, the Edron Academy, ITESM and the Sierra Nevada School joined ASF for three days of grueling competition on campus. The main competition was a World Schools-style debate format in which each three- or four-member team speaks four times, alternating with its opponent. ASF and other schools had multiple teams participating. For a month beforehand, competitors researched the prepared topics that were presented in “motion” form, such as “This House regrets the creation of the European Union,” “This House would eliminate plurinominal members from the Mexican Congress” and “This House would prevent companies from owning more than one TV station, radio station or newspaper in Mexico.” Participants had to be prepared to argue either side of the motion. There were also impromptu motions to deal with. There was an extemporaneous speaking competition, in which competitors would be given a random topic and a half hour to prepare a five- to seven-minute speech on it. By all accounts, the competition was intense, but ASF fared well, taking first and third places in the Spanish division and second place in the English division, sweeping the top three extemporaneous speaking spots and winning several of the individual top speaker awards. Here are the results for the ASF teams and individual participants: English Division Debate: • 2nd Place: Bruno Riquelme-Sissi Li-Fiona Kaech-Angélica Arteaga • Top Speaker: Ariel de la Garza • 2nd Place Speaker: Diego Cepeda • 3rd Place Speaker: Chris Dickson Spanish Division Debate: • 1st Place: Yair Gittler-Klaus Mastrijt-Sophia Riquelme • 3rd Place: Anik Shveid-Ceci Beltranena-Alejandro Terminal • Top Speaker: Yair Gittler • 2nd Place Speaker: Anik Shveid • 3rd Place Speaker: Sophia Riquelme Extemporaneous Speaking: • 1st Place: Diego Cepeda • 2nd Place: Julio Meyer • 3rd Place: Chris Dickson

Fourth Grade Puccinis The curtain fell last May on another spectacular Fourth Grade Opera season, the annual project in which students brainstorm and work together to create original music and storylines — and then perform them. The themes they came up with included friendship, accepting others, gossip, karma and telling the truth. One class got to attend a professional production of “Peter Pan” and go backstage, adding to their knowledge of the craft. An innovation this year was the integration of more technology, with the students using the program GarageBand to generate sound effects. They also used iMovie to create more elaborate videos. Jenna Kubricht, a fourth grade teacher (and now grade-level coordinator), said many students and families gave good feedback. “It was great seeing the students make connections between the operas and reallife situations,” Ms. Kubricht said. 8

Economics? Easy! She was known as Miss Olvera during her 23 years of teaching at ASF. Since her retirement in 2007, Suzanne Cane y Olvera has kept on teaching by other means — as an author. Her latest is All the Economics You Really Need, in which she makes no attempt to disguise her annoyance at how politicians overcomplicate simple economic concepts. “This book was born on the day that a former student, who is currently majoring in economics at an Ivy League university, told me that everything they were throwing at him in his economics classes could be found ‘on the flow chart you put on the board that day,’” she says. “Economics should not be hard to understand. All you need is some logic, an understanding of cause and effect and a little common sense.” You can download this new book via amazon.com. To see what else Miss Olvera has been up to, go to www.caneolvera.com. And if you’re interested publishing something electronically, e-mail her at caneolverabooks@yahoo.com. 9


NE W S & E V ENTS They Came, They Saw, They Debated

Stepping Up ... From Middle School to Upper School On Wednesday, June 13, the class of 2016 celebrated the culmination of their Middle School years. Eighth grade students, teachers, staff, family and friends gathered for a formal ceremony in the new Jenkins Foundation Wellness Center to mark the occasion. This rite was followed by a lovely reception marking the end of a wonderful three years, and the attendees could feel the excitement of the new beginning that was soon to follow. The ceremony opened with a procession of staff, teachers and students. Executive Director Paul Williams and Head of Middle School Rebecca Crutchfield then shared words of wisdom with the class before the students took the stage to receive their certificates and awards. Valedictorian Emma Raiteri prepared an inspiring speech for her classmates, thanking the parents in particular for their support. Finally students exited the ceremony, large smiles on their faces as they filed out. Family members and special guests, including several members of the Board of Trustees, staff and teachers, witnessed the culminating event of a three-year period in the lives of these young men and women. Members of the class of 2016 truly embody the mission and vision of our institution and will surely continue their success throughout the next stage of their academic careers.

Just a few years ago, school debate competitions were little known in Mexico. Since then, a fledgling debate circuit has begun to operate and Mexico has sent a strong national team abroad to two world competitions. ASF has played a major role in the debate scene, and last April 20-22 it hosted the first official Mexican Debating Championships, organized by the Red Mexicana de Debate, A.C. and recognized by the young debaters as the most anticipated event of the year. Churchill School, Churchill College, the Edron Academy, ITESM and the Sierra Nevada School joined ASF for three days of grueling competition on campus. The main competition was a World Schools-style debate format in which each three- or four-member team speaks four times, alternating with its opponent. ASF and other schools had multiple teams participating. For a month beforehand, competitors researched the prepared topics that were presented in “motion” form, such as “This House regrets the creation of the European Union,” “This House would eliminate plurinominal members from the Mexican Congress” and “This House would prevent companies from owning more than one TV station, radio station or newspaper in Mexico.” Participants had to be prepared to argue either side of the motion. There were also impromptu motions to deal with. There was an extemporaneous speaking competition, in which competitors would be given a random topic and a half hour to prepare a five- to seven-minute speech on it. By all accounts, the competition was intense, but ASF fared well, taking first and third places in the Spanish division and second place in the English division, sweeping the top three extemporaneous speaking spots and winning several of the individual top speaker awards. Here are the results for the ASF teams and individual participants: English Division Debate: • 2nd Place: Bruno Riquelme-Sissi Li-Fiona Kaech-Angélica Arteaga • Top Speaker: Ariel de la Garza • 2nd Place Speaker: Diego Cepeda • 3rd Place Speaker: Chris Dickson Spanish Division Debate: • 1st Place: Yair Gittler-Klaus Mastrijt-Sophia Riquelme • 3rd Place: Anik Shveid-Ceci Beltranena-Alejandro Terminal • Top Speaker: Yair Gittler • 2nd Place Speaker: Anik Shveid • 3rd Place Speaker: Sophia Riquelme Extemporaneous Speaking: • 1st Place: Diego Cepeda • 2nd Place: Julio Meyer • 3rd Place: Chris Dickson

Fourth Grade Puccinis The curtain fell last May on another spectacular Fourth Grade Opera season, the annual project in which students brainstorm and work together to create original music and storylines — and then perform them. The themes they came up with included friendship, accepting others, gossip, karma and telling the truth. One class got to attend a professional production of “Peter Pan” and go backstage, adding to their knowledge of the craft. An innovation this year was the integration of more technology, with the students using the program GarageBand to generate sound effects. They also used iMovie to create more elaborate videos. Jenna Kubricht, a fourth grade teacher (and now grade-level coordinator), said many students and families gave good feedback. “It was great seeing the students make connections between the operas and reallife situations,” Ms. Kubricht said. 8

Economics? Easy! She was known as Miss Olvera during her 23 years of teaching at ASF. Since her retirement in 2007, Suzanne Cane y Olvera has kept on teaching by other means — as an author. Her latest is All the Economics You Really Need, in which she makes no attempt to disguise her annoyance at how politicians overcomplicate simple economic concepts. “This book was born on the day that a former student, who is currently majoring in economics at an Ivy League university, told me that everything they were throwing at him in his economics classes could be found ‘on the flow chart you put on the board that day,’” she says. “Economics should not be hard to understand. All you need is some logic, an understanding of cause and effect and a little common sense.” You can download this new book via amazon.com. To see what else Miss Olvera has been up to, go to www.caneolvera.com. And if you’re interested publishing something electronically, e-mail her at caneolverabooks@yahoo.com. 9


NE W S & E V ENTS What Better Way to Spend a Sunday Morning?

Brunch Al Fresco

More than a thousand runners, plus their relatives and fans, descended on the ASF campus early Sunday, May 20, for the third Run for Education. As in the past, competitors could choose between the 5K and 10K, and there were also shorter races for the 3-14 year-old age group. This year pulled in the best turnout yet, including many competitive runners from outside the ASF community. Thanks to the Alumni Council and other organizers, along with Asdeporte, for making this event a wonderful celebration of wellness for the whole community. Congratulations to our many winners, including the following:

Teachers and staff enjoyed the Parent Association’s traditional Teachers Day brunch on May 18, held outdoors thanks to the nice spring weather. Parents were among those serving up delicious dishes, from a pasta bar to salads, hors d’oeuvres and desserts, to the appreciative ASF employees.

• Men’s 10K: Luis Jiménez Vázquez, Gustavo Ramírez Muñoz, Abel Pérez Martínez • Women’s 10K: Aurora León, Karen Sánchez Abbott, Claudia Olivares Torres • Men’s 5K: Jesús Rubalcaba Muñoz, Miguel Mendoza Vallina, Giovanni Saldaña Anaya • Women’s 5K: Ilse Anaís Juárez Herrera, Kelly Conron Carr, Marca Cuenca Armendáriz Thanks to the following sponsors: Banamex, 4000 Taxis, Aerolíneas Ejecutivas, Aeromexico, Chevrolet, Círculo K, Destino GPS, Energy Fitness, Flanax, Gatorade, Hard Candy, Herdez, Motors Vita, PepsiCo, Transportes Lipu

All the Library’s a Stage ... ... and all the men and women and boys and girls merely players at the Open Mic Nights organized by the Upper School Library and the ASF student-produced international literary magazine Repentino. Two such events took place last spring, and the talent included the likes of Jack Little, a teacher in Mexico who publishes his own literary magazine (The Ofi Press); then-ASF seniors Alina Aksiyote (’12) and Rafael Ramos (’12) displaying the acting talents that won them recognition at the 2012 Shakespeare Competition; Nadine El-Yabroudi Cañibe on violin; Peter Winckers, owner of Azteca Travel Tours-Art; budding sixth grade poets Regina Patiño and Daniela Salom; and Upper School teacher Daniel Hamilton (pictured) doing emcee duties. To find out about upcoming Open Mic Nights, and to get on the Repentino mailing list, contact Harry Brake at brakeh@asf.edu.mx.

It’s the Economy, Students Each year in the Upper School, groups of three to five Introduction to Economics students brainstorm a product or service (or a combination of the two) to sell during a 35-minute lunch period on the day of the annual Entrepreneurs in Action economics fair, popularly known as the Econ Fair. Each group is responsible for creating a budget for their business, with a spending limit of $1,000 (fake) pesos for their project. They also plan advertising and determine their pricing strategies before the fair. Last spring, 26 groups participated in the 2012 edition of the fair, which took place on March 28 on the blacktop outside the Upper School. They were competing for the 50 fake pesos that were distributed to all Upper School students, as well as teachers, counselors, administrators, maintenance and cafeteria staff and other school personnel. The most successful project was organized by a group of sophomore girls who earned more than $3,000 pesos in profits by creating and selling Brazilian desserts alongside Mexican tacos de canasta. This group and others helped Mr. Bret Sikkink’s period 3B Introduction to Economics class earn the highest overall class profits. Everybody in all classes, however, did a tremendous job. 10

The new Fine Arts Center is the perfect place to make the multiple artistic talents of our student body thrive. A Dramatic Addition Canek Vázquez, an ASF alumnus (’07) and professional actor, has been working closely with the ASF drama program as a volunteer for several years. His contribution has been so valuable that he has been asked to join the ASF community as the new cultural affairs coordinator for the school, specifically the Ángeles Espinosa Yglesias Fine Arts Center. He will function in this new role as a liaison between the school’s visual arts and performing arts and the fine arts world outside ASF.

Economics students Camila de la Parra, Jinah Jun, Karen Johnson and Macarena Blanco sell Brazilian desserts and tacos at the Econ Fair last March. Their products turned out to be the biggest sellers. 11


NE W S & E V ENTS What Better Way to Spend a Sunday Morning?

Brunch Al Fresco

More than a thousand runners, plus their relatives and fans, descended on the ASF campus early Sunday, May 20, for the third Run for Education. As in the past, competitors could choose between the 5K and 10K, and there were also shorter races for the 3-14 year-old age group. This year pulled in the best turnout yet, including many competitive runners from outside the ASF community. Thanks to the Alumni Council and other organizers, along with Asdeporte, for making this event a wonderful celebration of wellness for the whole community. Congratulations to our many winners, including the following:

Teachers and staff enjoyed the Parent Association’s traditional Teachers Day brunch on May 18, held outdoors thanks to the nice spring weather. Parents were among those serving up delicious dishes, from a pasta bar to salads, hors d’oeuvres and desserts, to the appreciative ASF employees.

• Men’s 10K: Luis Jiménez Vázquez, Gustavo Ramírez Muñoz, Abel Pérez Martínez • Women’s 10K: Aurora León, Karen Sánchez Abbott, Claudia Olivares Torres • Men’s 5K: Jesús Rubalcaba Muñoz, Miguel Mendoza Vallina, Giovanni Saldaña Anaya • Women’s 5K: Ilse Anaís Juárez Herrera, Kelly Conron Carr, Marca Cuenca Armendáriz Thanks to the following sponsors: Banamex, 4000 Taxis, Aerolíneas Ejecutivas, Aeromexico, Chevrolet, Círculo K, Destino GPS, Energy Fitness, Flanax, Gatorade, Hard Candy, Herdez, Motors Vita, PepsiCo, Transportes Lipu

All the Library’s a Stage ... ... and all the men and women and boys and girls merely players at the Open Mic Nights organized by the Upper School Library and the ASF student-produced international literary magazine Repentino. Two such events took place last spring, and the talent included the likes of Jack Little, a teacher in Mexico who publishes his own literary magazine (The Ofi Press); then-ASF seniors Alina Aksiyote (’12) and Rafael Ramos (’12) displaying the acting talents that won them recognition at the 2012 Shakespeare Competition; Nadine El-Yabroudi Cañibe on violin; Peter Winckers, owner of Azteca Travel Tours-Art; budding sixth grade poets Regina Patiño and Daniela Salom; and Upper School teacher Daniel Hamilton (pictured) doing emcee duties. To find out about upcoming Open Mic Nights, and to get on the Repentino mailing list, contact Harry Brake at brakeh@asf.edu.mx.

It’s the Economy, Students Each year in the Upper School, groups of three to five Introduction to Economics students brainstorm a product or service (or a combination of the two) to sell during a 35-minute lunch period on the day of the annual Entrepreneurs in Action economics fair, popularly known as the Econ Fair. Each group is responsible for creating a budget for their business, with a spending limit of $1,000 (fake) pesos for their project. They also plan advertising and determine their pricing strategies before the fair. Last spring, 26 groups participated in the 2012 edition of the fair, which took place on March 28 on the blacktop outside the Upper School. They were competing for the 50 fake pesos that were distributed to all Upper School students, as well as teachers, counselors, administrators, maintenance and cafeteria staff and other school personnel. The most successful project was organized by a group of sophomore girls who earned more than $3,000 pesos in profits by creating and selling Brazilian desserts alongside Mexican tacos de canasta. This group and others helped Mr. Bret Sikkink’s period 3B Introduction to Economics class earn the highest overall class profits. Everybody in all classes, however, did a tremendous job. 10

The new Fine Arts Center is the perfect place to make the multiple artistic talents of our student body thrive. A Dramatic Addition Canek Vázquez, an ASF alumnus (’07) and professional actor, has been working closely with the ASF drama program as a volunteer for several years. His contribution has been so valuable that he has been asked to join the ASF community as the new cultural affairs coordinator for the school, specifically the Ángeles Espinosa Yglesias Fine Arts Center. He will function in this new role as a liaison between the school’s visual arts and performing arts and the fine arts world outside ASF.

Economics students Camila de la Parra, Jinah Jun, Karen Johnson and Macarena Blanco sell Brazilian desserts and tacos at the Econ Fair last March. Their products turned out to be the biggest sellers. 11


NE W S & E V ENTS

divi s i o n s & d e par t m e n t s ea r l y c h i l d h o o d cen t e r

It’s Official: ASF is a Green School For at least the past seven years, ASF has considered itself a green school, with the entire ASF community recycling on campus, bringing recyclables from home to the campus, reducing resource usage, reusing materials, teaching green practices, celebrating Earth Week and designing remodels and new constructions as green buildings. Last year, a new program launched jointly by the Mexican Public Education and Environment Secretariats provided the school with an opportunity to demonstrate its commitment to sustainability to the community at large, as well as to the government. The “Programa Escuela Verde” aims to help school communities actively participate in the betterment of their environment and offer their students a quality environmental education. The program also certifies qualified educational institutions as official “Green Schools” based on evidence that they carry out successful projects in the following areas: environmental education, solid waste management, efficient use of water and electricity and environmental actions that benefit the community. It was recently announced that ASF has fulfilled all the requirements and will receive its certification as a Green School this fall. Moreover, ASF was awarded the highest level of achievement — “Escuela Líder Ambiental,” or Leading Environmental School. “This is just the beginning,” said Carlos Alaniz, the ASF teacher who heads the school’s Sustainability Committee. “We look forward to higher goals for the upcoming school year, thanks to the continued support of the administration, Parent Association, teachers, students and staff who all have contributed to making our community a greener one.”

From the Head of School

Have a GREAT Year

K3 at the Farm Inquiries about where our food comes from came to life with a visit to the Tatowi farm. By Leslie Barnhizer, ECC Teacher

Stepping Up ... From Lower School to Middle School ASF’s Class of 2019 celebrated the big leap from Lower School to Middle School at its Stepping Up ceremony on June 14, 2012. In front of an audience of cheering parents, grandparents, siblings, teachers and friends, the then-fifth graders were recognized for finishing Lower School, and many were singled out for special mention as award-winners and leaders of their grade and their classrooms. Grade-level coordinator Sara Carter encouraged the students to keep their eyes open, while Lower School Head Evan Hunt advised them to celebrate — and then get back to work as they move toward more and more future successes. Four students were chosen to speak at the ceremony — two in Spanish (Francisca Saldívar and Carlos Sandoval) and two in English (Diego Marcos Ordoñez and Sofía Ordoñez). They talked about friendship, their success in closing this chapter in their academic careers and looking ahead, even as far as their high school graduation in 2019 and beyond. 12

T

hroughout the month of March, ASF’s K3 classrooms visited, two at a time, a farm called Tatowi that’s near Mexico City. It was a fantastic experience that gave the youngsters a chance to experience first-hand what they had been learning in their IB Units of Inquiry. Our class spent several weeks studying questions about food products and the processes used for them to arrive at our dinner tables. We watched videos, interviewed experts and consulted books to find the answers. On the day of our trip, we all came to school excited and ready to take our learning to the next level. We boarded the bus in the capable hands of the counselors provided by the Tatowi farm. And when we arrived it felt like our eyes and minds were opening up along with the big blue sky above us. We experienced the process of producing a tortilla, starting by shucking an ear of corn and grinding the kernels. We cut wool from a sheep and watched as our counselors spun it into yarn. We had fun visiting an orchard, watering seeds. We spent time with the rabbits, ducks and chickens that call the farm home. Everything we saw, tasted and touched at the farm deepened our understanding of the inquiries we had been doing back home in the ECC. But there was also a real pleasure in deepening our bond with nature. Kids and adults alike benefit from the chance to renew and refresh by enjoying the beauty of nature. We can’t be at the farm every day, but I know our class took every opportunity to play, picnic, read and spend time together out of doors. Our school offers plenty of beautiful green spaces to do that. 13

Since I have always worked in education, August and September symbolize new beginnings for me. For this new school year, we can ask ourselves what we can do to make it a GREAT one. I put that word in capitals because it is an acronym for a key to happier living based on a review of the latest scientific research related to happiness and wellbeing. I got it from a recent article at the site of a UK-based organization called Action for Happiness, which is committed to building a happier society. I recommend that you read the article at www.actionforhappiness.org and talk about it with your family. In the meantime, I’ll give you a summary of what “GREAT” refers to: • GIVING: It can be time, ideas, energy or anything else that makes others healthier and happier, while creating connections between people. • RELATING: It brings a sense of belonging and increases our feelings of self-worth. • EXERCISING: Physical activity is a mood-booster. • APPRECIATING: Stop and smell the roses and you’ll find yourself spending less time regretting the past or fearing the future. • TRYING OUT: Learn new things! In closing, I would like to wish all of you a year full of joy, gratitude, contentment, inspiration and pride.

Susan Olivo Head of Early Childhood Center


NE W S & E V ENTS

divi s i o n s & d e par t m e n t s ea r l y c h i l d h o o d cen t e r

It’s Official: ASF is a Green School For at least the past seven years, ASF has considered itself a green school, with the entire ASF community recycling on campus, bringing recyclables from home to the campus, reducing resource usage, reusing materials, teaching green practices, celebrating Earth Week and designing remodels and new constructions as green buildings. Last year, a new program launched jointly by the Mexican Public Education and Environment Secretariats provided the school with an opportunity to demonstrate its commitment to sustainability to the community at large, as well as to the government. The “Programa Escuela Verde” aims to help school communities actively participate in the betterment of their environment and offer their students a quality environmental education. The program also certifies qualified educational institutions as official “Green Schools” based on evidence that they carry out successful projects in the following areas: environmental education, solid waste management, efficient use of water and electricity and environmental actions that benefit the community. It was recently announced that ASF has fulfilled all the requirements and will receive its certification as a Green School this fall. Moreover, ASF was awarded the highest level of achievement — “Escuela Líder Ambiental,” or Leading Environmental School. “This is just the beginning,” said Carlos Alaniz, the ASF teacher who heads the school’s Sustainability Committee. “We look forward to higher goals for the upcoming school year, thanks to the continued support of the administration, Parent Association, teachers, students and staff who all have contributed to making our community a greener one.”

From the Head of School

Have a GREAT Year

K3 at the Farm Inquiries about where our food comes from came to life with a visit to the Tatowi farm. By Leslie Barnhizer, ECC Teacher

Stepping Up ... From Lower School to Middle School ASF’s Class of 2019 celebrated the big leap from Lower School to Middle School at its Stepping Up ceremony on June 14, 2012. In front of an audience of cheering parents, grandparents, siblings, teachers and friends, the then-fifth graders were recognized for finishing Lower School, and many were singled out for special mention as award-winners and leaders of their grade and their classrooms. Grade-level coordinator Sara Carter encouraged the students to keep their eyes open, while Lower School Head Evan Hunt advised them to celebrate — and then get back to work as they move toward more and more future successes. Four students were chosen to speak at the ceremony — two in Spanish (Francisca Saldívar and Carlos Sandoval) and two in English (Diego Marcos Ordoñez and Sofía Ordoñez). They talked about friendship, their success in closing this chapter in their academic careers and looking ahead, even as far as their high school graduation in 2019 and beyond. 12

T

hroughout the month of March, ASF’s K3 classrooms visited, two at a time, a farm called Tatowi that’s near Mexico City. It was a fantastic experience that gave the youngsters a chance to experience first-hand what they had been learning in their IB Units of Inquiry. Our class spent several weeks studying questions about food products and the processes used for them to arrive at our dinner tables. We watched videos, interviewed experts and consulted books to find the answers. On the day of our trip, we all came to school excited and ready to take our learning to the next level. We boarded the bus in the capable hands of the counselors provided by the Tatowi farm. And when we arrived it felt like our eyes and minds were opening up along with the big blue sky above us. We experienced the process of producing a tortilla, starting by shucking an ear of corn and grinding the kernels. We cut wool from a sheep and watched as our counselors spun it into yarn. We had fun visiting an orchard, watering seeds. We spent time with the rabbits, ducks and chickens that call the farm home. Everything we saw, tasted and touched at the farm deepened our understanding of the inquiries we had been doing back home in the ECC. But there was also a real pleasure in deepening our bond with nature. Kids and adults alike benefit from the chance to renew and refresh by enjoying the beauty of nature. We can’t be at the farm every day, but I know our class took every opportunity to play, picnic, read and spend time together out of doors. Our school offers plenty of beautiful green spaces to do that. 13

Since I have always worked in education, August and September symbolize new beginnings for me. For this new school year, we can ask ourselves what we can do to make it a GREAT one. I put that word in capitals because it is an acronym for a key to happier living based on a review of the latest scientific research related to happiness and wellbeing. I got it from a recent article at the site of a UK-based organization called Action for Happiness, which is committed to building a happier society. I recommend that you read the article at www.actionforhappiness.org and talk about it with your family. In the meantime, I’ll give you a summary of what “GREAT” refers to: • GIVING: It can be time, ideas, energy or anything else that makes others healthier and happier, while creating connections between people. • RELATING: It brings a sense of belonging and increases our feelings of self-worth. • EXERCISING: Physical activity is a mood-booster. • APPRECIATING: Stop and smell the roses and you’ll find yourself spending less time regretting the past or fearing the future. • TRYING OUT: Learn new things! In closing, I would like to wish all of you a year full of joy, gratitude, contentment, inspiration and pride.

Susan Olivo Head of Early Childhood Center


divi s i o n s & d e par t m e n t s l o w e r sc h o o l

divi s i o n s & d e par t m e n t s m i d d l e sc h o o l

Fifth Grade Exhibition:

From the Head of School

Who Are You?

A Student’s-Eye View

In their last year in Lower School, ASF students work in teams on an Exhibition project in which they choose a topic and research it, and then present their findings and conclusions in a way that connects their topic to the real world. After finishing their work and displaying it to the ASF community for three days at the end of May, seven then-fifth graders — Valeria Bravo, Laura Checa, Anisa Estrada, Ana Paula García, Andrea Konigs, Ana Paola Mendoza and Mariana Reide — took some extra time to write about their experience for Focus readers. Here is their collective reflection: From the Head of School

Inquiry Zoom, splat, and crack were some of the words students were using in a fourth grade classroom I visited last spring during a lesson on onomatopoeia. They looked at art representing the theme and wrote original poetry highlighting the concept. It was one of many examples of the kind of teaching and learning that goes on in the Lower School. Only a week before, while viewing the Fifth Grade Exhibition, I learned about the impact of animal trafficking, and that birds and monkeys are the most heavily trafficked animals today. Thanks to these fifth grade students, I will never think of this topic in the same way. The same is true of other Exhibition topics, such as Kony in Africa or water usage. Elementary students have an uncanny ability to remind even the busiest of adults to pause and consider the world we live in. Each of these visits showed an example of what in an education setting we call “inquiry.” It is the type of experience ASF students live every day. It is a way to energize students and keep them mindful of the things that are most important in this world. All human beings are on a lifelong journey of inquiry. At school, inquiry provides an opportunity to consider new things, and allows for self-reflection. We call the adults who work with students “teachers,” but they are also coaches, mentors, advocates and facilitators. They are the ones who present topics and themes for students to consider, but they are not the ones who control the inquiry. Students themselves ultimately decide which areas to consider with the most scrutiny. We as educators encourage students to develop that skill, and we never take it lightly.

T

here are many words that can describe the Exhibition: fun, fantastic, fabulous and amazing. When we came into the classroom every day, many of us thought, “I want to work on Exhibition!” Some people may describe Exhibition as boring and pointless, but actually it’s totally the opposite. It is a fun way to learn about a topic you choose. Since it’s normally a topic that you are interested in, you are really curious about your theme and want to learn more about it every day. Exhibition is an event that opens your mind to different ideas, and it’s a place to become aware of some of the world’s important issues. It is also a nice way to learn how to solve problems and think over your own ideas. Sometimes having to discuss what you need to do or what you are missing is the only way to perfect your knowledge of your topic. Exhibition might seem to start out a little bit boring, but all of that research and discussion is worth it. We think that the Exhibition helped prepare us for Middle School because Middle School is all about being independent and responsible. Exhibition is a great way we can all work together, but at the same time be

Evan Hunt Head of Lower School 14

Bring Your Own

For a year now, Middle School teachers have been designing lessons to be compatible with students’ digital devices. The program is working, and there’s more to come. By Charles Pawlik, Middle School Dean of Students

independent. You learn how to be responsible because you have to do things at home alone. Each one of us had responsibilities and tasks that we had to take care of, and then we would check if they were accomplished so we could move on to the next task. Each group, usually made up of three students, chose a topic according to their interest. Some of the topics were: graffiti, mistreatment of women and children, cloning and poverty. All these topics related to the central idea that all fifth graders decided on at the beginning of the Exhibition process: “Our actions and decisions about sharing resources, providing equal opportunities and solving problems can affect us, our generation and future generations.” Exhibition is more than just an exposition or project. It is a long process that reflects the IB Learner Profile and the values and attitudes that we’ve been working on since first grade. All fifth grade students want people to recognize and enjoy the hard work that we have done throughout the year and during our time in the Lower School. When we finished, some of us may have felt a little sad that it ended, but mostly we felt proud of our accomplishments.

F

or the last year in Middle School, connectivity has been the catchword, and digital learning has become natural for student and teacher alike. A big advance has been the initiation of the Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) plan that allows students, if they choose, to carry a laptop, tablet or smartphone to class, connect to the Internet and use this digital tool for investigations, assignments or collaborative projects. In many cases, laptops are brought into class for those who do not have one. Teachers have also made their lessons more collaborative so the students can share the devices available. English and social studies classes were the first to incorporate digital tools into their lessons. But by the second quarter, the doors were flung open to BYOD in all classrooms. Patty Zamora, our digital literacy coach, trained teachers in the latest tools and joined them in their classes to help the digital projects along. Also, teachers attended connectivity meetings as part of their professional development. Google Apps became a popular instrument for learning. Other tools introduced into the curriculum included Evernote, Dropbox, Issuu, iMovie, GarageBand, Keynote and Prezi. Importantly, teachers realized that they did not have to be the digital whiz in the class. Many of the students already understood the digital tools and were using them in other classes. This allowed the teachers to ask for

student experts to step forward and help others in the class. As a key element to their professional development, more than 35 ASF teachers are participating in the Educational Technology Certificate tied to the SUNY Buffalo master’s degree program. They use professional learning networks, Web 2.0 tools and electronic projectbased lessons in their daily classes. They are models for what digital literacy can accomplish. Not only are students ready for BYOD, they are driving the curriculum to be more visual, project based and personal. When we asked students about their digital savvy, 82% said that computers make schoolwork more fun and help them understand their classes better, 86% believe that having a computer is a learning advantage and 88% prefer to do their schoolwork on a computer instead of using pencil and paper. Students are digital natives, but they need help with digital citizenship. During our Advocacy program, the students created the appropriate use document that guides how and when to use devices in the classroom. Students are shown what a digital footprint is (personal information left behind on the Web) and how they can control it. Hardware security is also a concern. Students are constantly reminded to be responsible for their devices and not to leave them unattended. All of these factors help students manage their computers both inside and outside of class. 15

Using the IB Attitudes introduced in the ECC years, we in the Middle School will continue to foster a positive place that welcomes students who are ready to give their best effort and showcase their highest academic achievements. These attitudes are: appreciation, commitment, confidence, cooperation, creativity, curiosity, empathy, enthusiasm, independence, integrity, respect and tolerance. This year, we will be asking the Middle School community, “Who do you want to be?” What will that look like on a day-today basis? Well, here are some examples of what will take place in this new school year. • The inclusion of “wellness” subjects in Advocacy discussions, with regularly scheduled counseling and infirmary talks. • Spirit days, competitions, cooperative activities and much more recognition of students’ academic efforts and positive behavior. • Regular generation meetings. • A much-enhanced club program that brings together like-minded students. • Integration activities for new students and new families to link all community members together. Parents should model the IB Attitudes, and talk with their adolescents about how they might exhibit these during their day. And parents should ask their adolescents this question: “Who do you want to be?”

Rebecca Crutchfield Head of Middle School

As this new school year progresses, more teachers will be using digital tools to enhance their learning environment. More projectbased work will be assigned and iMovie, Prezi and Keynote presentations are being shown to the teachers as final outcomes. Each grade has its own site displaying what’s new and exciting in the world of connectivity within their classroom. The sites will be updated in September as we move into the new semester, but you can access them before that with their 2011-2012 content at: • sites.google.com/a/asf.edu.mx/six-grade-happy-nings/ • sites.google.com/a/asf.edu.mx/seventh-heaven/ • sites.google.com/a/asf.edu.mx/eighth-grade-learning-mashups/


divi s i o n s & d e par t m e n t s l o w e r sc h o o l

divi s i o n s & d e par t m e n t s m i d d l e sc h o o l

Fifth Grade Exhibition:

From the Head of School

Who Are You?

A Student’s-Eye View

In their last year in Lower School, ASF students work in teams on an Exhibition project in which they choose a topic and research it, and then present their findings and conclusions in a way that connects their topic to the real world. After finishing their work and displaying it to the ASF community for three days at the end of May, seven then-fifth graders — Valeria Bravo, Laura Checa, Anisa Estrada, Ana Paula García, Andrea Konigs, Ana Paola Mendoza and Mariana Reide — took some extra time to write about their experience for Focus readers. Here is their collective reflection: From the Head of School

Inquiry Zoom, splat, and crack were some of the words students were using in a fourth grade classroom I visited last spring during a lesson on onomatopoeia. They looked at art representing the theme and wrote original poetry highlighting the concept. It was one of many examples of the kind of teaching and learning that goes on in the Lower School. Only a week before, while viewing the Fifth Grade Exhibition, I learned about the impact of animal trafficking, and that birds and monkeys are the most heavily trafficked animals today. Thanks to these fifth grade students, I will never think of this topic in the same way. The same is true of other Exhibition topics, such as Kony in Africa or water usage. Elementary students have an uncanny ability to remind even the busiest of adults to pause and consider the world we live in. Each of these visits showed an example of what in an education setting we call “inquiry.” It is the type of experience ASF students live every day. It is a way to energize students and keep them mindful of the things that are most important in this world. All human beings are on a lifelong journey of inquiry. At school, inquiry provides an opportunity to consider new things, and allows for self-reflection. We call the adults who work with students “teachers,” but they are also coaches, mentors, advocates and facilitators. They are the ones who present topics and themes for students to consider, but they are not the ones who control the inquiry. Students themselves ultimately decide which areas to consider with the most scrutiny. We as educators encourage students to develop that skill, and we never take it lightly.

T

here are many words that can describe the Exhibition: fun, fantastic, fabulous and amazing. When we came into the classroom every day, many of us thought, “I want to work on Exhibition!” Some people may describe Exhibition as boring and pointless, but actually it’s totally the opposite. It is a fun way to learn about a topic you choose. Since it’s normally a topic that you are interested in, you are really curious about your theme and want to learn more about it every day. Exhibition is an event that opens your mind to different ideas, and it’s a place to become aware of some of the world’s important issues. It is also a nice way to learn how to solve problems and think over your own ideas. Sometimes having to discuss what you need to do or what you are missing is the only way to perfect your knowledge of your topic. Exhibition might seem to start out a little bit boring, but all of that research and discussion is worth it. We think that the Exhibition helped prepare us for Middle School because Middle School is all about being independent and responsible. Exhibition is a great way we can all work together, but at the same time be

Evan Hunt Head of Lower School 14

Bring Your Own

For a year now, Middle School teachers have been designing lessons to be compatible with students’ digital devices. The program is working, and there’s more to come. By Charles Pawlik, Middle School Dean of Students

independent. You learn how to be responsible because you have to do things at home alone. Each one of us had responsibilities and tasks that we had to take care of, and then we would check if they were accomplished so we could move on to the next task. Each group, usually made up of three students, chose a topic according to their interest. Some of the topics were: graffiti, mistreatment of women and children, cloning and poverty. All these topics related to the central idea that all fifth graders decided on at the beginning of the Exhibition process: “Our actions and decisions about sharing resources, providing equal opportunities and solving problems can affect us, our generation and future generations.” Exhibition is more than just an exposition or project. It is a long process that reflects the IB Learner Profile and the values and attitudes that we’ve been working on since first grade. All fifth grade students want people to recognize and enjoy the hard work that we have done throughout the year and during our time in the Lower School. When we finished, some of us may have felt a little sad that it ended, but mostly we felt proud of our accomplishments.

F

or the last year in Middle School, connectivity has been the catchword, and digital learning has become natural for student and teacher alike. A big advance has been the initiation of the Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) plan that allows students, if they choose, to carry a laptop, tablet or smartphone to class, connect to the Internet and use this digital tool for investigations, assignments or collaborative projects. In many cases, laptops are brought into class for those who do not have one. Teachers have also made their lessons more collaborative so the students can share the devices available. English and social studies classes were the first to incorporate digital tools into their lessons. But by the second quarter, the doors were flung open to BYOD in all classrooms. Patty Zamora, our digital literacy coach, trained teachers in the latest tools and joined them in their classes to help the digital projects along. Also, teachers attended connectivity meetings as part of their professional development. Google Apps became a popular instrument for learning. Other tools introduced into the curriculum included Evernote, Dropbox, Issuu, iMovie, GarageBand, Keynote and Prezi. Importantly, teachers realized that they did not have to be the digital whiz in the class. Many of the students already understood the digital tools and were using them in other classes. This allowed the teachers to ask for

student experts to step forward and help others in the class. As a key element to their professional development, more than 35 ASF teachers are participating in the Educational Technology Certificate tied to the SUNY Buffalo master’s degree program. They use professional learning networks, Web 2.0 tools and electronic projectbased lessons in their daily classes. They are models for what digital literacy can accomplish. Not only are students ready for BYOD, they are driving the curriculum to be more visual, project based and personal. When we asked students about their digital savvy, 82% said that computers make schoolwork more fun and help them understand their classes better, 86% believe that having a computer is a learning advantage and 88% prefer to do their schoolwork on a computer instead of using pencil and paper. Students are digital natives, but they need help with digital citizenship. During our Advocacy program, the students created the appropriate use document that guides how and when to use devices in the classroom. Students are shown what a digital footprint is (personal information left behind on the Web) and how they can control it. Hardware security is also a concern. Students are constantly reminded to be responsible for their devices and not to leave them unattended. All of these factors help students manage their computers both inside and outside of class. 15

Using the IB Attitudes introduced in the ECC years, we in the Middle School will continue to foster a positive place that welcomes students who are ready to give their best effort and showcase their highest academic achievements. These attitudes are: appreciation, commitment, confidence, cooperation, creativity, curiosity, empathy, enthusiasm, independence, integrity, respect and tolerance. This year, we will be asking the Middle School community, “Who do you want to be?” What will that look like on a day-today basis? Well, here are some examples of what will take place in this new school year. • The inclusion of “wellness” subjects in Advocacy discussions, with regularly scheduled counseling and infirmary talks. • Spirit days, competitions, cooperative activities and much more recognition of students’ academic efforts and positive behavior. • Regular generation meetings. • A much-enhanced club program that brings together like-minded students. • Integration activities for new students and new families to link all community members together. Parents should model the IB Attitudes, and talk with their adolescents about how they might exhibit these during their day. And parents should ask their adolescents this question: “Who do you want to be?”

Rebecca Crutchfield Head of Middle School

As this new school year progresses, more teachers will be using digital tools to enhance their learning environment. More projectbased work will be assigned and iMovie, Prezi and Keynote presentations are being shown to the teachers as final outcomes. Each grade has its own site displaying what’s new and exciting in the world of connectivity within their classroom. The sites will be updated in September as we move into the new semester, but you can access them before that with their 2011-2012 content at: • sites.google.com/a/asf.edu.mx/six-grade-happy-nings/ • sites.google.com/a/asf.edu.mx/seventh-heaven/ • sites.google.com/a/asf.edu.mx/eighth-grade-learning-mashups/


divi s i o n s & d e par t m e n t s UPP E R sc h o o l

For Students, By Students A new Upper School effort to improve school communication. By Gabriel Lemmon, Upper School Dean of Students

divi s i o n s & d e par t m e n t s t h e a r t s

For All to See

Student-produced art is taking over available spaces across the ASF campus. By Pat Patterson, Visual Arts Coordinator

From the Head of School

Modeling Cool We —the administrators and teachers— are excited about the beginning of a new school year. We spent the last month or so preparing for the students’ arrival. We also thought about ways to empower Upper School students as leaders and, in particular, as environmental leaders of our school. One of the things we are going to remind the Upper School students of is just how important they are as role models on our K-12 campus. Ecology and sustainable practices will be areas where ninth to twelfth graders can take the lead on campus. This is how their leadership will be visible: 1. At breaks during the school day, and at school events such as the Art Fair, the oldest members of the community can model recycling practices. 2. They can inspire younger students to bring recyclables from home and put them in the bins outside the Transportation Center. 3. At home, they can show parents and younger siblings ways to reuse paper, notebooks and even articles of clothing. In short, Upper School students are charged with the role of showing all of ASF just how cool it is to support sustainability.

Amy Gallie Head of Upper School

A

SF has a well-established official and institutional voice, like this publication, that is largely targeted to adults and represents the school as a whole. This approach is effective and appropriate with its intended audience, but students do not gravitate to it. Young people prefer the world of on-line self-publishing (think Twitter and Facebook). It is more immediate, entertaining and targeted to younger audiences. But most important, it is in their voice. In an attempt to bridge the gap between the voice of the institution and the preferences of students, the Upper School is offering a course to reinvent and reinvigorate school communication. The students in Advanced Multimedia Design will use a variety of tools to create and distribute content for the school in a manner that attracts the interest of our media-savvy young people. This project will be a continually evolving effort, but there are a few goals for the initial year of the course. First, students will create and manage a new web site that will serve as the central hub for everything Upper School. This will help students to have better access to activities, clubs and organizations. “The truth is that there is so much happening at this school that it is hard to keep up with it all,” says Amy Gallie, head of the Upper School. “One of our sports teams could win a championship, an activity could be happening after school or a guest speaker could make a visit, and far too many people would not even know about it.” So simply having more information organized in one place will be a positive first step. For example, imagine a world where students could easily find the Ecology Club page that listed the officers, held meeting notes and provided all of the upcoming Ecology Club events. We all will be better informed and connected to the life of the school. In addition to the web site, these students will be building the spirit of community through the content that they create. “Our job is to do more than make announcements and provide information,” says Bernardo Letayf, the course’s instructor. “We will transform the classroom into a professional marketing agency that will be developing media campaigns to engage our students and motivate them to participate in everything ASF.” To this end, students will be employing a multimedia, student-generated approach to communication. They will create videos, Facebook pages, event posters, tweets and public address announcements in a concerted effort to bring the community together. If social media can do something as powerful as ignite the Arab Spring, it is likely to help to raise the attendance at the Homecoming football game. Finally, students in the course hope to make a mobile version of everything that they create. Like it or not, the lives of our students revolve around their mobile devices, so it only makes sense to take the content created by our students, for our students, to our students on the platform they prefer. This will include creating a mobile version of the web site, increased use of QR codes and possibly even an ASF app. In all, the scope of this course and the efforts of our students will help move the Upper School forward to our goal of a Connected Learning Community. 16

I

t’s like mushrooms after the rain — every spring more art appears around school, popping up in unusual places. Those who have been on the ASF campus recently may have noticed the red bench made from PVC tubes in front of the Fine Arts Center, or the large-scale paintings in the Wellness Center. Students in Middle School visual arts, Upper School’s Art III and the IB Visual Arts classes have been leaving their mark in the form of paintings and sculptures in various spaces around campus. Choosing a space, getting the necessary approval and then creating the work are all steps in the process of creating public art. For students, it has been a good lesson in patience, as they needed to get permission from school administrators, work with the school carpenters and refine their ideas to have strong visual impact and personal expression. Middle School students have been brightening their school spaces with large murals interpreting great works such as Olga Costa’s “La vendedora de frutas” (1951). Their unit on street art has also resulted in creative hallway expressions, bringing life to the spaces and adding a sense of pride and accomplishment for the students. Yong Moon Cho (’12), who was a stellar math student during his years at ASF, decided to honor his favorite subject with a recycled blackboard full of calculations and equations, permanently preserving them with varnish. The surreal nature of the piece, as it hangs in

the Upper School mathematics hallway, has raised a lot of eyebrows. Junior Macarena Blanco, newly arrived last year from Argentina and not a big fan of math class, made a cheerful piece for the same hallway, “to make people feel happy who are not doing well in math.” Junior Nicole Chaput painted large eyes as a metaphor for the complexities of perception and placed them over the stairway to the third floor to watch over the crowds each day. The new large walls of the Jenkins Foundation Wellness Center were very inviting for some of the projects. One work by Tomás Ruiz (’11) was relocated to the Wellness Center from its former location in the Upper School building, creating a dramatic effect along the front stairway. Our Art Fair Artist of the Year for 2012, Bernardo Berruga (’12), donated his large painting called “Permanence” to what will function as the weight room. Paintings are being completed by graduates Michelle Epelstein (’12) and Alexia Alcocer (’12), and seniors Alejandro Perusquia and Diana Meneses for the hallways of the new athletic facility. The artworks feature positive, upbeat themes that the students felt would be in keeping with an idea of personal wellness. Many of the recently graduated IB Visual Arts students worked in groups, as in the case of “The Bench” a functional artwork located in front of the new Ángeles Espinosa Yglesias 17

Fine Arts Center, done by 2012 graduates Nicole Von Mohr, Adriana Kuri, Dominque Ransom, Michelle Habia, Lorena Borja, Yoshua Rozen and Roberto Gómez. They worked to refine their idea of using industrial materials in a functional way, creating a threepart bench. The results were so inviting, that the day the piece was installed, students immediately started sitting on the red bench. Bernardo Berruga (’12) and Lucia Pichardo (’12) worked collaboratively on a large painting while Nicolás Aguilar documented their process on video. The completed work is hanging in Head of Upper School Amy Gallie’s office. Enrique Traver, Maria Matus, Yael Heiblum, Louis Poire and Andrea Gil, all of whom graduated last June, created an installation called “Our Journey at ASF.” It consists of a series of playful swings; each student contributed his or her individual design. These pieces will be installed in the Upper School Library stairway. Others worked individually, such as Suwan Park (’12), who painted a chair for the Upper School Library with a detailed and delicate design. Pablo Elizondo’s (‘12) color photograph of one of his chalk paintings will be on display in the Board of Trustees office. With the large ASF campus constantly changing, it is nice to have student expression as a priority for our community. Each new generation makes its mark and adds to the ambience of the learning environment.


divi s i o n s & d e par t m e n t s UPP E R sc h o o l

For Students, By Students A new Upper School effort to improve school communication. By Gabriel Lemmon, Upper School Dean of Students

divi s i o n s & d e par t m e n t s t h e a r t s

For All to See

Student-produced art is taking over available spaces across the ASF campus. By Pat Patterson, Visual Arts Coordinator

From the Head of School

Modeling Cool We —the administrators and teachers— are excited about the beginning of a new school year. We spent the last month or so preparing for the students’ arrival. We also thought about ways to empower Upper School students as leaders and, in particular, as environmental leaders of our school. One of the things we are going to remind the Upper School students of is just how important they are as role models on our K-12 campus. Ecology and sustainable practices will be areas where ninth to twelfth graders can take the lead on campus. This is how their leadership will be visible: 1. At breaks during the school day, and at school events such as the Art Fair, the oldest members of the community can model recycling practices. 2. They can inspire younger students to bring recyclables from home and put them in the bins outside the Transportation Center. 3. At home, they can show parents and younger siblings ways to reuse paper, notebooks and even articles of clothing. In short, Upper School students are charged with the role of showing all of ASF just how cool it is to support sustainability.

Amy Gallie Head of Upper School

A

SF has a well-established official and institutional voice, like this publication, that is largely targeted to adults and represents the school as a whole. This approach is effective and appropriate with its intended audience, but students do not gravitate to it. Young people prefer the world of on-line self-publishing (think Twitter and Facebook). It is more immediate, entertaining and targeted to younger audiences. But most important, it is in their voice. In an attempt to bridge the gap between the voice of the institution and the preferences of students, the Upper School is offering a course to reinvent and reinvigorate school communication. The students in Advanced Multimedia Design will use a variety of tools to create and distribute content for the school in a manner that attracts the interest of our media-savvy young people. This project will be a continually evolving effort, but there are a few goals for the initial year of the course. First, students will create and manage a new web site that will serve as the central hub for everything Upper School. This will help students to have better access to activities, clubs and organizations. “The truth is that there is so much happening at this school that it is hard to keep up with it all,” says Amy Gallie, head of the Upper School. “One of our sports teams could win a championship, an activity could be happening after school or a guest speaker could make a visit, and far too many people would not even know about it.” So simply having more information organized in one place will be a positive first step. For example, imagine a world where students could easily find the Ecology Club page that listed the officers, held meeting notes and provided all of the upcoming Ecology Club events. We all will be better informed and connected to the life of the school. In addition to the web site, these students will be building the spirit of community through the content that they create. “Our job is to do more than make announcements and provide information,” says Bernardo Letayf, the course’s instructor. “We will transform the classroom into a professional marketing agency that will be developing media campaigns to engage our students and motivate them to participate in everything ASF.” To this end, students will be employing a multimedia, student-generated approach to communication. They will create videos, Facebook pages, event posters, tweets and public address announcements in a concerted effort to bring the community together. If social media can do something as powerful as ignite the Arab Spring, it is likely to help to raise the attendance at the Homecoming football game. Finally, students in the course hope to make a mobile version of everything that they create. Like it or not, the lives of our students revolve around their mobile devices, so it only makes sense to take the content created by our students, for our students, to our students on the platform they prefer. This will include creating a mobile version of the web site, increased use of QR codes and possibly even an ASF app. In all, the scope of this course and the efforts of our students will help move the Upper School forward to our goal of a Connected Learning Community. 16

I

t’s like mushrooms after the rain — every spring more art appears around school, popping up in unusual places. Those who have been on the ASF campus recently may have noticed the red bench made from PVC tubes in front of the Fine Arts Center, or the large-scale paintings in the Wellness Center. Students in Middle School visual arts, Upper School’s Art III and the IB Visual Arts classes have been leaving their mark in the form of paintings and sculptures in various spaces around campus. Choosing a space, getting the necessary approval and then creating the work are all steps in the process of creating public art. For students, it has been a good lesson in patience, as they needed to get permission from school administrators, work with the school carpenters and refine their ideas to have strong visual impact and personal expression. Middle School students have been brightening their school spaces with large murals interpreting great works such as Olga Costa’s “La vendedora de frutas” (1951). Their unit on street art has also resulted in creative hallway expressions, bringing life to the spaces and adding a sense of pride and accomplishment for the students. Yong Moon Cho (’12), who was a stellar math student during his years at ASF, decided to honor his favorite subject with a recycled blackboard full of calculations and equations, permanently preserving them with varnish. The surreal nature of the piece, as it hangs in

the Upper School mathematics hallway, has raised a lot of eyebrows. Junior Macarena Blanco, newly arrived last year from Argentina and not a big fan of math class, made a cheerful piece for the same hallway, “to make people feel happy who are not doing well in math.” Junior Nicole Chaput painted large eyes as a metaphor for the complexities of perception and placed them over the stairway to the third floor to watch over the crowds each day. The new large walls of the Jenkins Foundation Wellness Center were very inviting for some of the projects. One work by Tomás Ruiz (’11) was relocated to the Wellness Center from its former location in the Upper School building, creating a dramatic effect along the front stairway. Our Art Fair Artist of the Year for 2012, Bernardo Berruga (’12), donated his large painting called “Permanence” to what will function as the weight room. Paintings are being completed by graduates Michelle Epelstein (’12) and Alexia Alcocer (’12), and seniors Alejandro Perusquia and Diana Meneses for the hallways of the new athletic facility. The artworks feature positive, upbeat themes that the students felt would be in keeping with an idea of personal wellness. Many of the recently graduated IB Visual Arts students worked in groups, as in the case of “The Bench” a functional artwork located in front of the new Ángeles Espinosa Yglesias 17

Fine Arts Center, done by 2012 graduates Nicole Von Mohr, Adriana Kuri, Dominque Ransom, Michelle Habia, Lorena Borja, Yoshua Rozen and Roberto Gómez. They worked to refine their idea of using industrial materials in a functional way, creating a threepart bench. The results were so inviting, that the day the piece was installed, students immediately started sitting on the red bench. Bernardo Berruga (’12) and Lucia Pichardo (’12) worked collaboratively on a large painting while Nicolás Aguilar documented their process on video. The completed work is hanging in Head of Upper School Amy Gallie’s office. Enrique Traver, Maria Matus, Yael Heiblum, Louis Poire and Andrea Gil, all of whom graduated last June, created an installation called “Our Journey at ASF.” It consists of a series of playful swings; each student contributed his or her individual design. These pieces will be installed in the Upper School Library stairway. Others worked individually, such as Suwan Park (’12), who painted a chair for the Upper School Library with a detailed and delicate design. Pablo Elizondo’s (‘12) color photograph of one of his chalk paintings will be on display in the Board of Trustees office. With the large ASF campus constantly changing, it is nice to have student expression as a priority for our community. Each new generation makes its mark and adds to the ambience of the learning environment.


divi s i o n s & d e par t m e n t s p a r en t ass o cia t i o n

divi s i o n s & d e par t m e n t s a t h l e t ics & e x t en d e d l ea r nin g

Happy Campers

Bernardo Berruga (below) and some of his recent artwork.

From the Head of Athletics & Extended Learning

New Offerings

K Everything is Possible ASF’s 43rd Annual Art Fair, organized by the Parent Association, takes place on Saturday, November 10. The featured artist will be Bernardo Berruga (’12), who graduated from ASF in June. Bernardo was recently interviewed for Focus by Paloma Porraz, an ASF parent and director of the Museo del Antiguo Colegio de San Ildefonso, one of Mexico City’s premier art venues.

From the President

New Experiences As every school year begins, we feel pleasurable sensations. For students, there are new notebooks, new backpacks, new classrooms. Above all, there are new experiences in store. Parent Association volunteers feel the same way. The start of a new school year fills us with joy and energy, and we look forward to all the new projects we’ve planned for. We will start in August by accompanying the new teachers on a visit to San Ángel, the historic and culturally rich colonia in the south of Mexico City. In early October, our English Book Fair will take place. Our premiere event, the 43rd Annual Art Fair, will be on November 10. The theme this year is “Andy Warhol, The Bazaar Years.” Just imagine! In December we will offer the traditional Winter Brunch for the school’s employees. And of course, every first Wednesday of each month, there is a PA general meeting at 8:00 a.m., when we’ll show parents a little bit of what happens inside of the children’s’ world at ASF. Hope to see you there!

Alma Rosa Rodríguez Parent Association President

Paloma Porraz: You’ve explored a wide variety of forms, styles and techniques to create images. It would appear that all of them coexist in harmony and none of them takes the place of another. Bernardo Berruga: The different crafts and media that I’ve used are apparently a byproduct of my need to express certain ideas in different ways over the years. I don’t think that pattern will stop anytime soon. I usually end up recurring to watercolor, inks, spray paint and acrylic — mostly acrylic because it’s what I find most aesthetically pleasing and entertaining. PP: Your work shifts from one medium to another in a very natural way. Do you do a lot of planning? BB: My approach to painting tends to be spontaneous and I don’t hesitate to carry out an idea. Most of the time I just have an image in my head that I really need to get out and I dive straight into the piece with little to no previous planning. I find it more meaningful to let an idea flow smoothly from its conception to its realization. PP: What are the concepts and ideas that inspire your artistic production? BB: I like to dignify nature in my art. And by nature I mean reality, because it is the only thing that we can be sure of. It is the only thing that there is, whether it is a product of the mind or outside of it. Illustrating different aspects of nature seems to help me see objectively when I’m in need of clarity. If you think about it, everything, literally everything, is a possibility of nature. So anything I decide to paint is 18

something that nature made possible.Science, culture and spirituality help us try to understand, interact and live with reality, and I think they’re all interconnected and give each other endless meaning. I think all of that is somehow sincerely expressed in all of my paintings. PP: I can see an influence in your work from Japanese graphics and illustrations, along with the science fiction that characterizes them. BB: I wouldn’t say that there is a Japanese intention behind any of my paintings, at least not consciously. But I’ve always admired Japanese culture in all its forms, and I was very much drawn to their cartoons when I was very young so I suppose it is natural if there is some influence from that in my work.

Athletics and Extended Learning is focused on providing an outstanding menu of activities and athletic teams as we move into the new Jenkins Foundation Wellness Center in the 2012-13 school year. ASF has long affirmed the importance of the arts and athletics, and we are committed to providing our students with paths to express themselves and to grow holistically. To help do that, we offer more than 80 courses and organized sports activities after the school day. For this 2012-2013 school year, we have new and exciting Extended Learning courses. They include:

ids from 3 to 12 took over the ASF campus for five weeks over the summer, as campers in ASF’s Cub Camp (ages 3-6) and Youth Camp (ages 7-12). Participating in activities from soccer to gymnastics to cooking to adventure sports, the campers met others of all ages in their “tribes” and through special events, like an extended day that kept the kids on campus until 9:00 p.m. eating, playing games and enjoying a pretend “spa.” The camps are a tradition at ASF, although this year, the students had a new activity option on the menu: photography. Another change was to the schedule, moving the camp day earlier to 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., to give buses and parents a break from traffic.

Let Your Creativity Fly By Juan de Luca, Extended Learning Coordinator

O

f the many new and exciting Extended Learning classes being introduced this school year, two that stand out are Claymation and Creative Film Production. Claymation is a class that helps students develop skills in the arts and technology. Children will work toward creating a short animated video made entirely with clay. They will go through all the creative process: sketching, building, photographing and finally computer editing. Creative Film Production also involves several processes in order to create a short film: everything from designing a storyboard to acting and digital post-production. Students will experience what it’s like to be a director, producer, actor and digital artist — all in one course.

PP: Tell us about the artists who have influenced you. BB: Because of my lifelong interest in art, I’m always looking at artists from all moments in history. There are so many artists that inspire and influence me that it’s impossible to name them all. To name a few, I love van Gogh, Klimt, Toulouse-Lautrec and Goya, as well as Duchamp, Dalí, Francis Bacon and Robert Crumb, and contemporary artists like Blu, Alex Pardee, John Baizley, Aaron Turner, Paul Romano, Jhonen Vasquez and Banksy. PP: Where do you want to take your art? BB: I want to keep improving my skills and developing ideas, but with no particular direction in mind, as long as I’m able to keep enjoying it. And hopefully I can be successful doing what I love.

• Music Exposure (grades K-2) • Claymation (grades 3-7) • Creative Video Production (grades 6-12) • Electronic Music Production (grades 6-12) • Video Game Production (grades 6-12) • Insane Workout (Adults) • Court Sports (grades 1-5) In Athletics, the Wellness Center will allow us to build our court sports, including basketball and volleyball, at all grade levels. Once Phase 2 is finished, we will be in a position to rebuild our tennis program. One of our goals for this new year is to fill our campus on Friday afternoons and Saturdays with athletic events. We see our community coming together — teachers, coaches, parents and students — to witness and participate in multiple A&EL activities. We seek to create a vibrant campus full of young and old, experiencing the excitement of competition and teaching children good sportsmanship values that will serve them well throughout their life. Join us if you are in Mexico City. We look forward to seeing you.

Robert Wilson Head of Athletics & Extended Learning

19


divi s i o n s & d e par t m e n t s p a r en t ass o cia t i o n

divi s i o n s & d e par t m e n t s a t h l e t ics & e x t en d e d l ea r nin g

Happy Campers

Bernardo Berruga (below) and some of his recent artwork.

From the Head of Athletics & Extended Learning

New Offerings

K Everything is Possible ASF’s 43rd Annual Art Fair, organized by the Parent Association, takes place on Saturday, November 10. The featured artist will be Bernardo Berruga (’12), who graduated from ASF in June. Bernardo was recently interviewed for Focus by Paloma Porraz, an ASF parent and director of the Museo del Antiguo Colegio de San Ildefonso, one of Mexico City’s premier art venues.

From the President

New Experiences As every school year begins, we feel pleasurable sensations. For students, there are new notebooks, new backpacks, new classrooms. Above all, there are new experiences in store. Parent Association volunteers feel the same way. The start of a new school year fills us with joy and energy, and we look forward to all the new projects we’ve planned for. We will start in August by accompanying the new teachers on a visit to San Ángel, the historic and culturally rich colonia in the south of Mexico City. In early October, our English Book Fair will take place. Our premiere event, the 43rd Annual Art Fair, will be on November 10. The theme this year is “Andy Warhol, The Bazaar Years.” Just imagine! In December we will offer the traditional Winter Brunch for the school’s employees. And of course, every first Wednesday of each month, there is a PA general meeting at 8:00 a.m., when we’ll show parents a little bit of what happens inside of the children’s’ world at ASF. Hope to see you there!

Alma Rosa Rodríguez Parent Association President

Paloma Porraz: You’ve explored a wide variety of forms, styles and techniques to create images. It would appear that all of them coexist in harmony and none of them takes the place of another. Bernardo Berruga: The different crafts and media that I’ve used are apparently a byproduct of my need to express certain ideas in different ways over the years. I don’t think that pattern will stop anytime soon. I usually end up recurring to watercolor, inks, spray paint and acrylic — mostly acrylic because it’s what I find most aesthetically pleasing and entertaining. PP: Your work shifts from one medium to another in a very natural way. Do you do a lot of planning? BB: My approach to painting tends to be spontaneous and I don’t hesitate to carry out an idea. Most of the time I just have an image in my head that I really need to get out and I dive straight into the piece with little to no previous planning. I find it more meaningful to let an idea flow smoothly from its conception to its realization. PP: What are the concepts and ideas that inspire your artistic production? BB: I like to dignify nature in my art. And by nature I mean reality, because it is the only thing that we can be sure of. It is the only thing that there is, whether it is a product of the mind or outside of it. Illustrating different aspects of nature seems to help me see objectively when I’m in need of clarity. If you think about it, everything, literally everything, is a possibility of nature. So anything I decide to paint is 18

something that nature made possible.Science, culture and spirituality help us try to understand, interact and live with reality, and I think they’re all interconnected and give each other endless meaning. I think all of that is somehow sincerely expressed in all of my paintings. PP: I can see an influence in your work from Japanese graphics and illustrations, along with the science fiction that characterizes them. BB: I wouldn’t say that there is a Japanese intention behind any of my paintings, at least not consciously. But I’ve always admired Japanese culture in all its forms, and I was very much drawn to their cartoons when I was very young so I suppose it is natural if there is some influence from that in my work.

Athletics and Extended Learning is focused on providing an outstanding menu of activities and athletic teams as we move into the new Jenkins Foundation Wellness Center in the 2012-13 school year. ASF has long affirmed the importance of the arts and athletics, and we are committed to providing our students with paths to express themselves and to grow holistically. To help do that, we offer more than 80 courses and organized sports activities after the school day. For this 2012-2013 school year, we have new and exciting Extended Learning courses. They include:

ids from 3 to 12 took over the ASF campus for five weeks over the summer, as campers in ASF’s Cub Camp (ages 3-6) and Youth Camp (ages 7-12). Participating in activities from soccer to gymnastics to cooking to adventure sports, the campers met others of all ages in their “tribes” and through special events, like an extended day that kept the kids on campus until 9:00 p.m. eating, playing games and enjoying a pretend “spa.” The camps are a tradition at ASF, although this year, the students had a new activity option on the menu: photography. Another change was to the schedule, moving the camp day earlier to 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., to give buses and parents a break from traffic.

Let Your Creativity Fly By Juan de Luca, Extended Learning Coordinator

O

f the many new and exciting Extended Learning classes being introduced this school year, two that stand out are Claymation and Creative Film Production. Claymation is a class that helps students develop skills in the arts and technology. Children will work toward creating a short animated video made entirely with clay. They will go through all the creative process: sketching, building, photographing and finally computer editing. Creative Film Production also involves several processes in order to create a short film: everything from designing a storyboard to acting and digital post-production. Students will experience what it’s like to be a director, producer, actor and digital artist — all in one course.

PP: Tell us about the artists who have influenced you. BB: Because of my lifelong interest in art, I’m always looking at artists from all moments in history. There are so many artists that inspire and influence me that it’s impossible to name them all. To name a few, I love van Gogh, Klimt, Toulouse-Lautrec and Goya, as well as Duchamp, Dalí, Francis Bacon and Robert Crumb, and contemporary artists like Blu, Alex Pardee, John Baizley, Aaron Turner, Paul Romano, Jhonen Vasquez and Banksy. PP: Where do you want to take your art? BB: I want to keep improving my skills and developing ideas, but with no particular direction in mind, as long as I’m able to keep enjoying it. And hopefully I can be successful doing what I love.

• Music Exposure (grades K-2) • Claymation (grades 3-7) • Creative Video Production (grades 6-12) • Electronic Music Production (grades 6-12) • Video Game Production (grades 6-12) • Insane Workout (Adults) • Court Sports (grades 1-5) In Athletics, the Wellness Center will allow us to build our court sports, including basketball and volleyball, at all grade levels. Once Phase 2 is finished, we will be in a position to rebuild our tennis program. One of our goals for this new year is to fill our campus on Friday afternoons and Saturdays with athletic events. We see our community coming together — teachers, coaches, parents and students — to witness and participate in multiple A&EL activities. We seek to create a vibrant campus full of young and old, experiencing the excitement of competition and teaching children good sportsmanship values that will serve them well throughout their life. Join us if you are in Mexico City. We look forward to seeing you.

Robert Wilson Head of Athletics & Extended Learning

19


g rad u a t i o n 2 0 1 2

Graduation

2012!

20

21


g rad u a t i o n 2 0 1 2

Graduation

2012!

20

21


g rad u a t i o n 2 0 1 2

Dress Code ASF’s familiar graduation outfits are more than just tradition. There’s a lot of meaning in the details. By Bret Sikkink, Upper School Teacher

U

Congratulations to the Class of 2012 181 ASF seniors became ASF alumni on Saturday, June 2.

T

Other speakers included valedictorian Andrea Arroyo (see page 26 for her speech), Master of Ceremonies and Senior Class President Andrés Gutiérrez, Board of Trustees Chair Rosa Marentes de Pisinger (’87), Student Activities Specialist Helen Kang, Executive Director Paul Williams and Head of Upper School Amy Gallie, who advised the soon-to-be graduates always to start with a “yes” as they improvise their ways through the unknowns of life. Members of the Class of 2012 have said yes to diverse plans for the coming months and years. 16% of the graduates plan to take a gap semester or year, to travel, work or study, before continuing on with university studies. 39% of the Class of 2012 will be enrolling at a U.S. university in the fall, while 37% will continue their studies in Mexico and 8% are headed to other countries, such as Canada, Korea and Spain (see pages 24-25 for details).

he traditional pomp and circumstance of ASF’s graduation ceremony continue to inspire, year after year. But each graduating class makes the day its own. That was no less the case for the 2012 edition. On a sweltering spring day in Mexico City, family members, friends, teachers and other supporters crowded under huge tents set up on Coach Colman Field, vying for the best view of the Class of 2012 as they processed in, following faculty and school leaders. The day featured varied musical selections and speakers. The Upper School jazz band played at intervals, and senior class counselor Malu Molano gave the congratulatory address. “Look within yourself for strength, live in the moment and embrace the end, as with it comes a new beginning,” Ms. Molano said, summing up her three pieces of advice for the Class of 2012. 22

pper School students’ sartorial choices are always important to them. But never more than on graduation day. With their maroon cap and gown, the seniors wear one or more tassels, stoles and pins that recognize their leadership, academic accomplishments and tenure at the school. All graduates are given a maroon tassel as recognition of their new status as alumni of The American School Foundation. Those students who have attended the school since kindergarten or first grade with no more than a year spent elsewhere receive a maroon and gold tassel identifying them as “Old Timers.” There were 70 such seniors in the Class of 2012. Other special insignia include a light blue tassel for members of the Model United Nations class, an International Baccalaureate pin for students who completed the full IB Diploma program, a gold tassel for members of the Aztec Chapter of the National Honor Society and white tassels for graduating seniors who served on the Student Council. Additional hardware is reserved for the leadership of those last two clubs. National Honor Society officers wear a cord and pin that symbolize their position: a gavel for the president, a torch for the vice-president, a quill for the secretary and a key for the treasurer. Student Council officers wear a white stole as well as the pin symbolizing their position; those active in the last year wear a gold stole. Coordinators of the LINK (new student mentoring) program have their own pin. Faculty have the option to wear their own gowns and hoods (staff without gowns wear a black toga). Their degrees are indicated by the color of the hood: maroon for a bachelor’s, gold for a master’s and a mix of maroon and gold for a completed doctorate. Most visible at the ceremony are those on the dais. The chair of the Board of Trustees and the executive director are seated alongside the Upper School administration, along with guests invited by the graduating generation. While most high schools typically rent graduation outfits, ASF graduates are given gowns and mortarboards (graduation hats) at a previous capping ceremony. They keep them.

Clockwise from upper left: The various different tassels, the IB pin, a link coordinator sash, the different hoods worn by faculty and staff and students wearing colored sashes for their achievements.

23


g rad u a t i o n 2 0 1 2

Dress Code ASF’s familiar graduation outfits are more than just tradition. There’s a lot of meaning in the details. By Bret Sikkink, Upper School Teacher

U

Congratulations to the Class of 2012 181 ASF seniors became ASF alumni on Saturday, June 2.

T

Other speakers included valedictorian Andrea Arroyo (see page 26 for her speech), Master of Ceremonies and Senior Class President Andrés Gutiérrez, Board of Trustees Chair Rosa Marentes de Pisinger (’87), Student Activities Specialist Helen Kang, Executive Director Paul Williams and Head of Upper School Amy Gallie, who advised the soon-to-be graduates always to start with a “yes” as they improvise their ways through the unknowns of life. Members of the Class of 2012 have said yes to diverse plans for the coming months and years. 16% of the graduates plan to take a gap semester or year, to travel, work or study, before continuing on with university studies. 39% of the Class of 2012 will be enrolling at a U.S. university in the fall, while 37% will continue their studies in Mexico and 8% are headed to other countries, such as Canada, Korea and Spain (see pages 24-25 for details).

he traditional pomp and circumstance of ASF’s graduation ceremony continue to inspire, year after year. But each graduating class makes the day its own. That was no less the case for the 2012 edition. On a sweltering spring day in Mexico City, family members, friends, teachers and other supporters crowded under huge tents set up on Coach Colman Field, vying for the best view of the Class of 2012 as they processed in, following faculty and school leaders. The day featured varied musical selections and speakers. The Upper School jazz band played at intervals, and senior class counselor Malu Molano gave the congratulatory address. “Look within yourself for strength, live in the moment and embrace the end, as with it comes a new beginning,” Ms. Molano said, summing up her three pieces of advice for the Class of 2012. 22

pper School students’ sartorial choices are always important to them. But never more than on graduation day. With their maroon cap and gown, the seniors wear one or more tassels, stoles and pins that recognize their leadership, academic accomplishments and tenure at the school. All graduates are given a maroon tassel as recognition of their new status as alumni of The American School Foundation. Those students who have attended the school since kindergarten or first grade with no more than a year spent elsewhere receive a maroon and gold tassel identifying them as “Old Timers.” There were 70 such seniors in the Class of 2012. Other special insignia include a light blue tassel for members of the Model United Nations class, an International Baccalaureate pin for students who completed the full IB Diploma program, a gold tassel for members of the Aztec Chapter of the National Honor Society and white tassels for graduating seniors who served on the Student Council. Additional hardware is reserved for the leadership of those last two clubs. National Honor Society officers wear a cord and pin that symbolize their position: a gavel for the president, a torch for the vice-president, a quill for the secretary and a key for the treasurer. Student Council officers wear a white stole as well as the pin symbolizing their position; those active in the last year wear a gold stole. Coordinators of the LINK (new student mentoring) program have their own pin. Faculty have the option to wear their own gowns and hoods (staff without gowns wear a black toga). Their degrees are indicated by the color of the hood: maroon for a bachelor’s, gold for a master’s and a mix of maroon and gold for a completed doctorate. Most visible at the ceremony are those on the dais. The chair of the Board of Trustees and the executive director are seated alongside the Upper School administration, along with guests invited by the graduating generation. While most high schools typically rent graduation outfits, ASF graduates are given gowns and mortarboards (graduation hats) at a previous capping ceremony. They keep them.

Clockwise from upper left: The various different tassels, the IB pin, a link coordinator sash, the different hoods worn by faculty and staff and students wearing colored sashes for their achievements.

23


Graduating Class of 2012

H O H, IB, O O O H, IB, O O O O IB IB H, IB O

IB, O

H

IB, O

H, IB, O IB, O H, IB H O O H, IB O O H, IB,O

Sandra Giselle Acevedo Nicolás Aguilar Pedro Akle Cantú Alina Aksiyote Benardete Gustavo Alcocer Olivares Pablo Alvarez Magaña Orly Amkie Álvarez Andrea Arroyo Ornelas Jameson Armando Austin Diego Azcárraga Fuentes Andrés Azcárraga Rivera-Torres Víctor Balcázar Zorrilla Francisco Barros Nathalie Baudouin Lauriane Baur Eduardo Manuel Bermúdez Maldonado Santiago Bernaldo de Quirós Barbachano Renata Bernot Simón Bernardo Berruga Mariana Betancourt Arciniegas Fernanda Bitar Simón Mary Bocaranda Lorena Borja Carranza Cory Brennan Tere Breton Orrala Jean Paul Broc Stephen Anthony Cadena Michel Caraco Jorge Cardona López-Duplan Natalie Joanne Centeno Servando Cervantes Carbajal Alejandra Céspedes González Andres Chapiro Fermon Carlos Cherbowski Yong-Moon Cho Jina Chong Jeon Christopher Robert Clifford Raz-Guzmán Patrick Espiritu Colby Andrea Córdoba Urrutia Jordi Erik Cores López Antonio Cortés Posada Nathalia Cravioto Alcántara Daniel Cui Zhou Miguel Javier de Angoitia Legorreta Santiago de Buen Alina de Córdoba

Gap semester Chapman University Gap semester in Rome, Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México Yale University Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Santa Fe Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México Gap year in Israel University of Pennsylvania Gap year Universidad Iberoamericana Universidad Iberoamericana Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey Universidad Iberoamericana École Hôtelière de Lausanne Northwestern University Universidad Iberoamericana Gap semester, Universidad Iberoamericana Gap semester Universidad La Salle Gap semester sailing in Spain, Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México Full Sail University Gap semester, study in London Champlain College Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México University of Southern California American University Pennsylvania State University, University Park Gap year in Europe Miami Dade College Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México Bellerbys College — London University of Colorado at Boulder City University Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology The George Washington University Universidad G. Martell University of Southern California New York University Loyola University Chicago Universidad Iberoamericana Northeastern University Washington University in St. Louis Pace University, New York City Centro De Investigación Y Docencia Económicas, A.C. Amherst College

24

H IB O O

O O H, IB, O O

IB O IB H, IB O O O H O O O H H O H, IB O

O H, IB H, IB

H, IB, O O H, O

Paulina Díaz John Kevin Dix Van Michelle Driessen Rubalcava Pablo Elizondo Grediaga Michelle Epelstein Peralta Gerardo Estévez Franco Lillian Feder Huymans Nicholas Ferezin Andrés Fernández Orendain Jorge Fernández Shapiro Patricia Fernández de Castro Sámano Alan Finkler Plaschinski Peter Terence Fox Capetillo Melissa Franco Pedro Fuentes Álvarez Roberto Galván López Guillermo Federico García García Paulina García Razo Álvaro García Lecuona Esteve Karla Garza José Pablo Gaspar de Alba Andrés Gaviria Villarreal Andrea Gil Rangel Iker Giménez Bilbao Jacqueline Goldberg Dalma Roberto Gómez Muller Marcelo Graña Samanez Andrea Guerrero Villanueva Andrés Gutiérrez Canales Adriana Gutiérrez Gómez Michelle Habia Nacach Yael Heiblum Alejandro Hernández Gochis Yalina Hernández Clemente Max Hinojosa Humberto Ibarzabal Valladares Woo Seok Jang Lee Natasha Javier González Emma Esperanza Johnson Roberto Jones Romo Rina Kawakami Ji Hae Sharon Kim Woobin Kim Jae Deok Kim Danna Krouham Efter Adriana Kuri Alamillo

Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Santa Fe Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México Universidad Anáhuac University of British Columbia Gap year in Israel Gap semester in Florence, Universidad Iberoamericana Universidad Iberoamericana American University Universidad Iberoamericana Universidad Anáhuac University of Notre Dame Gap semester in Florence, Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México Universidad Iberoamericana Universidad Iberoamericana Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México Centro De Investigación Y Docencia Económicas Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Santa Fe Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México University of California at Berkeley Gap semester Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México Universidad Iberoamericana Universidad Iberoamericana DigiPen Europe-Bilbao Gap semester in Israel, Universidad Anáhuac Universidad Iberoamericana University of California at San Diego Northeastern University University of Notre Dame Parsons The New School for Design Gap year in Israel New York University Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México University of California at San Diego Universidad Iberoamericana University of Miami Universidad Iberoamericana Gap semester, University of British Columbia Mills College College of Charleston Waseda University Pepperdine University Northeastern University Seoul National University Gap semester in Israel, Universidad Iberoamericana School of the Art Institute of Chicago

O O H O H, O O O H, IB IB

O

H, O O O O

H, IB

O H H, IB O H O O O O O

Alejandro Lafon Riojas Sung Ji Lee Andrea Faria Carlos López Morales Juan Miguel López Mosti Santiago Lozano Márquez María Guadalupe Madero Olavarrieta María Martínez María Matus Bárbara Mendoza Escobar Carlos Mendoza Gallego Nicole Meyer Jinich Silvia Soledad Mora Stephanie Moreno Karl Muller Fabiana Muñoz Luis Naim Dib Jorge Nicolin Martínez Sebastian Niezen Vanessa Niño Rubio Felipe Núñez Andrea Oberhauser Mendez Da Yoon Oh Kevin Orozco Mendoza Andrés David Osegueda Adkins Alexa Pages Su Wan Park Denise Pascal Aroeste Javier Pérez de Acha Mariana Perez-Varona Mai-Lee Picard Lucía Pichardo Vanessa Pinto Aray Louis Poire Flores Sandra Posternak Gebel Galia Radosh Sverdlin Rafael Ramos Martínez Sebastián Ramos Lorena Rangel Mejía Dominique Ransom Soto Carlos David Rebora Díaz-Sandi Lior Rei Aileen Rey Quintero Dalia Rincón Altamirano Constanza Rioseco Mercado Carlota Rodríguez Lemos

Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Santa Fe Savannah College of Art and Design-Atlanta University of Miami Pennsylvania State University, University Park Universidad Anáhuac Gap semester Bucknell University Pepperdine University Escuela de Música DIM Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México The George Washington University Johns Hopkins University Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México The University of Texas, Austin University of British Columbia Universidad Iberoamericana Universidad Iberoamericana Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Santa Fe Universidad Javeriana Georgia State University Universidad Iberoamericana Emory University Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Santa Fe Northeastern University University of Colorado at Boulder School of Visual Arts Centro De Estudios Superiores de San Ángel Gap semester in Africa Gap year Cornell University Universidad de Navarra Universidad del Desarrollo Universidad Iberoamericana New York University Gap year in Israel Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Drexel University Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México School of the Art Institute of Chicago Universidad Anáhuac Gap year in Israel, Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México Savannah College of Art and Design - Atlanta Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México Universidad Iberoamericana Universidad Iberoamericana

O Almudena Rodríguez Karam Oscar Rodríguez O Matthew Rogers Simón Romano Behar O María Romano de Angoitia O Juan Carlos Romero Daccarett H, O Yoshua Rozen Ariela Rozenbaum Lerner H, O Alexander Rubén Castillo H Marcela Ruiz de Chávez Vélez O Moisés Sabanero Zarzuela O Eduardo Sáenz Aguilar-Álvarez O Alberto Salome Batarse Max Sampson Manuel Sánchez Ruiz IB, O Ricardo Sánchez Ambrosi Mathias Sauberli Quatorze O Javier Scaglia Georgina Schravesande Gutiérrez Sherman Schwartz Monica Michelle Simmons O Santiago Soní Velasco O Karen Jessica Sorsby Fuentes O Nicholas Souroujon IB Ricardo Spinola Sean Alexander Tillery Loaiza IB, O Enrique Traver Barbabosa O Federico Treviño Garza H, O Alfredo Trueba Ruiz H, O María Fernanda Urban García O Tania Varela Sarfati Stephanie Ann Velazquez Carlos Villaseñor Penela O Ana Karen Vizcarra Herrera Nicole Von Mohr Ballina IB, O Andres Wallentin Jaris H, IB Zhiqi Wang O Ricardo Washington Mac Gregor Emilia Gabrielle Wattley IB Morgan Josephine Aolele Wetzell Ramsey Marianne Yamaguchi Trovamala Patricia Zebley O Rafael Zetune

H - Honor Society

25

Universidad Iberoamericana University of Central Florida Oral Roberts University Gap semester, Brandeis University Claremont McKenna College Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México Gap year in Israel, university in the United States Gap year Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México Universidad Iberoamericana Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México The American University in Cairo Loyola University Chicago Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México Georgia Institute of Technology Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Santa Fe Universidad Iberoamericana The University of Tampa Gap year working at the U.S. Embassy Universidad Panamericana Florida International University Northeastern University New York University Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Santa Fe Parsons The New School for Design and Eugene Lang College Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México Tisch School of the Arts at New York University Universidad Panamericana Gap semester in Israel, CENTRO James Madison University Universidad Nacional Autónoma De México Universidad Iberoamericana School of the Art Institute of Chicago Massachusetts Institute of Technology University of Rochester Berklee College of Music Florida State University, Panama Gap semester Gap semester California State University, Chico Gap semester

IB - IB Diploma Programme

O - Old Timers


Graduating Class of 2012

H O H, IB, O O O H, IB, O O O O IB IB H, IB O

IB, O

H

IB, O

H, IB, O IB, O H, IB H O O H, IB O O H, IB,O

Sandra Giselle Acevedo Nicolás Aguilar Pedro Akle Cantú Alina Aksiyote Benardete Gustavo Alcocer Olivares Pablo Alvarez Magaña Orly Amkie Álvarez Andrea Arroyo Ornelas Jameson Armando Austin Diego Azcárraga Fuentes Andrés Azcárraga Rivera-Torres Víctor Balcázar Zorrilla Francisco Barros Nathalie Baudouin Lauriane Baur Eduardo Manuel Bermúdez Maldonado Santiago Bernaldo de Quirós Barbachano Renata Bernot Simón Bernardo Berruga Mariana Betancourt Arciniegas Fernanda Bitar Simón Mary Bocaranda Lorena Borja Carranza Cory Brennan Tere Breton Orrala Jean Paul Broc Stephen Anthony Cadena Michel Caraco Jorge Cardona López-Duplan Natalie Joanne Centeno Servando Cervantes Carbajal Alejandra Céspedes González Andres Chapiro Fermon Carlos Cherbowski Yong-Moon Cho Jina Chong Jeon Christopher Robert Clifford Raz-Guzmán Patrick Espiritu Colby Andrea Córdoba Urrutia Jordi Erik Cores López Antonio Cortés Posada Nathalia Cravioto Alcántara Daniel Cui Zhou Miguel Javier de Angoitia Legorreta Santiago de Buen Alina de Córdoba

Gap semester Chapman University Gap semester in Rome, Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México Yale University Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Santa Fe Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México Gap year in Israel University of Pennsylvania Gap year Universidad Iberoamericana Universidad Iberoamericana Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey Universidad Iberoamericana École Hôtelière de Lausanne Northwestern University Universidad Iberoamericana Gap semester, Universidad Iberoamericana Gap semester Universidad La Salle Gap semester sailing in Spain, Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México Full Sail University Gap semester, study in London Champlain College Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México University of Southern California American University Pennsylvania State University, University Park Gap year in Europe Miami Dade College Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México Bellerbys College — London University of Colorado at Boulder City University Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology The George Washington University Universidad G. Martell University of Southern California New York University Loyola University Chicago Universidad Iberoamericana Northeastern University Washington University in St. Louis Pace University, New York City Centro De Investigación Y Docencia Económicas, A.C. Amherst College

24

H IB O O

O O H, IB, O O

IB O IB H, IB O O O H O O O H H O H, IB O

O H, IB H, IB

H, IB, O O H, O

Paulina Díaz John Kevin Dix Van Michelle Driessen Rubalcava Pablo Elizondo Grediaga Michelle Epelstein Peralta Gerardo Estévez Franco Lillian Feder Huymans Nicholas Ferezin Andrés Fernández Orendain Jorge Fernández Shapiro Patricia Fernández de Castro Sámano Alan Finkler Plaschinski Peter Terence Fox Capetillo Melissa Franco Pedro Fuentes Álvarez Roberto Galván López Guillermo Federico García García Paulina García Razo Álvaro García Lecuona Esteve Karla Garza José Pablo Gaspar de Alba Andrés Gaviria Villarreal Andrea Gil Rangel Iker Giménez Bilbao Jacqueline Goldberg Dalma Roberto Gómez Muller Marcelo Graña Samanez Andrea Guerrero Villanueva Andrés Gutiérrez Canales Adriana Gutiérrez Gómez Michelle Habia Nacach Yael Heiblum Alejandro Hernández Gochis Yalina Hernández Clemente Max Hinojosa Humberto Ibarzabal Valladares Woo Seok Jang Lee Natasha Javier González Emma Esperanza Johnson Roberto Jones Romo Rina Kawakami Ji Hae Sharon Kim Woobin Kim Jae Deok Kim Danna Krouham Efter Adriana Kuri Alamillo

Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Santa Fe Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México Universidad Anáhuac University of British Columbia Gap year in Israel Gap semester in Florence, Universidad Iberoamericana Universidad Iberoamericana American University Universidad Iberoamericana Universidad Anáhuac University of Notre Dame Gap semester in Florence, Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México Universidad Iberoamericana Universidad Iberoamericana Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México Centro De Investigación Y Docencia Económicas Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Santa Fe Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México University of California at Berkeley Gap semester Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México Universidad Iberoamericana Universidad Iberoamericana DigiPen Europe-Bilbao Gap semester in Israel, Universidad Anáhuac Universidad Iberoamericana University of California at San Diego Northeastern University University of Notre Dame Parsons The New School for Design Gap year in Israel New York University Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México University of California at San Diego Universidad Iberoamericana University of Miami Universidad Iberoamericana Gap semester, University of British Columbia Mills College College of Charleston Waseda University Pepperdine University Northeastern University Seoul National University Gap semester in Israel, Universidad Iberoamericana School of the Art Institute of Chicago

O O H O H, O O O H, IB IB

O

H, O O O O

H, IB

O H H, IB O H O O O O O

Alejandro Lafon Riojas Sung Ji Lee Andrea Faria Carlos López Morales Juan Miguel López Mosti Santiago Lozano Márquez María Guadalupe Madero Olavarrieta María Martínez María Matus Bárbara Mendoza Escobar Carlos Mendoza Gallego Nicole Meyer Jinich Silvia Soledad Mora Stephanie Moreno Karl Muller Fabiana Muñoz Luis Naim Dib Jorge Nicolin Martínez Sebastian Niezen Vanessa Niño Rubio Felipe Núñez Andrea Oberhauser Mendez Da Yoon Oh Kevin Orozco Mendoza Andrés David Osegueda Adkins Alexa Pages Su Wan Park Denise Pascal Aroeste Javier Pérez de Acha Mariana Perez-Varona Mai-Lee Picard Lucía Pichardo Vanessa Pinto Aray Louis Poire Flores Sandra Posternak Gebel Galia Radosh Sverdlin Rafael Ramos Martínez Sebastián Ramos Lorena Rangel Mejía Dominique Ransom Soto Carlos David Rebora Díaz-Sandi Lior Rei Aileen Rey Quintero Dalia Rincón Altamirano Constanza Rioseco Mercado Carlota Rodríguez Lemos

Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Santa Fe Savannah College of Art and Design-Atlanta University of Miami Pennsylvania State University, University Park Universidad Anáhuac Gap semester Bucknell University Pepperdine University Escuela de Música DIM Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México The George Washington University Johns Hopkins University Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México The University of Texas, Austin University of British Columbia Universidad Iberoamericana Universidad Iberoamericana Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Santa Fe Universidad Javeriana Georgia State University Universidad Iberoamericana Emory University Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Santa Fe Northeastern University University of Colorado at Boulder School of Visual Arts Centro De Estudios Superiores de San Ángel Gap semester in Africa Gap year Cornell University Universidad de Navarra Universidad del Desarrollo Universidad Iberoamericana New York University Gap year in Israel Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Drexel University Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México School of the Art Institute of Chicago Universidad Anáhuac Gap year in Israel, Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México Savannah College of Art and Design - Atlanta Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México Universidad Iberoamericana Universidad Iberoamericana

O Almudena Rodríguez Karam Oscar Rodríguez O Matthew Rogers Simón Romano Behar O María Romano de Angoitia O Juan Carlos Romero Daccarett H, O Yoshua Rozen Ariela Rozenbaum Lerner H, O Alexander Rubén Castillo H Marcela Ruiz de Chávez Vélez O Moisés Sabanero Zarzuela O Eduardo Sáenz Aguilar-Álvarez O Alberto Salome Batarse Max Sampson Manuel Sánchez Ruiz IB, O Ricardo Sánchez Ambrosi Mathias Sauberli Quatorze O Javier Scaglia Georgina Schravesande Gutiérrez Sherman Schwartz Monica Michelle Simmons O Santiago Soní Velasco O Karen Jessica Sorsby Fuentes O Nicholas Souroujon IB Ricardo Spinola Sean Alexander Tillery Loaiza IB, O Enrique Traver Barbabosa O Federico Treviño Garza H, O Alfredo Trueba Ruiz H, O María Fernanda Urban García O Tania Varela Sarfati Stephanie Ann Velazquez Carlos Villaseñor Penela O Ana Karen Vizcarra Herrera Nicole Von Mohr Ballina IB, O Andres Wallentin Jaris H, IB Zhiqi Wang O Ricardo Washington Mac Gregor Emilia Gabrielle Wattley IB Morgan Josephine Aolele Wetzell Ramsey Marianne Yamaguchi Trovamala Patricia Zebley O Rafael Zetune

H - Honor Society

25

Universidad Iberoamericana University of Central Florida Oral Roberts University Gap semester, Brandeis University Claremont McKenna College Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México Gap year in Israel, university in the United States Gap year Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México Universidad Iberoamericana Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México The American University in Cairo Loyola University Chicago Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México Georgia Institute of Technology Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Santa Fe Universidad Iberoamericana The University of Tampa Gap year working at the U.S. Embassy Universidad Panamericana Florida International University Northeastern University New York University Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Santa Fe Parsons The New School for Design and Eugene Lang College Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México Tisch School of the Arts at New York University Universidad Panamericana Gap semester in Israel, CENTRO James Madison University Universidad Nacional Autónoma De México Universidad Iberoamericana School of the Art Institute of Chicago Massachusetts Institute of Technology University of Rochester Berklee College of Music Florida State University, Panama Gap semester Gap semester California State University, Chico Gap semester

IB - IB Diploma Programme

O - Old Timers


g rad u a t i o n 2 0 1 2

Goodbye, T Hello

here’s no getting around it. Time passes. It always does. I think I realized that at a really young age. Every time I had to get through a bad week or a bad month I always just thought that at some point, it would be over. It’s like when you get sick. You just think this time next week you’ll feel better. And you do, usually. But good things come to an end too. I suppose one way of looking at our lives is just as a whole series of endings, because in a way they are. And I really suck at endings. I hate saying goodbyes and I’ll-miss-yous. You know what I mean, right? You know that indescribable pull you feel when you leave someone and you just know you’ll probably never see them again. It’s a feeling so intense that you just can’t put it into words. It’s like when I read a book. And just take my word for it, I’ve read a lot of books. I’ve read books on everything you can imagine, from sorcerers to petty high school drama, to different countries and time periods, to classics. Every time, without fail, when I get to the last chapter I get a little sad. I think it’s because I get so attached to the characters. You get to know a character in a book so much better than those you see on a screen. You get to hear their thoughts and you feel their sadness or elation and you live every moment like you were there. So when it comes time to say goodbye to them in that last chapter, on that last page, you always think, “Wait, but I wanted it to go on a little longer.” That’s how I’m feeling right now. I want all of this to go on a little bit longer because the thought of saying goodbye is scary. When I read a book, when it’s really good, I just automatically want to read it again. It’s like with Harry Potter. I started reading it when I was in elementary school, with my dad, and even now I want to relive my favorite parts. I want Fred Weasley to come back to life. I want to start from the beginning when everyone was 11 and innocent. And that’s the great thing about reading — you can do that. Maybe that’s why I love it so much, because in life there is no “command-z” button; there’s no way to go back and relive all of our favorite moments. The only way to go is forward. So, let’s look forward. As you’re saying all of your goodbyes, think about all of the hellos you’ll be saying. Look at all the things that are ahead of us — the things that, no matter what, will always come. The way I see it, we’re at the beginning. For now, we have hundreds of chapters before us, hundreds of moments we haven’t experienced yet. That idea should be thrilling, not sad. Yes, we have had our last first day of high school, our last prom, our last graduation. But for every last, there’s a first that’s coming. There’s the first day of college, the first job interview, the first apartment. Embrace it; live it. Don’t get stuck in the past. When I came to Mexico two years ago, I didn’t even know that any of the people in this room existed. I had no idea who any of you were. And now I can’t imagine saying goodbye. But as we say goodbye, remember that there will always be those people who, no matter what, will stay in your life forever. There will be those friends who know you so well that they know how you’re feeling before you say it, and maybe before you even admit it to yourself. You’ll also have your family. Even if they drive you crazy half the time or most of the time, they will be the people who will always defend you. I know I can always count on my mom to tell me she’s proud of me and that she’ll stand by me no matter what. That’s something I’ll never forget. My dad told me something once. He said, “Don’t take any pictures. Just sit there and enjoy this moment. Feel everything because that’s how you’re going to remember it.” So do me a favor, right now, just close your eyes for a second and feel this moment of being here together as a class for one of the last times. These high school years may have been the highlight of your life or maybe they weren’t. Either way, you’ll always have them, they will always be a part of you and at every reunion you’ll remember these times we shared. And trust me, the bad memories — they’ll fade and all you’ll be left with are the amazing moments we had here at ASF. Together. Goodbyes? They’re just another way of saying: I’ll remember.

Mai-Lee Picard, an Honor Society member who will be attending Cornell University, was the 2012 salutatorian, speaking at the Senior Awards Ceremony. The moving speech that she delivered to her fellow seniors appears here, slightly edited for space.

Good Decisions ASF’s Class of 2012 valedictorian was María Andrea Arroyo Ornelas, an Honor Society member and Old Timer who will be attending the University of Pennsylvania. Here is her inspiring speech:

G

ood morning parents, teachers, administrators and most of all... seniors! First, I would like to take a moment to thank you all for being here and to congratulate the Class of 2012. It’s been four long years of late nights finishing math assignments, early mornings studying for history exams and stressful brunches scrambling to print out English essays. Yet here we are, on the verge of graduating. So, how did we go from being nervous freshmen at our first comida to confident seniors about to begin college? Well…we made decisions. And decisions accumulate. The series of choices we made these past four years have paved the way to our current success. Sure, some of us chose to skip Derecho once or twice (sorry, Prof!), or maybe watch an episode of “The Office” instead of studying the properties of protons. But there were many more instances when we chose to finish a project, rewrite an essay and study extra hard for a test. Our graduating is the culmination of this string of decisions. Seniors, it’s real. We’re graduating! On one hand, today is an absolutely joyous occasion, filled with dancing, screaming, throwing out binders and burning essays. From experience, I suggest you do so carefully. On the other hand, many of us do tear up when we realize that we are leaving ASF, that we are leaving 15 years of our lives behind us. Endings inevitably entail nostalgia.

However, endings are also the points at which we get to stop and think. We get to ask ourselves: Where did I succeed? Where did I fail? And, most important, where do I take it from here? I am thrilled to say that today we find ourselves exactly at one of these crossroads. We can look back at each of the past 15 years and decide how to live our lives from here. Graduation is the perfect moment to begin a new string of decisions and write a new story. One that represents not only who we are today, but also who we want to become tomorrow. I, for instance, joined the debate team only at the end of high school, yet I found it to be life changing. I love researching, analyzing and (as I’m certain many of you will find greatly surprising) what I most enjoyed was arguing. Debate will certainly continue to be a part of my life. Many of you had similar experiences with the Drama Club, Student Council or the football team. And I encourage you to reflect on, cultivate and incorporate these passions into your life going forward. On the other hand, as much as I enjoyed IB history and truly love Mr. Rees, I will never read a single sentence on World War I again. The great thing about graduating is that I don’t have to. That’s what’s so amazing about this new stage of our lives — we get to take what we enjoyed most at ASF, leave behind what we didn’t enjoy as much and start writing the story we want our lives to be. 26

Today, we get to choose what to make of ourselves. Because we not only get to decide what classes to take and what clubs to join, we also get to decide how much we laugh, how we treat others and (for those of us leaving Mexico and venturing into the world of doing our own laundry) we also get to choose whether we are the type of person who is willing to reuse socks or even underwear. Class of 2012, we are in control of who we become — today more than ever. So let’s take advantage of this clean slate and be who we want to be. The coolest thing about this is that we can start with really simple choices. Just for today, let’s decide to give an honest compliment to someone you are not friends with. Just for today, let’s read a chapter of a book rather than watch TV. Just for today, let’s laugh more than we did yesterday. Our decisions accumulate. When we decide to do these things today, they will become who we are tomorrow. I am speaking to a group of incredibly joyful and greatly privileged individuals. Remember that happiness is not defined by what we have, but rather by how we choose to use what we were given. Today, we are being given an opportunity. We are being given a fresh start. Let’s start accumulating good decisions and write ourselves a great story. Thank you. And congratulations, Class of 2012! 27


g rad u a t i o n 2 0 1 2

Goodbye, T Hello

here’s no getting around it. Time passes. It always does. I think I realized that at a really young age. Every time I had to get through a bad week or a bad month I always just thought that at some point, it would be over. It’s like when you get sick. You just think this time next week you’ll feel better. And you do, usually. But good things come to an end too. I suppose one way of looking at our lives is just as a whole series of endings, because in a way they are. And I really suck at endings. I hate saying goodbyes and I’ll-miss-yous. You know what I mean, right? You know that indescribable pull you feel when you leave someone and you just know you’ll probably never see them again. It’s a feeling so intense that you just can’t put it into words. It’s like when I read a book. And just take my word for it, I’ve read a lot of books. I’ve read books on everything you can imagine, from sorcerers to petty high school drama, to different countries and time periods, to classics. Every time, without fail, when I get to the last chapter I get a little sad. I think it’s because I get so attached to the characters. You get to know a character in a book so much better than those you see on a screen. You get to hear their thoughts and you feel their sadness or elation and you live every moment like you were there. So when it comes time to say goodbye to them in that last chapter, on that last page, you always think, “Wait, but I wanted it to go on a little longer.” That’s how I’m feeling right now. I want all of this to go on a little bit longer because the thought of saying goodbye is scary. When I read a book, when it’s really good, I just automatically want to read it again. It’s like with Harry Potter. I started reading it when I was in elementary school, with my dad, and even now I want to relive my favorite parts. I want Fred Weasley to come back to life. I want to start from the beginning when everyone was 11 and innocent. And that’s the great thing about reading — you can do that. Maybe that’s why I love it so much, because in life there is no “command-z” button; there’s no way to go back and relive all of our favorite moments. The only way to go is forward. So, let’s look forward. As you’re saying all of your goodbyes, think about all of the hellos you’ll be saying. Look at all the things that are ahead of us — the things that, no matter what, will always come. The way I see it, we’re at the beginning. For now, we have hundreds of chapters before us, hundreds of moments we haven’t experienced yet. That idea should be thrilling, not sad. Yes, we have had our last first day of high school, our last prom, our last graduation. But for every last, there’s a first that’s coming. There’s the first day of college, the first job interview, the first apartment. Embrace it; live it. Don’t get stuck in the past. When I came to Mexico two years ago, I didn’t even know that any of the people in this room existed. I had no idea who any of you were. And now I can’t imagine saying goodbye. But as we say goodbye, remember that there will always be those people who, no matter what, will stay in your life forever. There will be those friends who know you so well that they know how you’re feeling before you say it, and maybe before you even admit it to yourself. You’ll also have your family. Even if they drive you crazy half the time or most of the time, they will be the people who will always defend you. I know I can always count on my mom to tell me she’s proud of me and that she’ll stand by me no matter what. That’s something I’ll never forget. My dad told me something once. He said, “Don’t take any pictures. Just sit there and enjoy this moment. Feel everything because that’s how you’re going to remember it.” So do me a favor, right now, just close your eyes for a second and feel this moment of being here together as a class for one of the last times. These high school years may have been the highlight of your life or maybe they weren’t. Either way, you’ll always have them, they will always be a part of you and at every reunion you’ll remember these times we shared. And trust me, the bad memories — they’ll fade and all you’ll be left with are the amazing moments we had here at ASF. Together. Goodbyes? They’re just another way of saying: I’ll remember.

Mai-Lee Picard, an Honor Society member who will be attending Cornell University, was the 2012 salutatorian, speaking at the Senior Awards Ceremony. The moving speech that she delivered to her fellow seniors appears here, slightly edited for space.

Good Decisions ASF’s Class of 2012 valedictorian was María Andrea Arroyo Ornelas, an Honor Society member and Old Timer who will be attending the University of Pennsylvania. Here is her inspiring speech:

G

ood morning parents, teachers, administrators and most of all... seniors! First, I would like to take a moment to thank you all for being here and to congratulate the Class of 2012. It’s been four long years of late nights finishing math assignments, early mornings studying for history exams and stressful brunches scrambling to print out English essays. Yet here we are, on the verge of graduating. So, how did we go from being nervous freshmen at our first comida to confident seniors about to begin college? Well…we made decisions. And decisions accumulate. The series of choices we made these past four years have paved the way to our current success. Sure, some of us chose to skip Derecho once or twice (sorry, Prof!), or maybe watch an episode of “The Office” instead of studying the properties of protons. But there were many more instances when we chose to finish a project, rewrite an essay and study extra hard for a test. Our graduating is the culmination of this string of decisions. Seniors, it’s real. We’re graduating! On one hand, today is an absolutely joyous occasion, filled with dancing, screaming, throwing out binders and burning essays. From experience, I suggest you do so carefully. On the other hand, many of us do tear up when we realize that we are leaving ASF, that we are leaving 15 years of our lives behind us. Endings inevitably entail nostalgia.

However, endings are also the points at which we get to stop and think. We get to ask ourselves: Where did I succeed? Where did I fail? And, most important, where do I take it from here? I am thrilled to say that today we find ourselves exactly at one of these crossroads. We can look back at each of the past 15 years and decide how to live our lives from here. Graduation is the perfect moment to begin a new string of decisions and write a new story. One that represents not only who we are today, but also who we want to become tomorrow. I, for instance, joined the debate team only at the end of high school, yet I found it to be life changing. I love researching, analyzing and (as I’m certain many of you will find greatly surprising) what I most enjoyed was arguing. Debate will certainly continue to be a part of my life. Many of you had similar experiences with the Drama Club, Student Council or the football team. And I encourage you to reflect on, cultivate and incorporate these passions into your life going forward. On the other hand, as much as I enjoyed IB history and truly love Mr. Rees, I will never read a single sentence on World War I again. The great thing about graduating is that I don’t have to. That’s what’s so amazing about this new stage of our lives — we get to take what we enjoyed most at ASF, leave behind what we didn’t enjoy as much and start writing the story we want our lives to be. 26

Today, we get to choose what to make of ourselves. Because we not only get to decide what classes to take and what clubs to join, we also get to decide how much we laugh, how we treat others and (for those of us leaving Mexico and venturing into the world of doing our own laundry) we also get to choose whether we are the type of person who is willing to reuse socks or even underwear. Class of 2012, we are in control of who we become — today more than ever. So let’s take advantage of this clean slate and be who we want to be. The coolest thing about this is that we can start with really simple choices. Just for today, let’s decide to give an honest compliment to someone you are not friends with. Just for today, let’s read a chapter of a book rather than watch TV. Just for today, let’s laugh more than we did yesterday. Our decisions accumulate. When we decide to do these things today, they will become who we are tomorrow. I am speaking to a group of incredibly joyful and greatly privileged individuals. Remember that happiness is not defined by what we have, but rather by how we choose to use what we were given. Today, we are being given an opportunity. We are being given a fresh start. Let’s start accumulating good decisions and write ourselves a great story. Thank you. And congratulations, Class of 2012! 27


They Made it All Possible

c amp u s c u rr e n t s

Ringing in the New

The American School Foundation, A.C. extends special thanks to the following institutions and individuals: DONORS Cornerstone Gift: Mary Street Jenkins Foundation Leadership Gifts: Bernardo Riojas, Grupo Mar-Tuny/Antonio A. Guerra Autrey & Fernanda Guerra, Héctor Sulaiman

ASF’s Wellness Center received a rousing welcome at a fun-filled opening celebration.

EVENT SPONSORS Thank you to: ADCO, ADTec, Banorte, Bertha Abizaid (’89), Braulio and Mariana Arsuaga, Chubb Group, Citemex, Green Cover, Grupo Presidente, LJV Sport, Pepsico, Volaris

EVENT ORGANIZING COMMITTEE Board Chairs: Frances Huttanus, Joan Liechty de Olvera Event Chairs: Erika Hojel, Gina Hojel de Aiza (’89)
 Committee members:

 ASF Parent Association/Lillián Toro, Lola José Phillips (’82), Mariana de Haro, Marissa Russell (’92), Valentina Ortiz Monasterio Ladè Majic, the Ambassadors’ ball-handling whiz and comedienne par excellence, poses with three younger fans, who were an important part of the afternoon’s activities.

T

by renowned Mexican architect José Moyao, it is a key component of an ongoing capital improvement program at ASF that also includes the recently completed Upper School renovation and the construction phase of the Ángeles Espinosa Fine Arts Center. All three constructions meet Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) standards, making them green buildings. Those who attended the event got a close-up look at the size of the indoor sports area — big enough to stage a well-attended basketball game on a standard court, as well as to be divided in two for simultaneous classes, practices or games for all indoor court sports. But the center is much more than a gym. It also has a fitness area, offices for the Athletics and Extended Learning division and rooms for health classes, other instruction and meetings. Though the facility is now in use, the May event was not an official inauguration, but rather a celebration of the first stage of construction, which was the main building stage. Still to come are permanent retractable bleachers, a sound and acoustics system, new fitness equipment, storage areas and a green roof that will include tennis courts, as well as other amenities. Fundraising is underway for these projects. The principal beneficiaries of the new Jenkins Foundation Wellness Center are, of course, ASF students, present and future. But it will also enhance ASF’s longstanding commitment to community service projects. Some potential examples are the Community Enrichment Academies, which offer continuing education to teachers in the Mexican educational system and Gamma, which brings neighborhood children to campus for art, science, English and other classes. “The Wellness Center will also serve the Bondojito extended community through educational programs promoting health, wellness and the arts,” said Mr. Jenkins, referring to the neighborhood around the school. “I strongly believe this marvelous new space will enable us to contribute by helping and teaching others in society.”

he first event in ASF’s brand new Jenkins Foundation Wellness Center was a joyful celebration of the facility itself. On May 12, a Saturday, some 2,000 ASF community members and friends of all ages packed the Wellness Center’s spacious indoor sports area for an inspiring and entertaining afternoon that brought to life everything the new building stands for — athletic and academic opportunity, community involvement, international cooperation, family activity and great spaces for great minds. And it all took place in an upbeat atmosphere of music, cheering and raucous fun. “The new gymnasium was crowded with students, parents, grandparents and friends teeming with excitement,” said ASF Executive Director Paul Williams. “I’m glad to see this new space rapidly come to life.” The featured event was an exhibition basketball game between the Harlem Ambassadors and the ASF Bears Select Team, made up of school coaches, teachers, administrators and parents. The Ambassadors, a professional U.S. basketball show team featuring former college and pro players, brought with them dazzling hoops skills, comic flair and a mission that emphasizes racial harmony and a drug-free positive lifestyle. The game, best described as a highly entertaining mismatch, was not the only highlight of the day. Many of the attendees spent time at the Family Fun Day on the adjacent Middle School Field, which featured food stands, craft booths, games, face painting and lots of room to run around. Before the center’s doors opened, hundreds gathered outside for a ribbon-cutting ceremony featuring U.S. Ambassador to Mexico Earl Anthony Wayne and Guillermo Jenkins Anstead, president of the Mary Street Jenkins Foundation, whose cornerstone gift made the facility possible. Among the speakers were ASF Board of Trustees Chair Rosa Marentes de Pisinger (’87) and Mr. Williams. For all the dignitaries, school supporters and skilled athletes on the scene, the true star of the day was the Wellness Center itself. Designed 28

Ribbon-cutting honors went to (left to right) ASF Executive Director Paul Williams, Roberto Jenkins, Guillermo Jenkins Anstead, Sofía Jenkins (seated), Mariel Jenkins and U.S. Ambassador to Mexico Earl Anthony Wayne.

Before the start of the game, the Mexican and U.S. flags were both honored, and both national anthems sung.

Robert Wilson, ASF’s head of Athletics and Extended Learning, lauded the new Wellness Center as providing “not only superior quality facilities, but enough space for the planned programs in Extended Learning, Athletics and community service projects.” He is shown here at the celebration with (left to right) Gina Hojel (’89), Cindy Tanaka (’91) Dafne Ordóñez, Joan Liechty, María José Marín, Michele Beltran, Lola José (’82), Erika Hojel and Frances Huttanus.

The Bears Boosters set up one of dozens of booths at the Family Fun Day event that coincided with the activities inside the Wellness Center.

29


They Made it All Possible

c amp u s c u rr e n t s

Ringing in the New

The American School Foundation, A.C. extends special thanks to the following institutions and individuals: DONORS Cornerstone Gift: Mary Street Jenkins Foundation Leadership Gifts: Bernardo Riojas, Grupo Mar-Tuny/Antonio A. Guerra Autrey & Fernanda Guerra, Héctor Sulaiman

ASF’s Wellness Center received a rousing welcome at a fun-filled opening celebration.

EVENT SPONSORS Thank you to: ADCO, ADTec, Banorte, Bertha Abizaid (’89), Braulio and Mariana Arsuaga, Chubb Group, Citemex, Green Cover, Grupo Presidente, LJV Sport, Pepsico, Volaris

EVENT ORGANIZING COMMITTEE Board Chairs: Frances Huttanus, Joan Liechty de Olvera Event Chairs: Erika Hojel, Gina Hojel de Aiza (’89)
 Committee members:

 ASF Parent Association/Lillián Toro, Lola José Phillips (’82), Mariana de Haro, Marissa Russell (’92), Valentina Ortiz Monasterio Ladè Majic, the Ambassadors’ ball-handling whiz and comedienne par excellence, poses with three younger fans, who were an important part of the afternoon’s activities.

T

by renowned Mexican architect José Moyao, it is a key component of an ongoing capital improvement program at ASF that also includes the recently completed Upper School renovation and the construction phase of the Ángeles Espinosa Fine Arts Center. All three constructions meet Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) standards, making them green buildings. Those who attended the event got a close-up look at the size of the indoor sports area — big enough to stage a well-attended basketball game on a standard court, as well as to be divided in two for simultaneous classes, practices or games for all indoor court sports. But the center is much more than a gym. It also has a fitness area, offices for the Athletics and Extended Learning division and rooms for health classes, other instruction and meetings. Though the facility is now in use, the May event was not an official inauguration, but rather a celebration of the first stage of construction, which was the main building stage. Still to come are permanent retractable bleachers, a sound and acoustics system, new fitness equipment, storage areas and a green roof that will include tennis courts, as well as other amenities. Fundraising is underway for these projects. The principal beneficiaries of the new Jenkins Foundation Wellness Center are, of course, ASF students, present and future. But it will also enhance ASF’s longstanding commitment to community service projects. Some potential examples are the Community Enrichment Academies, which offer continuing education to teachers in the Mexican educational system and Gamma, which brings neighborhood children to campus for art, science, English and other classes. “The Wellness Center will also serve the Bondojito extended community through educational programs promoting health, wellness and the arts,” said Mr. Jenkins, referring to the neighborhood around the school. “I strongly believe this marvelous new space will enable us to contribute by helping and teaching others in society.”

he first event in ASF’s brand new Jenkins Foundation Wellness Center was a joyful celebration of the facility itself. On May 12, a Saturday, some 2,000 ASF community members and friends of all ages packed the Wellness Center’s spacious indoor sports area for an inspiring and entertaining afternoon that brought to life everything the new building stands for — athletic and academic opportunity, community involvement, international cooperation, family activity and great spaces for great minds. And it all took place in an upbeat atmosphere of music, cheering and raucous fun. “The new gymnasium was crowded with students, parents, grandparents and friends teeming with excitement,” said ASF Executive Director Paul Williams. “I’m glad to see this new space rapidly come to life.” The featured event was an exhibition basketball game between the Harlem Ambassadors and the ASF Bears Select Team, made up of school coaches, teachers, administrators and parents. The Ambassadors, a professional U.S. basketball show team featuring former college and pro players, brought with them dazzling hoops skills, comic flair and a mission that emphasizes racial harmony and a drug-free positive lifestyle. The game, best described as a highly entertaining mismatch, was not the only highlight of the day. Many of the attendees spent time at the Family Fun Day on the adjacent Middle School Field, which featured food stands, craft booths, games, face painting and lots of room to run around. Before the center’s doors opened, hundreds gathered outside for a ribbon-cutting ceremony featuring U.S. Ambassador to Mexico Earl Anthony Wayne and Guillermo Jenkins Anstead, president of the Mary Street Jenkins Foundation, whose cornerstone gift made the facility possible. Among the speakers were ASF Board of Trustees Chair Rosa Marentes de Pisinger (’87) and Mr. Williams. For all the dignitaries, school supporters and skilled athletes on the scene, the true star of the day was the Wellness Center itself. Designed 28

Ribbon-cutting honors went to (left to right) ASF Executive Director Paul Williams, Roberto Jenkins, Guillermo Jenkins Anstead, Sofía Jenkins (seated), Mariel Jenkins and U.S. Ambassador to Mexico Earl Anthony Wayne.

Before the start of the game, the Mexican and U.S. flags were both honored, and both national anthems sung.

Robert Wilson, ASF’s head of Athletics and Extended Learning, lauded the new Wellness Center as providing “not only superior quality facilities, but enough space for the planned programs in Extended Learning, Athletics and community service projects.” He is shown here at the celebration with (left to right) Gina Hojel (’89), Cindy Tanaka (’91) Dafne Ordóñez, Joan Liechty, María José Marín, Michele Beltran, Lola José (’82), Erika Hojel and Frances Huttanus.

The Bears Boosters set up one of dozens of booths at the Family Fun Day event that coincided with the activities inside the Wellness Center.

29


c amp u s c u rr e n t s

Bears Abroad

What a Game!

As part of the May 12 celebration, the Harlem Ambassadors took on the ASF Bears Select Team at the Jenkins Foundation Wellness Center. The pictures tell the story.

From New York to Las Vegas, three separate groups of ASF students took their academic efforts abroad for some unforgettable experiences.

2 4

From left to right: Literary magazine staffers in Manhattan with 911 Memorial designer Michael Arad, members of the ASF Robotics Club with their Rookie Inspiration Award trophies in Las Vegas and the Middle School MUN class, which won the Secretary General Award at the recent MUN in New York City.

I

t’s well known in education circles that a significant percentage of learning takes place outside the classroom. It can also take place outside the entire country, should the opportunity arise. That was certainly the case last spring for three groups of ASF students who traveled to the United States to gain the kind of insight and perspective about their academic interests that they never would have found on campus.

1

Live from New York

3 1. The Harlem Ambassadors, clearly nervous to face the superior ASF Bears Select Team, pose with Head of Athletics and Extended Learning Robert Wilson and Executive Director Paul Williams. 2. The feared ASF Bears Select Team had the advantage over the Ambassadors in all aspects of the game (except perhaps for speed, quickness, height, experience, ball-handling, leaping ability, shooting, defense, rebounding and court sense). 3. Bear standout Jonathan Chenier, at the time the Middle School’s student activities specialist, uses his trademark Funky Freebird defensive move to stop his opponent dead in his tracks with laughter.

4. In a brilliant energy-saving defensive strategy, the Bears watch in awe as the Ambassadors’ Alexander Wright takes off for one of his many flying slam-dunks. 5. Showing the kind of creativity on defense that he’s known for, Head of Lower School Evan Hunt tries to talk Wright out of making another basket.

5

6. It was a tight game that could have gone either way, but when the final buzzer sounded, the scoreboard showed that the visiting Ambassadors had eked out a razor-thin upset victory. 30

6

Talk about first-hand experience! Nineteen ASF Middle Schoolers traveled to the very seat of the United Nations in New York last March to join some 1,500 other participants from 10 countries at a three-day Model United Nations Conference sponsored by the United Nations Association of the United States of America’s Global Classrooms program. This was the first time that ASF has participated at the Middle School level at such an event, which provides, in the organization’s words, “an authentic simulation of the UN in a highly professional setting” and the chance for delegates to debate such pressing global issues as infectious diseases, maternal health and the rights of refugees. The ASF participants acquitted themselves beyond all expectations, placing in seven of nine committees, garnering two honorable mentions and two “best delegate” honors, as well as taking home the prestigious Secretary General’s Award. “We initially intended to go just for the experience, but through weeks of difficult preparation this group grew in self-esteem and mutual

respect,” said Laura Salazar, the ASF teacher who guided the students. “I was delighted to see the results from this deserving group.” Renata Brockmann, Alexis Epelstein, Paloma Mendoza and Javier Beltranena won “Best Delegate.” Honorable mentions went to Camila Migoya,Paulina Guerra, Ricardo Mateos, Alex Antillón, Alina Chávez, Jesús Silva, Mauricio Karam, José Guillermo Gutiérrez, Ximena Villalobos and Xu Zhongyi. Eva Salazar, Andrés Guarneros, Max Werner, Sofía Barbosa and María Pérez also participated.

Machine Dreams Robotics Club members Rafael Zardain, Miqueas Kim and Francisco Manuel Barros took their computer, electronics and mechanical engineering skills to Las Vegas last April where they represented ASF in a regional competition organized by FIRST, or “For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology.” The event, dubbed the Rebound Rumble, consisted of having the participating schools construct on campus a robot with basketball skills. The resulting mechanical hoopsters were then brought to Las Vegas to engage in activities that combine competition with cooperation. ASF, competing for the first time and the only non-U.S. school represented, was honored with the Rookie Inspiration Award. “Organizing, uniting and working as a team through the ups and downs was the most important part of this project,” said teacher Dean Goldsworthy, an advisor to the ASF Robotics Club. 31

Literary Quest It’s hard to think of a more fruitful trip for budding young creative writers than the one that members of the staff of the new ASF literary magazine Repentino took to New York last March to attend the Scholastic Press Association Conference at Columbia University. The conference itself was a rich learning experience, and the Upper School students used what they learned to finalize the first issue of Repentino when they returned. But there was more. Under the guidance of Harry Brake, a member of the ASF Upper School Library staff who oversees Repentino and accompanied them on the trip, the students (Camila de la Parra, Ji Moon, Sophia Israel, Ana McCausland, and Melesio Hernandez) were able to form working relationships with other such publications, including Daedalus magazine in Connecticut and Aerie magazine in Montana. They were also able to meet and interview Michael Arad, the designer of the 911 Memorial (and a former student in Mexico of ASF Upper School counselor Christine Hill) and Clarissa Wallace, Group Visits Associate at the Tribute World Trade Center Visitor Center. For more on information about Repentino, including about becoming a contributor or obtaining a copy, contact asflitmag@gmail. com.


c amp u s c u rr e n t s

Bears Abroad

What a Game!

As part of the May 12 celebration, the Harlem Ambassadors took on the ASF Bears Select Team at the Jenkins Foundation Wellness Center. The pictures tell the story.

From New York to Las Vegas, three separate groups of ASF students took their academic efforts abroad for some unforgettable experiences.

2 4

From left to right: Literary magazine staffers in Manhattan with 911 Memorial designer Michael Arad, members of the ASF Robotics Club with their Rookie Inspiration Award trophies in Las Vegas and the Middle School MUN class, which won the Secretary General Award at the recent MUN in New York City.

I

t’s well known in education circles that a significant percentage of learning takes place outside the classroom. It can also take place outside the entire country, should the opportunity arise. That was certainly the case last spring for three groups of ASF students who traveled to the United States to gain the kind of insight and perspective about their academic interests that they never would have found on campus.

1

Live from New York

3 1. The Harlem Ambassadors, clearly nervous to face the superior ASF Bears Select Team, pose with Head of Athletics and Extended Learning Robert Wilson and Executive Director Paul Williams. 2. The feared ASF Bears Select Team had the advantage over the Ambassadors in all aspects of the game (except perhaps for speed, quickness, height, experience, ball-handling, leaping ability, shooting, defense, rebounding and court sense). 3. Bear standout Jonathan Chenier, at the time the Middle School’s student activities specialist, uses his trademark Funky Freebird defensive move to stop his opponent dead in his tracks with laughter.

4. In a brilliant energy-saving defensive strategy, the Bears watch in awe as the Ambassadors’ Alexander Wright takes off for one of his many flying slam-dunks. 5. Showing the kind of creativity on defense that he’s known for, Head of Lower School Evan Hunt tries to talk Wright out of making another basket.

5

6. It was a tight game that could have gone either way, but when the final buzzer sounded, the scoreboard showed that the visiting Ambassadors had eked out a razor-thin upset victory. 30

6

Talk about first-hand experience! Nineteen ASF Middle Schoolers traveled to the very seat of the United Nations in New York last March to join some 1,500 other participants from 10 countries at a three-day Model United Nations Conference sponsored by the United Nations Association of the United States of America’s Global Classrooms program. This was the first time that ASF has participated at the Middle School level at such an event, which provides, in the organization’s words, “an authentic simulation of the UN in a highly professional setting” and the chance for delegates to debate such pressing global issues as infectious diseases, maternal health and the rights of refugees. The ASF participants acquitted themselves beyond all expectations, placing in seven of nine committees, garnering two honorable mentions and two “best delegate” honors, as well as taking home the prestigious Secretary General’s Award. “We initially intended to go just for the experience, but through weeks of difficult preparation this group grew in self-esteem and mutual

respect,” said Laura Salazar, the ASF teacher who guided the students. “I was delighted to see the results from this deserving group.” Renata Brockmann, Alexis Epelstein, Paloma Mendoza and Javier Beltranena won “Best Delegate.” Honorable mentions went to Camila Migoya,Paulina Guerra, Ricardo Mateos, Alex Antillón, Alina Chávez, Jesús Silva, Mauricio Karam, José Guillermo Gutiérrez, Ximena Villalobos and Xu Zhongyi. Eva Salazar, Andrés Guarneros, Max Werner, Sofía Barbosa and María Pérez also participated.

Machine Dreams Robotics Club members Rafael Zardain, Miqueas Kim and Francisco Manuel Barros took their computer, electronics and mechanical engineering skills to Las Vegas last April where they represented ASF in a regional competition organized by FIRST, or “For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology.” The event, dubbed the Rebound Rumble, consisted of having the participating schools construct on campus a robot with basketball skills. The resulting mechanical hoopsters were then brought to Las Vegas to engage in activities that combine competition with cooperation. ASF, competing for the first time and the only non-U.S. school represented, was honored with the Rookie Inspiration Award. “Organizing, uniting and working as a team through the ups and downs was the most important part of this project,” said teacher Dean Goldsworthy, an advisor to the ASF Robotics Club. 31

Literary Quest It’s hard to think of a more fruitful trip for budding young creative writers than the one that members of the staff of the new ASF literary magazine Repentino took to New York last March to attend the Scholastic Press Association Conference at Columbia University. The conference itself was a rich learning experience, and the Upper School students used what they learned to finalize the first issue of Repentino when they returned. But there was more. Under the guidance of Harry Brake, a member of the ASF Upper School Library staff who oversees Repentino and accompanied them on the trip, the students (Camila de la Parra, Ji Moon, Sophia Israel, Ana McCausland, and Melesio Hernandez) were able to form working relationships with other such publications, including Daedalus magazine in Connecticut and Aerie magazine in Montana. They were also able to meet and interview Michael Arad, the designer of the 911 Memorial (and a former student in Mexico of ASF Upper School counselor Christine Hill) and Clarissa Wallace, Group Visits Associate at the Tribute World Trade Center Visitor Center. For more on information about Repentino, including about becoming a contributor or obtaining a copy, contact asflitmag@gmail. com.


f o c u s o n e d u c at i o n

“Apply to two safety, three target and two reach universities”

“Pick your options based on the course of study you want, not necessarily on the university’s standing” —Samantha Rogers (’07)

—Andrei Kleinschmidt (’08)

“It’s not the school you’re in, it’s what you make of it” —Giancarlo Besa (’11)

“Explore your options before you choose a major” —Paula García (’07)

“In England, you’re expected to do lots of independent study” —Miguel Migueltorena (’09)

Voices of Experience

Recent ASF grads look back at their college application process, and talk about how everything worked out. Current seniors, take note. By Isabel Oliveres (’10)

SAT. ACT. Common App. UCAS. TOEFL. Official transcripts. Entrance exams. Conditional acceptances.

Applying to college may seem like a dizzying whirlwind of indecipherable buzzwords, overwhelming choices and harsh deadlines. It’s a grueling process that you have to find time for even as you’re dealing with homework, exams, extracurricular activities and preparing to say goodbye to friends. It’s comforting to know, then, that thousands of ASF graduates have met this particular challenge over the decades, many of them quite recently under conditions similar to what the Class of 2013 is facing. Some were willing to share their experience with Focus and offer advice to current seniors about deciding where to continue their education, and then making it happen. These recent grads aren’t qualified college counselors, of course. But if you’re an ASF senior or the parent of one, they do offer something most professionals cannot: They know what you’re going through, because they just went through it themselves. So from Liverpool to Austin to right here in Mexico City, let’s listen to what these sympathetic souls have to say.

Staying in Mexico? Many may be under the impression that because they attended an American school, most ASF graduates go to college in the United States. That’s not the case. A large part of each graduating class stays in Mexico for their university education. For Paula García (’07), who is finishing up her bachelor’s degree in chemistry at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), the decision to stay in Mexico City was a simple one. “I chose to study in Mexico because I could continue being close to my family and still get an education at the best university in Latin America,” she says. Paula says the most difficult part of attending college in Mexico is having to declare your major before you even graduate from high school. “I changed my major once and most of my classmates did the same,” she says. “I would definitely suggest exploring your options before you choose a major,” Paula says. Her best advice for future university students? Find motivation. “You can have either the best education or a mediocre one,” Paula says. “It depends on the effort you’re willing to put into it.” Renato Carregha (’10), who has completed two years at the Instituto Tecnológico 32

Autónomo de México (ITAM), found the road to studying in Mexico a bit bumpier than Paula’s. “To be perfectly honest,” he says, “after being rejected by most of the colleges I applied to [in the United States] — although I was accepted into my safety school — I weighed my options and in the end decided it would be better to study at ITAM.” So Renato’s original collegiate plans changed drastically, but so did his opinion of higher education in Mexico. “When I started my college application process I considered Mexican universities as having a lower quality than their American counterparts,” he says. “When I started attending ITAM I realized I was completely wrong.”

Studying in the United States? The United States is by far the country where the majority of ASF students who decide to attend college outside of Mexico flock. With choices ranging from tiny liberal arts colleges to colossal state universities, the process of selecting which schools to apply to can seem overwhelming. Yayoi Teramoto (’10), a rising junior at Princeton University, Giancarlo Besa (’11), who recently finished his first year at the University of Texas at Austin, and Andrei Kleinschmidt (’08), who just graduated

from Babson University, are three ASF grads who chose to study in the United States. All three agree that the most important strategy is to apply to a broad range of schools. “I would recommend that students do what I did, which was apply to two safety, three target and two reach universities,” says Andrei. But don’t be afraid to take chances, Giancarlo urges. “Don’t listen to people who say that schools are too high-reach for you,” he says. “You need to take every shot you can, because you really do have a chance. Just don’t make the mistake of applying only to high reach institutions.” Yayoi’s insight is of a different kind. She stresses the importance of looking for colleges that are the best fit for your interests. “If you have a specific interest … look for schools that specialize in that area,” she says. “They might not have the Ivy League name, but sometimes they have more dedicated professors or a better department in general.” One of the appealing characteristics of many colleges in the United States is that students can enter with an undeclared major, and are usually given two years to explore their academic options before deciding on a particular area of study. “I chose Princeton because it seemed like the place to explore the world of academia and research,” says Yayoi, who ended up creating her own major in quantitative neuroscience. “Plus they have a lot of ice cream, free food, awesome people and cool professors.” For Giancarlo, the experience has been

fruitful and eye opening. “A good friend of mine told me that college is where you figure things out,” he says. “She was spot on the truth.” Like Paula, Giancarlo stresses the importance of taking advantage of the opportunities you are given: “I didn’t get into my dream school, but I got into a school that has become a second home. An important thing to realize is that it’s not the school or major you’re in, it’s what you make of it.”

How About the United Kingdom? Every year, some brave ASF graduates venture their way across the Atlantic to study in the United Kingdom. For example, Samantha Rogers (’07) studied journalism at John Moores University in Liverpool, Miguel Migueltorena (’09) just graduated from Nottingham Trent University and Giuliana Tenerelli (’10) is getting her degree in management studies from the University of Nottingham. All three agree that applying to college in the UK is more complicated than applying to a U.S. school. For one thing, the process is more restrictive, and even college counselors know less about it. Miguel admits that applying to university was “a nightmare,” since any mistake on the UCAS application could put his future in jeopardy. (UCAS is a centralized organization which processes applications to British universities.) Sam also points out that top tier UK schools are usually very classics-studies oriented. “So certain courses you might be interested in won’t be catered to,” she says. “You 33

should pick your university options based on the course [of study] you want, not necessarily on the university’s standing.” Miguel’s choice resulted in a good experience. “The program that my university offered for my specific major was great,” he says. Also, as a Spanish citizen, he could work in England while he studied. Both factors were persuasive in his choice. The experience attending university in the UK is very different from that in Mexico or the U.S., which is definitely appealing for some students. “Here in England you do not study as much [in the classroom] as in the U.S. or in Mexico,” says Miguel. Instead, you are expected “to do a lot of hours outside uni, [and pursue] independent study.” This focus on independent study was one of the reasons Sam chose to study in the UK; she found it “more challenging.” Giuliana, too, is happy with her decision to study in Nottingham. “There are so many international students that come to the UK that it is easy to meet people,” she says. “Traveling around Europe and meeting so many different people has been an amazing experience.” Finally, with so much to think about, what’s the single most important piece of advice? “Be honest,” says Rachel Dillon, ASF’s college counselor. “Be honest with yourself regarding who you are, with your parents as to what you want for your future, with me when telling me how I can best support you. And be honest on your application because truth will come through anyway.”


f o c u s o n e d u c at i o n

“Apply to two safety, three target and two reach universities”

“Pick your options based on the course of study you want, not necessarily on the university’s standing” —Samantha Rogers (’07)

—Andrei Kleinschmidt (’08)

“It’s not the school you’re in, it’s what you make of it” —Giancarlo Besa (’11)

“Explore your options before you choose a major” —Paula García (’07)

“In England, you’re expected to do lots of independent study” —Miguel Migueltorena (’09)

Voices of Experience

Recent ASF grads look back at their college application process, and talk about how everything worked out. Current seniors, take note. By Isabel Oliveres (’10)

SAT. ACT. Common App. UCAS. TOEFL. Official transcripts. Entrance exams. Conditional acceptances.

Applying to college may seem like a dizzying whirlwind of indecipherable buzzwords, overwhelming choices and harsh deadlines. It’s a grueling process that you have to find time for even as you’re dealing with homework, exams, extracurricular activities and preparing to say goodbye to friends. It’s comforting to know, then, that thousands of ASF graduates have met this particular challenge over the decades, many of them quite recently under conditions similar to what the Class of 2013 is facing. Some were willing to share their experience with Focus and offer advice to current seniors about deciding where to continue their education, and then making it happen. These recent grads aren’t qualified college counselors, of course. But if you’re an ASF senior or the parent of one, they do offer something most professionals cannot: They know what you’re going through, because they just went through it themselves. So from Liverpool to Austin to right here in Mexico City, let’s listen to what these sympathetic souls have to say.

Staying in Mexico? Many may be under the impression that because they attended an American school, most ASF graduates go to college in the United States. That’s not the case. A large part of each graduating class stays in Mexico for their university education. For Paula García (’07), who is finishing up her bachelor’s degree in chemistry at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), the decision to stay in Mexico City was a simple one. “I chose to study in Mexico because I could continue being close to my family and still get an education at the best university in Latin America,” she says. Paula says the most difficult part of attending college in Mexico is having to declare your major before you even graduate from high school. “I changed my major once and most of my classmates did the same,” she says. “I would definitely suggest exploring your options before you choose a major,” Paula says. Her best advice for future university students? Find motivation. “You can have either the best education or a mediocre one,” Paula says. “It depends on the effort you’re willing to put into it.” Renato Carregha (’10), who has completed two years at the Instituto Tecnológico 32

Autónomo de México (ITAM), found the road to studying in Mexico a bit bumpier than Paula’s. “To be perfectly honest,” he says, “after being rejected by most of the colleges I applied to [in the United States] — although I was accepted into my safety school — I weighed my options and in the end decided it would be better to study at ITAM.” So Renato’s original collegiate plans changed drastically, but so did his opinion of higher education in Mexico. “When I started my college application process I considered Mexican universities as having a lower quality than their American counterparts,” he says. “When I started attending ITAM I realized I was completely wrong.”

Studying in the United States? The United States is by far the country where the majority of ASF students who decide to attend college outside of Mexico flock. With choices ranging from tiny liberal arts colleges to colossal state universities, the process of selecting which schools to apply to can seem overwhelming. Yayoi Teramoto (’10), a rising junior at Princeton University, Giancarlo Besa (’11), who recently finished his first year at the University of Texas at Austin, and Andrei Kleinschmidt (’08), who just graduated

from Babson University, are three ASF grads who chose to study in the United States. All three agree that the most important strategy is to apply to a broad range of schools. “I would recommend that students do what I did, which was apply to two safety, three target and two reach universities,” says Andrei. But don’t be afraid to take chances, Giancarlo urges. “Don’t listen to people who say that schools are too high-reach for you,” he says. “You need to take every shot you can, because you really do have a chance. Just don’t make the mistake of applying only to high reach institutions.” Yayoi’s insight is of a different kind. She stresses the importance of looking for colleges that are the best fit for your interests. “If you have a specific interest … look for schools that specialize in that area,” she says. “They might not have the Ivy League name, but sometimes they have more dedicated professors or a better department in general.” One of the appealing characteristics of many colleges in the United States is that students can enter with an undeclared major, and are usually given two years to explore their academic options before deciding on a particular area of study. “I chose Princeton because it seemed like the place to explore the world of academia and research,” says Yayoi, who ended up creating her own major in quantitative neuroscience. “Plus they have a lot of ice cream, free food, awesome people and cool professors.” For Giancarlo, the experience has been

fruitful and eye opening. “A good friend of mine told me that college is where you figure things out,” he says. “She was spot on the truth.” Like Paula, Giancarlo stresses the importance of taking advantage of the opportunities you are given: “I didn’t get into my dream school, but I got into a school that has become a second home. An important thing to realize is that it’s not the school or major you’re in, it’s what you make of it.”

How About the United Kingdom? Every year, some brave ASF graduates venture their way across the Atlantic to study in the United Kingdom. For example, Samantha Rogers (’07) studied journalism at John Moores University in Liverpool, Miguel Migueltorena (’09) just graduated from Nottingham Trent University and Giuliana Tenerelli (’10) is getting her degree in management studies from the University of Nottingham. All three agree that applying to college in the UK is more complicated than applying to a U.S. school. For one thing, the process is more restrictive, and even college counselors know less about it. Miguel admits that applying to university was “a nightmare,” since any mistake on the UCAS application could put his future in jeopardy. (UCAS is a centralized organization which processes applications to British universities.) Sam also points out that top tier UK schools are usually very classics-studies oriented. “So certain courses you might be interested in won’t be catered to,” she says. “You 33

should pick your university options based on the course [of study] you want, not necessarily on the university’s standing.” Miguel’s choice resulted in a good experience. “The program that my university offered for my specific major was great,” he says. Also, as a Spanish citizen, he could work in England while he studied. Both factors were persuasive in his choice. The experience attending university in the UK is very different from that in Mexico or the U.S., which is definitely appealing for some students. “Here in England you do not study as much [in the classroom] as in the U.S. or in Mexico,” says Miguel. Instead, you are expected “to do a lot of hours outside uni, [and pursue] independent study.” This focus on independent study was one of the reasons Sam chose to study in the UK; she found it “more challenging.” Giuliana, too, is happy with her decision to study in Nottingham. “There are so many international students that come to the UK that it is easy to meet people,” she says. “Traveling around Europe and meeting so many different people has been an amazing experience.” Finally, with so much to think about, what’s the single most important piece of advice? “Be honest,” says Rachel Dillon, ASF’s college counselor. “Be honest with yourself regarding who you are, with your parents as to what you want for your future, with me when telling me how I can best support you. And be honest on your application because truth will come through anyway.”


f o c u s o n e d u c at i o n Q & A

r a o h b Law e D rence

Focus: Why the performing arts? Deborah Lawrence: Because there is no job in the world where you don’t have to express yourself publicly at some point. And there’s tons of research out there showing that being involved in the arts helps kids with their other endeavors, like math or science classes. And for their own sake, the performing arts provide an outlet and a path to a certain kind of thinking person. Musical intelligence, after all, is one of the categories in Howard Gardner’s influential “Multiple Intelligences” theory of learning.

Focus: Your purview being K-12, you have more than just one division to think about as you design the curriculum. DL: We’re having a lot of discussions about scope and sequence. After a student starts, say, music class in the second grade, the same concepts need to be used through all the grades, so when he or she rolls over from fifth grade to Middle School, there’s continuity and the student’s not wondering what’s going on. It makes sense to me that all the schools are on the same page.

Focus: Tell us your thoughts about the new Fine Arts Center. DL: From the very beginning my focus has been that we all have to be on the same page as far as what this facility is going to be for. I’m coming from the perspective that it’s for the students. That means the kids always have first priority. If it’s going to be booked out for community use, that’s great, but not when there’s a student performance going on. It’s just an empty shell if the kids aren’t using it.

Focus: What do you think it will take to get more students involved in the performing arts? DL: We have the talent, and we have the interest. But as for getting more kids signed up with the program and excited about being in choir or band or drama, we’re not there yet. What we’ve been advocating for is choice. Right now the kids are mostly drafted into performing arts classes. In Middle School, for example, there have been no performing arts electives. It’s all been what we call “exploratory” classes. But I think by sixth grade students know if they like art or music or drama, and what performing arts classes they would like or not. So we think choice is very important for increasing involvement.

Focus: How do they feel about the new theater? DL: The kids are very excited. They’ve never had this kind of experience. We would talk about it before it was finished, and they thought, sure, it would be kind of cool. But then when I gave them a tour their eyes were popping out. Just amazing.

ASF’s performing arts coordinator sees a world of opportunity ahead. Dr. Deborah Lawrence has been the performing arts coordinator at ASF since 2010. That means, among other things, that she is the point person for all activities, both curricular and extracurricular, that have to do with music, drama and dance for all school levels, from ECC to Upper School seniors. Since her tenure corresponds with the advent of the Ángeles Espinosa Yglesias Fine Arts Center on campus, she has of course been hard at work on moving the school’s performing arts curriculum forward to take full advantage of the new facility. Focus recently chatted with Dr. Lawrence about that effort, and about the activity that she says means the most to her — teaching young people and enriching their lives through the performing arts.

34

Focus: It seems like students in the arts — performing or visual — feel a special connection to their teachers and vice versa. DL: It’s not like math, where you have a class one semester and then a different class the next semester with another teacher. I teach grades six through twelve, so theoretically if students start out in band in the sixth grade and they stay on, I would have them over six years, and very important years for their development.

Focus: The next building phases will fully outfit the facility and integrate it with remodeled classrooms. That sounds like quite a boon for the various performing arts programs. DL: Of course. But it’s important to remember that ultimately it’s the programs that are going to make the building successful. It’s not the building that’s going to make the programs successful.

Focus: So you get to know them quite well. DL: They’re like my own kids. I can even tell if they’re not feeling well as soon as they walk in the door. And in a family-oriented school like this one, I get to know their parents and brothers and sisters. I teach family members at different levels. And that’s really fun.

Focus: What’s in store for the performing arts program? DL: We’re working on realigning the curriculum. It’s a long-term project, and it will be a couple of years before our performing arts curriculum is as strong as I would like it to be. It’s important to establish what I call the spine of the curriculum, the basic structure of what we have to offer. Then every decision we make should be based on that, including whom we hire. 35


f o c u s o n e d u c at i o n Q & A

r a o h b Law e D rence

Focus: Why the performing arts? Deborah Lawrence: Because there is no job in the world where you don’t have to express yourself publicly at some point. And there’s tons of research out there showing that being involved in the arts helps kids with their other endeavors, like math or science classes. And for their own sake, the performing arts provide an outlet and a path to a certain kind of thinking person. Musical intelligence, after all, is one of the categories in Howard Gardner’s influential “Multiple Intelligences” theory of learning.

Focus: Your purview being K-12, you have more than just one division to think about as you design the curriculum. DL: We’re having a lot of discussions about scope and sequence. After a student starts, say, music class in the second grade, the same concepts need to be used through all the grades, so when he or she rolls over from fifth grade to Middle School, there’s continuity and the student’s not wondering what’s going on. It makes sense to me that all the schools are on the same page.

Focus: Tell us your thoughts about the new Fine Arts Center. DL: From the very beginning my focus has been that we all have to be on the same page as far as what this facility is going to be for. I’m coming from the perspective that it’s for the students. That means the kids always have first priority. If it’s going to be booked out for community use, that’s great, but not when there’s a student performance going on. It’s just an empty shell if the kids aren’t using it.

Focus: What do you think it will take to get more students involved in the performing arts? DL: We have the talent, and we have the interest. But as for getting more kids signed up with the program and excited about being in choir or band or drama, we’re not there yet. What we’ve been advocating for is choice. Right now the kids are mostly drafted into performing arts classes. In Middle School, for example, there have been no performing arts electives. It’s all been what we call “exploratory” classes. But I think by sixth grade students know if they like art or music or drama, and what performing arts classes they would like or not. So we think choice is very important for increasing involvement.

Focus: How do they feel about the new theater? DL: The kids are very excited. They’ve never had this kind of experience. We would talk about it before it was finished, and they thought, sure, it would be kind of cool. But then when I gave them a tour their eyes were popping out. Just amazing.

ASF’s performing arts coordinator sees a world of opportunity ahead. Dr. Deborah Lawrence has been the performing arts coordinator at ASF since 2010. That means, among other things, that she is the point person for all activities, both curricular and extracurricular, that have to do with music, drama and dance for all school levels, from ECC to Upper School seniors. Since her tenure corresponds with the advent of the Ángeles Espinosa Yglesias Fine Arts Center on campus, she has of course been hard at work on moving the school’s performing arts curriculum forward to take full advantage of the new facility. Focus recently chatted with Dr. Lawrence about that effort, and about the activity that she says means the most to her — teaching young people and enriching their lives through the performing arts.

34

Focus: It seems like students in the arts — performing or visual — feel a special connection to their teachers and vice versa. DL: It’s not like math, where you have a class one semester and then a different class the next semester with another teacher. I teach grades six through twelve, so theoretically if students start out in band in the sixth grade and they stay on, I would have them over six years, and very important years for their development.

Focus: The next building phases will fully outfit the facility and integrate it with remodeled classrooms. That sounds like quite a boon for the various performing arts programs. DL: Of course. But it’s important to remember that ultimately it’s the programs that are going to make the building successful. It’s not the building that’s going to make the programs successful.

Focus: So you get to know them quite well. DL: They’re like my own kids. I can even tell if they’re not feeling well as soon as they walk in the door. And in a family-oriented school like this one, I get to know their parents and brothers and sisters. I teach family members at different levels. And that’s really fun.

Focus: What’s in store for the performing arts program? DL: We’re working on realigning the curriculum. It’s a long-term project, and it will be a couple of years before our performing arts curriculum is as strong as I would like it to be. It’s important to establish what I call the spine of the curriculum, the basic structure of what we have to offer. Then every decision we make should be based on that, including whom we hire. 35


fami l y f o r u m with six. Generally speaking, children ages 6 to 10 (roughly corresponding to Lower School) need 10 hours a night, while those from 11 up should progressively reduce that number until they sleep 7.5 hours a night as adults. By nature, human beings synchronize their biological clocks to the rhythm of life. The brain knows it is time to wake up when there is light. When it gets dark, it produces a hormone called melatonin that makes people feel sleepy. But of course, modern life is not that simple. We must seek good sleeping habits by maintaining sleep hygiene, which consists of a series of behavioral and environmental factors to ensure a more restful and effective sleep. Some suggestions: • Go to bed at the same time every day and wake up the same time as well, even on weekends. • Make sure the bedroom is dark, quiet and with a comfortable and constant temperature. • Avoid big meals for three hours before bedtime. • Do not drink stimulant beverages, such as coffee, chocolate or tea in the afternoons and evenings. Remember that caffeine stays in the body for up to 10 hours after being consumed. • Exercise during the day.

Although there is still much to learn about sleep, we know that a number of important physical and psychological functions depend on it. Those include body restoration, healing, learning, decisionmaking and reasoning. Clearly, our quality of life is extremely related to sleep. Yet we are a sleep-deprived society. People are simply not sleeping enough these days. We all have a lot to do and usually not enough time to do it. So we fulfill our commitments by stealing hours from our sleep time. That “sleep debt” can negatively affect many of our functions and daily activities. Insufficient sleep causes people to feel physically and mentally tired throughout the day. That in turn reduces attention levels, which for students translates into a poor ability to retain information. Ultimately it can lead to bad grades. Other consequences of sleep deprivation that can hurt student performance are impatience, bad mood and a diminished ability to perform high-level cognitive functions. It’s also worth noting that insufficient sleep increases the risk of automobile accidents, especially at night. So how much sleep do we need? That depends on age. Newborns will sleep more than 15 hours a day, while the elderly might get by

I

f adolescents need eight or nine hours of sleep each night, it’s a simple matter of getting them to sleep early enough. Except that parents of adolescents — and adolescents themselves — don’t consider it so simple. Neither do sleep experts, it turns out. Focus gathered some professional comments to illustrate the sleep challenge that adolescent students face.

… The adage ‘early to bed, early to rise’ presents a real challenge for adolescents.” “ — Mary A. Carskadon,

iStockphoto.

professor of psychiatry and human behavior at Brown Medical School

Studies show that, while children’s and adults’ brains are wired to follow a sleep-wake cycle that makes them sleepy in the mid to late evening and wakeful first thing, teens’ brains signal both sleepiness and wakefulness at much later times. … The further along in maturation kids are, the more likely they’ll be experiencing a delay in sleep onset and the later that delay may become.

Why Sleep Matters

—Helene A. Emsellem, M.D., medical director of The Center for Sleep & Wake Disorders and author of Snooze or Lose: 10 “No-War” Ways to Improve Your Teen’s Sleep Habits

It’s key to the quality of life. And without enough, students don’t learn as well. By Dr. Fructuoso Ayala Guerrero

I

But we don’t dream all the time we are asleep. It’s important to note that sleep is not a unitary process. There are two alternating phases based on the depth of our sleep. Each performs a different function. One is slow wave sleep (SWS), or “quiet” sleep. During this state, blood supply to the muscles increases and important chemicals are released, such as the growth hormone. The other is rapid eye movement (REM) or “active” sleep, when our brains are active but our bodies immobile. Only the eyes move, and this is what gives this phase its name. It is thought that the eyes follow the outlines of the images we perceive, since it is during this phase that dreaming occurs. Memory consolidation also takes place in this state.

magine the following: You have been asleep for more than three years. During this time, you have traveled around the world, met hundreds of people and experienced wonderful adventures. A fairy tale? The truth is, this is a description of real life for a child of ten, who spends about a third of his life sleeping (as we all do). That fact alone gives us a hint of how important sleep is in our lives, both for the body and the mind. One of the reasons sleep is important is because of dreams. Everybody dreams every night, whether they remember it or not. Young children and adolescents dream more than adults. Science isn’t completely sure why we dream, but it is believed that while dreaming we process the events of daily life and consolidate memories. Therefore, dreaming is related to our psychological well-being. 36

91 percent of the surveyed high school students reported going to sleep after 11:00 p.m. on weekends, and 40 “ percent went to bed after 11:00 p.m. on school nights.” — Summary of a report by the U.S. National Sleep Foundation

No amount of bribing or threatening can make an adolescent fall asleep early. Don’t blame video games or TV. Even if you take all of these away (and you should that late at night, and replace them with books) and switch off the lights, the poor teen will toss and turn and not fall asleep ...

— Bora Zivkovic, a chronobiologist and blog editor at Scientific American

Teens’ natural sleep cycle puts them in conflict with school start times ... Schools that have set later bell times “ find that students do not go to bed later, but get one hour more of sleep per school night, which means five hours more per week.” — The U.S. National Sleep Foundation 37


fami l y f o r u m with six. Generally speaking, children ages 6 to 10 (roughly corresponding to Lower School) need 10 hours a night, while those from 11 up should progressively reduce that number until they sleep 7.5 hours a night as adults. By nature, human beings synchronize their biological clocks to the rhythm of life. The brain knows it is time to wake up when there is light. When it gets dark, it produces a hormone called melatonin that makes people feel sleepy. But of course, modern life is not that simple. We must seek good sleeping habits by maintaining sleep hygiene, which consists of a series of behavioral and environmental factors to ensure a more restful and effective sleep. Some suggestions: • Go to bed at the same time every day and wake up the same time as well, even on weekends. • Make sure the bedroom is dark, quiet and with a comfortable and constant temperature. • Avoid big meals for three hours before bedtime. • Do not drink stimulant beverages, such as coffee, chocolate or tea in the afternoons and evenings. Remember that caffeine stays in the body for up to 10 hours after being consumed. • Exercise during the day.

Although there is still much to learn about sleep, we know that a number of important physical and psychological functions depend on it. Those include body restoration, healing, learning, decisionmaking and reasoning. Clearly, our quality of life is extremely related to sleep. Yet we are a sleep-deprived society. People are simply not sleeping enough these days. We all have a lot to do and usually not enough time to do it. So we fulfill our commitments by stealing hours from our sleep time. That “sleep debt” can negatively affect many of our functions and daily activities. Insufficient sleep causes people to feel physically and mentally tired throughout the day. That in turn reduces attention levels, which for students translates into a poor ability to retain information. Ultimately it can lead to bad grades. Other consequences of sleep deprivation that can hurt student performance are impatience, bad mood and a diminished ability to perform high-level cognitive functions. It’s also worth noting that insufficient sleep increases the risk of automobile accidents, especially at night. So how much sleep do we need? That depends on age. Newborns will sleep more than 15 hours a day, while the elderly might get by

I

f adolescents need eight or nine hours of sleep each night, it’s a simple matter of getting them to sleep early enough. Except that parents of adolescents — and adolescents themselves — don’t consider it so simple. Neither do sleep experts, it turns out. Focus gathered some professional comments to illustrate the sleep challenge that adolescent students face.

… The adage ‘early to bed, early to rise’ presents a real challenge for adolescents.” “ — Mary A. Carskadon,

iStockphoto.

professor of psychiatry and human behavior at Brown Medical School

Studies show that, while children’s and adults’ brains are wired to follow a sleep-wake cycle that makes them sleepy in the mid to late evening and wakeful first thing, teens’ brains signal both sleepiness and wakefulness at much later times. … The further along in maturation kids are, the more likely they’ll be experiencing a delay in sleep onset and the later that delay may become.

Why Sleep Matters

—Helene A. Emsellem, M.D., medical director of The Center for Sleep & Wake Disorders and author of Snooze or Lose: 10 “No-War” Ways to Improve Your Teen’s Sleep Habits

It’s key to the quality of life. And without enough, students don’t learn as well. By Dr. Fructuoso Ayala Guerrero

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But we don’t dream all the time we are asleep. It’s important to note that sleep is not a unitary process. There are two alternating phases based on the depth of our sleep. Each performs a different function. One is slow wave sleep (SWS), or “quiet” sleep. During this state, blood supply to the muscles increases and important chemicals are released, such as the growth hormone. The other is rapid eye movement (REM) or “active” sleep, when our brains are active but our bodies immobile. Only the eyes move, and this is what gives this phase its name. It is thought that the eyes follow the outlines of the images we perceive, since it is during this phase that dreaming occurs. Memory consolidation also takes place in this state.

magine the following: You have been asleep for more than three years. During this time, you have traveled around the world, met hundreds of people and experienced wonderful adventures. A fairy tale? The truth is, this is a description of real life for a child of ten, who spends about a third of his life sleeping (as we all do). That fact alone gives us a hint of how important sleep is in our lives, both for the body and the mind. One of the reasons sleep is important is because of dreams. Everybody dreams every night, whether they remember it or not. Young children and adolescents dream more than adults. Science isn’t completely sure why we dream, but it is believed that while dreaming we process the events of daily life and consolidate memories. Therefore, dreaming is related to our psychological well-being. 36

91 percent of the surveyed high school students reported going to sleep after 11:00 p.m. on weekends, and 40 “ percent went to bed after 11:00 p.m. on school nights.” — Summary of a report by the U.S. National Sleep Foundation

No amount of bribing or threatening can make an adolescent fall asleep early. Don’t blame video games or TV. Even if you take all of these away (and you should that late at night, and replace them with books) and switch off the lights, the poor teen will toss and turn and not fall asleep ...

— Bora Zivkovic, a chronobiologist and blog editor at Scientific American

Teens’ natural sleep cycle puts them in conflict with school start times ... Schools that have set later bell times “ find that students do not go to bed later, but get one hour more of sleep per school night, which means five hours more per week.” — The U.S. National Sleep Foundation 37


i n s t i t u t i o n a l adva n c e m e n t

Another Generous Donation From the Parent Association

Step up and Take a Seat During last spring’s fifth grade Stepping Up ceremony, the Class of 2019 donated a seat to the Ángeles Espinosa Yglesias Fine Arts Center, and gave a donation to the Annual Scholarship Drive (ASD). ASF is grateful for their support of the Take a Seat campaign, which will benefit our new theater and help showcase the communities’ artistic talents. And another big thank you for their donation to the ASD, which will give qualified young learners who need financial aid the opportunity to receive a quality education at ASF.

On Wednesday, May 30, Parent Association President Alma Rosa Rodríguez presented two checks to Institutional Advancement Director Michele Beltran. One was for $350,000 pesos, to support the Annual Scholarship Drive. The other was for $250,000 pesos, toward the Capital Building Campaign. The American School Foundation thanks the PA for its generous yearly commitments to the Annual Scholarship Drive and the Capital Building Campaign.

Girl Scouts Take a Seat Members of the local Girl Scouts Junior Troop 255012 — Julia de la Fontaine, Verónica Gutiérrez, Lucila González, Diana Siegel, Majo Gutiérrez, Regina González and Miranda Sultan — donated a seat to the Ángeles Espinosa Yglesias Fine Arts Center. We thank them for their support and commitment in creating a better future for ASF.

Senior Class Gift Recruiters This year a new initiative was put in place with the Senior Class Gift Recruiters. The recruiters contacted fellow students to promote giving and fundraising as well as encouraging them to leave a legacy through a class gift. Recruiters Bárbara Mendoza (’12), Roberto Jones (’12) and Marcela Ruiz de Chávez (’12) presented a check for $7,000 pesos to Executive Director Paul Williams during Commencement on June 2, to support the Annual Scholarship Drive.

A Touch of Class Following tradition, ECC and Lower School classrooms collected funds to support the Take a Seat Campaign and the Annual Scholarship Drive. Middle School students as a whole also made a generous contribution to the Annual Scholarship Drive. The ECC and Lower School classrooms that gave to Take a Seat were: K2 Rm2, 3F, 4E (pictured) and 4G. The participating Lower School classrooms that gave to the Annual Scholarship Drive were: 2D, 3G (pictured), 4D and 5E. The Office of Institutional Advancement thanks ASF’s generous students, families and teachers for their continuous support. 38

39


i n s t i t u t i o n a l adva n c e m e n t

Another Generous Donation From the Parent Association

Step up and Take a Seat During last spring’s fifth grade Stepping Up ceremony, the Class of 2019 donated a seat to the Ángeles Espinosa Yglesias Fine Arts Center, and gave a donation to the Annual Scholarship Drive (ASD). ASF is grateful for their support of the Take a Seat campaign, which will benefit our new theater and help showcase the communities’ artistic talents. And another big thank you for their donation to the ASD, which will give qualified young learners who need financial aid the opportunity to receive a quality education at ASF.

On Wednesday, May 30, Parent Association President Alma Rosa Rodríguez presented two checks to Institutional Advancement Director Michele Beltran. One was for $350,000 pesos, to support the Annual Scholarship Drive. The other was for $250,000 pesos, toward the Capital Building Campaign. The American School Foundation thanks the PA for its generous yearly commitments to the Annual Scholarship Drive and the Capital Building Campaign.

Girl Scouts Take a Seat Members of the local Girl Scouts Junior Troop 255012 — Julia de la Fontaine, Verónica Gutiérrez, Lucila González, Diana Siegel, Majo Gutiérrez, Regina González and Miranda Sultan — donated a seat to the Ángeles Espinosa Yglesias Fine Arts Center. We thank them for their support and commitment in creating a better future for ASF.

Senior Class Gift Recruiters This year a new initiative was put in place with the Senior Class Gift Recruiters. The recruiters contacted fellow students to promote giving and fundraising as well as encouraging them to leave a legacy through a class gift. Recruiters Bárbara Mendoza (’12), Roberto Jones (’12) and Marcela Ruiz de Chávez (’12) presented a check for $7,000 pesos to Executive Director Paul Williams during Commencement on June 2, to support the Annual Scholarship Drive.

A Touch of Class Following tradition, ECC and Lower School classrooms collected funds to support the Take a Seat Campaign and the Annual Scholarship Drive. Middle School students as a whole also made a generous contribution to the Annual Scholarship Drive. The ECC and Lower School classrooms that gave to Take a Seat were: K2 Rm2, 3F, 4E (pictured) and 4G. The participating Lower School classrooms that gave to the Annual Scholarship Drive were: 2D, 3G (pictured), 4D and 5E. The Office of Institutional Advancement thanks ASF’s generous students, families and teachers for their continuous support. 38

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i n s t i t u t i o n a l adva n c e m e n t

Thank you to our 2011-2012 Donors and Sponsors for the Annual Scholarship Drive, Capital Campaign and Special Events MEMORIAL Blaise Steve (’61) Chedraui Sergio De la Riva Lorraine (’58) Fis Menache Ricardo (’69) Gómez Lucero In support of Elda de Leon In support of Kirsten Fink (’88) In support of Margo Torres Osegueda Ximena (’91) Reyes Elena (’89) Rossetto Bonnie On Behalf Of Beja Mateo, Jeanette and Daniel Botton Melina (’83 Elías Botton Family (’85) Elías Diana Ellstein Sharon and Family (’89) Gojman Mauricio and Tanya (’96) Halkin Fernando, Ceci and Sharon Langenauer Roberto, Marion, Carlos, Jorge and Alejandro Nadelsticher Laura, Galia and Alan Pisinger Diego, Rosa, Jaime and Mateo (’84/’87) Pisinger Nelly and Fabio Revah Betty Reyes-Varela Pisinger Family Rubinstein Isaac, Lilian, Gabriel, Mijael and Jonathan Valner Sandor, Monica, Daniel and Michelle Woroszylski Alejandro, Sandra, Nicole and Moy (’84/’85) Friends Anonymous Baker Allan Cameron Ridell Campillo Richard Case Murray Fuentevilla Finny Family Gamboa Combs Family Huttanus Frances Kohlmann Eduardo Lagunes Annette V. Mongiello Leonard Pérez Violet Sullivan Tom and Dari Vidaurri Tito Staff and Faculty Anonymous Abarca Trujillo Miriam Abreu López María Mercedes Aguirre Tovar Elisa Alaniz Estrada José Carlos Álvarez Gónzalez Mónica Ayala Violeta Barnhizer Leslie Anne Beltrán Michele Berentsen Ivette (’90) Bilbao Itziar

Blevins Ann Marie Stefana Brik Sakina Brown Stephanie Rae Keller Byrnes Jennifer Lee Caballero Rincón Fátima Lucía Campa Mónica Campos Karla (’01) Carlos Sumer Carrera Maru Castañar Flores Vicente Castillo Betsy (’70) Chaves Margarita Cheney Guy Frederick Crutchfield Rebecca Cummings Stephanie Dávalos Leticia Dawson Kenneth De Ávila Muñoz Adriana De Jesús Juan De St. Aubin Mercedes Dickson Lauren Marie Dillon Rachel Domínguez San Millán Liliana Drury Martha Dora Duque Pelaez Isabel Arline Escobar Rojo Adriana Fong Elaine Shirley Galán Rangel Yolanda (’65) Gallie Amy Gerson Cwilich Diana Goldschmed Harrison Susana (’91) Gutiérrez Zanatta María Eugenia Hamilton Daniel John Hananel Alberto Nessim Isaac Hanes Bailey Twyla Jan Hernández Franyutti Paulina Herrerías DeLong Family Herschleb Karen Jean Hinojosa Infante Tania Howe Olivia Gonzalez Hunt Anne Hunt Evan Jackson Daniel John Jessel Pérez Sagra María De Lourdes Jiménez Grant Elisa Kawas Merino Lorena Keeler Keenan Lisa Ann (’83) Kelman Desatnik Anna Sarah Kennedy Kroner Naomi Michele Kerze Anne Salamon Lanners Kaitlin Margaret Leites Sueur Ana Priscila Lemmon Gabriel David Lemmon Tanya Delise Loaiza Mateos Roberta Lozano Giral Family Maas Jordan Mankoch Medel Antonieta Martin Johnstone Patricia McGowan Ricca Rocqael Miller Tracy Morales Álvarez Laura Patricia MS Teachers Alejandra, Isabel, Ivette,

Lisa and Tania Murra Rodríguez Jaime Alberto Nelson Brett Richard Newell Locke Tatiana Alexandra Noriega Amalia Occelli De La Parra Verónica Ochoa Delgado Marcela Olper Benuzillo Leo, Sandra, Renee / Antebi Benuzillo Karen, Alex, Jacques (’85/’88) Ordóñez Dafne Oseguera Amy Marie Susan Payne McDerment Susan Marion Pérez Galán Mariana (’00) Piccaluga Gutiérrez María Elena Ramon Verdin Lorena (’82) Reyes Santillana Alejandra (’87) Rojas Aguilar María Cecilia Romo Mendoza Sandra Salas Valencia María Del Rocio Schell Jason Andrew Schendel Matthew Timothy Segura Quintanilla Luz Eugenia Sikkink Bret Alan Solorio Enríquez Ana María Starke Sloane Tagle Memi Tanaka Cindy (’91) Tapia Chávez Leticia Araceli Tolumes Villafaña Lorena Trautman Erin Valle Alerhand Axel Ver Duin Megan Leigh Webber Mark Joseph Westholm Michelle Williams Jamie Marie Williams Paul Wolpert Kuri Janet Woroszylski Yoselevitz Helen (’93) Zamora Castro Ana Patricia (’82) Zamora Castro Graciela Leticia (’83) Zetina Ocaña Mónica Alumni Anonymous Anderson Swartwort Frances (’71) Arocha Dagdug Marcos (’93) Besquin Neumann Arturo (’06) Calvo Chico Jorge (’97) Campomanes Victor (’02) Cherem José (’09) Church L. George (’44) Class of 1977 Class of 2011 Dadoo Clemente (’11) Danner Luisa (’56) Davis Blake (’11) De St. Aubin Stephanie (’01) Donohue Hart Joan (’60) Euresti David (’97) Franco Montealvo José Luis (’02) Furbeck Boltman Irma (’52) García Luis Fernando (’02) García Cacho Diego (’04)

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García González Gerardo (’05) Gómez Pablo (’09) Gwynn James (’46) Hogan Souza Family (’77) Holschneider Gabriel and Gamboa Fernanda (’97) Hunter Barbara (’53) Kolteniuk Ricardo (’94) Kruttschnitt Louise (’56) Lopatkiewez Ted (’70) Macías Dowling Alan (’84) Martínez Valdez Concepción (’67) Mejía Emilio (’09) Michel Bonny (’67) Nanes Sarfati Teddy (’09) Ortiz Ortie A.H. (’47) Quintana Mauricio (’00) Rodríguez Eric (’03) Rodríguez B. Raoul (’55) Salomon Jonathan (’03) Seifert Richard (’02) Stieglitz Alejandro (’02) Suárez Juan José (’10) Suárez Víctor (’09) Sullivan Mónica (’34) Torres Galvin Family (’93/’96) Weingarten David (’09) Zapata Ivan (’04) GrandparentS Anonymous Botton Dolly and Julio De Haro González Jorge Goldschmied Adele Olmedo de José Irene Phillips Jacobson Fritz Lamm Helen and Alcocer Buddy Laviada Carlos and Laura McCoy Horacio (’57) ParentS Anonymous Abizaid Bertha (’89) Aboumrad Chedraui Family Achar Jakobsmeier Family Adame Javier (’90) Adler Adriana Aguilar Peñaloza Family (’90/(’92) Albores Roiz Family Alcocer Juan Pablo Allende Esteve Family Alonso María Adela Alvarado Aglot Family Álvarez Román and Ana Sofía (’85) Ambrosi Family Andrews Craig Family Arredondo Family Arreola de la Peña Family Arsuaga De Haro Family Austin Cathy (’78) Ayestaran Escalante Family Bachaalani Family Balcarcel Family

Barajas Rangel Family Barbosa Family Bastida Rivera Family Bernaldo de Quirós Santiago Blanco Flores Family Borgio Alcocer Family Brachet Alexis Braun Aparicio Family Broitman Family Bustos Family Calleja Erdmann Family Camero Family Cannizzo Centellas Family Cantú Serrano Family Carvajal Santander Family Cerisola Casanova Family Chaba-Kalach Costi Family (’84) Chapula Salgado Family Checa Laviada Family (’91) Chertorivski Family Conesa de la Vega Family Cosio Clusa Family Cosio Saenz Family (’89) Cue Alejandra Davidoff Misrachi Aline Dávila y Del Valle Rosa María De Icaza Montalvo Family De la Fontaine Pérez Vargas Family (’81) De la Mora Ramiro Family De Yturbe Gutierrez Family Del Rio Canales Family Del Valle Christianson Family Del Valle Ocejo Family Delgado Marcano Family Delgado Orrantia Family Demesa Morales Family Devlyn Family Diaque Martín-Moreno Family Díaz Ramírez Jorge A. Doporto Family Dubson García Family Duque González Family Edid Jaris Family (’89) Elías Botton Family (’85) Elizaga Family Esponda Saucedo Family Esteve Aguilar Family Esteve Santos Family Estrada Karachi Family Fernández Romero Family Figueroa Guerrero Family Fink Kirsten (’88) Fonseca Family Franco Alejos Family Franco Choperena Family Franco de la Rosa Family Fraser Porraz Family Funes Gárate Family García Aguilar Family García Domínguez Family García Lecuona Family Garibay Quintero Family Garrido Galewicz Family (’90) Gavaldon González Santiago Gerdes Moreno Family Gilardi Ramirez Family Gómez Luis Benjamín Gómez Orvañanos Family González Aja Family González Calvillo Rodrigo H. González Frías Family González Guerrero Family Gorbea Family Guerra Suarez Family Gutiérrez Fernando and Adriana Gutiérrez Ormsbee Family

Sánchez-Navarro Lebrija Family (’94) Santacruz del Valle Family Sepúlveda Santiago Solís Raymundo (’86) Sotelo Gilberto Sulaimán Héctor Tejado Escobar Family Toca Amador Valenzuela Goldman Family Varela Belmont Family Vazquez Rex Family Velimirovic Family Villalobos Alejandro Vizarretea Family Vondell Losada Family Waller McClellan Family Werner Martin Williamson Lloreda Family Woroszylski Ellstein Family (’84/’85) Yañez Family Zesati Negrete Family Zevada Maritere Zhao Ying Family Zimmerman Family Zorrila Francisco

Herman Laura Hernández Pons Vázquez Family Icaza Serrano Family Israel Family Jiménez Berlie Family Junquera Quijada Family Kalach Hans Family Karam Hinzpeter Family Klipstein Verónica Kuribreña Suárez Family (’90) Lagos Dondé Family Laresgoiti Obregón Family Legorreta Cordova Family Legorreta Hernández Family Litchi Cynthia (’90) Maldonado Álvarez Family Malo Family Maugeri Andrade Family McElfresh Jeffrey S. Mena Samano Family Mendoza Klein Family (’91) Merikanskas Leon (’93) Merino Parcero Family Meyer Jinich Family (’83) Michel Camero Family Miranda Fausto E. Mizrahi Daniel Family Moguel Family Monterubio Wong Family Moya-Angeler Antonio Nae Velázquez Family Naftali Entebi Family Nahum Antonio Family Neme Lara Family Nuñez Ortega Family Obregón Servitje Family Ogarrio Sánchez-Navarro Family Ohara Bartz Family Olivares Garces Family Orvañanos Vignon Family Paredes Santiago (’89) Parent Association Paullada Maldonado Family Peralta Jacobson Family (’94) Peralta Tort Family Peraza Sandoval Family Perelman Cesarman Family Pérez del Toro Choueke Family Pérez Merino Family (’86/’94) Pérez Odriozola Family Pisinger Marentes Family (’84/(’87) Popovits Rene and Veronica Posselt Moran Family Prada Pérez Family Pryor Neil and Julie Quintana Hurtado Family (’00) Quinzaños Teuscher Family (’91) Ramos Hoffman Family (’90) Raz Guzmán Macedo Family Reimers Isaac Rementeria Alberto Rendon Russell Family (’92) Reséndez Quijano Family Reyes-Retana Héctor Rihan Goyeneche Family (’86) Rihan P. Family (’85) Rimoch Buelna Family Riojas Bernardo Ríos Amador Family Rodríguez Escobedo Family Rodríguez Lebrija Family (’85) Rovzar Family (’96) Ruiz Fernandez Family Salazar Puig Family Saldívar Palacios Family Salinas Olivares Family

Students Anonymous 4E’s -22 G.U.M.S. Opera Company Class of 2011-2012 Class of 2012 Class of 2018 Class of 2019 K2 Classroom 2 Lower School Classroom 2D Lower School Classroom 3F Lower School Classroom 3G Lower School Classroom 4D Lower School Classroom 4G Lower School Classroom 5E Middle School Students The Girl Scouts, Junior Troop 255012 Foundations and Corporations Anonymous 4000 Taxis ABC Hospital ADCO Administración y Constructibilidad, S. A. de C. V. AD-TEC Consultores De Construccion, S.A. de C.V. Aerolineas Ejecutivas Aeromexico AON Risk Services ASDeporte Bacardi Banamex Banorte - Ixe Barrier Bosque Real Buró de Crédito Caras Sports Chevrolet Chubb Group Cielito Querido Cisco Citemex Decoraciones Dupuis Destino GPS Devlyn

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Editorial Televisa Energy Fitness Excel Flanax Fomento Educacional Fonda Garufa Gatorade Gifan Gimsa Goldman Sachs Green Cover Grupo Financiero Interacciones Grupo Plan Grupo Publica Habanero Films Haciendas Mundo Maya Hard Candy Herdez Heyman Asociados Hojel Schumacher Foundation Hotel Brick Hoteles Intercontinental HP HSBC Indicium Solutions Iusacell Jonhson & Johnson La Cava de los Amigos Lenom Poshbranding LG LJV Sports Lorant Marinter Monte Xanic Motors Vita Museo del Antiguo Colegio de San Ildefonso Navix PepsiCo Pesa Uniformes Piel Canela Pozzeidon Price Waterhouse Coopers, S.C. Rancho Avándaro Roger’s Garden Gourmet Stadia Suites Starbucks Tecnolomet Texas Ribs The Roath School- Linda Wallsten and Family The United States Embassy in Mexico Toyota Financial Services Transportes Lipu Vadillo & CO Volaris Warranty Group Yogurtland


i n s t i t u t i o n a l adva n c e m e n t

Thank you to our 2011-2012 Donors and Sponsors for the Annual Scholarship Drive, Capital Campaign and Special Events MEMORIAL Blaise Steve (’61) Chedraui Sergio De la Riva Lorraine (’58) Fis Menache Ricardo (’69) Gómez Lucero In support of Elda de Leon In support of Kirsten Fink (’88) In support of Margo Torres Osegueda Ximena (’91) Reyes Elena (’89) Rossetto Bonnie On Behalf Of Beja Mateo, Jeanette and Daniel Botton Melina (’83 Elías Botton Family (’85) Elías Diana Ellstein Sharon and Family (’89) Gojman Mauricio and Tanya (’96) Halkin Fernando, Ceci and Sharon Langenauer Roberto, Marion, Carlos, Jorge and Alejandro Nadelsticher Laura, Galia and Alan Pisinger Diego, Rosa, Jaime and Mateo (’84/’87) Pisinger Nelly and Fabio Revah Betty Reyes-Varela Pisinger Family Rubinstein Isaac, Lilian, Gabriel, Mijael and Jonathan Valner Sandor, Monica, Daniel and Michelle Woroszylski Alejandro, Sandra, Nicole and Moy (’84/’85) Friends Anonymous Baker Allan Cameron Ridell Campillo Richard Case Murray Fuentevilla Finny Family Gamboa Combs Family Huttanus Frances Kohlmann Eduardo Lagunes Annette V. Mongiello Leonard Pérez Violet Sullivan Tom and Dari Vidaurri Tito Staff and Faculty Anonymous Abarca Trujillo Miriam Abreu López María Mercedes Aguirre Tovar Elisa Alaniz Estrada José Carlos Álvarez Gónzalez Mónica Ayala Violeta Barnhizer Leslie Anne Beltrán Michele Berentsen Ivette (’90) Bilbao Itziar

Blevins Ann Marie Stefana Brik Sakina Brown Stephanie Rae Keller Byrnes Jennifer Lee Caballero Rincón Fátima Lucía Campa Mónica Campos Karla (’01) Carlos Sumer Carrera Maru Castañar Flores Vicente Castillo Betsy (’70) Chaves Margarita Cheney Guy Frederick Crutchfield Rebecca Cummings Stephanie Dávalos Leticia Dawson Kenneth De Ávila Muñoz Adriana De Jesús Juan De St. Aubin Mercedes Dickson Lauren Marie Dillon Rachel Domínguez San Millán Liliana Drury Martha Dora Duque Pelaez Isabel Arline Escobar Rojo Adriana Fong Elaine Shirley Galán Rangel Yolanda (’65) Gallie Amy Gerson Cwilich Diana Goldschmed Harrison Susana (’91) Gutiérrez Zanatta María Eugenia Hamilton Daniel John Hananel Alberto Nessim Isaac Hanes Bailey Twyla Jan Hernández Franyutti Paulina Herrerías DeLong Family Herschleb Karen Jean Hinojosa Infante Tania Howe Olivia Gonzalez Hunt Anne Hunt Evan Jackson Daniel John Jessel Pérez Sagra María De Lourdes Jiménez Grant Elisa Kawas Merino Lorena Keeler Keenan Lisa Ann (’83) Kelman Desatnik Anna Sarah Kennedy Kroner Naomi Michele Kerze Anne Salamon Lanners Kaitlin Margaret Leites Sueur Ana Priscila Lemmon Gabriel David Lemmon Tanya Delise Loaiza Mateos Roberta Lozano Giral Family Maas Jordan Mankoch Medel Antonieta Martin Johnstone Patricia McGowan Ricca Rocqael Miller Tracy Morales Álvarez Laura Patricia MS Teachers Alejandra, Isabel, Ivette,

Lisa and Tania Murra Rodríguez Jaime Alberto Nelson Brett Richard Newell Locke Tatiana Alexandra Noriega Amalia Occelli De La Parra Verónica Ochoa Delgado Marcela Olper Benuzillo Leo, Sandra, Renee / Antebi Benuzillo Karen, Alex, Jacques (’85/’88) Ordóñez Dafne Oseguera Amy Marie Susan Payne McDerment Susan Marion Pérez Galán Mariana (’00) Piccaluga Gutiérrez María Elena Ramon Verdin Lorena (’82) Reyes Santillana Alejandra (’87) Rojas Aguilar María Cecilia Romo Mendoza Sandra Salas Valencia María Del Rocio Schell Jason Andrew Schendel Matthew Timothy Segura Quintanilla Luz Eugenia Sikkink Bret Alan Solorio Enríquez Ana María Starke Sloane Tagle Memi Tanaka Cindy (’91) Tapia Chávez Leticia Araceli Tolumes Villafaña Lorena Trautman Erin Valle Alerhand Axel Ver Duin Megan Leigh Webber Mark Joseph Westholm Michelle Williams Jamie Marie Williams Paul Wolpert Kuri Janet Woroszylski Yoselevitz Helen (’93) Zamora Castro Ana Patricia (’82) Zamora Castro Graciela Leticia (’83) Zetina Ocaña Mónica Alumni Anonymous Anderson Swartwort Frances (’71) Arocha Dagdug Marcos (’93) Besquin Neumann Arturo (’06) Calvo Chico Jorge (’97) Campomanes Victor (’02) Cherem José (’09) Church L. George (’44) Class of 1977 Class of 2011 Dadoo Clemente (’11) Danner Luisa (’56) Davis Blake (’11) De St. Aubin Stephanie (’01) Donohue Hart Joan (’60) Euresti David (’97) Franco Montealvo José Luis (’02) Furbeck Boltman Irma (’52) García Luis Fernando (’02) García Cacho Diego (’04)

40

García González Gerardo (’05) Gómez Pablo (’09) Gwynn James (’46) Hogan Souza Family (’77) Holschneider Gabriel and Gamboa Fernanda (’97) Hunter Barbara (’53) Kolteniuk Ricardo (’94) Kruttschnitt Louise (’56) Lopatkiewez Ted (’70) Macías Dowling Alan (’84) Martínez Valdez Concepción (’67) Mejía Emilio (’09) Michel Bonny (’67) Nanes Sarfati Teddy (’09) Ortiz Ortie A.H. (’47) Quintana Mauricio (’00) Rodríguez Eric (’03) Rodríguez B. Raoul (’55) Salomon Jonathan (’03) Seifert Richard (’02) Stieglitz Alejandro (’02) Suárez Juan José (’10) Suárez Víctor (’09) Sullivan Mónica (’34) Torres Galvin Family (’93/’96) Weingarten David (’09) Zapata Ivan (’04) GrandparentS Anonymous Botton Dolly and Julio De Haro González Jorge Goldschmied Adele Olmedo de José Irene Phillips Jacobson Fritz Lamm Helen and Alcocer Buddy Laviada Carlos and Laura McCoy Horacio (’57) ParentS Anonymous Abizaid Bertha (’89) Aboumrad Chedraui Family Achar Jakobsmeier Family Adame Javier (’90) Adler Adriana Aguilar Peñaloza Family (’90/(’92) Albores Roiz Family Alcocer Juan Pablo Allende Esteve Family Alonso María Adela Alvarado Aglot Family Álvarez Román and Ana Sofía (’85) Ambrosi Family Andrews Craig Family Arredondo Family Arreola de la Peña Family Arsuaga De Haro Family Austin Cathy (’78) Ayestaran Escalante Family Bachaalani Family Balcarcel Family

Barajas Rangel Family Barbosa Family Bastida Rivera Family Bernaldo de Quirós Santiago Blanco Flores Family Borgio Alcocer Family Brachet Alexis Braun Aparicio Family Broitman Family Bustos Family Calleja Erdmann Family Camero Family Cannizzo Centellas Family Cantú Serrano Family Carvajal Santander Family Cerisola Casanova Family Chaba-Kalach Costi Family (’84) Chapula Salgado Family Checa Laviada Family (’91) Chertorivski Family Conesa de la Vega Family Cosio Clusa Family Cosio Saenz Family (’89) Cue Alejandra Davidoff Misrachi Aline Dávila y Del Valle Rosa María De Icaza Montalvo Family De la Fontaine Pérez Vargas Family (’81) De la Mora Ramiro Family De Yturbe Gutierrez Family Del Rio Canales Family Del Valle Christianson Family Del Valle Ocejo Family Delgado Marcano Family Delgado Orrantia Family Demesa Morales Family Devlyn Family Diaque Martín-Moreno Family Díaz Ramírez Jorge A. Doporto Family Dubson García Family Duque González Family Edid Jaris Family (’89) Elías Botton Family (’85) Elizaga Family Esponda Saucedo Family Esteve Aguilar Family Esteve Santos Family Estrada Karachi Family Fernández Romero Family Figueroa Guerrero Family Fink Kirsten (’88) Fonseca Family Franco Alejos Family Franco Choperena Family Franco de la Rosa Family Fraser Porraz Family Funes Gárate Family García Aguilar Family García Domínguez Family García Lecuona Family Garibay Quintero Family Garrido Galewicz Family (’90) Gavaldon González Santiago Gerdes Moreno Family Gilardi Ramirez Family Gómez Luis Benjamín Gómez Orvañanos Family González Aja Family González Calvillo Rodrigo H. González Frías Family González Guerrero Family Gorbea Family Guerra Suarez Family Gutiérrez Fernando and Adriana Gutiérrez Ormsbee Family

Sánchez-Navarro Lebrija Family (’94) Santacruz del Valle Family Sepúlveda Santiago Solís Raymundo (’86) Sotelo Gilberto Sulaimán Héctor Tejado Escobar Family Toca Amador Valenzuela Goldman Family Varela Belmont Family Vazquez Rex Family Velimirovic Family Villalobos Alejandro Vizarretea Family Vondell Losada Family Waller McClellan Family Werner Martin Williamson Lloreda Family Woroszylski Ellstein Family (’84/’85) Yañez Family Zesati Negrete Family Zevada Maritere Zhao Ying Family Zimmerman Family Zorrila Francisco

Herman Laura Hernández Pons Vázquez Family Icaza Serrano Family Israel Family Jiménez Berlie Family Junquera Quijada Family Kalach Hans Family Karam Hinzpeter Family Klipstein Verónica Kuribreña Suárez Family (’90) Lagos Dondé Family Laresgoiti Obregón Family Legorreta Cordova Family Legorreta Hernández Family Litchi Cynthia (’90) Maldonado Álvarez Family Malo Family Maugeri Andrade Family McElfresh Jeffrey S. Mena Samano Family Mendoza Klein Family (’91) Merikanskas Leon (’93) Merino Parcero Family Meyer Jinich Family (’83) Michel Camero Family Miranda Fausto E. Mizrahi Daniel Family Moguel Family Monterubio Wong Family Moya-Angeler Antonio Nae Velázquez Family Naftali Entebi Family Nahum Antonio Family Neme Lara Family Nuñez Ortega Family Obregón Servitje Family Ogarrio Sánchez-Navarro Family Ohara Bartz Family Olivares Garces Family Orvañanos Vignon Family Paredes Santiago (’89) Parent Association Paullada Maldonado Family Peralta Jacobson Family (’94) Peralta Tort Family Peraza Sandoval Family Perelman Cesarman Family Pérez del Toro Choueke Family Pérez Merino Family (’86/’94) Pérez Odriozola Family Pisinger Marentes Family (’84/(’87) Popovits Rene and Veronica Posselt Moran Family Prada Pérez Family Pryor Neil and Julie Quintana Hurtado Family (’00) Quinzaños Teuscher Family (’91) Ramos Hoffman Family (’90) Raz Guzmán Macedo Family Reimers Isaac Rementeria Alberto Rendon Russell Family (’92) Reséndez Quijano Family Reyes-Retana Héctor Rihan Goyeneche Family (’86) Rihan P. Family (’85) Rimoch Buelna Family Riojas Bernardo Ríos Amador Family Rodríguez Escobedo Family Rodríguez Lebrija Family (’85) Rovzar Family (’96) Ruiz Fernandez Family Salazar Puig Family Saldívar Palacios Family Salinas Olivares Family

Students Anonymous 4E’s -22 G.U.M.S. Opera Company Class of 2011-2012 Class of 2012 Class of 2018 Class of 2019 K2 Classroom 2 Lower School Classroom 2D Lower School Classroom 3F Lower School Classroom 3G Lower School Classroom 4D Lower School Classroom 4G Lower School Classroom 5E Middle School Students The Girl Scouts, Junior Troop 255012 Foundations and Corporations Anonymous 4000 Taxis ABC Hospital ADCO Administración y Constructibilidad, S. A. de C. V. AD-TEC Consultores De Construccion, S.A. de C.V. Aerolineas Ejecutivas Aeromexico AON Risk Services ASDeporte Bacardi Banamex Banorte - Ixe Barrier Bosque Real Buró de Crédito Caras Sports Chevrolet Chubb Group Cielito Querido Cisco Citemex Decoraciones Dupuis Destino GPS Devlyn

41

Editorial Televisa Energy Fitness Excel Flanax Fomento Educacional Fonda Garufa Gatorade Gifan Gimsa Goldman Sachs Green Cover Grupo Financiero Interacciones Grupo Plan Grupo Publica Habanero Films Haciendas Mundo Maya Hard Candy Herdez Heyman Asociados Hojel Schumacher Foundation Hotel Brick Hoteles Intercontinental HP HSBC Indicium Solutions Iusacell Jonhson & Johnson La Cava de los Amigos Lenom Poshbranding LG LJV Sports Lorant Marinter Monte Xanic Motors Vita Museo del Antiguo Colegio de San Ildefonso Navix PepsiCo Pesa Uniformes Piel Canela Pozzeidon Price Waterhouse Coopers, S.C. Rancho Avándaro Roger’s Garden Gourmet Stadia Suites Starbucks Tecnolomet Texas Ribs The Roath School- Linda Wallsten and Family The United States Embassy in Mexico Toyota Financial Services Transportes Lipu Vadillo & CO Volaris Warranty Group Yogurtland


student voices

a l u m n i p r o fi l e

At left, Mrs. Castillo poses with sons Alejandro (’00) on her right and Roberto (’02) on her left. Below, she is honored last spring for her 35 years of service to ASF. Bottom: Betsy as an ASF senior, 1970. The inset is a 1976 photo of Betsy as a new ASF teacher.

pas

Chia in y a D a f o e The Lif

high walls soaring h it w l o co so wide anyon st on a river so fa g in d ee sp t a lue sky Bo ors in a clear b d n co t a p u g Lookin ing plant life brew h it w en re g oming ills so constantly blo s er w o fl y b g ed Surround insects zoomin e th ly n O ? z z What’s that bu r falls e way the wate calls ’m in awe of th wler monkey o h a , ce n ta awl? is And in the d ocodile may cr cr a ay aw r fa ow Who knows h uoise blue scades of turq ca ugh h it w l u z A gua stream run thro y d ea st e th h atc the view Fascinated, I w re spectacular o m e th b, im The higher I cl m the past of wonder fro ce la p a e, to last u q alen have continued s are cast s in ru n a ay M shadow Ancient sun, immense t h g ri b e th in And ack ng down my b ti ea b n su g in lack blaz seems to be a g in ik h t n a st track The con I must keep on e, se to ch u m So of red with rooftops s sa a C s la e d ad an Cristobal coffee and bre f o ir a e th in eir heads. Aromas ing goods on th y rr ca ls ca lo la Busy Chamu me experience for n a t a h w s, a p Oh Chia sting memory. la a ch su d te You have crea ade student

C H I A P A S

—Nina Sachdev,

seventh gr

42

The Experience of a Lifetime

ASF student, teacher, parent and alumna, Betsy Castillo (’70) has been an inspiration to others.

B

By Cindy Tanaka (’91) for tests and quizzes without feeling uncomfortable, be able to solve problems, make your own decisions and cooperate with others.” As an ASF parent she has experienced another side of ASF. Alejandro Castillo (’00) and Roberto Castillo (‘02) are grateful to have had the opportunity to study at ASF. “My sons tell me all the time they would be willing to change anything about their lives except their education,” Ms. Castillo says. “They felt so prepared that they have been able to compete on the outside. And the friendships they made at school continue to be of great importance.” With appreciation, Ms. Castillo says, “ ASF has been always at the forefront, offering you diverse options and possibilities to learn new trends and preparing students for a more globalized world. Teaching at ASF has always been a challenge, but it has also made enjoy myself. The diversity of teachers and students make ASF a very special place to be.” Hundreds of students, including this writer, have had the honor to learn from this great teacher. She is a risk-taker, willing to hear us out and understand us. She would teach us more that just a school course. She would make it a life experience, and touch our hearts. Even in retirement, Ms. Castillo won’t give up teaching. She will continue tutoring in the afternoons. But she will also be able to engage in personal activities that she did not have time for while at ASF. As Rebecca Poffet, another former ASF teacher and dear friend of Ms. Castillo, puts it, “Betsy, you’re not retiring. You’re rewiring.”

etsy Castillo has spent most of her life at ASF — as a student, alumna, parent and teacher, not to mention the daughter of Elsie Jeffcott, a typing teacher at ASF for 22 years. Ms. Castillo, who has been an inspiration to many, will now be missed on campus. She recently retired after 37 years as an ASF Middle School teacher. She graduated from high school in 1970. In college, she studied Spanish literature with a minor in classical dance, graduating Magna Cum Laude. Though at the time she had no intention of being a teacher, she nevertheless started her career in education at the Lomas Grade School. “The day I went to pick up the class book and I saw it for the first time, I wanted to cry,” she says. “I didn’t know how in the world I was going to be able to learn and teach so much. The director of Lomas Grade School came to me and said, ‘You only have to be one day ahead of your students.’ Since then, I understood that in order to learn, there is nothing like teaching.” Ms. Castillo decided in 1975 to follow in her mother’s footsteps and come back to ASF to work as a Middle School teacher. She loved every minute of it. “Teaching Middle School students at ASF has been a valuable and great experience,” she says, smiling every time she thinks about her ASF experience. “Middle Schoolers are entertaining, exciting and different. They like to test their values and push their limits, making it a better school. They keep you on your toes.” Ms. Castillo has touched countless hearts with her teaching philosophy, which she describes as, “Learn from your own mistakes, study 43


student voices

a l u m n i p r o fi l e

At left, Mrs. Castillo poses with sons Alejandro (’00) on her right and Roberto (’02) on her left. Below, she is honored last spring for her 35 years of service to ASF. Bottom: Betsy as an ASF senior, 1970. The inset is a 1976 photo of Betsy as a new ASF teacher.

pas

Chia in y a D a f o e The Lif

high walls soaring h it w l o co so wide anyon st on a river so fa g in d ee sp t a lue sky Bo ors in a clear b d n co t a p u g Lookin ing plant life brew h it w en re g oming ills so constantly blo s er w o fl y b g ed Surround insects zoomin e th ly n O ? z z What’s that bu r falls e way the wate calls ’m in awe of th wler monkey o h a , ce n ta awl? is And in the d ocodile may cr cr a ay aw r fa ow Who knows h uoise blue scades of turq ca ugh h it w l u z A gua stream run thro y d ea st e th h atc the view Fascinated, I w re spectacular o m e th b, im The higher I cl m the past of wonder fro ce la p a e, to last u q alen have continued s are cast s in ru n a ay M shadow Ancient sun, immense t h g ri b e th in And ack ng down my b ti ea b n su g in lack blaz seems to be a g in ik h t n a st track The con I must keep on e, se to ch u m So of red with rooftops s sa a C s la e d ad an Cristobal coffee and bre f o ir a e th in eir heads. Aromas ing goods on th y rr ca ls ca lo la Busy Chamu me experience for n a t a h w s, a p Oh Chia sting memory. la a ch su d te You have crea ade student

C H I A P A S

—Nina Sachdev,

seventh gr

42

The Experience of a Lifetime

ASF student, teacher, parent and alumna, Betsy Castillo (’70) has been an inspiration to others.

B

By Cindy Tanaka (’91) for tests and quizzes without feeling uncomfortable, be able to solve problems, make your own decisions and cooperate with others.” As an ASF parent she has experienced another side of ASF. Alejandro Castillo (’00) and Roberto Castillo (‘02) are grateful to have had the opportunity to study at ASF. “My sons tell me all the time they would be willing to change anything about their lives except their education,” Ms. Castillo says. “They felt so prepared that they have been able to compete on the outside. And the friendships they made at school continue to be of great importance.” With appreciation, Ms. Castillo says, “ ASF has been always at the forefront, offering you diverse options and possibilities to learn new trends and preparing students for a more globalized world. Teaching at ASF has always been a challenge, but it has also made enjoy myself. The diversity of teachers and students make ASF a very special place to be.” Hundreds of students, including this writer, have had the honor to learn from this great teacher. She is a risk-taker, willing to hear us out and understand us. She would teach us more that just a school course. She would make it a life experience, and touch our hearts. Even in retirement, Ms. Castillo won’t give up teaching. She will continue tutoring in the afternoons. But she will also be able to engage in personal activities that she did not have time for while at ASF. As Rebecca Poffet, another former ASF teacher and dear friend of Ms. Castillo, puts it, “Betsy, you’re not retiring. You’re rewiring.”

etsy Castillo has spent most of her life at ASF — as a student, alumna, parent and teacher, not to mention the daughter of Elsie Jeffcott, a typing teacher at ASF for 22 years. Ms. Castillo, who has been an inspiration to many, will now be missed on campus. She recently retired after 37 years as an ASF Middle School teacher. She graduated from high school in 1970. In college, she studied Spanish literature with a minor in classical dance, graduating Magna Cum Laude. Though at the time she had no intention of being a teacher, she nevertheless started her career in education at the Lomas Grade School. “The day I went to pick up the class book and I saw it for the first time, I wanted to cry,” she says. “I didn’t know how in the world I was going to be able to learn and teach so much. The director of Lomas Grade School came to me and said, ‘You only have to be one day ahead of your students.’ Since then, I understood that in order to learn, there is nothing like teaching.” Ms. Castillo decided in 1975 to follow in her mother’s footsteps and come back to ASF to work as a Middle School teacher. She loved every minute of it. “Teaching Middle School students at ASF has been a valuable and great experience,” she says, smiling every time she thinks about her ASF experience. “Middle Schoolers are entertaining, exciting and different. They like to test their values and push their limits, making it a better school. They keep you on your toes.” Ms. Castillo has touched countless hearts with her teaching philosophy, which she describes as, “Learn from your own mistakes, study 43


a l u m n i e v en t s

a l u m n i c l ass n o t es

Alumni Spirit Award

T

his year’s Alumni Spirit Award was presented to Alina Aksiyote (’12) and Alfredo Trueba (’12) on May 20. The award, which the Alumni Council presents annually to the graduating seniors with the most school spirit, was presented by Melissa Berenstein (’03), a member of the Alumni Council, and Alumni Relations Coordinator Cindy Tanaka (’91), during the Senior Awards Ceremony. The winners received ASF jackets to continue to show their Bear pride in the years to come. Alina now attends Columbia University and Alfredo chose the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University.

Left to right, Alfredo Trueba, Cindy Tanaka, Melissa Berenstein and Alina Aksiyote.

Coming Up: Career Day

’74

Antonio Turok informs us that he has been living in Oaxaca for several years. As a photographer, he has documented the September 11, 2001, terrorist attack, Central American guerrilla movements and the Zapatista uprising in Chiapas. His work has been collected by a number of prestigious museums and galleries, such as the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the National Museum of Mexican Art in Chicago and the Wittliff Gallery of Mexican and Southwestern Photography in San Marcos, Texas. For more information about Antonio and his work you can visit his web page at antonioturokphoto.com.

’75

Johanna Siegmann writes that 2012 has been “a breakout year” for her photography enterprise, Johanna Siegmann Photography. After her first solo photography show in Mexico City in May, she opened an exhibit of her work at the Desert Light Gallery in the Kelso Depot Visitor Center, deep in Southern California’s Mojave Desert. The show runs through September 16, 2012. Johanna invites ASF alumni to visit her Facebook page at https://www. facebook.com/pages/Johanna-SiegmannPhotography/150154048383373.

’03

Nicolás Santacruz writes: “My university studies, which were concluded abroad, and my work at General Electric have taken me to Australia, Colombia and now Brazil for the better part of the last five years. I had the good fortune of meeting my wife while working in Colombia. We got married on June 30 of this year in Medellín, Colombia.”

Thanks, León. Congratulations, Mauricio There are some changes on its way for the Alumni Council. León Merikanskas (’93) is ending his two-year term as president of the council. León earned everybody’s appreciation for his dedication and commitment heading up the council. His valuable leadership created a better community for all alumni. Thank you León! Taking León’s place as president is Mauricio Quintana (’00), who starts his two-year term with the new 2012-2013 school year. Mauricio will continue León’s work for the alumni community, strengthening relations among the alumni. Congratulations, Güicho!

’09

Hannah Rogers married Joshua Adams on May 6, 2012, underneath the beautiful Oklahoma sky, surrounded by 200 of their closest friends and family. Hannah graduated from Oral Roberts University, Magna Cum Laude, with a Bachelor of Arts degree in communications on May 5 (the day before the wedding!). Joshua and Hannah now live in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and Hannah will be attending Rhema Bible School in the fall.

Outgoing Alumni Council President León Merikanskas (second from left) receives a token of appreciation from council members Janet Huerta (’03), Marissa Russell (’92), and new president Mauricio Quintana

’90

Congratulations to Ana Mendez who won first place in her category at the 5K swim race Desafío Atlantis 2012, which took place June 9 in Yucalpeten, Yucatán.

A Big Thank You to Kathryn Blair (’38) ASF alumna Kathryn Blair (‘38) supported the Annual Scholarship Drive (ASD) through her book sales in a special three-month fundraising project from April through June. For every book purchased, two dollars were donated to ASD. We would like to thank all the alumni who participated in this effort by purchasing the book through our Amazon link. And a special thank you to Ms. Blair for her commitment to ASF and for supporting the ASD through this unique first-time partnership. Though the fundraising project is over, the book, Forging a Nation: The History of Mexico from the Aztecs to the Present, is of course still available (got to forginganation.com for more information). It is a serious and readable approach to Mexican history that also seeks to enhance U.S.-Mexico relations. We invite you to read the following review from Naomi Pawlik, Upper School academic dean: Forging a Nation is an ambitious undertaking by its author, Kathryn S. Blair, who endeavors to examine the fundamental events in the history of Mexico from the Aztecs to the present day. Her primary purpose is to trace the often-rocky path traveled by all who have contributed to making Mexico the democratic nation it is today. Considering the immense scope of the chosen subject, Ms. Blair has done a remarkable job of condensing the content into a mere 275 pages. As one would imagine, the book is packed with historical data, but her use of narrative broadens her potential audience to include not just academics and historians, but anyone interested in the history of the nation. Additionally, the author injects the retelling with a motif of mystery and foreboding through the mention of significant natural events such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and meteor showers that were often interpreted as omens by those
practicing indigenous religions and that beg the question of the significance of similar phenomena today. Ms. Blair patiently works through the dense and tangled mass of the history of the nation, isolating the main threads and marking a clear path for the reader to follow. Rife with vivid imagery and detailed depictions of historical figures of strong, and sometimes questionable, character, who propel the story forward, the book is a good starting point for any budding student of Mexican history.

’94

Juan Carlos del Valle inaugurated his art exhibition “Chavela Vargas y Juan Carlos del Valle: Un diálogo existencial” on June 9 at the Centro Cultural de España in Mexico City. Manuel Alabart, Spain’s Ambassador to Mexico, and Mexican singer Chavela Vargas attended the event.

A

SF alumni can give Upper School students the opportunity to learn more about the careers that interest them on September 28, when Career Day takes place on campus. Any ASF alumni who would like to enrich the education ASF offers its students by speaking about their professional experiences can contact Cindy Tanaka, the alumni relations coordinator, at alumni@asf.edu.mx or call (55) 5227-4966.

Photo ID: A Good Thing The ASF Alumni Office would like to acknowledge Elsita Villar (‘47), Reina Schwarts (‘47) and Eva Feder (‘72) for volunteering to come to the school once a week during part of the spring 2012 semester to help classify and identify old pictures in the archive kept in the Upper School Library. Left to right: Elsita, Reina and Eva

ASF Alumni Bowl

T

he American football tradition continues when the Alumni Bowl takes place again on the ASF campus on September 1. It’s a wholesome event, and alumni from all generations are invited to join us as we form our dream team. For more information, please feel free to e-mail alumni@asf.edu.mx. Let’s go Bears! 44

asf.edu.mx 45


a l u m n i e v en t s

a l u m n i c l ass n o t es

Alumni Spirit Award

T

his year’s Alumni Spirit Award was presented to Alina Aksiyote (’12) and Alfredo Trueba (’12) on May 20. The award, which the Alumni Council presents annually to the graduating seniors with the most school spirit, was presented by Melissa Berenstein (’03), a member of the Alumni Council, and Alumni Relations Coordinator Cindy Tanaka (’91), during the Senior Awards Ceremony. The winners received ASF jackets to continue to show their Bear pride in the years to come. Alina now attends Columbia University and Alfredo chose the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University.

Left to right, Alfredo Trueba, Cindy Tanaka, Melissa Berenstein and Alina Aksiyote.

Coming Up: Career Day

’74

Antonio Turok informs us that he has been living in Oaxaca for several years. As a photographer, he has documented the September 11, 2001, terrorist attack, Central American guerrilla movements and the Zapatista uprising in Chiapas. His work has been collected by a number of prestigious museums and galleries, such as the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the National Museum of Mexican Art in Chicago and the Wittliff Gallery of Mexican and Southwestern Photography in San Marcos, Texas. For more information about Antonio and his work you can visit his web page at antonioturokphoto.com.

’75

Johanna Siegmann writes that 2012 has been “a breakout year” for her photography enterprise, Johanna Siegmann Photography. After her first solo photography show in Mexico City in May, she opened an exhibit of her work at the Desert Light Gallery in the Kelso Depot Visitor Center, deep in Southern California’s Mojave Desert. The show runs through September 16, 2012. Johanna invites ASF alumni to visit her Facebook page at https://www. facebook.com/pages/Johanna-SiegmannPhotography/150154048383373.

’03

Nicolás Santacruz writes: “My university studies, which were concluded abroad, and my work at General Electric have taken me to Australia, Colombia and now Brazil for the better part of the last five years. I had the good fortune of meeting my wife while working in Colombia. We got married on June 30 of this year in Medellín, Colombia.”

Thanks, León. Congratulations, Mauricio There are some changes on its way for the Alumni Council. León Merikanskas (’93) is ending his two-year term as president of the council. León earned everybody’s appreciation for his dedication and commitment heading up the council. His valuable leadership created a better community for all alumni. Thank you León! Taking León’s place as president is Mauricio Quintana (’00), who starts his two-year term with the new 2012-2013 school year. Mauricio will continue León’s work for the alumni community, strengthening relations among the alumni. Congratulations, Güicho!

’09

Hannah Rogers married Joshua Adams on May 6, 2012, underneath the beautiful Oklahoma sky, surrounded by 200 of their closest friends and family. Hannah graduated from Oral Roberts University, Magna Cum Laude, with a Bachelor of Arts degree in communications on May 5 (the day before the wedding!). Joshua and Hannah now live in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and Hannah will be attending Rhema Bible School in the fall.

Outgoing Alumni Council President León Merikanskas (second from left) receives a token of appreciation from council members Janet Huerta (’03), Marissa Russell (’92), and new president Mauricio Quintana

’90

Congratulations to Ana Mendez who won first place in her category at the 5K swim race Desafío Atlantis 2012, which took place June 9 in Yucalpeten, Yucatán.

A Big Thank You to Kathryn Blair (’38) ASF alumna Kathryn Blair (‘38) supported the Annual Scholarship Drive (ASD) through her book sales in a special three-month fundraising project from April through June. For every book purchased, two dollars were donated to ASD. We would like to thank all the alumni who participated in this effort by purchasing the book through our Amazon link. And a special thank you to Ms. Blair for her commitment to ASF and for supporting the ASD through this unique first-time partnership. Though the fundraising project is over, the book, Forging a Nation: The History of Mexico from the Aztecs to the Present, is of course still available (got to forginganation.com for more information). It is a serious and readable approach to Mexican history that also seeks to enhance U.S.-Mexico relations. We invite you to read the following review from Naomi Pawlik, Upper School academic dean: Forging a Nation is an ambitious undertaking by its author, Kathryn S. Blair, who endeavors to examine the fundamental events in the history of Mexico from the Aztecs to the present day. Her primary purpose is to trace the often-rocky path traveled by all who have contributed to making Mexico the democratic nation it is today. Considering the immense scope of the chosen subject, Ms. Blair has done a remarkable job of condensing the content into a mere 275 pages. As one would imagine, the book is packed with historical data, but her use of narrative broadens her potential audience to include not just academics and historians, but anyone interested in the history of the nation. Additionally, the author injects the retelling with a motif of mystery and foreboding through the mention of significant natural events such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and meteor showers that were often interpreted as omens by those
practicing indigenous religions and that beg the question of the significance of similar phenomena today. Ms. Blair patiently works through the dense and tangled mass of the history of the nation, isolating the main threads and marking a clear path for the reader to follow. Rife with vivid imagery and detailed depictions of historical figures of strong, and sometimes questionable, character, who propel the story forward, the book is a good starting point for any budding student of Mexican history.

’94

Juan Carlos del Valle inaugurated his art exhibition “Chavela Vargas y Juan Carlos del Valle: Un diálogo existencial” on June 9 at the Centro Cultural de España in Mexico City. Manuel Alabart, Spain’s Ambassador to Mexico, and Mexican singer Chavela Vargas attended the event.

A

SF alumni can give Upper School students the opportunity to learn more about the careers that interest them on September 28, when Career Day takes place on campus. Any ASF alumni who would like to enrich the education ASF offers its students by speaking about their professional experiences can contact Cindy Tanaka, the alumni relations coordinator, at alumni@asf.edu.mx or call (55) 5227-4966.

Photo ID: A Good Thing The ASF Alumni Office would like to acknowledge Elsita Villar (‘47), Reina Schwarts (‘47) and Eva Feder (‘72) for volunteering to come to the school once a week during part of the spring 2012 semester to help classify and identify old pictures in the archive kept in the Upper School Library. Left to right: Elsita, Reina and Eva

ASF Alumni Bowl

T

he American football tradition continues when the Alumni Bowl takes place again on the ASF campus on September 1. It’s a wholesome event, and alumni from all generations are invited to join us as we form our dream team. For more information, please feel free to e-mail alumni@asf.edu.mx. Let’s go Bears! 44

asf.edu.mx 45


a l u m n i r e u ni o ns

1977: Coming Together in Vegas

L

as Vegas was the perfect setting for the most amazing reunion the Class of ’77 has hosted over the last 35 years. Alumni gathered under the theme “Come Together.” Directly upon arrival, they warmly greeted one another by the pool at the MGM Signature Towers. After sharing a few cocktails, they enjoyed dinner at Diego’s Mexican Restaurant and then were shuttled off to see Cirque du Soleil’s absolutely outstanding The Beatles LOVE. Day two brought more poolside socializing during the day and in the evening the highlight reunion event on the Brooklyn Bridge replica. There the class was greeted by Vegas showgirls and dinner was served while classmates Mark Maldonado, Fritz Heede, Mike Love and Brandon Scott performed musical and magic acts for the crowd. Emotions were running high during special award presentations in which organizer Mark Maldonado highlighted scenes and scenarios from back in the day. It was as if no time had passed at all. Conversations picked up where they left off, plans were made for the future and friendships were rekindled for many years to come.

1959-1969: ’65 turns 65

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rganizers Nena Gottfried, Grant Brandon, and Leigh Lockwood (all from the Class of ’65, hence the event theme of “’65 turns 65”) invited classmates and contemporaries from classes of ’59-’69 for a reunion at the historic Wigwam Resort, Phoenix, Arizona, in June 2012. Attendees covered 14 time zones from The Netherlands to Hawaii. Our contemporary, Bill Richardson, former Governor of New Mexico, captivated us at the Saturday night gala with his charming and interesting speech. Bill reaffirmed the importance of reunions and websites in gathering our collective oral histories and preserving them for posterity. On Thursday night Nena Gottfried graciously invited all of us to her lovely nearby home where we were serenaded with contemporary music and entertained with authentic Mexican cuisine. While mariachis livened up the Sunday morning despedida, it was a sad parting until our next reunion. Discussions were held about plans for the 50th reunion. The class of 1965 organizers invite students who attended school in Mexico City (even if they graduated elsewhere) from 1959 to 1969 to join our web site at www.ahs65mexico.com. Instructions are on the home page.

1987: 25th Class Reunion

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n May 3-6, 2012, the Class of ‘87 held its 25th reunion in Los Cabos. It was a cheerful weekend, spent remembering good old times at ASF. We had such a good time that the next reunion is being planned for April 18-21, 2013, in Puerto Vallarta. The entire group would like to thank Nora S. for her time and enthusiasm in organizing the event. Standing, back row: Rodrigo S., Tere D., Sonia S., Daniel M., Andrés A., Federico P., Hazael O., Rodrigo R. Standing. Middle row: Rosario V., Maricela G., Gaby L., Gaby B., María Elena S., Rosa M., Elena S., Lorena R., Mahilete B., Carmen F. Bottom row: Montse D., Mauricio J., Alex Z., Rodolfo L., Andrés S., Nora S., Liza L. .

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a l u m n i r e u ni o ns

1977: Coming Together in Vegas

L

as Vegas was the perfect setting for the most amazing reunion the Class of ’77 has hosted over the last 35 years. Alumni gathered under the theme “Come Together.” Directly upon arrival, they warmly greeted one another by the pool at the MGM Signature Towers. After sharing a few cocktails, they enjoyed dinner at Diego’s Mexican Restaurant and then were shuttled off to see Cirque du Soleil’s absolutely outstanding The Beatles LOVE. Day two brought more poolside socializing during the day and in the evening the highlight reunion event on the Brooklyn Bridge replica. There the class was greeted by Vegas showgirls and dinner was served while classmates Mark Maldonado, Fritz Heede, Mike Love and Brandon Scott performed musical and magic acts for the crowd. Emotions were running high during special award presentations in which organizer Mark Maldonado highlighted scenes and scenarios from back in the day. It was as if no time had passed at all. Conversations picked up where they left off, plans were made for the future and friendships were rekindled for many years to come.

1959-1969: ’65 turns 65

O

rganizers Nena Gottfried, Grant Brandon, and Leigh Lockwood (all from the Class of ’65, hence the event theme of “’65 turns 65”) invited classmates and contemporaries from classes of ’59-’69 for a reunion at the historic Wigwam Resort, Phoenix, Arizona, in June 2012. Attendees covered 14 time zones from The Netherlands to Hawaii. Our contemporary, Bill Richardson, former Governor of New Mexico, captivated us at the Saturday night gala with his charming and interesting speech. Bill reaffirmed the importance of reunions and websites in gathering our collective oral histories and preserving them for posterity. On Thursday night Nena Gottfried graciously invited all of us to her lovely nearby home where we were serenaded with contemporary music and entertained with authentic Mexican cuisine. While mariachis livened up the Sunday morning despedida, it was a sad parting until our next reunion. Discussions were held about plans for the 50th reunion. The class of 1965 organizers invite students who attended school in Mexico City (even if they graduated elsewhere) from 1959 to 1969 to join our web site at www.ahs65mexico.com. Instructions are on the home page.

1987: 25th Class Reunion

O

n May 3-6, 2012, the Class of ‘87 held its 25th reunion in Los Cabos. It was a cheerful weekend, spent remembering good old times at ASF. We had such a good time that the next reunion is being planned for April 18-21, 2013, in Puerto Vallarta. The entire group would like to thank Nora S. for her time and enthusiasm in organizing the event. Standing, back row: Rodrigo S., Tere D., Sonia S., Daniel M., Andrés A., Federico P., Hazael O., Rodrigo R. Standing. Middle row: Rosario V., Maricela G., Gaby L., Gaby B., María Elena S., Rosa M., Elena S., Lorena R., Mahilete B., Carmen F. Bottom row: Montse D., Mauricio J., Alex Z., Rodolfo L., Andrés S., Nora S., Liza L. .

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k id s ’ c o r n e r

a l u m n i m ai l b o x & I N Me m o r ia m

To t h e e d i t o r s ,

IN MEMORIAM

I read Focus magazine each time it comes out. I am a former lifetime student (pre-K through 12, and a student athlete in the Class of 2003), and the third brother of three to graduate from ASF. Our love for the school will be ever present. We were always involved in the school and its activities, and cherish very dearly the legacy of ASF.

As you comprehend this profound loss, let yourself cry knowing each tear is a note of love rising to the heavens...

I wanted to take a quick moment to congratulate you for all the amazing things that are accomplished at ASF every day. It’s truly remarkable to see the number of projects, initiatives, renovations and improvements that have happened at ASF since my graduation almost nine “very short” years ago. I’m also impressed by the culture that has been created and sustained at ASF. Just seeing the pictures, projects and the articles you publish, one can easily perceive a culture of excellence, the thriving sense of belonging, the outreach and the involvement of our alumni, as well as the creation of a strong community with solid foundations that exists because of the values that are taught and maintained at ASF. This takes leadership, passion, vision and execution, all of which have been present in the last few years. Unfortunately, having been abroad, I have not been able to participate closely with these projects and this evolution, although I was glad to run in the 10K Run for Education last year when I was on assignment in Mexico for a few months. But I have never been more proud to be an alumnus of this great institution, and I hope upon my eventual return to Mexico I can get involved with the Alumni Council. Hopefully a few years down the road, my kids will have the honor of attending ASF as my brothers and I once did. I reiterate my congratulations for the excellent job that has been done leading this school and these initiatives, and wish you even more success going forward. Very warm regards, Nicolás Santacruz (’03)

— Author Unknown

Sergio Chedraui Eguia

A Message in Song

When Ms. Leslie’s K1 Room 19 and Ms. Lupita’s K2 Room 2 were invited last semester on a tour of Los Pinos, the presidential residence, they decided to give the visit a purpose. Having investigating land, water and air pollution during the PYP unit of inquiry “Please Take Care of the World,” the youngsters expressed their concern through music. At Los Pinos, they sang two songs. One of them, “Enciende una vela por la paz,” or “Light a Candle for Peace,” was written by former ECC music teacher Diana Couriel.

ASF parent Sergio Chedraui Eguia passed away unexpectedly on Sunday, June 3, while participating in a race in Mexico City’s Bosque de Chapultepec. He was 35 years old.

Ricardo Fis Menache (’65) It is with great sadness that we learned about the passing of Ricardo Fis Menache (’69) in June of 2012. He is survived by his wife Blima Grossman, his daughter Alexis (’02) and his sons Allan (’95) and Daniel (’97).

Where Are You? If you ever attended ASF, we’re looking for you! Please update your information by sending an e-mail to alumni@asf.edu. mx right away. We want to keep you up to date on all the ASF news as well as informed about upcoming alumni events. Keep in touch!

Afterwards, the children talked about their experience. Here are some of their comments: ““We sang ‘Please Take Care of the Trees’ and ‘Enciende una vela por la paz.’” Hyun Hee Um

“We did it because the President makes decisions for the whole country.” Aldonza Holschneider

“We learned the names of some presidents, like Miguel Aleman ... Álvaro Ruiz Maza

“ ... and Fox.” Andrés Bross

“The President has many guards.”

Emiliano Salazar

“We also learned to stand straight when we sing.”

Rogelio Leon García

“There are seven houses in Los Pinos ... and f ive of them are off ices.” Jaebin Im Noboru 48


k id s ’ c o r n e r

a l u m n i m ai l b o x & I N Me m o r ia m

To t h e e d i t o r s ,

IN MEMORIAM

I read Focus magazine each time it comes out. I am a former lifetime student (pre-K through 12, and a student athlete in the Class of 2003), and the third brother of three to graduate from ASF. Our love for the school will be ever present. We were always involved in the school and its activities, and cherish very dearly the legacy of ASF.

As you comprehend this profound loss, let yourself cry knowing each tear is a note of love rising to the heavens...

I wanted to take a quick moment to congratulate you for all the amazing things that are accomplished at ASF every day. It’s truly remarkable to see the number of projects, initiatives, renovations and improvements that have happened at ASF since my graduation almost nine “very short” years ago. I’m also impressed by the culture that has been created and sustained at ASF. Just seeing the pictures, projects and the articles you publish, one can easily perceive a culture of excellence, the thriving sense of belonging, the outreach and the involvement of our alumni, as well as the creation of a strong community with solid foundations that exists because of the values that are taught and maintained at ASF. This takes leadership, passion, vision and execution, all of which have been present in the last few years. Unfortunately, having been abroad, I have not been able to participate closely with these projects and this evolution, although I was glad to run in the 10K Run for Education last year when I was on assignment in Mexico for a few months. But I have never been more proud to be an alumnus of this great institution, and I hope upon my eventual return to Mexico I can get involved with the Alumni Council. Hopefully a few years down the road, my kids will have the honor of attending ASF as my brothers and I once did. I reiterate my congratulations for the excellent job that has been done leading this school and these initiatives, and wish you even more success going forward. Very warm regards, Nicolás Santacruz (’03)

— Author Unknown

Sergio Chedraui Eguia

A Message in Song

When Ms. Leslie’s K1 Room 19 and Ms. Lupita’s K2 Room 2 were invited last semester on a tour of Los Pinos, the presidential residence, they decided to give the visit a purpose. Having investigating land, water and air pollution during the PYP unit of inquiry “Please Take Care of the World,” the youngsters expressed their concern through music. At Los Pinos, they sang two songs. One of them, “Enciende una vela por la paz,” or “Light a Candle for Peace,” was written by former ECC music teacher Diana Couriel.

ASF parent Sergio Chedraui Eguia passed away unexpectedly on Sunday, June 3, while participating in a race in Mexico City’s Bosque de Chapultepec. He was 35 years old.

Ricardo Fis Menache (’65) It is with great sadness that we learned about the passing of Ricardo Fis Menache (’69) in June of 2012. He is survived by his wife Blima Grossman, his daughter Alexis (’02) and his sons Allan (’95) and Daniel (’97).

Where Are You? If you ever attended ASF, we’re looking for you! Please update your information by sending an e-mail to alumni@asf.edu. mx right away. We want to keep you up to date on all the ASF news as well as informed about upcoming alumni events. Keep in touch!

Afterwards, the children talked about their experience. Here are some of their comments: ““We sang ‘Please Take Care of the Trees’ and ‘Enciende una vela por la paz.’” Hyun Hee Um

“We did it because the President makes decisions for the whole country.” Aldonza Holschneider

“We learned the names of some presidents, like Miguel Aleman ... Álvaro Ruiz Maza

“ ... and Fox.” Andrés Bross

“The President has many guards.”

Emiliano Salazar

“We also learned to stand straight when we sing.”

Rogelio Leon García

“There are seven houses in Los Pinos ... and f ive of them are off ices.” Jaebin Im Noboru 48


FOCUS SUMMER/FALL 2012  

A magazine for alumni, parents, students, faculty & friends

FOCUS SUMMER/FALL 2012  

A magazine for alumni, parents, students, faculty & friends

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